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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Stokes, Durward T
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Record #:
8274
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Lynn Banks Holt was a Confederate officer, a champion horse breeder, and a cotton mill owner. Holt, who was born in Alamance County, joined the Confederate Army on July 3, 1861. Taken prisoner twice, Holt was released from Union captivity on February 3, 1865. He kept a pocket diary throughout his captivity that included details on home remedies and poetry. Holt built the Oneida Cotton Mills in Graham following the war. With his financial success Holt began breeding champion trotting stallions, including the famous John R. Gentry.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 8, Jan 1985, p16-17, por
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Record #:
16431
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Jesse Holmes, the Fool Killer, was a fictitious character invented by Charles Napoleon Bonaparte Evans, editor and publisher of the Milton Chronicle during most of the period form 1841 to 1883. At monthly intervals, letters to Evans from his alter ego Holmes were published in the Caswell County weekly newspaper. These letters, dealing with current topics, and often with local people, proved to be the most popular feature of the Milton paper.
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Record #:
20621
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Thomas Hart was a prominent businessman in 18th century Orange County. He served both Hillsboro and Orange County in a number of ways from political, to business, religion, and through military service. The author recounts Hart's service to the community from his move from Virginia to his service as Sheriff and later as the Captain of the Orange County Militia.
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Record #:
20857
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This biographical essay looks at the life of historical figure and founder of the city of Rochester, NY, Nathaniel Rochester with an emphasis on the early years of his life spent in North Carolina.
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Record #:
20931
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The Great Revival was a movement in southern states to promote religious conviction and morality in the year 1800. Predating this revival were several other religious movements both within the state and across America. This article summarizes the religious frenzies leading up to The Great Revival of 1800, the revival itself, and its eventual decline by 1805.
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Record #:
20986
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This biographical essay looks at the life of 18 century North Carolina Presbyterian minister Henry Pattillo. Particular attention is given Pattillo's journal as well as his published writings and from period records.
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Record #:
21009
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This article looks at the establishment of the \"Milton Chronicle\" in Caswell County as well as its founder and editor, Charles Napoleon Bonaparte Evans. An examination of the paper's contents as well as Evan's editorial style is included. Appendix \"A\" to the article documents all accounts of marriage in the Milton Chronicle, while appendix \"B\" lists all published death notices.
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Record #:
21090
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This is a reprint of five letters written by Jesse Holmes, the Fool Killer, a creation of Charles Napoleon Bonaparte Evans, editor of the \"Milton Chronicle\" from 1841 to 1883. The letters, and the character of Homes and his associate Rascal Whaler, were used by Evans as a vehicle to express his opinions on people, social events, political developments, morals, customs, and any project or cause he wished to promote or defend.
Record #:
21230
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This article examines the multi-faceted career of Adam Boyd. During his life, Boyd was a minister, official of the court, member of the Committee of Safety, chaplain in the Continental Army, member of the North Carolina Society for the Cincinnati, and founder of the 'Cape Fear Mercury' one of North Carolina's earliest newspaper.
Record #:
35796
Author(s):
Abstract:
A letter published by the Fool Killer, aka Jesse Holmes, aka Charles Napoleon Bonaparte Evans, was found. This one differs from the rest because apparently the Fool Killer had acquired the letter from one of his victims, and then passed it on to the newspaper editor. A picture of the letter is included.