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44 results for "Sadler, W. J"
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Record #:
15745
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George Burrington was the 18th and 20th governor of North Carolina and had the unique distinction of being the proprietary and royal governor of the state. He was ousted from office on both occasions; however, he had his good qualities, especially in knowing the condition and needs of the colony better than any governor who had ruled before him and in supporting religious tolerance. His declining years were poverty stricken and his body was found in a London canal in 1759.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 6, July 1935, p6
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Record #:
15747
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Gabriel Johnston, royal governor of North Carolina, served the longest tenure of any governor--eighteen years. He followed the unpopular George Burrington and heartily welcomed by the colonists. During his time in office the population grew from 40,000 to over 90,000. However, like his predecessors, enforcing edicts of the Crown brought conflict with the citizenry.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 7, July 1935, p6
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Record #:
15739
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Edward Hyde was the first governor of the colony of North Carolina. His administration was one of the most disastrous the colonists had been called upon to endure in the New World. A revolt led by the former governor Thomas Cary and the Tuscarora Indian War filled his brief two year term with turmoil and violence.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 1, June 1935, p6
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Record #:
15743
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Sir Richard Everard was the 19th governor of colonial North Carolina, 1725-1731. Two major events marked his administration--the sale of the rights in the colony by seven of the eight Lords Proprietors to the King of England and the establishment of the North Carolina-Virginia boundary.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 5, June 1935, p6
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Record #:
15740
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Thomas Pollock, described as a \"man of wealth, ability, and influence,\" was the second governor of North Carolina. Among his principal accomplishments were the subjugation of hostile Indian tribes, restoration of religion freedom, and the laying out of the city of Beaufort.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 2, June 1935, p8
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Record #:
15744
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Charles Eden was Governor the North Carolina colony under the Lords Proprietors and the town of Edenton is named for him. His term in office is best remembered for the activities of pirates, especially Blackbeard.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 3, June 1935, p6
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Record #:
15750
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William Tryon was a professional soldier and governor of the North Carolina colony on the eve of the American Revolution. Almost immediately following his arrival, he had to deal with resistance to the Stamp Act, which was finally repealed to head off bloodshed. Later, citizens, known as Regulators, banded together in armed resistance to excessive taxation. Tryon led the troops that put them down in 1771. After six years of strife and turmoil, the King named him Governor of New York. Although citizens were glad to see him go, Tryon's lasting monument in the state was the magnificent Palace in New Bern, which served as a state house as well as a home for governors.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 9, July 1935, p8
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Record #:
15748
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Arthur Dobbs, colonial governor of North Carolina, was one of the colony's ablest chief executives. He served for eleven years, 1754-1765; however, hostilities with the Native Americans, internal problems, and being at odds with the state assembly for most of his term marred his administration. Worn out near the end of his tenure, he requested to be relieved and was succeeded by William Tryon.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 8, July 1935, p6
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Record #:
15761
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Richard Caswell was a militia officer and the first Governor of North Carolina to be elected by an independent legislature. He served during the Revolutionary period, and during his term many reforms in government were inaugurated, among them being the drafting of the state constitution on December 18, 1776 and the establishment of county and Superior courts.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 12, Aug 1935, p6
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Record #:
15811
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Richard Dobbs Spaight, a man of wealth, education, and a signer of the federal Constitution, served North Carolina well during his three one-year terms as Governor. A political campaign dispute between Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr., and John Stanly culminated in the summer of 1802, when the men fought the state's most famous duel in New Bern. Spaight was mortally wounded.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 18, Sept 1935, p6
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Record #:
15814
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Benjamin Williams, who succeeded Governor William R. Davie, was Governor of North Carolina for three years. During his term the State Supreme Court and State Medical Society were established. He also gave considerable attention to agriculture and public education.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 20, Oct 1935, p6
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Record #:
15831
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James Turner served three one-year terms as Governor of North Carolina. Although he had received a small amount of education as a youth, he championed a comprehensive system of education for the state. The Legislature, however, thought otherwise and his efforts were unsuccessful. He was a proponent of a better road system, but lacked of funds kept this from happening. During his term the first Governor's Mansion was erected.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 21, Oct 1935, p6
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Record #:
15853
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John Owen served two terms as North Carolina Governor and had a special interest in education and transportation. He urged river clearance of stumps and other obstructions for better navigation. He later served as chairman of the Whig National Convention in 1839. Delegates sought to nominate him for vice-president but he declined. Had he accepted he would have become President when William Henry Harrison died a few weeks after taking the oath of office.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 30, Dec 1935, p8
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Record #:
15855
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Edward Dudley of New Hanover County was the first North Carolina Governor to be elected by popular vote. Davie County was formed during his administration and Davidson College established. Like his predecessors he fought for public education and sent to the legislature proposals including the establishment of free schools in every county. Although the legislature was resistant, Dudley is given credit for doing more for public education than any previous governor.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 32, Jan 1936, p8
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Record #:
15852
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John Branch of Halifax County served three one-year terms as Governor. Like many of his predecessors he fought for education but received little support from the legislature. He had been a member of the NC House and Senate before becoming Governor and was later elected to Congress. He was Secretary of the Navy in President Jackson's administration and the last Governor of the Territory of Florida and the first acting Governor of the State of Florida.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 26, Nov 1935, p6
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