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11 results for "Cape Lookout Lighthouse"
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Record #:
7193
Abstract:
William Henry Chase Whiting, a brilliant engineer and West Point graduate in the class of 1845, designed and oversaw the construction of the Cape Lookout Lighthouse. He finished the structure in the fall of 1859. The light flashed for the first time on November 1, 1859, just a few days after John Brown's attack at Harper's Ferry. At the outbreak of war, Whiting joined the Confederate Army and in 1862 was promoted to brigadier general. He was mortally wounded in 1865, during the massive assault by Union forces on Fort Fisher outside Wilmington. Whiting's design was so successful that after the Civil War three other lighthouses in the state - Cape Hatteras, Bodie Island, and Currituck Beach - followed its design.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 12, May 2005, p106-109, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34506
Author(s):
Abstract:
An excerpt from a travel diary, this article details a visit to the Cape Lookout Lighthouse in 1953. Emphasis is placed on daily activities at the lighthouse, Coast Guard activity, and lighthouse activities during a hurricane.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Winter 1994, p11-13
Record #:
18777
Abstract:
Cape Hatteras and Cape Lookout lighthouses, both listed in the National Register of Historic Places, are facing loss into the Atlantic Ocean due to erosion. Researchers have recently offered donations for the implementation of erosion control devices, although evaluation of the equipment is needed first.
Record #:
31510
Author(s):
Abstract:
When the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was threatened by storms and beach erosion last winter, a 150-foot strip of sandbags and rubble was installed near the base of the historic landmark. Efforts are now being organized to provide permanent protection for the lighthouse. Proposals include building a circular revetment around the lighthouse’s base, moving the lighthouse, or extending the present groins and pumping new sand onto the beach.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 13 Issue 9, Sept 1981, p8-9, il
Record #:
35812
Abstract:
Many articles are written about NC’s series of lighthouses, but keepers often not mentioned. In this instance, the spotlight was placed on the person who kept the beacon burning. Highlighted were details of lighthouse keeper life and later work experience aboard a lightship. Also mentioned were the seven lighthouses where he worked, such as Cape Charles on Smith Island and Cape Lookout off of Harkers Island.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 1, Feb 1980, p6
Record #:
25006
Author(s):
Abstract:
The water is getting dangerously close to the Cape Lookout lighthouse. With erosion increasing from 2.8 feet a month to 23.4 feet a month, it will not be long before the lighthouse is falling into the sea. While blame for this problem is being put on various causes, the big issue now is not who did it, but how the lighthouse will be saved.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, February 1979, p1-3, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
25007
Author(s):
Abstract:
Now that the need to save the Cape Lookout lighthouse is recognized, the question is how? Various ideas have been put forward, from bank revetment to simply moving the lighthouse itself.
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Record #:
35809
Author(s):
Abstract:
Noted first were reasons to appreciate the Coast and its waters, particularly sites that lend appeal. Land marks ranged from the well-known Outer Banks to perhaps lesser known Bird’s Island. Towns included famed Kittyhawk to the famed by relatively few Duck. As for what he saw as evidence of being taken for granted: pollution of air and water, destruction to dunes and wildlife. Out of an enduring appreciation for, and mounting concern about, he called for all North Carolinians to restore the Coast and its waters for future generations and out of a sacred duty.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p40-42, 56-60
Record #:
10791
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cape Lookout Lighthouse is a national tourist attraction in Carteret County and is accessible by sail boat ferry from Harkers Island. The 100-year old tower underwent reconstruction after the Civil War and operates as a visual warning for ships along the dangerous Lookout Shoals.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 22, Apr 1967, p13, il, map
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Record #:
24679
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the most popular tourist spots on Cape Lookout and what the local geography offers.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 15, December 1954, p10-11, 19, il, map
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