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10 results for Cooper, John E
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Record #:
10144
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John E. Cooper is research curator of crustaceans at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh and has studied crayfish for over forty years. They are among the largest and more numerous animals in the state's freshwaters. In the past nineteen years, fifteen species have been added to the state's list of native crayfish.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 1, June 2008, p168-172, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
12532
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In North Carolina forty native crayfishes make their home, as well as three invasive species and several known but undescribed species. Cooper's paper is the first comprehensive listing of the state's crayfish fauna since 1995.
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Record #:
15559
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Six species of shrimps of the genus Macrobrachium are found in fresh waters around the country. Of that number three have been found in North and South Carolina waters.
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Record #:
19727
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The authors report on several crayfish species that are expanding their range, either coming in from other states or moving into new territory within the state. Some life history and taxonomic notes for several of the species are included.
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Record #:
6569
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H. H. and C. S. Brimley, immigrant English boys, came to Raleigh in 1880. Herbert became an outstanding taxidermist and worked for the Museum of Natural Science for sixty years, fifty-one as curator and director. Clement was an entomologist for the Agriculture Department and published the first catalog of insects in the South, The List of Insects of North Carolina. The Brimleys were the state's most influential naturalists, whose work left a lasting mark on the state
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 1, Mar 1979, p1-14, por, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
19059
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A new species of crayfish is the only known member of its subgenus east of the Blue Ridge physiographic province. It is endemic to the Neuse and Tar-Pamlico river basins of North Carolina, occurring in the Coastal Plain and the eastern edge of the Piedmont Plateau.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 23, Dec 1995, p65-87, il, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
19055
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Previously unreported species of crayfish have been documented in North Carolina. This article details the natural history of crayfish and the correlation of crayfish fauna with North Carolina's major river basins and physiographic provinces.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 22, June 1995, p87-132, bibl Periodical Website
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Record #:
28392
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North Carolina is home to forty native crayfishes, but taxonomic problems persist within several of the species. This is the first comprehensive listing of the state’s crayfish fauna and the first effort to correlate the distributions of all North Carolina crayfishes with hydrologic units and physiographic provinces.
Record #:
8727
Abstract:
Three non-native crayfishes have established breeding populations in North Carolina waters. Invasive species are ones that have been introduced into an area far from their natural ranges. Such species are considered biological pollutants, for they can have a negative effect on the local ecosystem. Future assessments of these crayfishes will require baseline data provided by this study: precise localities, dates of collection, sexes and numbers, and some information on reproduction.
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Record #:
30080
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The genus Necturus is a group of aquatic salamanders commonly known as waterdogs and mudpuppies. Of the three species occurring in North Carolina, only the Neuse River Waterdog (Necturus lewisi) is endemic to the state. In 1978, a three-year study began to provide information on its life history, habitat preference, and preliminary conservation status.
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Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 10, Feb 1985, p1-12, bibl Periodical Website
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