Eastern North Carolina Digital Library

Authors

Waddell, Alfred M. (Alfred Moore), 1834-1912
Waddell, Alfred M. (Alfred Moore), 1834-1912
Waddell, Alfred M. (Alfred Moore), 1834-1912
Waddell, Alfred M. (Alfred Moore), 1834-1912
Some memories of my life
1908
Wadsworth, William B.
Walcott, Charles Folsom
Walcott, George
Wall, Mary Virginia
Wallace (N.C.)
Wallace Enterprise
Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-
Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-
Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-
Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-
Pamlico profile
1961
Author Bio
Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-
Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-
Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-
Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-
Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-
Warren, Lindsay C. (Lindsay Carter), 1889-1976
Washington (N.C.)
Washington, John
Lenoir County
1929
Author Bio
Watson, Alfred Augustin, bp., 1818-1905
Watson, Cyrus Barksdale
Watters, Fannny C.
Webster, Henry Kitchell, 1875-1932
Weekes, Robert Dodd, b. 1819
Weeks, Stephen B. (Stephen Beauregard), 1865-1918
Weeks, Stephen B. (Stephen Beauregard), 1865-1918
Weil, Lionel
Welch, William Lewis, 1840-1903
Wheeler, John H. (John Hill), 1806-1882
Wheeler, John H. (John Hill), 1806-1882
White, Julia S.
Whitham, Grace I.
Whittlesey, Sarah J. C. (Sarah Johnson Cogswell), 1825-1896
Wiley, C. H. (Calvin Henderson), 1819-1887
Williamson, Hugh, 1735-1819
Williamson, Hugh, 1735-1819
Wilmington Chamber of Commerce (N.C.)
Wilmington Chamber of Commerce (N.C.)
Wilson Chamber of Commerce (N.C.)
Wilson County (N.C.). Board of Education.
Wilson, John M. (John Moulder), 1837-1919
Wilson, William Thomas
Winborne, Benjamin B.
Winslow, Arthur, 1860-
Winslow, Ellen Goode Rawlings
Wood, John Elliott
Wood, L. C. (Lydia Cope), b. 1845
Wood, Thomas Fanning, 1841-1892
Woodbury, Augustus, 1825-1895
Ambrose Everett Burnside
1882
Woodward, Walter Carleton, 1878-1942
Woolson, Constance Fenimore, 1838-1894
Wooten, John L., 1924-2004
Worlock, Wilbur W.
Worthington, D.
Worthington, S. O. (Samuel Otis), 1898-
Worthy, Pauline Marion
Wright, Joshua G.
Wright, Robert Herring, 1870-1934
Author Bio for: Walcott, Charles Folsom

Charles F. Walcott was a Captain in the Twenty-First Massachusetts Regiment, Captain in the Twelfth Unattached Co. Massachusetts, and held the positions of Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel in the Sixty-First Massachusetts Volunteers. He was also a Brevet Brigadier General of the U.S.V. He resigned from service April 25, 1863. Walcott compiled the History of the Twenty-First Regiment.

Heather Anderson

History of the Twenty-First Regiment

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Author Bio for: Walcott, George

Charles F. Walcott was a Captain in the Twenty-First Massachusetts Regiment, Captain in the Twelfth Unattached Co. Massachusetts, and held the positions of Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel in the Sixty-First Massachusetts Volunteers. He was also a Brevet Brigadier General of the U.S.V. He resigned from service April 25, 1863. Walcott compiled the History of the Twenty-First Regiment.

Heather Anderson

History of the Twenty-First Regiment

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Author Bio for: Wall, Mary Virginia

Mary Virginia Wall, an author, was a native of Virginia. The Daughter of Virginia Dare is her only novel.

Leanne Smith

Source: Biographical Dictionary of Southern Authors

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Author Bio for: Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-

Charles Crossfield Ware (1 January 1886-1974) was born in Rowland, Kentucky, the son of Henry Nathan and Julia Ann Crossfield Ware. He was educated at Kentucky University College of the Bible. Ware was a minister in the United Disciples of Christ Church and served in a various pastorates around the United States. He edited the North Carolina Christian, and served as curator of the Carolina Discipliana Collection at Barton College. He wrote numerous monographs on the history of the Disciples of Christ.

Jesse Worley

MacLean, William Jerry. Barton College: Our Century. Wilson, N.C.: Barton College, 2002. Powell, William S., ed. North Carolina Lives: The Tarheel Who's Who. Hopkinsville, Ky.: Historical Record Association, 1962.

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Author Bio for: Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-

Charles Crossfield Ware (1 January 1886-1974) was born in Rowland, Kentucky, the son of Henry Nathan and Julia Ann Crossfield Ware. He was educated at Kentucky University College of the Bible. Ware was a minister in the United Disciples of Christ Church and served in a various pastorates around the United States. He edited the North Carolina Christian, and served as curator of the Carolina Discipliana Collection at Barton College. He wrote numerous monographs on the history of the Disciples of Christ.

Jesse Worley

MacLean, William Jerry. Barton College: Our Century. Wilson, N.C.: Barton College, 2002. Powell, William S., ed. North Carolina Lives: The Tarheel Who's Who. Hopkinsville, Ky.: Historical Record Association, 1962.

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Author Bio for: Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-

Charles Crossfield Ware (1 January 1886-1974) was born in Rowland, Kentucky, the son of Henry Nathan and Julia Ann Crossfield Ware. He was educated at Kentucky University College of the Bible. Ware was a minister in the United Disciples of Christ Church and served in a various pastorates around the United States. He edited the North Carolina Christian, and served as curator of the Carolina Discipliana Collection at Barton College. He wrote numerous monographs on the history of the Disciples of Christ.

Jesse Worley

MacLean, William Jerry. Barton College: Our Century. Wilson, N.C.: Barton College, 2002. Powell, William S., ed. North Carolina Lives: The Tarheel Who's Who. Hopkinsville, Ky.: Historical Record Association, 1962.

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Author Bio for: Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-

Charles Crossfield Ware (1 January 1886-1974) was born in Rowland, Kentucky, the son of Henry Nathan and Julia Ann Crossfield Ware. He was educated at Kentucky University College of the Bible. Ware was a minister in the United Disciples of Christ Church and served in a various pastorates around the United States. He edited the North Carolina Christian, and served as curator of the Carolina Discipliana Collection at Barton College. He wrote numerous monographs on the history of the Disciples of Christ.

Jesse Worley

MacLean, William Jerry. Barton College: Our Century. Wilson, N.C.: Barton College, 2002. Powell, William S., ed. North Carolina Lives: The Tarheel Who's Who. Hopkinsville, Ky.: Historical Record Association, 1962.

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Author Bio for: Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-

Charles Crossfield Ware (1 January 1886-1974) was born in Rowland, Kentucky, the son of Henry Nathan and Julia Ann Crossfield Ware. He was educated at Kentucky University College of the Bible. Ware was a minister in the United Disciples of Christ Church and served in a various pastorates around the United States. He edited the North Carolina Christian, and served as curator of the Carolina Discipliana Collection at Barton College. He wrote numerous monographs on the history of the Disciples of Christ.

