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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Logan, Frenise A
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Record #:
20219
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Abstract:
After Reconstruction, the movement of African-Americans out of southern states like North Carolina were the result of political and socio-economic pressures. Restrictions on civil rights, lack of wages, the operation of land tenure and the credit system, brought discontent that pushed for a mass migration out of North Carolina.
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Record #:
20296
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the Reconstruction era in North Carolina, African-Americans began to demand the establishment of a state supported college. Following much debate and opposition, Greensboro was approved for a A and M College for African-Americans in 1891.
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Record #:
20349
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1890, African-Americans made up nearly 50% of the total urban population in North Carolina. The dominance of these populations in towns and cities has raised the question of how these groups earned a living given the economic limitations placed on them by the white populations of the state. This article looks at African-Americans in domestic and personal service, manufacturing and mechanical industries, trade, and transportation, as well as business and professional men and women.
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Record #:
21463
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the first state legislature to meet in North Carolina after Reconstruction, thirteen black assemblymen served and were informed through words and actions that Democrats would do everything possible to undo the progress that had been achieved during Reconstruction. The legislature passed racially restrictive laws in its 1876-1877 session that encouraged racial discrimination and restricted the rights of black citizens.
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