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36 results for "Milling, Marla Hardee"
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Record #:
8718
Abstract:
Milling describes two museums in Hickory and Newton that contain a wealth of art, history, and heritage. The museums are the Hickory Museum of Art in Hickory and the Catawba County Museum of History in Newton.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 10, Mar 2007, p184-186, 188, 190-191, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8768
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Panthertown Valley, covering six thousand acres in Jackson, Macon, and Transylvania Counties in western North Carolina, is an ecological treasure with rare plants and animals. The valley was damaged by heavy logging in the 1920s, and in the 1960s, under great pressure from developers who wanted to turn it into a resort and vacation area. Duke Power purchased it in 1987 to build a high-voltage transmission line. In 1989, the North Carolina Chapter of the Nature Conservancy paid Duke Power $8 million for the 6,000-acre tract. Today, through preservation efforts, the valley has regained its wild beauty.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p106-108, 110, 112, 114-115, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8790
Abstract:
Asheville Potter Karen Newgard transforms clay into elegant porcelain cups, bowls, pitchers, and platters. Newgard graduated from Louisiana State University with an art degree. Milling discusses technique and creations.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 11, Apr 2007, p216-218, 20, 222, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8879
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Milling discusses the artwork of Jeff Pittman, who lives in Fletcher in Henderson County. He grew up exposed to art. His father, Bob Pittman, is a highly regarded painter who lives in Greenville, and his mother Claire Pittman is a poet and history professor at East Carolina University. Besides his landscape paintings, Pittman has carved out a popular niche as a painter of city skylines and has painted skylines of Chicago, New York, Nashville, Charlotte, Raleigh, and Wilmington. Presently, he is concentrating his work on the state's mountains and the skyline and street scenes of downtown Asheville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 12, May 2007, p214-216, 218-219, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9477
Abstract:
Ramona Lossie is a sixth-generation Cherokee basket weaver, and her daughters are seventh-generation weavers. She learned the art of weaving from her mother and grandmother. Creating a basket can take as long as four months; this includes collecting the material and preparing it. Her baskets sell for up to $2,000, depending on the size and complexity, and increase in value through the years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 5, Oct 2007, p146-148, 150,, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9597
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Owen Theatre, a Classical-Revival style brick building on Mars Hills College campus, began life as the Pleasant Hill Baptist Church in the 1880s. Today it is on the National Register of Historic Places and is home to the Southern Appalachian repertory Theatre. Milling discusses the transformation from church to theatre.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 3, Aug 2007, p122-124, 126, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9606
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William Amherst Vanderbilt Cecil, Jr. and Diana Cecil Pickering, great-grandchildren of George Vanderbilt, the builder of Biltmore House and Estate, discuss growing up there and later becoming part of the family business that runs it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 6, Nov 2007, p72-74, 76, 78-79, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9613
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Grandfather Mountain, the highest peak in the Blue Ridge chain, has been in the Morton family for five generations. Milling discusses the family's stewardship of the mountain, which recently passed to Hugh M. Morton's grandson, Hugh M. Morton, III.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 6, Nov 2007, p138-140, 142, 144-145, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9627
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Built in 1923, the Dan'l Boone Inn restaurant was originally the home of Dr. Bingham, the town physician. Milling describes the restaurant and its offerings, which are served family style, and include such Southern classics as fried chicken and mashed potatoes.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 7, Dec 2007, p188-190, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9821
Abstract:
When World War I broke out in Europe in 1914, Kiffin Rockwell of Asheville and his brother Paul offered their services to France. After serving two years as an infantryman, Rockwell and six other Americans formed a fighter squadron called the Escadrille Lafayette. On May 18, 1916, he became the first American to shoot down an enemy plane. He was killed September 23, 1926 while engaging in his 142nd dogfight.
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Record #:
9885
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Sid and Debbie Gragg's hobby of collecting and growing daylilies has grown into a business at their Honeybees Paradise Gardens. Over 950 daylily varieties grow on their farm in Linville, with between 200 and 250 varieties available for purchase. The Graggs have also created seven varieties of lilies.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 11, Apr 2008, p100-102, 104-105, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
9912
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Opened to the public in 1892, Chimney Rock State Park is one of the state's oldest attractions and draws thousands of tourists and hikers from all over the country. Milling describes a visit there and things to do, including a visit to The Wicklow Inn, village shopping, and going to the top of the rock for the incredible 75-mile view.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 11, Apr 2008, p176-178, 180-181, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10132
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In this pictorial essay, Milling discusses the work of eight outstanding North Carolina photographers over the last seven decades.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 1, June 2008, p60-78, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
10701
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At one time general stores functioned as a community's hub. Townspeople gathered there to buy supplies and talk about anything in the town. These store have mostly disappeared from the landscape, being replaced by mass marketing and big-box retailers. Milling describes some that carry on the old general store tradition. They are Buchanan's Store Manson), Fred's General Mercantile (Beech Mountain), Ronnie's Country Store (Winston-Salem), N.C. Clampitt Hardware (Bryson City), Z.A.K.'S of Mallardtown USA (Trenton), and the Senior's Country Store (Welcome).
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 8, Jan 2009, p42-44, 46-48, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
22397
Abstract:
Roy Williams, coach of the University of North Carolina's basketball team, reminisces about his roots in Western North Carolina and as coach at North Carolina and Kansas.
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