NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


24 results for "Construction industry"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
30884
Author(s):
Abstract:
Supply houses are necessary for expanding business and industry in North Carolina. One such supply house--Atlas Supply Company's new Charlotte branch--provides a convenient location for distributing air conditioning, heating, and plumbing materials and equipment throughout the Southeast.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 17 Issue 2, June 1959, p12-14, 26, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
918
Author(s):
Abstract:
William Holland, Chairman and CEO of Charlotte-based United Dominion, which provides industrial products and engineering and construction services, discusses how his company has coped with the recession.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 1, Jan 1993, p10-13, por
Record #:
4445
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1999, construction companies did not lack for projects statewide. However, the state's low unemployment level (3.2 percent in October 1999) caused many companies to have project backlogs because there were not enough workers. This worker shortage lengthened many job completions by 10 to 20 percent. Many companies are offering incentives to hourly workers, like health insurance and 401(k)s.
Record #:
13212
Author(s):
Abstract:
Manufacturers of pre-cast, pre-stressed concrete products for the construction industry, Concrete Materials Inc., of Charlotte, North Carolina, brings new industry to the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 12, Nov 1954, p15, 21, il
Full Text:
Record #:
14869
Author(s):
Abstract:
While many developers, local officials, and chambers of commerce worry about the construction market overheating, the boom continues around the state. Adams examines construction in the state's three largest markets which account for over half of the projects reported - Raleigh/Durham Research Triangle, Charlotte/Mecklenburg, and the Piedmont Triad of Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and High Point.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 8, Aug 1985, p41-42, 44-45, 47, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
14870
Abstract:
BUSINESS NORTH CAROLINA profiles four key players in the state's construction industry - J. M. Dixon Inc.; Jones Group Inc.; G. Smedes York; and Henry Faison.
Source:
Business North Carolina (NoCar HF 5001 B8x), Vol. 5 Issue 8, Aug 1985, p50-51, 53-54, 56-58, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Record #:
11825
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jobs for construction companies are becoming more competitive. Where two or three might have been in competition in the past, it is not unusual to have a dozen or more competing for the same job due to current economic conditions. Revenues rank the top twenty-five contractors in the state. Barnhill Contracting Company in Tarboro ranked first with $522 million in revenues.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
36262
Author(s):
Abstract:
Promise noted in five profiled individuals, employed by North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, also held a potential to enhance the quality of life. The research endeavors by these individuals promised to tackle issues such as obesity, colon cancer, emissions, and pavement quality.
Record #:
12926
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gennett reports on the construction industry in the Carolinas where over 3,500 firms hire six percent of the workforce.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 46 Issue 8, Aug 1988, p32-34, 51-52, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
35440
Author(s):
Abstract:
Designing correctional facilities is a complex business, according to author Elizabeth Cozart. Aiding in the understanding of their complex design considerations was a discussion of factors such as security, budget, time frame, and appearance. Included were examples of correctional facilities from Henderson, Rowan, and Durham counties.
Source:
North Carolina Architecture (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, 1997, p10-20
Record #:
32963
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Nello L. Teer Company began in 1909 as a small grading construction company in Durham, and grew to become a worldwide enterprise. To complement construction, the company developed quarries to produce crushed aggregate plus sand and gravel operations in eastern North Carolina. As a roadbuilder, the Teer Company has constructed more than 14,000 miles of highway.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 42 Issue 11, Nov 1984, p78-128, il, por
Record #:
35438
Author(s):
Abstract:
A speedway of this size was the dream of Dennis Yates of Yates-Chreitzburg Architects. Featured as part of this business owner’s dream come true was Yates’ long time interest in racing tracks and the more recent history behind the construction of this sports facilities, proclaimed as the largest in the United States.
Source:
North Carolina Architecture (NoCar NA 730 N8 N67x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, 1997, p7-8
Record #:
30196
Author(s):
Abstract:
As an example of the growth of industrialization in North Carolina, the work of C.M. Guest and Sons shows how careful study and planning have allowed the completion of projects throughout the state. C.M. Guest and Sons has completed industrial buildings for textiles, paper, silk companies, among many others.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
15080
Abstract:
During the 1940s, North Carolinian iron workers worked on projects from buildings in Raleigh to San Francisco's famous Golden Gate Bridge. Iron workers reached the pinnacle of their careers only after serving many years in lesser positions. Beginning as 'waterboys,' men became acquainted with the trade and then served as 'helper' before becoming a full-fledged iron worker. George Newton of the George E. Newton Company recalled some of the men he worked with and projects he had completed.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 9 Issue 4, June 1941, p10-11, 25-26, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
13141
Abstract:
There are many examples in North Carolina of nontraditional industries. The best example is North Carolina's rapid rise as a producer electronic equipment. Also, North Carolina's branch of the Associated General Contractors of America is the largest of its kind in the United States. North Carolina is a leader in railroads and motor carriers as well.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 16, Dec 1955, p19-21, f
Subject(s):
Full Text: