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6 results for Duffus, Kevin P
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Record #:
5395
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On December 21, 1884, lookouts at Outer Banks life-saving stations spotted the barkentine EPHRAIM WILLIAMS in distress. Duffus describes the daring rescue of the ship's crew, carried out by Outer Banks lifesavers in huge rolling waves, frigid water, and fierce winds.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 7, Dec 2002, p25-26, 28-29, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6644
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Fearing that Federal troops would capture the Fresnel lens in the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Confederate soldiers removed it in 1862 and shipped it inland to Washington, then Tarboro. With the Union threatening destruction of Washington if the lens wasn't returned, Dr. David Tayloe, who supported the Confederacy, assumed responsibility for the lens and carried it to safety by boxcar to his home in Townsville in what is now Vance County. Tayloe died in 1884. The whereabouts of the forty-four boxes containing the Fresnel lens have been one of the great mysteries of the Civil War. Thirty years ago Kevin Duffus set out to solve the 140-year-old mystery. He discusses his quest, which ended with the finding of the lens in 2002. In 2005, the Fresnel lens will go on display at the Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p100-102, 104-105, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
6643
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum will reflect, when completed in 2004, the heritage of coastal Carolina and maritime history represented by the shipwrecks. Located at Hatteras Village, the 19,000-square-foot climate-controlled facility is designed to withstand sustained winds of 135 mph. The museum has an amazing quantity of extraordinary relics connected to momentous events in history. Even more stunning is that many of these artifacts have landed on the Outer Banks from halfway round the world and from over 2,000 years ago.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p84-86, 88, 91-92, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7106
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Jacob Edwin Keiger left his parent's Stokes County farm and enlisted as a private in Company D of the 53rd North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War. Within three years dozens of Company D's 120 men were wounded, over forty were captured and held as prisoners, twenty-one deserted, and thirty-five died, mostly from disease. Keiger and his parents exchanged over one hundred letters before his death, at 24, in Raleigh from disease in July 1863. Excerpts his letters, interspersed with narrative of the company's movements, create a picture of one soldier's life during the Civil War.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 10, Mar 2005, p74-76, 78, 80, 82-83, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
18828
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Duffus recounts how friends and relatives of Jim Baugham Gaskill of Ocracoke learned that his ship had been torpedoed off the North Carolina coast. His cousin found his third mate's license washed up on the beach, and a few days later an oar bearing the ship's name washed up at his father's inn, the Pamlico Inn. His ship, SS Caribsea, went down in three minutes on March 11, 1942; only seven survived.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 45 Issue 2, Feb 2013, p26-27, il, por
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Record #:
10517
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Abstract:
In the early days of World War II, German submarines sank Allied ships within sight of the North Carolina coast. Duffus recounts incidents from the dark days of 1942, when German U-Boats ruled the seas off North Carolina.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 47 Issue 2, Spring 2008, p22-24, il, por