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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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128 results for Earley, Lawrence S
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Record #:
719
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Small, scattered and disappearing, mountain bogs are some of our rarest habitats and contain some of the least common plants and animals. Yet we know almost nothing about these tiny, isolated worlds.
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Record #:
1744
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North Carolina has joined other states in the nation in restoring, and even creating, wetlands. The creation of wetlands is still a relatively new science, and its reliability is uncertain.
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Record #:
1963
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Life in the naval stores industry of 19th-century North Carolina is documented in a pictorial series.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p12-15, il
Record #:
4147
Author(s):
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Riparian buffers along streams filter out large amounts of pollution before it reaches streams. Many Neuse River Basin landowners are protesting a temporary rule requiring them to have 50-foot buffers along streams. Champion International Corp., however, voluntarily is leaving 200-foot buffers on thirty-two miles of Upper Tar River Basin streams. The corporation is asking landowners to do likewise.
Record #:
4592
Author(s):
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Robert Johnson paints nature. His newest project, \"The Nature Conservancy Series,\" was completed in the spring of 1999 and consists of paintings of ten sites protected by the Nature Conservancy, including Bluff Mountain, Panthertown Valley, and Horseshoe Lake. Don't expect to find the realism of a photograph in Johnson's paintings; his works are interpretations of what he sees. Johnson has lived and worked in North Carolina for twenty-six years, and nature is the subject of much of his paintings.
Record #:
4610
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Eastern North Carolina received 23 inches of rain in two weeks, half of the yearly total, from Hurricanes Dennis and Floyd. The result was a flood of mammoth proportions. Experts also blame man's altering the landscape as a prime cause of the flooding. Earley describes natural landscapes and floods; altered landscapes and floods; and altered landscapes and Hurricane Floyd.
Record #:
4744
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Early-successional habitats are areas of a mountain forest that are beginning to recover from events like fires, storms, or logging. First come grasses, then shrubs, and finally trees. All of these stages are important to wildlife survival. Earley discusses the value of early-successional habitats for mountain wildlife, their growing rarity, and what steps are being taken to maintain them.
Record #:
5500
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cheerwine, a burgundy-colored cola with a hint of lemon-lime, was first bottled in Salisbury, in Rowan County, in 1917. Cheerwine still remains a family-owned business. The company has begun marketing outside the state and also has developed a respectable mail-order business for North Carolinians who have moved away.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p34, il
Record #:
5501
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At age 75, Rose Post has been a reporter on the Salisbury Post for over 51 years. She was a recipient of the national Ernie Pyle Award in 1989, and has won more awards than anyone else in the history of the North Carolina Press Association.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 60 Issue 9, Sept 2002, p40, il
Record #:
7915
Author(s):
Abstract:
The tiger salamander's name comes from its coloration which features dark yellow spots and bars across a dark background. It grows to lengths of seven to eleven inches. It is an extremely difficult creature to find, as it spends ten months of the year beneath the surface of the ground feeding on earthworms and other insects. It leaves its burrow in December and January to breed in nearby ponds and then goes back underground. Although tiger salamanders were once widespread across the state, they are now confined to the edge of the Sandhills in Robeson, Hoke, and Scotland Counties.
Record #:
9723
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In North Carolina, pitcher plants grow mostly in the coastal plain. Earley describes this elegant plant that has an appetite for insects.
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Record #:
9725
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Brunswick County's Green Swamp is a 140-square-mile haven for plants and wildlife. All fourteen of the state's carnivorous plants live there. The area lay untouched for centuries until 1907 when the Waccamaw Lumber Company began logging operations. In 1974, the Department of the Interior designated 24,800 acres as a National Natural Landmark.
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Record #:
9732
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Abstract:
Until the 1800s, wolves were the dominant predator in North Carolina, and accounts of them can be found in colonial records and in early Moravian diaries. Wolf bounties were common during those periods, and settlers were encouraged to kill them. The last wolf sighting in the state was in 1933.
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Record #:
9830
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At the turn of the century, fabulous quail hunting attracted wealthy northern sportsmen to North Carolina's Piedmont. Earley describes some of the elaborate hunting lodges they constructed.
Record #:
9833
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Abstract:
Two subspecies of hellbenders have been found in the United States. North Carolina's hellbender lives in the cold mountain streams of the western counties. It is one of the largest salamanders in the western hemisphere and can grow up to 2 and one-half feet in length. It is rarely seen and lives on crayfish, fish, and other foods.
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