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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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12 results for "Climate change"
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Record #:
40327
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Abstract:
An ECU Maritime Archaeology graduate snorkeled for a worthy cause. Part of a Sedna Epic Expedition team in the Canadian Arctic that year, she helped raise awareness for climate change, by taking note of microplastics levels and wildlife along with shipwrecks. Her passion for climate change is also expended Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary.
Record #:
31324
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This article explores how one Charlotte organization is trying to take the politics out of climate change. Envision Charlotte promotes energy conservation and sustainable living without using the term “climate change”. Instead they present economically driven approaches to energy conservation, air quality, water usage and waste disposal that may act as partial solution to climate change without making it the topic of conversation.
Record #:
28355
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Duke Energy and ConocoPhillips have donated 3.5 million dollars to Duke University’s Climate Change Policy Partnership (CCPP) and that financial support may have influenced public policy. The money may have influenced members of the CCPP’s advisory panel and affected its the ability to vet climate policy research before it is released to the public. Anti-regulatory policy statements have been published under the CCPP’s name and critics say that its research has been skewed because of the two companies support.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 49, December 2007, pOnline Periodical Website
Record #:
26185
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Climatologist Peter Robinson maintains that the media hype surrounding the so-called greenhouse effect has distracted attention from the real implications of global climate change. In addition to changing temperatures, Robinson anticipates issues related to wind, pollution, solar radiation, and rainfall patterns.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1992, p7-9, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25524
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In a two-year study along North Carolina’s coast, the effects of sea-level rise and saltwater exposure on freshwater amphibians were investigated. Research findings show that the green tree frog has shown the ability to thrive in habitats of higher salinity than other frog species. These results are derived from the discovery of green tree frogs living and thriving in saltwater marshes of relatively high salinity.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 2, Spring 2016, p20-25, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34068
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At the meeting of the North Carolina Water Resources Association, scientists discussed preliminary studies on the effects in North Carolina of global climate change due to the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Nothing that current scenarios of the possible effects of climate change differ widely, scientists suggest that research is needed to predict the impacts of climate change and to deal with policy questions.
Record #:
34322
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Following record rainfall along the North Carolina coast caused by three sequential hurricanes (Dennis, Floyd and Irene) in fall of 1999, scientists began analyzing the impacts of the freshwater inputs to Pamlico Sound and speculating about the ecological consequences. They found that after the three storms passed over the watershed, nutrient-laden floodwaters displaced a large volume of Pamlico Sound and stimulated phytoplankton growth in the system. Weather experts predict that climate change and an increase in hurricane activity could seriously disrupt ecosystems critical for fishery resources, economic development, and habitability of the coastal zone.
Record #:
27761
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The effect that climate change will have on North Carolina’s agriculture is explored. Participants and presenters from The Abundance Foundation’s conference share their experiences with the effects of climate change on their farms and production and their research on how climate change could affect the practice of farming in North Carolina. The increase in temperatures, variability of weather, and water supply are the topics of most concern.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 10, March 2013, p14-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
34083
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Geographers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill will develop methods to predict how climate change may affect local water resources across the southeast. Atmospheric and hydrologic models will be created to predict the occurrence of locally induced storms under various climate scenarios.
Record #:
28822
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Last December, world leaders gathered in Paris to discuss strategies for curbing greenhouse gas emissions. Climate change is a global issue and impacting the North Carolina coast through sea level rise. However, climate change is being ignored by American politicians and lawmakers.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 45, Nov 2016, p10-13, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
34367
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Scientists say that the most important and predictable water-related impacts of climate change on North Carolina is rising sea level. This has impacts on rainfall and streamflow, on which much of North Carolina’s water supplies are dependent. This article discusses the consensus of scientists and predictions in North Carolina.