NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


50 results for "Figart, Frances"
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 4
Next
Record #:
29756
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asheville Farm To Table Tours is a new form of agritourism operated by Ann D. Strauss. The tour takes visitors to various farms where they learn about farm life and mountain foodways. Some of the destinations include East Fork Farm, Spinning Spider Creamery, and The Farmer’s Hands.
Full Text:
Record #:
29678
Author(s):
Abstract:
Andy Cooper is an artist in Asheville, North Carolina who creates furniture and accessories from salvaged materials, such as reclaimed wood, metal and glass. Cooper describes his work as a combination of functional art and artful furnishings. Recently, Cooper joined the gallery and artist cooperative, Eco-Depot Marketplace.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
24012
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two conservancy groups, Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy and Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy joined together in 2014 to create a new recreational trail in Hickory nut Gorge.
Source:
Record #:
23998
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the mid-1990s, Asheville's air quality was in crisis mode as a result of pollution. The Clean Air Campaign was created to raise awareness and come up with ways to combat pollution, such as conserving energy and controlling emissions.
Record #:
23124
Author(s):
Abstract:
First formed in 1976, the Asheville GreenWorks is an Asheville-based organization that keeps the city clean, maintains the area's natural beauty, and promotes environmental awareness. The organization's latest program, GreenWorks Youth Environmental Leadership Program, provides internship opportunities for students ages 16-19. The students complete 110 hours of work and receive training in leadership and environmental conservation.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
29796
Author(s):
Abstract:
Homeland Park is a neighborhood of historic log cabins and an eclectic mix of residents in Asheville, North Carolina. Originally developed as a mountain resort in the 1930s, Homeland Park was renovated and transformed into a vibrant community.
Full Text:
Record #:
29846
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mountain Springs Cabins is a secluded get-away in Candler, North Carolina, where visitors receive a relaxed vacation in which both nature and nurture play leading roles. Deaf since childhood, Sara Peltier created and ran the cabin rental business for twenty-four years. Her daughter, Kate King, continues Peltier’s legacy and plans to expand the property by adding tree houses, dog accommodations, and recreation areas.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
36546
Author(s):
Abstract:
Offering a “hOMe” away from home is Oshun Mountain Sanctuary, a Queen Anne style mansion turned country inn style retreat center. The twenty-five room facility built in 1889 encouraged holistic well-being and connection with nature through activities such as lectures and lodging options of sanctuary rooms and country cottages. The nonprofit also promoted sustainability of its 41 forest acres through a partnership with Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy.
Record #:
36488
Author(s):
Abstract:
Freelance contractors and business owners feeling isolated from the community and other businesses prove interdependent is a better descriptor. Generating community as well as collaboration is Base Camp Asheville, offering entrepreneurs spaces for work and play. Proving that pleasure and business can co-exist is a 1920s building refurbished with modern office conveniences like high speed Internet, recreational areas like a ping pong table. Proving this principle also are profiles of companies such as Anthroware and local entrepreneurs such as David and Amanda Highley, co-owners of web coding company MyTownUSA.
Record #:
36551
Author(s):
Abstract:
At this nonprofit organization, those otherwise classified as living on the fringes of society can find themselves treated as part of the community. Services offered by BeLoved to help generate this perception include assistance with completing job applications; transitional housing for vulnerable populations; food access; children’s enrichment programs; supporting the Rise Up Studio artists collective; and collaborating in homeless rights projects and campaigns.
Record #:
36559
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite being labeled as organic and regarded as more profitable by large poultry producers, the author asserts slower growing chickens is the better breed. Benefits for standard bred heritage chickens: stronger skeletal structure, normal organ development, greater muscle mass and meat texture, and stronger immune systems. Benefits for farmers and consumers are genetic sustainability and better taste, respectively.
Record #:
27537
Author(s):
Abstract:
Christine Garvin was stricken with chronic illness, but used the challenge as a springboard into her inspirational Asheville business called Christine Garvin Dance+Transform. Garvin teaches dance and developed a signature program called Metamorphosis. This program takes participants on a self-healing journey using mind, body and soul techniques.
Full Text:
Record #:
29704
Author(s):
Abstract:
A considerable number of areas in the southern Appalachian Mountains rank at the very top nationally for their conservation value, and many of these fall within Western North Carolina’s Nantahala and Pisgah national forests. To determine the amount of protection afforded to these lands, ecologists use four factors to assess conservation importance.
Full Text:
Record #:
24129
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2005, World's Edge--a series of cliffs on the Southern Blue Ridge Escarpment--came under threat of unsustainable development. Over the past ten years, public, private, and governmental agencies funded an effort to purchase the lands for conservation and trail development, which added to recreational opportunities at Chimney Rock State Park.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
29840
Author(s):
Abstract:
Spruce Pine Artist Debra Carpenter began to use painting as a form of self-directed therapy to cope with the death of her son in 2002. Of all the paintings displayed in her home studio for the Toe River Arts Council Tour, two are not for sale. The Scream and The Healing both represent the beginning and the ending of her grief, which continues to find its expression in portrayals of whimsical nightmarish paintings.
Source:
Full Text: