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43 results for "Silcox-Jarrett, Diane"
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Record #:
7261
Abstract:
History credits French peasants with the origin of croquet. In 1865, the game officially came to America with the establishment of the Newport Croquet Club in Rhode Island. Its popularity soon spread around the country. In 1987, the Bald Head Island Croquet Club organized. With eighty members, the club is one of the largest in the United States.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 2, July 2005, p88-90, 92-93, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7529
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Silcox-Jarrett discusses how Hopewell Presbyterian Church in Huntersville celebrates the Celtic traditions of its members during the Christmas season. Celtic family names have been represented on the church roster since the church's founding in 1762. The members' names, history of the church, and Celtic Christmas carols inspired the minister, Jeff Lowrance, to begin a Celtic celebration in 2000.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 7, Dec 2005, p104-106, 108, 109, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7698
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Burke Brothers Hardware in Raleigh has been in business since 1936. The store began in front of the family's lumber mill. Part of it contained a grocery and butcher shop. When big grocery chains came to Raleigh in the 1950s, the store began to focus entirely on hardware. Burke Brothers prides itself on customer service and old-fashioned hardware knowledge. If a customer can't find what he wants at Burke Brothers, the chances are it doesn't exist.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p148-150, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7701
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Family reunions are an important event in the lives of North Carolinians. The gatherings can involve several hundred people over a weekend or a dozen or so family members for lunch. It is the connection to the group, the traditions, and the heritage that is important. Silcox-Jarrett discusses three North Carolina families who have long-running family reunions: the Powell family, dating to 1588; the Brooks family, dating to the mid-1700s; and the Burgin-Lytle family, dating to 1677.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 10, Mar 2006, p66-68, 70, 72-73, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7795
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Mrs. Jessie Stevens Taylor served as Southport's volunteer weather observer and storm warning display woman from 1900 to 1961.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 12, May 2006, p166-168, 170, 172, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7858
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Camp Flintlock, located on sixty-eight acres of pine trees and fields in Johnston County, gives campers an opportunity to experience life as a colonial North Carolinian. The campers, ages nine to fifteen years, attend for one week. Boys and girls attend on alternate weeks. There are no video games, televisions, or cell phones. Campers dress as colonials and learn how to shoot a musket, throw a tomahawk, make leather crafts or rag dolls, cook chicken, and make homemade bread. Tim Langdon, founder and owner, started the camp in 1999.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 1, June 2006, p142-144, 146, 148, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7935
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The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry has maintained and preserved a proud tradition of service for 213 years. It was commissioned in 1793, under the Militia Act passed the previous year in Washington's administration. The company has responded with active service to the nation's conflicts from the War of 1812 to World War I. Individual members have served in World War II and every conflict since then. It is recognized as the official state historic military command. The Fayetteville Light Infantry Armory and Museum's collection includes two centuries of well-preserved documents, uniforms, and artifacts, including the coach the Marquis de Lafayette rode in during his visit to his namesake city in 1825.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p84-86, 88, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8258
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Ron Jones, a past president of the North Carolina Storytelling Guild, comes from a family of storytellers and has been immersed in the oral tradition all of his life. His style is straightforward, but he also uses his guitar to weave music into the tales he tells. He holds a master's degree in library science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and worked twenty-two years in the Wake County Library System. Much of his storytelling has been connected with the Wake County Public Libraries and public schools. Now retired, he spends his time storytelling across North Carolina and in surrounding states.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 6, Nov 2006, p110-112, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8496
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Fayetteville, county seat of Cumberland County, is a city rich in history and culture. Chartered in 1783, the city is the first one in America to be named for the Marquis de Lafayette and the only namesake city he ever visited. In the early days the city was the gateway to foreign ports, with passengers and trade goods leaving for ships at Wilmington by way of the Cape Fear River. European trade returned by the same route. Visitors to the town can find much to interest them, including the Fayetteville Transportation Museum, Cape Fear Botanical Garden, the Airborne & Special Operations Museum, and the Fayetteville Museum of Art. Fayetteville is the home of Fort Bragg, a large military base with about 47,000 military personnel on active duty.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 9, Feb 2007, p20-22, 24-25, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8695
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Jane S. McKimmon was the first director of the North Carolina Home Demonstration Clubs and the state's first home demonstration agent. She began work in 1909, and her job took her to many rural areas across the state. Her goal was to help rural women and girls learn how to improve their homes and their lives. Placing home demonstration agents in counties to work with farm women was part of her duties. She began with fourteen county agents and 416 women. Under her direction, the home demonstration clubs grew to 75,000 members representing all one hundred North Carolina counties. Once a year McKimmon would bring the agents to Raleigh for in-service training. As attendance increased over the years, the group needed their own building. Club members donated $2.50 apiece over a four-year period and raised over $100,000 in 1951 to help finance the Jane S. McKimmon Center on the North Carolina State University campus in Raleigh. McKimmon died in 1957, almost twenty years before the center opened in 1976.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p128-130, 132, 134, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
8766
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Two natural areas located in the Piedmont abound in natural beauty and are home to trees, plants, birds, and animals not commonly found outside the mountain regions. They exist because they formed along north-facing slopes that are cool and damp, similar to the environments found in the higher elevations of the mountains. Silcox-Jarrett describes the Occoneechee Mountain State Natural Area, located in Orange County, and the White Pines Nature Preserve, located in Chatham County.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p88-90, 92, 94-95, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9418
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The Carolina Chocolate Drops, a group of three young musicians, have rediscovered and are keeping alive the traditions of African American string bands of the Piedmont. The group's name is derived from a 1920s string band, The Tennessee Chocolate Drops. The group has been mentored by legendary musician, Joe Thompson, who at age 88, received one of eleven National Heritage Awards bestowed by the National Endowment for the Arts in 2007.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 4, Sept 2007, p108-110, 112, 114-115, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9445
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Virginia Boone of Canton is ninety-four years old and braided the first of her colorful, long-lasting rugs in 1945. Her rugs are known for their longevity and extra thickness. Choosing colors and coordinating them is one of her skills. Her rugs have found a place in all fifty states and in seven foreign countries. Since 1950, her rugs have been featured at the North Carolina State Fair's Village of Yesteryear.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p92-93, 96, 98, 100, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9600
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Two retail centers, the Salisbury Emporium in Salisbury and the Olde Southport Village in Southport, utilize buildings from the early 20th-century. Silcox-Jarrett describes the restoration of the buildings and how their merchandise links buyers back to an earlier time.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p78-80, 82, 84-85, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9611
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The line of preachers began with Marvin Earl Tyson, who started preaching at age 26. Then his six sons took up the work, as did some of their children. For those who grew up in Eastern North Carolina over the past seventy years and were a Methodist, the chances are good that a Tyson shared the gospel with, wed, or buried them.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 6, Nov 2007, p124-126, 128, 130, por Periodical Website
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