Jesse Worley

MacLean, William Jerry. Barton College: Our Century. Wilson, N.C.: Barton College, 2002. Powell, William S., ed. North Carolina Lives: The Tarheel Who's Who. Hopkinsville, Ky.: Historical Record Association, 1962.

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Author Bio for: Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-

Charles Crossfield Ware (1 January 1886-1974) was born in Rowland, Kentucky, the son of Henry Nathan and Julia Ann Crossfield Ware. He was educated at Kentucky University College of the Bible. Ware was a minister in the United Disciples of Christ Church and served in a various pastorates around the United States. He edited the North Carolina Christian, and served as curator of the Carolina Discipliana Collection at Barton College. He wrote numerous monographs on the history of the Disciples of Christ.

Jesse Worley

MacLean, William Jerry. Barton College: Our Century. Wilson, N.C.: Barton College, 2002. Powell, William S., ed. North Carolina Lives: The Tarheel Who's Who. Hopkinsville, Ky.: Historical Record Association, 1962.

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Author Bio for: Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-

Charles Crossfield Ware (1 January 1886-1974) was born in Rowland, Kentucky, the son of Henry Nathan and Julia Ann Crossfield Ware. He was educated at Kentucky University College of the Bible. Ware was a minister in the United Disciples of Christ Church and served in a various pastorates around the United States. He edited the North Carolina Christian, and served as curator of the Carolina Discipliana Collection at Barton College. He wrote numerous monographs on the history of the Disciples of Christ.

Jesse Worley

MacLean, William Jerry. Barton College: Our Century. Wilson, N.C.: Barton College, 2002. Powell, William S., ed. North Carolina Lives: The Tarheel Who's Who. Hopkinsville, Ky.: Historical Record Association, 1962.

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Author Bio for: Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-

Charles Crossfield Ware (1 January 1886-1974) was born in Rowland, Kentucky, the son of Henry Nathan and Julia Ann Crossfield Ware. He was educated at Kentucky University College of the Bible. Ware was a minister in the United Disciples of Christ Church and served in a various pastorates around the United States. He edited the North Carolina Christian, and served as curator of the Carolina Discipliana Collection at Barton College. He wrote numerous monographs on the history of the Disciples of Christ.

Jesse Worley

MacLean, William Jerry. Barton College: Our Century. Wilson, N.C.: Barton College, 2002. Powell, William S., ed. North Carolina Lives: The Tarheel Who's Who. Hopkinsville, Ky.: Historical Record Association, 1962.

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Author Bio for: Ware, Charles Crossfield, 1886-

Thomas Jordan Latham (1797-1862) was born in Pantego, North Carolina. Latham was a minister in the Free Will Baptist Church. In 1841, Latham helped unite the fledgling Disciples of Church denomination with the Free Will Baptists of North Carolina. Latham would serve as the leader of the combined organization for a number of years. While also a minister, Latham served as the postmaster in Pantego and later Washington, North Carolina.

Jesse Worley

Hamlin, Charles Hunter. Ninety Bits of North Carolina Biography. New Bern, N.C.: Owen G. Dunn, 1946.

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Author Bio for: Warren, Lindsay C. (Lindsay Carter), 1889-1976

Lindsay Carter Warren was born December 16, 1889 in Washington, North Carolina, to Charles Frederic and Elizabeth Mutter Blount Warren. He was educated at Bingham School in Asheville and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he earned his law degree. Soon after being admitted to the bar in 1912, he became the Beaufort County attorney and then began his political career. He served as chairman of the Beaufort County Democratic Executive Committee and was elected to the state senate in 1919. In 1924, Warren was elected to the Sixty-Ninth Congress, and was reelected for seven terms. In 1940, Warren became head of the General Accounting Office. In 1954 Warren retired back to North Carolina where he supported causes in the state senate. Warren married Emily Diana Harris in 1916 and they had three children: Lindsay C., Jr., Charles Fredric, and Emily Carter Warren (Jones). Warren died December 28, 1976 and was buried in Oakdale Cemetery in Beaufort County.

Heather Anderson

Source: Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Vol. 6, 1991.

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Author Bio for: Washington, John

John Washington was a commissioner of Kinston in 1806 and 1809 and postmaster in 1823.

Heather Anderson

Sources: The North Carolina Register, 1823, 68; Laws of North Carolina, 1806, ch. 42; Laws of North Carolina, 1809, ch. 99.

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Author Bio for: Watson, Alfred Augustin, bp., 1818-1905

Alfred Augustin Watson was born August 21, 1818 in Brooklyn, New York, to Jesse and Hannah Watson. He was a graduate of New York University with a B.A. degree. He later studied law under Chancellor James Kent and was admitted to the bar in 1841. Watson gave up the practice of law to tutor the children of Josiah Collins in Washington County, N.C., on the Somerset Plantation. Although Watson's parents were Presbyterian, he became involved in the Episcopal faith of the plantation family he served. He entered the General Theological Seminary in New York City and was ordained in 1844. He came back to North Carolina and served several missions including Grace Church in Plymouth and St. Luke's in Washington County. In 1858 he accepted the invitation to become the priest at Christ Church in New Bern. At the beginning of the Civil War, he became the chaplain to the Second Regiment of Infantry, North Carolina State Troops. In 1863, he became the assistant bishop at St. James's Church in Wilmington. The war brought many hardships to the parish, but at the war's end, Watson and his parishioners were able to help the church make a full recovery. In 1884, Watson became the first bishop of the East Carolina Diocese. He died April 21, 1905 and is buried in Wilmington's Oakdale Cemetery. Watson was married three times. Two of his wives, and an infant preceded him in death.

Heather Anderson

Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Vol 6, 1991

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Author Bio for: Watson, Cyrus Barksdale

