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6 results for Sloatman, Frederick L
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Record #:
27902
Abstract:
After an absence of almost ten years due to destruction by the boll weevil in the 1970s, cotton has returned to eastern North Carolina. Cotton was an important trade commodity for New Bern, and continues to be equally as important to our welfare thanks to the efforts of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
Source:
Record #:
36136
Abstract:
The Union Army’s success in capturing New Bern in 1862 involved famous military men such as General Ambrose Burnside. The Confederate general presiding over the troop for this famous battle was Lawrence Branch. The latter, though perhaps lesser known in history books, was celebrated as equally important through the CSA monument in Cedar Grove Cemetery.
Record #:
36147
Abstract:
This article was written in response to incorrect information contained in Frederick Sloatman’s “Streets and Roads of New Bern Linking Us with the Past,” published in the Spring 1993 edition. One of Sloatman’s corrections was in reference to New Bern’s involvement in the Revolutionary War. The second correction was an omitted paragraph. It referenced names of streets on the Price-Fitch map included in the previous article.
Record #:
36154
Abstract:
A life ended at thirty-six exuded influence spanning two centuries: a city park, street, creek, and bridge named for him. Evidence perhaps obscure, though, was produced during his lifetime: John Lawson’s History of North Carolina (1705).
Record #:
36153
Abstract:
The question: who owned the land, the German Palatines or Swiss paupers. The answer: evident in the descendants for those two groups. After two centuries, they still reside in the area named New Bern by their ancestors.
Record #:
36155
Abstract:
This entry offered three corrections for the May 1998 issue. One was a missing paragraph from Richard Lore’s “The New Bern Historical Society: The First Seventy-five Years.” The second was two lines omitted from Mary Baker’s “John R. Taylor.” The third was the improper copying of an illustration on page five.