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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Young, Eva M
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Record #:
10748
Author(s):
Abstract:
Gladys Tillett, of Charlotte, has been one of the pioneers in the fight for women's rights since her first suffragist parade as a student at Woman's College in Greensboro. After graduation, she enrolled at UNC-Chapel Hill and became one of its first co-ed graduates in 1917. She was one of the originators of the League of Women Voters in North Carolina, founding the first county league in 1922, and becoming state president of the organization in 1933. She has served as the Vice Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, was the keynote speaker for the women at the 1944 Democratic National Convention, and was appointed as the first woman to serve on the North Carolina State Election Board by Governor Luther Hodges. President Kennedy appointed her a member of the United States delegation to the General Assembly of the United Nations, and as a representative on the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 1, June 1968, p11, 14, por
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Record #:
10761
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Abstract:
The birthplace of Andrew Jackson has been claimed by both Carolinas. In 1957, South Carolina created the Andrew Jackson Historic Park that honors his birthplace, though North Carolina also claimed Jackson, since his mother birthed him when she went to a funeral inside the state. The historical argument is based on differing primary sources that have him born at Waxhaw, South Carolina or Twelve Miles Creek, North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 19, Mar 1967, p11-12, il
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Record #:
10790
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Abstract:
The home of the 11th United States President James K. Polk was located in Mecklenburg County. Though home is gone, a brick pyramid remains, honoring the birthplace. North Carolina bought the land and restored the memorial, creating the Polk Memorial Park in 1966.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 22, Apr 1967, p11-12, il
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Record #:
10795
Author(s):
Abstract:
The former president Andrew Jackson's birthplace has been restored. The cottage was once home to Jackson's parents, employees of Peter Casso's Inn in Raleigh. The inn was torn down in 1937, but the cottage was saved and sent on a tour of the state before resting at Pullen Park in the 1950s. The home has been preserved at State College Campus in Raleigh during the 1960s and much of the original furniture remains.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 23, May 1967, p15-16, por
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Record #:
10846
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the last twenty years, the University of North Carolina at Charlotte has transformed itself from a campus of a few hundred square feet with one classroom labeled \"Lost and Found\" and only 276 students, to a burgeoning center of higher education encompassing 900 acres and nine spacious buildings serving more than 2,000 students. As one of a dozen extension centers set up by the University of North Carolina for the returning veterans of WWII, UNC-Charlotte served GIs who would have had no other chance to attend college. Under the direction of Dr. Bonnie Cone, the school was made a part of the Charlotte school system in 1949 due to the veteran's program abandonment by the federal government, and by 1958 it had become part of the North Carolina Community College system.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 35 Issue 9, Oct 1967, p13-14, il, por
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Record #:
12576
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Abstract:
Transferred three times before arriving at its final resting place, the home and birthplace of President Andrew Johnson was moved to the North Carolina State University campus where it will remain on display as a museum in honor of the 17th President of the United States.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 23, May 1967, p15, il
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Record #:
12589
Author(s):
Abstract:
Designated by a pile of stones shaped into a pyramid, the location of James K. Polk's birthplace can be seen in Mecklenburg County. Erected by the Mecklenburg Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution, between 1845 through 1849, the stone pyramid served as a temporary monument prior to renovations that included improved road access, a new museum, a guest center, log homestead, and a rebuilt honorary pyramid.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 34 Issue 22, Apr 1967, p11-12, il
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Record #:
15258
Author(s):
Abstract:
New Bern native Bayard Wootten was born to a talented, artistic family; her grandmother Mary Bayard Clark was a well-known poet. Wootten studied at State Normal in Greensboro before becoming a teacher in Arkansas then Georgia. She returned to New Bern and opened a studio and landed her first large contract with the National Guard. Later in her career she devoted more time to capturing more artistic scenes which were published in several books, \"Charleston Azaleas and Old Bricks\" and \"Old Homes and Gardens.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 6 Issue 28, Dec 1938, p1, 24, 26, il
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