Clark, Walter McKenzie (19 Aug. 1846 - 20 May 1924), chief justice of the supreme court, was born at Prospect Hill plantation in Halifax County. His father was David Clark II, a wealthy planter and a brigadier general in the North Carolina militia during the Civil War. His mother was Anna Maria Thorne of Halifax County. Walter Clark spent most of his boyhood at Ventosa, his father's plantation on the Roanoke River. At eight years of age Clark went to Vine Hill Academy near Clarksville. In 1857 he attended Ridgeway School under the supervision of Professor William K. Bass, and in 1859 he studied with Professor Ralph H. Graves at Belmont School in Granville County. Clark entered Colonel C. C. Tew's Military Academy in Hillsborough in August 1860. In May of 1861 Clark was selected to drill the state's first group of recruits for the Civil War. He went with the Twenty-second North Carolina Regiment when it was sent to Virginia later that year. He joined Colonel Matt W. Ransom's Thirty-fifth North Carolina Regiment in August 1862 and served as adjutant and first lieutenant. Clark witnessed the Second Battle of Manassas and participated in the capture of Harper's Ferry and the battles of Sharpsburg and Fredricksburg. When his regiment returned to North Carolina in February 1863, Clark resigned his commission and continued his education at The University of North Carolina. He studied with President David L. Swain and Professor William H. Battle and graduated first in his class in June 1864. The day after commencement Clark was elected major of the Sixth Battalion, North Carolina Junior Reserves; he fought the next year within the state and became lieutenant colonel of the Seventieth Regiment. After the war Clark managed the family's plantation because his father was in poor health and he also supervised the Riverside plantation near New Bern, which his father had given him. In the late 1860s Clark supported industrialization for the South, advocated the importation of free white labor, and urged Southerners to get to work and forget the Lost Cause. He studied law on Wall Street in New York and at Columbian Law School in Washington, D.C., in 1866. In 1867 he received his license to practice law in Halifax County and opened his law office in Scotland Neck. The next year he was licensed to practice law before the supreme court. The University of North Carolina awarded the increasingly prosperous and prominent lawyer a M.A. in 1867. During the summer of 1871 Clark travelled widely in the American West. He lived briefly in Halifax in 1872 before moving to Raleigh in 1873. In the capital Clark practiced law, managed the Raleigh News, and served as a director and general counsel for the Raleigh and Gaston and the Raleigh and Augusta railroads. When he moved to Raleigh, Clark joined the Methodist church. His father and most of the Clark family were Episcopalians, but his mother had joined the Methodist church shortly before her marriage. As an active Methodist, Clark wrote about the church's history, spoke at Trinity College in 1880 on the philosophy of religion, and attended many church meetings. In 1881 he represented the Southern Methodist Episcopal Church at the Ecumenical Conference of Methodism at London. At that time he travelled extensively in Europe. He was a delegate to the church's General Conference at St. Louis in 1890 and at Memphis in 1894. Clark had a deep interest in North Carolina's history and laws. In 1882 he published Everybody's Book, Some Points in Law of Interest and Use to North Carolina Farmers, Merchants, and Business Men Generally. He compiled an annotated Code of Civil Procedure of North Carolina, which appeared in 1884 and became known as Clark's Code. He compiled and edited the State Records of North Carolina (16 vols., 1886-97). Clark also edited the Histories of the Several Regiments and Battalions from North Carolina, in the Great War 1861-1865 (5 vols., 1901). He annotated over one hundred volumes of North Carolina Reports of the state supreme court. In April 1885, Governor Alfred M. Scales appointed Clark a judge of the superior courts; he was elected to the post in November 1886. Three years later Governor Daniel G. Fowle named Clark an associate justice of the supreme court. The following year Clark won election to the unexpired term. In 1894 he was nominated by the Democratic party and endorsed by both the Populist and Republican parties for a full term on the supreme court. He won unanimously. In 1896 he refused the Democratic nomination for governor and chose to remain on the bench. In the same year, Clark, a supporter of free silver, received fifty votes for vice-president at the Democratic national convention. For several years around the turn of the century, Clark was embroiled in many controversies. He attacked the American Tobacco Company for violating the Sherman antitrust law and argued that it unfairly destroyed competitors and mistreated farmers. He exposed the evils of the state's powerful railroads, the Southern, the Atlantic Coast Line, and the Seaboard. Clark charged that they issued illegal passes, set exorbitant rates, received unfair tax valuations, lobbied in the legislature, and interfered in state politics. In dissenting opinions, speeches, articles, and fetters, Clark criticized the control over government exercised by banks, trusts, and railroads. In addition, he advocated many social reforms: postal savings banks, one-cent letter postage, popular election of senators, election of postmasters, an income tax, and woman suffrage. A.L. Brooks and Hugh T. Lefler called Clark "probably the most outspoken man in North Carolina or the South in advocating economic and social reforms." Clark also enthusiastically supported the Spanish-American war. In 1897-98 Clark, a member of Trinity College's board of trustees since 1889, clashed with President John C. Kilgo of Trinity. Part of the controversy resulted from Clark's opposition to Kilgo's proposal to elect faculty members for four-year terms. A larger issue involved Kilgo's close relationship with the Dukes and the tobacco trust, which Clark strongly opposed. The two men also differed regarding state aid to higher education, because Kilgo joined the forces opposing state aid to The University of North Carolina while Clark supported The University of North Carolina. In the end Kilgo won the battle and Clark resigned from the board of trustees. In 1902 Walter Clark sought the Democratic nomination for chief justice of the supreme court. The railroads, the American Tobacco Company, and most of the state's newspapers opposed Clark's candidacy. His strongest supporter was Josephus Daniels and the Raleigh News and Observer. After a bitter fight and a stirring nominating speech by Claude Kitchin, Clark won the Democratic convention's nomination. He was elected and later reelected to two additional terms. Clark served on the supreme court for thirty-five years and wrote 3,235 opinions. He made the court work efficiently, orderly, and promptly and was prominent in advocating the construction of a new building for the court. In 1912 Clark fought three of the state's most powerful figures for the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate: Governor W. W. Kitchin, former governor Charles B. Aycock, and incumbent Senator Furnifold M. Simmons. Candidate Clark advocated destruction of the trusts, popular election of senators and federal judges, a tariff for revenue only, initiative, referendum, recall (except for judges), child labor laws, more public schools, extension of good roads, and the operation of telephone and telegraph by the post office department. After the death of Aycock, Simmons aimed his campaign against Clark because Kitchin posed little threat. Simmons won easily and Clark received only about ten percent of the vote. After his defeat Clark continued to battle for "socialized democracy" in his many opinions, articles, addresses, and letters. He was a forceful supporter of woman's suffrage and served as legal adviser to the North Carolina League of Women Voters. He defended labor's right to organize and favored workmen's compensation laws and the eight hour day. He called for the abolition of the poll tax and an end to lynchings. Clark approved municipal ownership of utilities and advocated nationalization of coal mines, oil reserves, and water power sites. Appointed by President Wilson, Clark served as an umpire for the National War Labor Board in 1917-18. Clark was president of the North Carolina State Literary and Historical Association in 1902. For many years he was chairman of the judiciary committee of the North Carolina Grand Lodge of Masons. Clark led the efforts to have the two dates, 20 May 1775 and 12 Apr.1776, placed on the state flag and to have the state adopt as its motto, Esse Quam Videri. Clark was married on 27 Jan. 1875 to Susan Washington Graham, daughter of William A. Graham, governor of North Carolina, U.S. Senator, and secretary of the navy. Their children were Susan, David, John Washington, Graham McKenzie, Walter, Thorne McKenzie, and Eugenia. Clark was buried in Raleigh. His portrait hangs in the Supreme Court Building and his papers are in the state archives. SEE: Aubrey Lee Brooks, Walter Clark, Fighting Judge (1944); Aubrey Lee Brooks and Hugh T. Lefler, eds., The Papers of Walter Clark, 2 vols. (1948, 1950).

David Clark - Charles W. Eagles

From DICTIONARY OF NORTH CAROLINA BIOGRAPHY, Volume 1, edited by William S. Powell. Copyright (c) 1991 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher.

