NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


5 results for Sandbeck, Penne S
Currently viewing results 1 - 5
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
17801
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2006, the Sunny Side Oyster Bar marked its 77th anniversary. The little Williamston eatery represents a disappearing cultural landmark popular from the 1930s to the 1950s. Sunny Side Oyster Bar and its now defunct brethren are documented in this article.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 14, October 2006, p12-22, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
18971
Author(s):
Abstract:
Through historic documents, Sandbeck details life in New Bern through the eyes of two Northern soldiers stationed in the area during the Civil War.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 11 Issue 6, Spring 2012, p8-9, 11-15, il, por, f
Full Text:
Record #:
14384
Author(s):
Abstract:
Barely a year after North Carolina seceded, General Ambrose Burnside and 11,000 soldiers captured New Bern in March 1862. The city was vital to the South as a port and as a railroad hub. Leaving their property behind, many citizens fled the city, but a number remained to endure the occupation. Letters, memoirs, sketches, and other primary sources from both the North and South provide a picture of New Bern under occupation.
Source:
Record #:
37266
Author(s):
Abstract:
A portrait of Mary Daves McKinlay was represented in a painting, passed down to her namesake niece, that revealed an outer gentility. A portrait painted in words also revealed gentility, in actions such as financial generosity to surviving family and the Episcopal Church of New Bern, and a view of slavery ahead of her times. Her enduring mark on New Bern may be perceived in her marker in Cedar Grove Cemetery. It may also be perceived in the pictured tablet, made by the Daves family and now in Christ Church’s graveyard.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 13 Issue 1, Spring 2015, p22-24
Record #:
37417
Author(s):
Abstract:
George Dixon’s loss of dwelling and dream was the Palace’s gain, as one of the three historical homes for tour at the Palace. How Dixon lost this home, through a series of financial misfortunes, is described in detail. Described nearly as well are the owners, occupiers, and renters who resided in the Federal style dwelling before it became part of Tryon Palace’s architectural showpieces in 1957.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 12 Issue 1, Winter 2013/2014, p26-29