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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for McEachern, Leora H
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Record #:
28642
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Abstract:
Two versions of the Moore’s Creek Battle in 1776, which were published in Philadelphia and Baltimore, are presented. The articles which were published in 1817 and 1822 provide detailed accounts of the North Carolina battle, General James Moore and his army.
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Record #:
28640
Abstract:
Between 1818 and 1853 the United States Congress approved various acts by which Revolutionary War soldiers or their widows were entitled to apply for pensions. The provided depositions are from pension applicants of veterans who had served at battles in North Carolina and guarded the Cape Fear River during 1776-1781.
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Record #:
28613
Abstract:
From the time of the early settlements, salt was produced by two methods on the North Carolina coast. One method was by solar evaporation and the second method was by boiling sea water. This most efficient system was fully developed by the start of the Civil War.
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Record #:
28620
Abstract:
Mary Ann Buie (Miss Buie) was a writer known for her controversial articles published in the Wilmington Daily Journal from 1861-1865. Early in the Civil War, Miss Buie left journalism to specialize in solicitations for the welfare of the soldiers. It was her dedication to this cause that made her a celebrity.
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Record #:
28632
Abstract:
James Ryder Randall was secretary to Flag Officer William F. Lynch, commanding the Naval Defenses of North Carolina in 1863. He wrote daily letters to Kate S. Hammond, daughter of General M.C.M. Hammond of Burnside, describing his river excursions to Fort Fisher and Smithville. His letters provide a vivid picture of the estuary of the Cape Fear River in 1864.
Record #:
28292
Abstract:
A compilation of newspapers and personal narratives from the time documenting Wilmington’s battle against yellow fever in 1862.
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Record #:
28344
Abstract:
This article contains excerpts of documents related to the State Salk Works located south of Wilmington. During the Civil War, the state offered employment opportunities at the Salt Works to those who opposed the war.