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Author Bio for: Weekes, Robert Dodd, b. 1819

Weeks, Stephen Beauregard (2 Feb. 1865-3 May 1918), historian, bibliographer, collector of North Caroliniana, and government official, was born near Nixonton, Pasquotank County, to James Elliott and Mary Louisa Mullen Weeks. On the death of his parents, the child was reared by his father's sister and her husband, Robertson Jackson. After attending the Horner School at Henderson, Weeks entered The University of North Carolina, where he was graduated with second highest honors in 1886. He remained there, earning a master's degree the next year and in 1888 receiving the first doctor of philosophy degree ever given by the Department of English. That fall he entered Johns Hopkins University, where he came under the influence of Herbert Baxter Adams, America's foremost exponent of the German or "scientific" school of historical investigation. In 1891, after receiving his second doctoral degree, Weeks joined the faculty of Trinity College in Randolph County. Within the year he organized the Department of History and Political Science, founded the Trinity College Historical Society, and established himself as the first "professional" historian in North Carolina. He moved with the college to Durham, but in 1893 he resigned and returned to Johns Hopkins on a one-year fellowship. The following year Weeks joined the Bureau of Education of the Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C., as a specialist in educational history and associate editor of the bureau's annual report. For five years this position provided him with time for historical research and his consuming passion, the collection of books and articles relating to North Carolina. In 1895 he delivered the centennial address at The University of North Carolina, and in 1896 he was temporary chairman of the organizational meeting of the Southern History Association. Just before the turn of the century, Weeks developed a severe lung ailment, and his request for assignment as principal teacher in the Indian School at Santa Fe, New Mexico Territory, was granted. Four years later he was promoted to the superintendency of the San Carlos Agency School in Arizona Territory, where he remained until 1907, by which time his health had been restored. Impressed by Weeks's sketches written for inclusion in Samuel A. Ashe's Biographical History of North Carolina, the publisher Charles L. Van Noppen persuaded Weeks to join his firm as an editor, assisting with the seventh volume of the biographical series and revising the first volume of Ashe's History of North Carolina. Then, in 1909, Weeks returned to the site of the old Trinity College in Randolph County as principal teacher in a public school. He rejoined the Bureau of Education in Washington as historian in 1911 and remained there until his death. Weeks distinguished himself in four ways : he was the first professionally trained historian in North Carolina to earn his living from his speciality, he wrote prolifically - more than two hundred books and articles - on a variety of historical subjects, he was the state's first important bibliographer, and he amassed the finest collection of published North Caroliniana then in existence. His bibliography of North Caroliniana, published as Number 48 of Justin Winsor's Bibliographical Contributions (1895), listed 1,491 titles, 863 of which Weeks already possessed. By 1913 his collection had grown to 7,100 volumes. After his death the approximately 9,000 books and pamphlets in the Weeks Collection of North Caroliniana were purchased by The University of North Carolina to form the nucleus of its North Carolina Collection. Though Weeks's monographs and articles were generally sound, not all of his early writings - for instance, his article on the Robeson County Indians - have stood the test of time. However, he himself recognized that "Historical truth is a progressive evolution, the product of successive generations of painstaking scholars....It is only by continued research, by repeated investigation and reweighing of old beliefs in the light of fuller evidence that we can hope to arrive at ultimate truth." His single most useful publication was the monumental four-volume index to the combined Colonial Records of North Carolina, edited by William L. Saunders, and State Records of North Carolina, edited by Walter Clark, to which was added an exceedingly informative "Historical Review." Among his publications on non-North Carolina subjects were History of Public School Education in Alabama (1915) and History of Public School Education in Arizona (1918). Weeks on 12 June 1888 married Mary Lee Martin, the daughter of the Reverend Joseph Bonaparte Martin, and they had two children, only one of whom - Robertson Jackson Weeks - lived to adulthood. On 28 June 1893, two years after her death, Weeks married Sallie Mangum Leach, a daughter of Martin W. Leach of Randolph County and a granddaughter of Senator Willie P. Mangum. By her he fathered four children, two of whom - W1llie Person Mangum and Sallie Preston - lived to adulthood. A man of medium build - about 5'11" and 170 pounds - Weeks had wavy brown hair, blue eyes, and a somewhat ruddy complexion. He had a mustache and a Vandyke beard, and he often wore a high collar with a plain white bow tie. He was "an erect, rapid walker, a good though not scintillating public speaker, and a provocative conversationalist." Although he recovered sufficiently from a mild stroke in 1917 to return to work, Weeks died the following year from a heart and kidney complication and was buried on the Willie Person Mangum farm cemetery in northern Durham County. The News and Observer editorialized: "His career ought to be given liberal mention in every history of the State....It is likely that Dr. Weeks died a poor man. There is little reward of a financial kind in ransacking old libraries and musty correspondence files to establish the facts of history. But few men have wrought more capably and helpfully for the State than he did and the heritage of duty faithfully and efficiently rendered is more to be prized than great riches." SEE: Samuel A. Ashe, ed., Biographical History of North Carolina, vol. 5 (1906); DAB, vol. 10 (1936); H. G. Jones, "Stephen Beauregard Weeks : North Carolina's First 'Professional' Historian," North Carolina Historical Review 42 (1965); William S. Powell, Stephen Beauregard Weeks, 1865- 1918 : A Preliminary Bibliography (1965); Raleigh News and Observer, 4 May 1918; Who's Who in America (1916-17). Many of Weeks's papers are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; his library and an oil portrait by Paul E. Menzel are in the university's North Carolina Collection.

H. G. Jones

From DICTIONARY OF NORTH CAROLINA BIOGRAPHY, Volume 6, edited by William S. Powell. Copyright (c) 1991 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher.

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Author Bio for: Weeks, Stephen B. (Stephen Beauregard), 1865-1918

