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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for "Fischer, Suzanne"
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Record #:
3936
Author(s):
Abstract:
From 1894 to 1996, the Raleigh News and Observer was locally owned and run by the Daniels family. In 1997, Fred Crisp, who has worked for the paper since 1969, became the first non-Daniels to head the publication.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 11, Nov 1998, p8,10-11, por
Record #:
4333
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raleigh's Exploris Museum is the world's first global experience center. Instead of the traditional museum approach of collecting material then connecting it with visitors who just come and look, Exploris determined what experiences it wanted visitors to have, then collected materials to support them. Exploris encourages visitors to manipulate and interact with the exhibits through touch, sight, and sound.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 10, Oct 1999, p11, il
Record #:
4183
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Carolina Ballet closed a successful inaugural season in May 1999. Artistic director Robert Weiss has plans for an ambitious second season for the Research Triangle Metropolitan Area-based company. Ticket sales topped 5,000 FOR THE 1998-99 season, Weiss hopes to see subscribers grow to over 10,000 in the next three to five years.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 5, May 1999, p6, il
Record #:
4185
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's three major airports in Charlotte, Greensboro, and Raleigh- Durham are involved in massive expansion projects. At Raleigh-Durham a $400-to- $500-million project will expand parking to 16,000 spaces, reconstruct the terminals, and build a third runway. Greensboro is preparing for the arrival of Federal Express. Charlotte has proposed a fourth runway and a $90-million railroad- airport terminal.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 6, June 1999, p29-32, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
4408
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's Christmas tree farms produce 35 million trees, and the industry contributes $6.5 million to the state's economy. Even after the holidays are over, the trees can be used for constructing coastal shore fish habitats, building bird houses, and providing a source for wood chips.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 12, Dec 1999, p6, il
Record #:
4407
Author(s):
Abstract:
Education is a top priority in the state's business community. School activities in which companies and their employees are involved include mentoring, tutoring, and donating equipment. Educational contributions by companies including Neuvile, IBM, North Carolina Auto Dealers Association, Weyerhaeuser, and Nortel are profiled.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 12, Dec 1999, p24, 26, 28, 30-31, il
Record #:
4063
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state is rapidly becoming a mecca for retirees. Individuals will find a number of new communities and well-established ones to choose from. The southeast coast, southwest mountains, and northern piedmont are profiled in terms of housing options, costs, amenities, and quality of life, etc.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 1, Jan 1999, p12-19, il
Record #:
3982
Author(s):
Abstract:
Fundraising in the state's colleges and universities was high on 1998. Some schools, including Campbell University ($7 million), received the highest individual gifts in their history. Factors contributing to this include good town and gown relationships, an excellent overall economy, and larger and more effective fundraising staffs.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 56 Issue 12, Dec 1998, p24-30, il
Record #:
4127
Author(s):
Abstract:
Heritage tourism, or visiting an area for cultural enrichment, enables towns of any size to market their existing attributes. From tiny Milton, with 400 people, to Charlotte, with hundreds of thousands, each city has history and culture to showcase. Towns can offer such niche interests as flowers, dulcimer and banjo making, pottery, and glassblowing.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 4, Apr 1999, p14, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
4125
Author(s):
Abstract:
Heritage tourism, or visiting an area for cultural enrichment, is one of the fastest growing segments of the state's second largest industry, tourism. This kind of tourism is also receiving national and international attention. Among the cities that showcase their heritage are Hillsborough, Salisbury, and Spencer.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 4, Apr 1999, p12-17, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
4354
Author(s):
Abstract:
Each year Americans spend over $27 million of their own money on nontraditional medical treatments, including acupuncture, homeopathy, and chiropractic therapies. This trend has not been lost on health insurers. Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina was the first insurer in the state to develop a plan called Alt Med Blue. Several other state HMOs have since added an alt med component to their programs.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 11, Nov 1999, p12, 15-16, 20, 22, il
Record #:
3961
Author(s):
Abstract:
When a bypass caused the town of LaGrange in Wayne County almost to close up, retired general contractor and developer Conway Rose came to the rescue. Offering his services for free, he secured grants and donations to buy buildings. To date, thirteen in the downtown area have been purchased and are under renovation to attract new businesses.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 3, Mar 1999, p6, por
Record #:
4053
Author(s):
Abstract:
Architect Charles Gwathmey of New York is the designer of the new 42,000 square foot St. John's Museum of Art in Wilmington. A $4 million gift from the Bruce B. Cameron Foundation and an eight-acre site worth $2 million, donated by the Cameron children, made it possible. There is still $4.5 million to be raised. Completion date is set for the year 2000.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 57 Issue 2, Feb 1999, p6, il