NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


13 results for Reckhow, Kenneth H
Currently viewing results 1 - 13
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
34327
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Environmental Protection Agency’s Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) Program is under review for changes to the program and water quality standards. In North Carolina, limited resources and multiple objectives hamper the surface water quality monitoring program, but suggest that a rigorous re-evaluation of sample site selection and monitoring frequency could yield some gains. This article discusses how the Neuse River illustrates certain good and bad features of the current TMDL program, and what could be improved.
Record #:
34247
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Water Resources Research Institute has been active in supporting research that addresses key scientific questions of concern for the management of water quality in the Neuse River. In this article, Kenneth Reckhow, director of the institute, discusses dealing with the water quality issues and the uncertainty in scientific studies.
Record #:
34268
Author(s):
Abstract:
The rivers and estuaries of coastal North Carolina have experienced unprecedented increases in nutrient loading over the last fifty years. This has resulted in a proliferation of water quality problems including algae blooms, anoxic water and fish kills. The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources Science Advisory Council recommends continuation of an intensive long-term monitoring and modeling program for the Neuse River Estuary.
Record #:
34265
Author(s):
Abstract:
The newly enacted Clean Water Responsibility and Environmentally Sound Policy Act (H.B. 515) includes a section concerning the role of stakeholders in the approval of water quality models. This requires that nutrient limits be substantiated by the application of a calibrated water quality model developed with participation of stakeholders. The new role for stakeholders is consistent with the recent increased public involvement in environmental assessment and decision-making.
Record #:
34272
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists are uncertain whether fish kills in the Neuse River are caused by Pfiesteria or anoxia/hypoxia. Difficulties in the causal linkages make it difficult to determine appropriate response and management actions. This article discusses the fish kill events and water conditions in the Neuse.
Record #:
34295
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists believe that issues of limited water supply, sediment pollution, and excessive nitrogen are emerging as recurrent problems. The accepted nutrient application practices across the Coastal Plain may be contributing to unacceptably high nutrient concentrations throughout shallow aquifers. They advise plans to define sustainable rates of nutrient application to the land.
Record #:
34305
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s effort to address the devastation resulting from Hurricane Floyd has focused on human health, social needs, and economic recovery. As state planners prepare for long-term response to hurricanes, consideration is being given to stormwater runoff, water quality, watershed development, and urbanization.
Record #:
34311
Author(s):
Abstract:
Based on chlorophyll-a predictions from the Neuse Estuary Eutrophication Model, the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources has recommended no immediate change in the thirty-percent nitrogen reduction goal for the Neuse River Estuary. Scientists caution that changes to the total maximum daily load (TMDL) for total nitrogen could still occur later in the evaluation process.
Record #:
34313
Author(s):
Abstract:
The State of North Carolina and the Federal Emergency Management Agency signed an agreement in mid-September to update flood maps in North Carolina. The flood maps need to be updated to reflect changes in a watershed and development which can affect flood stage or height of rising river water resulting from storms. Updating flood maps is an important first step in establishing guidelines and restrictions on land use in the floodplain.
Record #:
34309
Author(s):
Abstract:
An apparent loophole in the North Carolina water quality standard for turbidity in surface waters allows exceedances of the numeric standard under certain conditions. Given that sediment is regarded by some to be the major surface water pollutant in North Carolina, the standards may need to be reconsidered.
Record #:
34317
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economists in North Carolina have noted the lack of economic analyses in the Neuse River Basin. Valuation to assess economic costs and benefits of various proposed management options has largely been neglected, and may undermine the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. Neuse stakeholders representing a range of interest groups will provide a surrogate for direct economic analyses.
Record #:
34332
Author(s):
Abstract:
Effective water quality management is built on a foundation of water quality standards that are expressed in a manner that makes compliance assessment clear and unambiguous. Most surface water quality standards in North Carolina are based on a chemical criterion value and used to determine if a waterbody is compliant. This article gives an overview of the state’s standards and total maximum daily load (TMDL) program.
Record #:
34352
Author(s):
Abstract:
Regulatory control of most pollutants is focused on point sources under the jurisdiction of the North Carolina Division of Water Quality, whereas sediments and turbidity are regulated nonpoint source pollutants based largely on controls established by the North Carolina Division of Land Resources. This article discusses the major obstacles in sedimentation and erosion control.