Weeks, Stephen Beauregard (2 Feb. 1865-3 May 1918), historian, bibliographer, collector of North Caroliniana, and government official, was born near Nixonton, Pasquotank County, to James Elliott and Mary Louisa Mullen Weeks. On the death of his parents, the child was reared by his father's sister and her husband, Robertson Jackson. After attending the Horner School at Henderson, Weeks entered The University of North Carolina, where he was graduated with second highest honors in 1886. He remained there, earning a master's degree the next year and in 1888 receiving the first doctor of philosophy degree ever given by the Department of English. That fall he entered Johns Hopkins University, where he came under the influence of Herbert Baxter Adams, America's foremost exponent of the German or "scientific" school of historical investigation. In 1891, after receiving his second doctoral degree, Weeks joined the faculty of Trinity College in Randolph County. Within the year he organized the Department of History and Political Science, founded the Trinity College Historical Society, and established himself as the first "professional" historian in North Carolina. He moved with the college to Durham, but in 1893 he resigned and returned to Johns Hopkins on a one-year fellowship. The following year Weeks joined the Bureau of Education of the Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C., as a specialist in educational history and associate editor of the bureau's annual report. For five years this position provided him with time for historical research and his consuming passion, the collection of books and articles relating to North Carolina. In 1895 he delivered the centennial address at The University of North Carolina, and in 1896 he was temporary chairman of the organizational meeting of the Southern History Association. Just before the turn of the century, Weeks developed a severe lung ailment, and his request for assignment as principal teacher in the Indian School at Santa Fe, New Mexico Territory, was granted. Four years later he was promoted to the superintendency of the San Carlos Agency School in Arizona Territory, where he remained until 1907, by which time his health had been restored. Impressed by Weeks's sketches written for inclusion in Samuel A. Ashe's Biographical History of North Carolina, the publisher Charles L. Van Noppen persuaded Weeks to join his firm as an editor, assisting with the seventh volume of the biographical series and revising the first volume of Ashe's History of North Carolina. Then, in 1909, Weeks returned to the site of the old Trinity College in Randolph County as principal teacher in a public school. He rejoined the Bureau of Education in Washington as historian in 1911 and remained there until his death. Weeks distinguished himself in four ways : he was the first professionally trained historian in North Carolina to earn his living from his speciality, he wrote prolifically - more than two hundred books and articles - on a variety of historical subjects, he was the state's first important bibliographer, and he amassed the finest collection of published North Caroliniana then in existence. His bibliography of North Caroliniana, published as Number 48 of Justin Winsor's Bibliographical Contributions (1895), listed 1,491 titles, 863 of which Weeks already possessed. By 1913 his collection had grown to 7,100 volumes. After his death the approximately 9,000 books and pamphlets in the Weeks Collection of North Caroliniana were purchased by The University of North Carolina to form the nucleus of its North Carolina Collection. Though Weeks's monographs and articles were generally sound, not all of his early writings - for instance, his article on the Robeson County Indians - have stood the test of time. However, he himself recognized that "Historical truth is a progressive evolution, the product of successive generations of painstaking scholars....It is only by continued research, by repeated investigation and reweighing of old beliefs in the light of fuller evidence that we can hope to arrive at ultimate truth." His single most useful publication was the monumental four-volume index to the combined Colonial Records of North Carolina, edited by William L. Saunders, and State Records of North Carolina, edited by Walter Clark, to which was added an exceedingly informative "Historical Review." Among his publications on non-North Carolina subjects were History of Public School Education in Alabama (1915) and History of Public School Education in Arizona (1918). Weeks on 12 June 1888 married Mary Lee Martin, the daughter of the Reverend Joseph Bonaparte Martin, and they had two children, only one of whom - Robertson Jackson Weeks - lived to adulthood. On 28 June 1893, two years after her death, Weeks married Sallie Mangum Leach, a daughter of Martin W. Leach of Randolph County and a granddaughter of Senator Willie P. Mangum. By her he fathered four children, two of whom - W1llie Person Mangum and Sallie Preston - lived to adulthood. A man of medium build - about 5'11" and 170 pounds - Weeks had wavy brown hair, blue eyes, and a somewhat ruddy complexion. He had a mustache and a Vandyke beard, and he often wore a high collar with a plain white bow tie. He was "an erect, rapid walker, a good though not scintillating public speaker, and a provocative conversationalist." Although he recovered sufficiently from a mild stroke in 1917 to return to work, Weeks died the following year from a heart and kidney complication and was buried on the Willie Person Mangum farm cemetery in northern Durham County. The News and Observer editorialized: "His career ought to be given liberal mention in every history of the State....It is likely that Dr. Weeks died a poor man. There is little reward of a financial kind in ransacking old libraries and musty correspondence files to establish the facts of history. But few men have wrought more capably and helpfully for the State than he did and the heritage of duty faithfully and efficiently rendered is more to be prized than great riches." SEE: Samuel A. Ashe, ed., Biographical History of North Carolina, vol. 5 (1906); DAB, vol. 10 (1936); H. G. Jones, "Stephen Beauregard Weeks : North Carolina's First 'Professional' Historian," North Carolina Historical Review 42 (1965); William S. Powell, Stephen Beauregard Weeks, 1865- 1918 : A Preliminary Bibliography (1965); Raleigh News and Observer, 4 May 1918; Who's Who in America (1916-17). Many of Weeks's papers are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; his library and an oil portrait by Paul E. Menzel are in the university's North Carolina Collection.

H. G. Jones

From DICTIONARY OF NORTH CAROLINA BIOGRAPHY, Volume 6, edited by William S. Powell. Copyright (c) 1991 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher.

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Author Bio for: Weeks, Stephen B. (Stephen Beauregard), 1865-1918

Weeks, Stephen Beauregard (2 Feb. 1865-3 May 1918), historian, bibliographer, collector of North Caroliniana, and government official, was born near Nixonton, Pasquotank County, to James Elliott and Mary Louisa Mullen Weeks. On the death of his parents, the child was reared by his father's sister and her husband, Robertson Jackson. After attending the Horner School at Henderson, Weeks entered The University of North Carolina, where he was graduated with second highest honors in 1886. He remained there, earning a master's degree the next year and in 1888 receiving the first doctor of philosophy degree ever given by the Department of English. That fall he entered Johns Hopkins University, where he came under the influence of Herbert Baxter Adams, America's foremost exponent of the German or "scientific" school of historical investigation. In 1891, after receiving his second doctoral degree, Weeks joined the faculty of Trinity College in Randolph County. Within the year he organized the Department of History and Political Science, founded the Trinity College Historical Society, and established himself as the first "professional" historian in North Carolina. He moved with the college to Durham, but in 1893 he resigned and returned to Johns Hopkins on a one-year fellowship. The following year Weeks joined the Bureau of Education of the Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C., as a specialist in educational history and associate editor of the bureau's annual report. For five years this position provided him with time for historical research and his consuming passion, the collection of books and articles relating to North Carolina. In 1895 he delivered the centennial address at The University of North Carolina, and in 1896 he was temporary chairman of the organizational meeting of the Southern History Association. Just before the turn of the century, Weeks developed a severe lung ailment, and his request for assignment as principal teacher in the Indian School at Santa Fe, New Mexico Territory, was granted. Four years later he was promoted to the superintendency of the San Carlos Agency School in Arizona Territory, where he remained until 1907, by which time his health had been restored. Impressed by Weeks's sketches written for inclusion in Samuel A. Ashe's Biographical History of North Carolina, the publisher Charles L. Van Noppen persuaded Weeks to join his firm as an editor, assisting with the seventh volume of the biographical series and revising the first volume of Ashe's History of North Carolina. Then, in 1909, Weeks returned to the site of the old Trinity College in Randolph County as principal teacher in a public school. He rejoined the Bureau of Education in Washington as historian in 1911 and remained there until his death. Weeks distinguished himself in four ways : he was the first professionally trained historian in North Carolina to earn his living from his speciality, he wrote prolifically - more than two hundred books and articles - on a variety of historical subjects, he was the state's first important bibliographer, and he amassed the finest collection of published North Caroliniana then in existence. His bibliography of North Caroliniana, published as Number 48 of Justin Winsor's Bibliographical Contributions (1895), listed 1,491 titles, 863 of which Weeks already possessed. By 1913 his collection had grown to 7,100 volumes. After his death the approximately 9,000 books and pamphlets in the Weeks Collection of North Caroliniana were purchased by The University of North Carolina to form the nucleus of its North Carolina Collection. Though Weeks's monographs and articles were generally sound, not all of his early writings - for instance, his article on the Robeson County Indians - have stood the test of time. However, he himself recognized that "Historical truth is a progressive evolution, the product of successive generations of painstaking scholars....It is only by continued research, by repeated investigation and reweighing of old beliefs in the light of fuller evidence that we can hope to arrive at ultimate truth." His single most useful publication was the monumental four-volume index to the combined Colonial Records of North Carolina, edited by William L. Saunders, and State Records of North Carolina, edited by Walter Clark, to which was added an exceedingly informative "Historical Review." Among his publications on non-North Carolina subjects were History of Public School Education in Alabama (1915) and History of Public School Education in Arizona (1918). Weeks on 12 June 1888 married Mary Lee Martin, the daughter of the Reverend Joseph Bonaparte Martin, and they had two children, only one of whom - Robertson Jackson Weeks - lived to adulthood. On 28 June 1893, two years after her death, Weeks married Sallie Mangum Leach, a daughter of Martin W. Leach of Randolph County and a granddaughter of Senator Willie P. Mangum. By her he fathered four children, two of whom - W1llie Person Mangum and Sallie Preston - lived to adulthood. A man of medium build - about 5'11" and 170 pounds - Weeks had wavy brown hair, blue eyes, and a somewhat ruddy complexion. He had a mustache and a Vandyke beard, and he often wore a high collar with a plain white bow tie. He was "an erect, rapid walker, a good though not scintillating public speaker, and a provocative conversationalist." Although he recovered sufficiently from a mild stroke in 1917 to return to work, Weeks died the following year from a heart and kidney complication and was buried on the Willie Person Mangum farm cemetery in northern Durham County. The News and Observer editorialized: "His career ought to be given liberal mention in every history of the State....It is likely that Dr. Weeks died a poor man. There is little reward of a financial kind in ransacking old libraries and musty correspondence files to establish the facts of history. But few men have wrought more capably and helpfully for the State than he did and the heritage of duty faithfully and efficiently rendered is more to be prized than great riches." SEE: Samuel A. Ashe, ed., Biographical History of North Carolina, vol. 5 (1906); DAB, vol. 10 (1936); H. G. Jones, "Stephen Beauregard Weeks : North Carolina's First 'Professional' Historian," North Carolina Historical Review 42 (1965); William S. Powell, Stephen Beauregard Weeks, 1865- 1918 : A Preliminary Bibliography (1965); Raleigh News and Observer, 4 May 1918; Who's Who in America (1916-17). Many of Weeks's papers are in the Southern Historical Collection, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; his library and an oil portrait by Paul E. Menzel are in the university's North Carolina Collection.

