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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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50 results for "Figart, Frances"
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Record #:
23124
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First formed in 1976, the Asheville GreenWorks is an Asheville-based organization that keeps the city clean, maintains the area's natural beauty, and promotes environmental awareness. The organization's latest program, GreenWorks Youth Environmental Leadership Program, provides internship opportunities for students ages 16-19. The students complete 110 hours of work and receive training in leadership and environmental conservation.
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23842
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Since 1982, the Gwynn Valley Camp in Brevard has served as a summer camp for children. Residential and day camps, as well as 4-H programs use the camp to teach children about the farm-to-table process by encouraging interaction with farm animals, planting seeds, and harvesting vegetables.
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Record #:
23998
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In the mid-1990s, Asheville's air quality was in crisis mode as a result of pollution. The Clean Air Campaign was created to raise awareness and come up with ways to combat pollution, such as conserving energy and controlling emissions.
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24006
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The author discusses growing canola in Western North Carolina as part of Field to Fryer to Fuel, a project that creates biofuel from locally-grown feedstock.
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24012
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Two conservancy groups, Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy and Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy joined together in 2014 to create a new recreational trail in Hickory nut Gorge.
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Record #:
24022
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In 2001, a bill was introduced to the North Carolina House of Representatives that would turn over Asheville's water system to Metropolitan Sewerage District, effectively taking decisions about water out of local's hands. Clean Water for North Carolina, a science-based advocacy non-profit organization is helping Asheville residents protect its water sources.
Record #:
24036
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In order to protect the Great Smokey Mountains, scientists take to the conservancy each year to study the species there. This effort began in 1997 when the All Taxa Biodiversity Inventory was launched. The focus of this program is to locate, study, describe, and catalog every living thing in the park.
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24028
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Land trusts work with willing landowners in their communities to ensure that critical places are protected forever. Western North Carolina is home to some of the largest sections of land trusts in the state.
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24080
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Southern Appalachian Wilderness Stewards is a non-profit organization made up of volunteers who build and maintain trails in National Forest wilderness areas. The organization fosters new generations of environmentalists and public land stewardship.
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24129
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In 2005, World's Edge--a series of cliffs on the Southern Blue Ridge Escarpment--came under threat of unsustainable development. Over the past ten years, public, private, and governmental agencies funded an effort to purchase the lands for conservation and trail development, which added to recreational opportunities at Chimney Rock State Park.
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Record #:
26921
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This article highlights four lesser known places to hike with your dog in western North Carolina. Each location description provides directions and trail lengths.
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Record #:
27323
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To improve the sustainability of its farming methods, residents of Asheville are exploring the uses of aquaponics. The technique combines aquaculture which is fish farming and hydroponics which is growing plants in water. Aquaponics is a method which uses nutrient-rich water provided by fish and their waste to help grow plants which then recycle the clean water back to the fish. Aquaponics uses 90 percent less water than traditional soil farming and prevents the damaging of soil and waterways.
Record #:
27533
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Mountains have played a formative role in Jack Douglas Stern’s life and art. Stern learned to paint while growing up in California, and has since painted mountain scenes throughout the western states. Stern and his family now reside in Tuckasegee, North Carolina, where he continues to capture the nature beauty of his rural surroundings in oils, watercolors and acrylics.
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Record #:
27535
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Local philanthropist Adelaide Key opened the Rathbun House to offer lodging in a supportive and home-like environment for patients and their families coming to Asheville for medical treatment. The hospitality house offers services free of charge and operates on donations and volunteers.
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Record #:
27537
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Christine Garvin was stricken with chronic illness, but used the challenge as a springboard into her inspirational Asheville business called Christine Garvin Dance+Transform. Garvin teaches dance and developed a signature program called Metamorphosis. This program takes participants on a self-healing journey using mind, body and soul techniques.
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