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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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6 results for Moore, Mona
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Record #:
19554
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When Jean and Barr Coleman bought an old tobacco farm, they had different ideas of what to do with two run down barns on the property. Instead of demolishing them both, they were renovated and became havens for family and friends.
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Record #:
19553
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Winter gardening can be a satisfying and rewarding activity to get the avid gardener through the winters of North Carolina. A variety of winter flowers can provide a splash of color throughout the winter months and winter vegetables can be both decorative and delicious.
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Record #:
19584
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Water aerobics is one of the most popular classes offered at the Vidant Wellness Center. During one of the four hour-long classes offered per day, students participate in cardio and resistance activities that does not put strain on their joints. Bolstered by referrals from local health care professionals, water aerobics has bettered the physical and mental health of its students and the community.
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Record #:
21978
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Asif Daher, owner of Zaitona's Mediterranean Restaurant in Washington, and his wife Sharaz discuss the appeal of growing and cooking with herbs and which ones are good for medicinal purposes. Master gardener Julie Parker comments on using herbs in cooking and which ones grow well in Eastern North Carolina.
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Record #:
21962
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Backwater Jack's Tiki Bar and Grill is a 1935 cottage located along Runyon Creek at the end of East Main Street owned by Laura Scoble and Cathy Bell. In 2011, Hurricane Irene flooded it, and it was closed for nine months. Moore recounts how local citizens came to their aid to help bring Backwater Jack's back to life.
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Record #:
21984
Abstract:
To some it's just a pile of wood waiting for the match, but to Lee Cooper Jr., owner of Rustic River Furnishings, it's a pile of driftwood waiting to be fashioned into functional pieces. He was a realtor specializing in waterfront second-homes for clients, and he spent twenty years as a boat builder. He discusses how he got into furniture-making using this unusual product.
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