H. G. Jones

From DICTIONARY OF NORTH CAROLINA BIOGRAPHY, Volume 6, edited by William S. Powell. Copyright (c) 1991 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher.

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Author Bio for: Weil, Lionel

Lionel Weil (1877-1948) was born in Goldsboro, the son of Solomon and Sarah Einstein Weil. In 1897, Weil received a Ph.D. in Geology from the University of North Carolina. Interested in further study in the field of chemistry, he was instead persuaded by his father to work in the family firm of H. Weil and Bros. in Goldsboro. Weil married Ruth Kaufmann Heyn in 1910; they had three children before her death in 1941. While employed as a partner in his father's business, Weil served Goldsboro as a city alderman from 1904 to 1923, chairman of the Zoning and Planning Committee, and secretary of the City Charter Committee in 1917. While civically active, he also wrote numerous monographs and pamphlets on city government and agricultural techniques. In addition to his government positions, Weil worked hard to support North Carolina's Jewish community. He served as treasurer of the Oheb Sholom congregation in 1917 and as president of the North Carolina Jewish Relief Committee from 1918 to 1922. In his later life, Weil was heavily involved in conservation and education in North Carolina. He personally donated the original land for the Cliffs of the Neuse State Park and was a charter member of the Friends of the Library at the University of North Carolina.

Christopher Bingham

Powell, William S., ed. Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Volume 6:T-Z. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1996

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Author Bio for: White, Julia S.

Julia Scott White was the youngest child of Jeptha and Ann M. White of Belvidere, N.C. She was born June 4, 1866. She attended Belvidere Academy as a child and later studied at Westtown Boarding School (Westtown, Pa.) where she graduated in 1885. She became a teacher in 1887 at the institution rechartered in 1888 as Guilford College. Julia White served as a governess and teacher for the school while completing her own college degree at Guilford in 1891. She left Guilford for several years for further study at Bryn Mawr College, two years teaching in Kentucky, and four years teaching at the newly-founded Pacfic College (a Quaker college now known as George Fox University). She left Pacific College in 1901 to become the librarian at Guilford College. She remained librarian until her death on August 20, 1923. While librarian she also served as the Custodian of the Records, caring for the documents of North Carolina Quakers. Her work with these records led to her published writings on the history of various Quaker meetings. A life long member of the Society of Friends, she was highly regarded in the Quaker community and recorded as a minister in 1908.

Gwen Gosney Erickson [FHC]

Source: Friends Historical Collection, Guilford College

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Author Bio for: Whitham, Grace I.

Grace I Whitham's historical fiction novels for children include the following: Basil the Page: A Story of the Days of Queen Elizabeth (1900s); The Last of the White Coats: A Story of Cavaliers and Roundheads (1905); Sir Sleep-Awake and his Brother: A Story of the Crusades (1908); His Majesty's Glove: A Story of the Great Rebellion (1909); The Red Knight. A Tale of the Days of King Edward III (1911); The Lord of Marney. A Tale of the Days of St. Louis of France (1912); The King's Knight. A Tale of the Days of King Edward III (1914); The Shepherd of the Ocean, and Other Tales of Valour (1914); "Mr. Manley" (1918); St. John of Honeylea (1919); The Guarded Room (1921); Marjorie Conyers (1921); As I Hear Tell (1924); Sarah's Husband (1929); Dick Chester (1937); and The General's Diary (1937).

Leanne Smith

World Cat

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Author Bio for: Whittlesey, Sarah J. C. (Sarah Johnson Cogswell), 1825-1896

Sarah Johnson Cogswell Whittlesey (24 Aug. 1824-14 Feb. 1896) was born in Williamston, the oldest child of Luman and Elizabeth G. Peale Whittlesey. She was graduated in 1841 from LaVallee Female Seminary in Halifax County and the next year married Henry A. Smith. She left her husband four years later. In 1850 they were divorced, and she took her maiden name. Whittlesey's first attempt at writing was in 1846, but she did not come into her own until she was living with her parents again several years later. The most influential of her works is entitled Bertha the Beauty: A Story of the Southern Revolution, an autobiographical novel published in 1872.

Katherine Moore

North Carolina Fiction, 1734-1957: An Annotated Bibliography (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Library, 1958). Powell, William S. Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Vol. 6, T-Z. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1996

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Author Bio for: Wiley, C. H. (Calvin Henderson), 1819-1887

Calvin Henderson Wiley was born on February 3, 1819 in Guilford County to David L. and Anne Woodburn Wiley. He was educated at the Caldwell Institution and the University of North Carolina where he graduated in 1840. He was admitted to the bar in 1841 and settled in Oxford where he edited the Oxford Mercury. He gave up his law practice and returned to Guilford County to help his family and to work on his novel Alamance. His other novels include Roanoke, or Where is Utopia?; Adventures of Old Dan Tucker, and His Son Walter: A Tale of North Carolina; and Life in the South. Although he continued to write, he became interested in public education and politics. He represented Guilford County in the North Carolina House of Commons in 1850 and 1852 and served as state superintendent of the common schools from January 1, 1853 until April 26, 1865 after the surrender of the Confederacy. During his time as superintendent, Wiley helped create common schools and improve education throughout North Carolina. He is the founder of the Common School Journal later known as North Carolina Education and is also credited with establishing examining boards and annual certifications for teachers. On February 25, 1862, at the age of forty-three, Wiley married Mittie Towles of Raleigh, and from this marriage seven children were born. Wiley died at his home in Salem, January 11, 1887.

