NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


39 results for Blackburn, Charles, Jr
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 3
Next
Record #:
5231
Abstract:
Twenty-five public fishing piers, approximately one-fourth of all the fishing piers on the Atlantic Coast, jut out from the state's coastline from Kitty Hawk to Sunset Beach. Blackburn discusses the attraction the vulnerable, wooden structures have on people.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
5356
Abstract:
Bernice Kelly Harris is one of thirty-one authors in the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. Blackburn discusses her life and literary accomplishments.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 69 Issue 10, Mar 2002, p108-109, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
5730
Abstract:
Raised by grandparents and an aunt in Durham, Pauli Murray was a civil rights pioneer, leading the first organized sit-in at a Washington, D.C., cafeteria in 1944, and being arrested in Virginia in 1940 for refusing to sit in the back of the bus. Blackburn profiles the life of this woman who was a civil rights lawyer, college professor, college vice president, and Deputy Attorney General of California.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 9, Feb 2003, p25-26, 28-29, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
5964
Abstract:
Blackburn discusses the Lowry Gang, a notorious band of murderers and thieves who plundered and ravaged Robeson County in the decade after the end of the Civil War.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 3 Issue 4, Sept/Oct 1975, p18-21, il, por
Record #:
5975
Abstract:
Located on the marshy coast of North Carolina and Virginia, the Great Dismal Swamp, once covering 2,200 square miles, has been described as an area of history and mystery. Blackburn discusses historical events and persons connected with the swamp, such as George Washington, who designed a plan to drain the swamp.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1976, p40-42, il, map
Record #:
6187
Abstract:
There are 36 authors in the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. Among them are ten remarkable women, including Inglis Fletcher, Bernice Kelly Harris, and Wilma Dykeman. Together they have produced over 130 books, including novels, stories, poems, plays, and memoirs.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 6, Nov 2003, p162-164, 166, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
6264
Abstract:
Georgia Thompson Brown of Henderson was a pioneer of aviation. Better known as Tiny Broadwick, she made her mark not by flying airplanes, but by parachuting from them. She was the first woman to parachute from a plane, and between 1908 and 1922, she made 1,100 jumps.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 8, Jan 2004, p25-26, il, por Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6410
Abstract:
While NASCAR and ACC basketball keep sports fans in the state occupied today, horse racing in eastern North Carolina during the 1700s and early 1800s was the most exciting sporting event around. Blackburn discusses the history of racing in the state, famous horses, like Sir Archie, and their owners.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
6731
Abstract:
Boating and fishing getaways are very popular in North Carolina, and the state has plenty of lakes to meet the needs of each. Describing lakes east of I-95, in the Piedmont, and in the western counties, Blackburn gives a small sampling of what the state's wide range of recreational lakes have to offer.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 2, July 2004, p62-64, 66, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
6917
Abstract:
Blackburn discusses the Wendell Harvest Festival, which is held in the town each year in early October. The regionally famous festival began in the early 1900s when tobacco was king in Wendell and the surrounding area. Today the festival is as much about the present as the past, celebrating the importance of tobacco and farming to Wendell's heritage as well as celebrating the present-day culture and life of the community.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p104-106, 108-109, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
6931
Abstract:
After World War II, drag racing officially moved off back-country roads onto legally sanctioned raceways. North Carolina was a hotbed for this type of racing and continues so today. The state has more drag strips than any other state. Blackburn discusses the history of the sport in the state, some of the legendary drivers, and the East Coast Drag Times Hall of Fame.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 7, Dec 2004, p25-26, 28-29, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
7135
Abstract:
North Carolina has one of the largest highway systems in the nation, with 79,000 miles of state-maintained roads. Only Texas with 80,000 has more. Each year along these roadways, from the mountains to the coast, the North Carolina Department of Transportation cultivates some 3,500 acres in wildflowers. Now in its 20 year, NCDOT the wildflower program is the largest in the nation.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p98-100, 102, 104-105, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
7218
Abstract:
State-operated farmers' markets are a uniquely Southern phenomenon. They provide customers fresh produce and give small farmers an outlet for their crops. The five state-owned regional markets in North Carolina are the Piedmont Triad Farmers Market (Colfax); Western North Carolina Farmers Market (Asheville); Charlotte Regional Farmers Market (Charlotte); Southeastern North Carolina Agricultural Center Farmers Market (Lumberton); and the State Farmers Market at Raleigh (Raleigh).
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 1, June 2005, p118-120, 122-124, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
7368
Abstract:
North Carolina has a rich history of stories of buried treasure. Over the centuries many North Carolinians, armed with shovels, maps, or just word-of-mouth, have sought these riches. Blackburn discusses some of these treasure troves, including Blackbeard's gold, gold buried by Confederates near the end of the Civil War, and Money Island in Greenville Sound near Wrightsville Beach.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 4, Sept 2005, p84-86, 88, 90, 92, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
7607
Abstract:
Mary Meletiou learned to ride a bicycle on the quiet streets of Burlington in the 1950s. Later she would go on a 2,000 mile bicycle ride from Greensboro to Denver. In 1974, she went to Raleigh to promote bicycle touring in North Carolina. There were no bicycle routes at that time. Meletiou, an economic major at UNC-G, had also studied cartography. She developed the state's first bike trail, the 700-mile Mountains to the Sea Trail. Today the state's extensive Bicycling Highways System consists of nine trails, including the Ports of Call, the North Line Trace, and the Cape Fear Run. North Carolina's bicycle trails program has received national attention and served as a model for other states, including Colorado and Tennessee.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 8, Jan 2006, p96-98, 100, 102-103, il, map Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text: