NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Williams, Isabel M
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
28656
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilmington’s City Hall opened in 1859, and featured a theater financed by the town commissioners and the Thalian Association. Known as Thalian Hall, the theater became an integral part of Wilmington life. Besides providing entertainment, it was a place of assembly for a variety of occasions.
Full Text:
Record #:
28613
Abstract:
From the time of the early settlements, salt was produced by two methods on the North Carolina coast. One method was by solar evaporation and the second method was by boiling sea water. This most efficient system was fully developed by the start of the Civil War.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
28620
Abstract:
Mary Ann Buie (Miss Buie) was a writer known for her controversial articles published in the Wilmington Daily Journal from 1861-1865. Early in the Civil War, Miss Buie left journalism to specialize in solicitations for the welfare of the soldiers. It was her dedication to this cause that made her a celebrity.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
28632
Abstract:
James Ryder Randall was secretary to Flag Officer William F. Lynch, commanding the Naval Defenses of North Carolina in 1863. He wrote daily letters to Kate S. Hammond, daughter of General M.C.M. Hammond of Burnside, describing his river excursions to Fort Fisher and Smithville. His letters provide a vivid picture of the estuary of the Cape Fear River in 1864.
Record #:
28292
Abstract:
A compilation of newspapers and personal narratives from the time documenting Wilmington’s battle against yellow fever in 1862.
Source:
Record #:
28344
Abstract:
This article contains excerpts of documents related to the State Salk Works located south of Wilmington. During the Civil War, the state offered employment opportunities at the Salt Works to those who opposed the war.