Heather Anderson

Sources: Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Vol. 6, 1991; North Carolina Government, 1585-1979.

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Author Bio for: Williamson, Hugh, 1735-1819

Hugh Williamson (5 Dec.1735-22 May 1819) was an educator, merchant, scientist, physician, writer, and politician. He was born and raised in Pennsylvania, where he matriculated at the College of Pennsylvania and later served as a teacher. After a brief career in the ministry, Williamson decided to get his medical degree. After studying at various European universities, Williamson received his medical degree and license in the Netherlands. After returning to Philadelphia, Williamson joined the American Philosophical Society and conducted numerous scientific experiments that won him recognition in European scientific circles. During the American Revolution, Williamson immigrated to North Carolina and was appointed surgeon general for North Carolina. After the war, he served in the legislature and represented North Carolina in the Constitutional Convention. Although most of his writings were scientific in nature, Williamson also wrote a two-volume History of North Carolina.

Jesse Worley

Powell, William S., ed. Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Vol. 6, T-Z. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

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Author Bio for: Williamson, Hugh, 1735-1819

Hugh Williamson (5 Dec.1735-22 May 1819) was an educator, merchant, scientist, physician, writer, and politician. He was born and raised in Pennsylvania, where he matriculated at the College of Pennsylvania and later served as a teacher. After a brief career in the ministry, Williamson decided to get his medical degree. After studying at various European universities, Williamson received his medical degree and license in the Netherlands. After returning to Philadelphia, Williamson joined the American Philosophical Society and conducted numerous scientific experiments that won him recognition in European scientific circles. During the American Revolution, Williamson immigrated to North Carolina and was appointed surgeon general for North Carolina. After the war, he served in the legislature and represented North Carolina in the Constitutional Convention. Although most of his writings were scientific in nature, Williamson also wrote a two-volume History of North Carolina.

Jesse Worley

Powell, William S., ed. Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Vol. 6, T-Z. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

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Author Bio for: Wilson County (N.C.). Board of Education.

Charles Lee Coon (25 Dec. 1868-23 Dec. 1927) was a noted educator and leader in educational reform in North Carolina and the South. As a school superintendent in the Wilson and Salisbury school systems, member of the Southern Education Board, and in other capacities, Coon advocated for more professional teachers, quality textbooks, and universal education. Coon also strongly promoted black education. Coon was inducted into the North Carolina Education Hall of Fame in 1960. He is known also for his books on the history of education in North Carolina.

Jesse Worley

Powell, William S., ed. Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Vol. 1, A-C. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1979

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Author Bio for: Winborne, Benjamin B.

Benjamin Brodie Winborne, the son of Samuel Darden Winborne and Mary Pretlow, was born April 14, 1854, in the Maney's Neck section of Hertford County, North Carolina. Benjamin Winborne attended Buckhorn Academy near his home and began his higher education in 1871 at Wake Forest College. After a year he enrolled in the Columbian College (now George Washington University) in Washington, D.C., where in 1874 he earned the B.L degree. Following a year of legal studies in Raleigh, he opened his law practice in Winton, the county seat of Hertford County. In 1879 Winborne married Nellie H. Vaughan of Murfreesboro and moved his law practice there. At different times a local solicitor and judge, Winborne represented Hertford County in the North Carolina House of Representatives in the sessions of 1895, 1905, 1907 and 1908. He served as a delegate in the 1896 Democratic National Convention. Winborne continued to practice law in Murfreesboro. Interested in genealogy and local history, he published several family histories and The Colonial and State Political History of Hertford County, N.C. (1906). After a period of declining health, he died on February 24, 1919, and was buried in the Southall family cemetery in Murfreesboro.

Sources: Benjamin B. Winborne Papers, Murfreesboro Historical Association Collection, East Carolina Manuscript Collection, Special Collections, Joyner Library, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina.

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Author Bio for: Winslow, Arthur, 1860-

Margaret Lane Mordecai Devereux (1824-1910) was born to Moses Mordecai (1785-1824) and his second wife, Ann Willis Lane Mordecai (1794-1854). In 1842, she married John Devereux, Jr., (1819-1893). The young couple passed the winter months on the Devereux plantation of Runiroi in Bertie County, N.C., (near Palmyra in Halifax County), and the summer months at Wills Forest, a former Lane family home near Raleigh that Margaret had inherited from her mother. By 1851, yearly moves had become tiresome for the Devereuxs, and John seriously considered selling his Bertie County property. Henry King Burgwyn wrote in his diary in May 1855 of meeting John Devereux and his family on their way to Raleigh. He described Mrs. Devereux as "a sweet lovely looking person, charming expression, and very young for a mother of six children...." John and Margaret eventually had eight children, including daughters Anne, Katherine, and Ellen, and sons Thomas and John. During the Civil War the Devereuxs lived exclusively at Wills Forest. With the South's defeat, the family fortune had dissipated. After battling a long illness, John Devereux died in debt in Raleigh on April 10, 1893. Margaret Devereux was forced to sell Wills Forest to settle John's estate, and continued to live in Raleigh with her eldest daughter until her own death in 1910. Both John and Margaret were buried in Oakwood Cemetery. In her collection of semi-fictional short narratives, Plantation Sketches, Margaret Devereux enumerated the plantations inherited by the Devereuxs: Runiroi, Feltons, Looking Glass, Montrose, Polenta, Lower Plantation, Barrows, and Conneconara.

Leanne Smith

Margaret Mordecai Devereux Papers. Southern Historical Collection. Library of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; "Journal of a Secesh Lady" The Diary of Catherine Ann Devereux Edmondson 1860-1866. p. xxxv. ; "John Devereux." Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Volume 2.

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Author Bio for: Wood, John Elliott

John Elliot Wood (1891-1963) was born in Hertford to parents John Q. A. and Julia Elliot Wood. After receiving a B.S. and M.A. in Architecture from the University of North Carolina, Wood joined the army in 1917 and served in France during World War I. Commissioned in the Corps of Engineers at the end of the war, Wood served in occupied Germany, the District of Columbia, along the Mexican border, and in the Philippines. In 1940, he was promoted to the rank of major and sent to Fort Bragg to train and organize a new engineer regiment. During World War II, he helped plan the 1942 amphibious landing on the coast of North Africa and served as an assistant division commander in Italy until the end of the war. During the late 1940s, Wood, now a brigadier general, served as an engineer officer in the Mediterranean Theater. He retired in 1949 and returned to his farm on Currituck Sound. During his later years, Wood, a member of the Pasquotank Historical Society, was active in writing and promoting local history.

