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5 results for "Appalachian Mountains, Southern"
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Record #:
24573
Author(s):
Abstract:
Roan Mountain’s summit is the crowning height of the Iron Mountains in the Southern Appalachians. This article presents a brief overview of the history of the area surrounding the mountain and what it was like in Mitchell County, North Carolina in the late 1800s.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 23, May 1972, p14-16, il
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Record #:
36574
Author(s):
Abstract:
Church picnics on the grounds meant the occasion took place in its churchyard or cemetery. As for the day designated, sometimes it was Decoration Day, at other times a cemetery cleanup or homecoming. No matter the day or occasion, it always involved traditional Appalachian dishes, illustrated in the accompanying photo. The author noted recipes such as dried green beans cooked with fatback called “leather britches” and stack cake made with alternating layers of cake and dried fruit.
Record #:
36565
Author(s):
Abstract:
Conquistador Juan Pardo intended to offer Spain a land route from the Appalachia to Mexico, where the country had established silver mines. The threat of Indian attacks at the Great Smokies’ slopes in Tennessee prompted Pardo to abandon the mission and his three forts. The accompanying image of a map created during the time period illustrates the land area representing the present day Southeastern states where Pardo conducted his two expeditions.
Record #:
14644
Author(s):
Abstract:
Missionaries in the Appalachian Mountains during the early 20th century were adamantly against liquor, specifically one man of the cloth Preacher Davis. The preacher lived in an area north of Asheville called Big Ivey in Buncombe County. Preacher Davis opposed the making of liquor not only in sermons but actively destroyed stills in the area. This active destruction nearly started a civil war with both sides arming themselves.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 14 Issue 35, Jan 1947, p3-4, 19, il
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Record #:
8899
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's mountains are some of the oldest ranges in the world. The state's mountain ranges create a ladder running north and south. The Unaka Mountains and the Blue Ridge make up the ladder's two sides. Between the sides are smaller ranges that run east and west. North Carolina's mountains contain both igneous and sedimentary rock. They also are home to a wide variety of plant species that range from sub-artic to sub-tropic.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Jan 1984, p26-28, il, por
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