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128 results for "Earley, Lawrence S"
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Record #:
27393
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The Beaufort County Voice of America radio transmission site from the Cold War is now owned by the Wildlife Resources Commission (WRC) due to it being an outdated form of communication. The WRC is going to make this site into game land to protect the Henslow’s sparrow, a bird endangered in some states, as many live on the land already. The land will also be used for hunting.
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Record #:
25093
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Fishing and work boats all have a history. This may be reflected in the name or in an oral history of the vessel. As years go by, the boats themselves, like the fishermen, have had to adapt to new changes.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2014, p6-11, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
20318
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Long-hauling was once a major way of fishing in Core and Pamlico Sounds. A new book from photographer Lawrence S. Early puts on display the work of long-haul communities into the 20th century.
Record #:
19078
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Wilmington-based Cape Fear Riverwood Corp. recovers centuries-old logs from the bottom of the Cape Fear River. Loggers from the late 1700s to early 1900s floated them downriver. Many that sank along the route are rare old-growth cypress, loblolly pine and longleaf pine between 300 and 700 years old. Earley describes how the logs are found and then processed. Once cut, the wood is used in flooring, furniture, and house building.
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Record #:
13943
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The Jean Dale, a workboat in North Carolina's coastal waterways, was built in 1946 by Harkers Island boatbuilder Brady Lewis, with the assistance of Burgess Lewis. In 2000, after fifty-five years of service, the Lewis family donated the Jean Dale to the Core Sound Waterfowl Museum and Heritage Center on Harkers Island. After ten years of restoration work, the boat was unveiled to the public in September 2010.
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Record #:
13152
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The wall in the title refers to the area in North Carolina where the soft sedimentary rock of the Coastal Plain meets the hard crystalline rock of the Piedmont. Such a meeting causes river rapids, such as Smiley's Falls in the Cape Fear River. For merchants and farmers living upstream in the 19th-century, the rapids blocked commercial traffic and goods from getting to market. Earley describes North Carolina's effort to overcome the rapids and open the river to traffic.
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Record #:
9830
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At the turn of the century, fabulous quail hunting attracted wealthy northern sportsmen to North Carolina's Piedmont. Earley describes some of the elaborate hunting lodges they constructed.
Record #:
10025
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Down East is more water than land and stretches from Beaufort to Cedar Island. Earley describes a diverse collection of fishing boats and their builders that have plied these waters for almost a century.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 12, May 2008, p126-128, 130, 132, 134, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10151
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Earley describes a way of fishing along North Carolina's coasts that is slowly disappearing--long-haul net fishing. The technique is expensive and labor intensive and requires coordination among the boats involved. In the 1970s and 1980s, around a dozen long-haul crews worked Core Sound, but it 2007, the number has been reduced to two crews.
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Record #:
30893
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Workboats in the Core Sound region of North Carolina are linked to families, communities, local landscapes, and the types of fishing that the region offers. On March 1, 2008, a symposium and photographic exhibit celebrates the role and importance of the area’s historic workboats. The public event will present talks by Core Sound fishermen, historians, and writers on the cultural heritage of the area’s fishing vessels.
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Record #:
7498
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Savannas were once a common feature of the vast longleaf pine forests of the Southeast. These open, wildflower-strewn landscapes were much admired by early explorers and botanists. Their numbers are diminished today, and many have vanished altogether. Early discusses reasons for the savanna's decline and what is being done to restore and maintain existing ones. Among North Carolina's remaining savannas are the B. W. Wells Savanna (Pender County); Holly Shelter game Land (Pender County); Green Swamp Preserve (Brunswick County); and Boiling Spring Lakes Wetland Complex (Brunswick County).
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Record #:
6393
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In areas hit hard by storms, including Hurricane Hugo, the population of red-cockaded woodpeckers has declined. This is because the storms wreaked havoc on live, old trees, which the woodpeckers need to build their nest cavities. Now a simple nesting device developed by North Carolina Wildlife Commission non-game biologist David Allen is helping the population recover.
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Record #:
6587
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One North Carolina Naturally (ONCN), the new conservation program of the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, seeks to protect the state's diminishing open spaces. The plan is an attempt to focus nonprofit and government conservation efforts in three program areas: Green Lands, Blue Waters - protection of one million acres of land by 2010; Private Lands, Public Benefits - stewardship of natural resources on privately owned farms and forests; and Working on the Water - restoration of sounds and ocean habitats.
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Record #:
6910
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Freshwater mussels benefit the environment by cleaning water as they filter it for food particles. Because many of the mussels are classified as endangered, their presence in a particular location can cause trouble with plans for growth and development. Since 1999, one hundred and nine road projects were delayed in North Carolina while local ordinances, stormwater controls and other measures were put into place to safeguard the federally protected mussels. Early encourages smart planning to direct growth to where it will do the least harm to one of the most threatened natural resources in the state.
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Record #:
20966
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Freshwater mussels are declining to the point of bring imperiled. Bridges and stream culverts have been implicated in their decline. A study conducted by the NC Museum of Natural Science and NC State University seeks to find a solution.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 11 Issue 3, Win 2003, p7-10, il, map
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