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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Price, Charles L
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Record #:
5950
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Abstract:
Railroads across eastern North Carolina were a vital supply link for Confederate forces during the Civil War. Price describes the adventures and challenges of riding the trains during the turmoil of war.
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, May/June 1975, p12-15, il
Record #:
9931
Author(s):
Abstract:
After three major fires in three years, the city of New Bern instituted a combination fire and police watch in 1794. The service became complacent due to a lack of fires, but in 1821 a major fire at a steam mill led to new demands for the formation of a fire company. Today, the Firemen's Museum in New Bern displays the numerous awards that have been won by the New Bern Fire Department, which has two companies with over 100 years of service.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 40 Issue 11, Nov 1972, p8-10, il
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Record #:
10680
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Abstract:
Conscious of the need for improved railroad facilities, North Carolina's railroad leaders introduced sleeping cars and diners, or saloon cars, for the first time within months of the end of the Civil War. By the middle of 1866, sleeping cars were being operated regularly on both the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad and the North Carolina Railroad. The Raleigh and Gaston Railroad, noticing a decline in passengers, attributed the drop to a lack of sleeping cars and added them as well in 1869.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 37 Issue 6, Aug 1969, p11-12, 22, il
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Record #:
21309
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Abstract:
It is a common thought that after the Civil War, Southern railroads could not have been repaired to working condition without the help of the Union Army. The railroads of North Carolina needed only minor repairs to assist in a temporary military occupation. Within six months after the conflict, the Army conducted no maintenance work at all and left the rails in worse condition that when they found them.
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Record #:
21192
Abstract:
This article examines a failed attempt by Union forces to capture Fort Fisher which protected Wilmington, one of the last Confederate open ports. In December 1861, Union General Benjamin F. Butler attempted to explode a powder ship on a sandbar in front on the fort. After the explosion, Butler sent infantry divisions to storm the fort, who failed in their attempt.
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