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7 results for Wallace, W.D
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Record #:
14797
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Abstract:
Furniture manufacturing was a diverse industry throughout North Carolina history. Henry Payne offered some of the earliest cabinetry work in Caldwell County. The first factory opened in 1880 at High Point, ten years later five more, and by 1900 44 furniture factories were operated. At the time of this article, there were 101 established factories located in High Point, Lenoir, Thomasville, Statesville, Hickory, Marion, Mt. Airy, Lexington, Mebane, and North Wilkesboro were the centers of furniture production.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 6, July 1943, p11
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Record #:
15372
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C. R. Peebles became president of \"Safe Bus, Inc.\" a new business venture to consolidate private bus lines into one company. The group of Winston-Salem bus owners operated 42 passenger buses and transported 8,000 passengers daily. The segregated bus line employed was owned, maintained, and operated by an African American group to provide the African American community with transportation services.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 4, June 1935, p7, 22, il
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Record #:
15385
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Mill village refers to the community developed in conjunction with any mill. Traditionally mill owners built and maintained homes for their employees to rent and supplied these makeshift villages with deputy services. Mr. Ferrell of Raleigh proposed a new plan of individual ownership of mill homes and the property to alleviate the mill owner's financial burden and to instill mill workers with a sense of pride in owning a home.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 13, Aug 1935, p1, 22, il
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Record #:
15478
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The Mount Olive Pickle Company began in 1925 in an effort to utilize some of the surplus crops of that section and it has been growing ever since. The company employs seventy-five people and fills 25,000 jars a day. Overall, it turns out about three million jars a year. Wallace gives an overview of the process from picking to packing.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 30, Dec 1935, p9, 20, f
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Record #:
15492
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The Barnwell brothers, R. W., James A., and John H. joined forces to start a lucrative trucking business. R. W. and James A. made up the Barnwell Brothers Inc., in Burlington and John H. was head of Transportation Inc. in Charlotte. The fleet of trucks consisted of 160 trucks which hauled 93,000,000 pounds of freight over 5,000,000 miles.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 45, Apr 1936, p5, por
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Record #:
19098
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Abstract:
The furniture industry had a modest beginning in the state. The early colonists brought very little with them and what they built themselves was crudely done. Later itinerant-cabinetmakers, when travel became more common, moved from community to community crafting some fine furniture. Henry Payne was one of the most prominent of these men. The first real factory was built in High Point in 1880, and from that date the industry has progressed until now it is the third largest industry in the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 6, July 1943, p11
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Record #:
20436
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Abstract:
Wallace describes the work that Hugh MacRae of Wilmington has been carrying on in eastern North Carolina in connection with the agricultural advancement in that section of the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 13 Issue 11, Aug 1945, p1-2, 18, 20, il
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