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128 results for "Earley, Lawrence S"
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Record #:
10025
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Down East is more water than land and stretches from Beaufort to Cedar Island. Earley describes a diverse collection of fishing boats and their builders that have plied these waters for almost a century.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 12, May 2008, p126-128, 130, 132, 134, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10406
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Inglis Fletcher is one of North Carolina's best-known novelists. Her ten historical novels deal with the Albemarle region during Colonial times. On April 14, 1961, Inglis Fletcher Day was celebrated in Edenton.
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Record #:
14896
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Thomas Lanier Clingman born in Huntsville became an eminent resident and well-respected scholar within the state. He attended University of North Carolina and upon graduation in 1832 held the distinction of being first in every class he had ever attended. He studied law independently under Mr. W. A. Graham of Hillsboro. In 1840 he was elected to the North Carolina Senate followed by appointment in 1843 to the U.S. Congress. He and Thomas Bragg became U.S. Senators in 1857 and served until the Civil War. Clingman earned a respectable war record and was wounded in several engagements. Beyond his civic career, Clingman studied geology and meteorology.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 18, Oct 1943, p4-5, il
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Record #:
17733
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During the era of wooden ships trade of naval stores was indispensable but fell off with the development of non-wooden hull types. A resurgence in the demand for tar increased in the mid-19th-century because of evolving field of petrochemicals. Throughout both periods the industry thrived in the state because of the density of long-leaf pine trees, a major source of resin for tar.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Oct 1992, p7-16, por
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Record #:
18747
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Unfortunately, it is a familiar site in rural North Carolina--the loss of the state's rural heritage is growing. Rural preservationists face the problem of vacant and decaying buildings and the loss of physical evidence of the state's former predominantly agricultural culture.
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Record #:
20318
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Long-hauling was once a major way of fishing in Core and Pamlico Sounds. A new book from photographer Lawrence S. Early puts on display the work of long-haul communities into the 20th century.
Record #:
20966
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Freshwater mussels are declining to the point of bring imperiled. Bridges and stream culverts have been implicated in their decline. A study conducted by the NC Museum of Natural Science and NC State University seeks to find a solution.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 11 Issue 3, Win 2003, p7-10, il, map
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Record #:
25093
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Fishing and work boats all have a history. This may be reflected in the name or in an oral history of the vessel. As years go by, the boats themselves, like the fishermen, have had to adapt to new changes.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2014, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
6042
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When publishing magnate and sportsman Joseph P. Knapp first came to Currituck in 1916, he began a love affair with the region. Earley describes how Knapp's love of hunting evolved into a need to conserve waterfowl. He helped form an organization which eventually became Ducks Unlimited, a leading conservation group. Since its founding in 1937, Ducks Unlimited has raised $134 million for waterfowl conservation. Almost $100 million has gone directly to wetland development.
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Record #:
6043
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John Lawson - Englishman, gentleman, and explorer - set forth in 1700 on a 59-day journey from Charleston, South Carolina, to Washington, North Carolina. He wasn't the first European to explore North Carolina, but he was, perhaps, the most observant. Lawson kept a journal in which he recorded the plants and animals he saw, the rivers he crossed, and the names and customs of Indian tribes he met. Journal excerpts are included.
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Record #:
9701
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Margaret Nygard and members of the Association for the Preservation of the Eno River Valley have been tireless workers against urban encroachment and unsound environmental policies. The 1,706-acre Eno State Park has been one of the Association's major accomplishments in their sixteen year fight to save the river.
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Record #:
9683
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Blanton Saunders, who lives around the Currituck Sound, has been a guide, decoy maker, skiff-builder, and chronicler of the old ways of living on the Outer Banks. Now 72, he looks back on a way of life that is disappearing.
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Record #:
9682
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Warblers either visit or nest in North Carolina. They are among the hardest birds to find and to identify because they are all the same size and come in a confusing array of colors and share similar field marks and songs.
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Record #:
6070
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Gunsmithing has a long history in North Carolina, dating back to the 18th and 19th centuries in Salem, Salisbury, and Jamestown. Richard Gatling and David \"Carbine\" Williams are among the famous gunsmiths in this ancient and demanding craft. Earley profiles three of the best in the 20th century: Hal Hartley of Lenoir; John Bivins, Jr., of Winston-Salem; and Joe Balickie of Apex.
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Record #:
6065
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Rising 5,100 feet in the Blue Ridge Mountains, Bluff Mountain, near West Jefferson, is a treasure chest of botanical riches. Forty-two rare, endangered animals and flowering plants, including the bog turtle, wood lily, and sundew, are found there. An unusual feature of the mountain is a highland plateau that contains the only fen in the southern Appalachians.
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