Christopher Bingham

Powell, William S., ed. Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Volume 6:T-Z. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1996

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Author Bio for: Wood, L. C. (Lydia Cope), b. 1845

Lydia Cope Wood, daughter of William Morris and Eliza Cooper Cope Collins, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1845, and was also educated there in private school. She married John Bacon Wood on May 8, 1867, and they had four children: Ellen Collins, Horatio Curtis, Arthur Morris, and Edward Cope. Lydia Cope Wood's interests included religious work, social philanthropic endeavors, woman suffrage, and outdoor recreation, and she was also a member of the Orthodox Friends. In her literary career, she contributed short stories to several papers and authored For a Free Conscience, The Haydocks, Testimony, and A Missionary Penny.

Leanne Smith

Woman's Who's Who of America

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Author Bio for: Woodward, Walter Carleton, 1878-1942

Walter Carlton Woodward (28 Nov. 1878- 14 April 1942), son of Ezra Hinshaw and Amanda M. Maris, was born near Mooresville, Indiana. As a youth he attended and was graduated from Friends Pacific Academy. He received degrees from such institutions as Pacific College and Earlham College, and earned his M.A. and PhD. at the University of California. Woodward spent his career devoted to teaching, writing, and serving the Friends community. He married Catherine Hartman in 1910 and they had three daughters, Bernice, Mary Ellen and Elisabeth.

Heather Anderson

Who Was Who In America, Vol. 2, 1943-1950. Chicago: A.N. Marquis Co., 1963.

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Author Bio for: Woolson, Constance Fenimore, 1838-1894

Constance Fenimore Woolson was born in Claremont, New Hampshire in 1840. She was educated at the Cleveland Female Seminary and at a boarding school in New York. After finishing school, she traveled with her father on business trips and experienced regional differences all over New England and the Midwest. This all came to an end with the beginning of the Civil War, which would later influence much of her writing. After the death of her father in 1869, she began to concentrate on her writing and contributed to literary magazines such as The Atlantic Monthly, Harper's, and Scribner's. For several years she spent winters in Florida with her mother and became very fond of the area. After her mother's death in 1879, she moved abroad and continued to travel and write until her death from a fall in 1894. Woolson's best known works are Castle Nowhere, Lake Country Sketches, Rodman the Keeper: Southern Sketches, and Anne.

Heather Anderson

http://www.lehigh.edu/~dek7/SSAWW/writWoolsonBio.htm

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Author Bio for: Wooten, John L., 1924-2004

Henry Thomas King, Jr., the son of Henry Thomas King and Martha Ann Turnage, was born November 9, 1861, near the community of Falkland, Pitt County, North Carolina. A journalist, he published the Carolina Banner (Tarboro, N.C.) and King's Weekly (Greenville, N.C.). He also edited a quarterly magazine, Southland, and Watch Tower, a publication of the Christian Church. He represented Pitt County in 1903 in the North Carolina House of Representatives. Beginning in 1911, King served as a United States commissioner of the United States Court, Eastern District of North Carolina. A lover of history, King published Sketches of Pitt County: A Brief History of the County, 1704-1910, in 1911. King married Blanche Draughan of Edgecombe County in 1901. They had two daughters, Helen and Ruth. King died in Greenville on February 15, 1924, and was buried in Cherry Hill Cemetery.

Cheney, John L., ed. North Carolina Government, 1585-1979: A Narrative and Statistical History.Raleigh, N.C.: North Carolina Department of the Secretary of State, 1981.

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Author Bio for: Worthington, D.

Dennison Worthington was born in Hertford County on October 6, 1843 the son of Albert H. and Elizabeth (Herbert) Worthington. In 1862 he enlisted in the 8th Regiment North Carolina Troops and was captured in 1864. After the war he settled in Norfolk, Virginia, to study law and was admitted to the bar in 1869. He soon returned to Hertford County where he continued his work as a lawyer. In 1880 he was elected judge of the criminal court in Martin County and the following year was elected to the North Carolina House of Representatives. He served as chairman of the joint committee for the appointment of magistrates for the state, speaker pro tem of the House, chairman of the joint committee to re-district the state, and chairman of the committee on military. He was father of the bills providing pensions for widows of Confederate soldiers in North Carolina, for the prevention of cruelty to animals, and for the State Guard. In 1885 he was appointed by the governor to be solicitor of the Third judicial district and continued in this job for six years. In 1891, Worthington moved to Rocky Mount, Nash County, and continued his career as a lawyer. He was a member of the Masonic Order, the Knights of Honor. In November 1871, he married Miss Julia Wheeler who was the daughter of Col. S. J. Wheeler of Murfreesboro, N.C. They had two children, Bessie and Samuel Wheeler. Worthington, known as Denny by his friends, authored the book The Broken Sword in 1901. He dedicated it to the Daughters of the Confederacy and those that had followed the Southern Cross. Worthington died May 14, 1904 and is buried in Maplewood Cemetery, Wilson, NC.

Heather Anderson

Sources: Cyclopedia of Eminent and Representative Men of the Carolinas of the Nineteenth Century; Wilson County, North Carolina, Cemeteries, Vol. 4; The Colonial and State Political History of Hertford County, North Carolina.

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Author Bio for: Worthington, S. O. (Samuel Otis), 1898-

Chapters in this booklet were researched and written by members of the Pitt County Club of the University of North Carolina in 1920. Club members (S.O. Worthington, Editor-in-Chief; M.B. Prescott, J.V. Perkins, J.H. Spain, J.S. Moore, S.J. Husketh, and I.M. Little ) were students of the Rural Social Science Department under direction of Professors E.C. Branson and S. H. Hobbs Jr.

Heather Anderson

Pitt County, Economics and Social

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Author Bio for: Worthy, Pauline Marion

Ursula Fogleman Loy (b. 28 Apr. 1919) was born in Randolph County, North Carolina. She stayed at home with her children when they were young, then directed the George H. and Laura E. Brown Library in Washington, North Carolina. She was active in the community for 20 years and served three terms on the Washington City Council. Mrs. Loy now resides in Greenville, North Carolina, near her two sons. Pauline Marion Worthy (20 Feb. 1900-17 May 1998) was a librarian and historian in Beaufort County, North Carolina. She spent fifty years compiling clippings and other materials for her book, Washington and the Pamlico. She received degrees from Winthrop University, Columbia, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and worked at the George H. and Laura E. Brown Library and the Washington High School Library. She helped start a library for African Americans in Washington and the Beaufort/Hyde/Martin Regional Library. Worthy also wrote book reviews for the Raleigh News and Observer. She was a member of the First Presbyterian Church in Washington.

Katherine Moore

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Author Bio for: Wright, Robert Herring, 1870-1934

Robert Herring Wright (21 May 1870-25 Apr. 1934) served as the first president of East Carolina Teachers Training School. He was born in Sampson County and educated at University of North Carolina and at the John Hopkins University. Although East Carolina was originally envisioned as a two-year training school, Wright helped pave the way for the school to become a four-year college. While making many valuable contributions in the early years of the institution, Wright worked to improve not only the quality of teacher education but also the quality of primary and secondary education throughout the state. He served on committees that made recommendations to the state legislature for the improvement of schools in North Carolina.

Jesse Worley

Powell, William S., ed. Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, Vol. 6, T-Z. Chapel Hill: The University of North Carolina Press, 1996.

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