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27 results for "Cape Hatteras Lighthouse"
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Record #:
26838
Author(s):
Abstract:
Seascape is the trade-name for a tubular device aimed at building an artificial reef in front of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. Divers, surfers, and volunteers assisted the National Park Service in moving sand-filled tubes parallel to the beach. The tubes serve as anchors to attached fronds designed to catch sand and thereby help to prevent beach erosion.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 28 Issue 8, Aug 1981, p8, il
Record #:
29955
Abstract:
The National Park Service is trying to buy time for the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse until a decision is made about what to do concerning erosion. A temporary measure has been to install sheet pile to resist water, but an alternative involves moving the lighthouse approximately 2400 feet back from the shoreline.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Spring/Summer 1981, pSP1-SP4, por
Record #:
29978
Author(s):
Abstract:
When the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was in danger from encroaching erosion, Mr. Bill Garret and his 'Seascape' stepped in to help. An artificial seaweed made from plastic, Seascape was built up into a reef along the shore of the lighthouse to dissipate erosion. The units of Seascape have so far been successful and an order has been made to add more offshore.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Fall/Winter 1982, p32-37, il, por
Record #:
35565
Author(s):
Abstract:
An aerial view of the Outer Banks offers sights like the Cape Hatteras lighthouse and Wild “Banker” Ponies. The treasures not viewable by the naked eye lie in the briny deep: remains of Spanish galleons, colonial brigantines, Confederate steamers, WW I freighters, and U-boats.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 3, June/July 1973, p13-15, 42
Record #:
35734
Author(s):
Abstract:
Stanley suggested there was NC Coastal treasure not buried in the briny depths. Noted treasure troves on land included the newly restored boardwalk and Hampton Mariner’s Museum. There was also waterborne treasure above the waves, such as the tour boat Karen Ann and marine science laboratory where Rachel Carson penned The Sea Around Us.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p75-76, 79
Record #:
35756
Abstract:
The author provided a Dare County guide with information about the county celebrating its quadricentennial. Cited were the Lost Colony’s history and historic landmarks like Kittyhawk. Described were must see sites like Cape Hatteras, must do recreation like hang gliding off of Jockey’s Ridge; and must visit towns like Southern Shores. As pictorial accompaniment was a hand drawn map of Manteo depicting its historical homes like the Meekins house, businesses like The Old Bank Building, and event sites like the Battle of Burnside.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p30A-30T
Record #:
35929
Author(s):
Abstract:
What TJ Evans shared was evidence of the Banks’ long personal history and occasional weavings into the greater tapestry of American history. His stories highlighting the history of Cape Hatteras Island, its lighthouse, and the Banks’ experiences with hurricanes. As for involvement with historical events of greater reported significance, noted was the only direct contact made with the sinking Titanic, from the Cape Hatteras Wireless Station.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1973, p56-58
Record #:
35938
Abstract:
Mrs. J.D. Barnett recounted the WWI sinking of the Diamond Shoals lightship by German submarines, an event reported in the local newspaper. As for the source of the entire story, that her father in law, captain of the sunken lightship.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p21-23
Record #:
35962
Author(s):
Abstract:
This Cape Hatteras’ journal edition provided by the Sea Chest staff, covering September 1876, offered a surface impression of days not worth writing home about. Details consisted of barometric pressure, rainfall amounts, telegraph lines repairs, and mild illnesses among the staff. Of historical note, though, may be the photocopied image of September 17th’s handwritten entry.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p67-69
Record #:
35960
Author(s):
Abstract:
Noted details for the tallest lighthouse in America were a drawing of the original lighthouse, the mid nineteenth century renovation that yielded installation of the Fresnel Lens, and its role in the Civil War.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p46-47
Record #:
37699
Abstract:
Hatteras Island’s magic is described here almost entirely in photographs. Included are sights such as Honey B, last remaining Banker pony on Hatteras Island; Futuro Saucer Home, second most photographed sight on the Outer Banks; Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, most photographed sight on Hatteras Island; and the restored Oregon Inlet Lifesaving Station, built in 1897.
Source:
Record #:
38008
Author(s):
Abstract:
Transcription of the proposal from 1798.