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43 results for "Silcox-Jarrett, Diane"
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Record #:
9876
Abstract:
Silcox-Jarrett discusses the life and work of novelist Lee Smith.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 10, Mar 2008, p130-132, 134-136, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9418
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The Carolina Chocolate Drops, a group of three young musicians, have rediscovered and are keeping alive the traditions of African American string bands of the Piedmont. The group's name is derived from a 1920s string band, The Tennessee Chocolate Drops. The group has been mentored by legendary musician, Joe Thompson, who at age 88, received one of eleven National Heritage Awards bestowed by the National Endowment for the Arts in 2007.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 4, Sept 2007, p108-110, 112, 114-115, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7781
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Silcox-Jarrett traces the history of the Raleigh Rose Garden. Some sixty varieties of roses grow in the formal garden, with over one hundred throughout the entire garden.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 11, Apr 2006, p136-138, 140-141, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11160
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Started in 1972, the Nantahala Outdoor Center near Bryson City is a nationally known center for beginners and experts who enjoy white-water canoeing, rafting, kayaking, and other outdoor activities. By the end of the first year, 800 people had gone down the Nantahala River, and by 2008, that many go down the river in a single day. The center provides thrilling excursions on four state rivers.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 77 Issue 1, June 2009, p134-136, 138, 140, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
11264
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Silcox-Jarrett describes the Stecoah Valley Cultural Arts Center, which is housed in an eighty-three-year-old school building. The stone-walled structure not only served students for almost seventy years, but was also the community's social center. Today it provides space for area artisans and features the art and fine crafts of more than 120 local and regional artists.
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Record #:
10888
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Silcox-Jarrett describes things to see and do, where to stay and where to eat during a weekend visit to Bath and Belhaven.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 10, Mar 2009, p92-94, 96, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10131
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Some of the best mail-order nurseries in the nation are located in the Research Triangle Metropolitan Area. Silcox-Jarrett discusses Niche Gardens, located near Chapel Hill, which has been supplying native plants to local residents and mail-order customers since 1986.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 1, June 2008, p42-44, 46, 48, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4581
Abstract:
Known as Company Shops until the railroads left in 1886, the town changed its name to Burlington. The economy next depended on textiles with the Glencoe Mill, 1880-1954, and Burlington Industries since 1923. Family businesses are old, some dating back to 1910. The nostalgic can find historic sites, including a 1910 carousal. The town is also home to Elon College. Burlington experienced a 12 percent population growth in the 1990s to 44,000; location between the Research Triangle and the Piedmont Triad was a contributing factor.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 12, May 2000, p16-18, 20-22, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22742
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At the beginning of a new century, the 1908 flood and the 1918 opening of Fort Bragg changed life in Fayetteville forever.
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CityView (NoCar F 264.T3 W4), Vol. Issue , October 2012, p54-55, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7529
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Silcox-Jarrett discusses how Hopewell Presbyterian Church in Huntersville celebrates the Celtic traditions of its members during the Christmas season. Celtic family names have been represented on the church roster since the church's founding in 1762. The members' names, history of the church, and Celtic Christmas carols inspired the minister, Jeff Lowrance, to begin a Celtic celebration in 2000.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 7, Dec 2005, p104-106, 108, 109, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
6920
Abstract:
Pam Earp of Johnston County has been making cornhusk dolls for almost thirty years. Her dolls reflect the heritage of North Carolina through her creations of pioneer women, ladies of the Victorian Era, and country maidens. The dolls are popular in North Carolina and in many other Southern states. Earp discusses her work.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p132-134, 136-137, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7136
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North Carolina's governor's mansion in Raleigh was completed in 1891, but little money was given to creating a landscape. When Daniel G. Fowle, the first governor to occupy the mansion, visited the Biltmore Estate, George Vanderbilt asked him how the house was coming. Fowle replied that the grounds were hopeless. Vanderbilt then dispatched Gifford Pinchot to Raleigh to work on the gardens. Silcox-Jarrett traces the development of the mansion's landscaping from Pinchot's early work to the present.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p114-116, 118-119, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8496
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Fayetteville, county seat of Cumberland County, is a city rich in history and culture. Chartered in 1783, the city is the first one in America to be named for the Marquis de Lafayette and the only namesake city he ever visited. In the early days the city was the gateway to foreign ports, with passengers and trade goods leaving for ships at Wilmington by way of the Cape Fear River. European trade returned by the same route. Visitors to the town can find much to interest them, including the Fayetteville Transportation Museum, Cape Fear Botanical Garden, the Airborne & Special Operations Museum, and the Fayetteville Museum of Art. Fayetteville is the home of Fort Bragg, a large military base with about 47,000 military personnel on active duty.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 9, Feb 2007, p20-22, 24-25, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7935
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The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry has maintained and preserved a proud tradition of service for 213 years. It was commissioned in 1793, under the Militia Act passed the previous year in Washington's administration. The company has responded with active service to the nation's conflicts from the War of 1812 to World War I. Individual members have served in World War II and every conflict since then. It is recognized as the official state historic military command. The Fayetteville Light Infantry Armory and Museum's collection includes two centuries of well-preserved documents, uniforms, and artifacts, including the coach the Marquis de Lafayette rode in during his visit to his namesake city in 1825.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 2, July 2006, p84-86, 88, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4018
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Quakers in the Piedmont originated the first national Underground Railroad in the 1700s. This was a secret network of people and places set up to help slaves escaping to the North. It was not without danger for the Quakers, for anyone caught helping runaways could be punished.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 66 Issue 9, Feb 1999, p38,40,42-43, il, por Periodical Website
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