The East Carolinian, November 17, 2004






1-16-04
Volume 80 Number 32
WEDNESDAY November 17, 2004
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Voter turnout increases among youth
Election officials
pleased at results
DUSTIN SCHULTZ
STAFF WRITER
The national turnout of
voters 18 to 24 has increased to
the largest number in more than
a decade.
According to the Center for
Information and Research on
Civic Learning and Engage-
ment, 42.3 percent of registered
youth voters made their way
to the polls on Election Day
this year. This number is up
by 5.8 percent since the
2000 election.
"There was a tremendous
increase in the youth vote said
Steve Hines, director of the Pitt
County Board of Elections.
"It proves that young voters
really can be mobilized and
I think that in future
elections we'll see more politicians
and campaigns seeking out this
block I'll add that we found
about a 64 percent youth turn-
out in the 10 states with the
smallest margin of victory said
Carrie Donovan, youth director
at CIRCLE.
According to Hines, the bal-
lots will be finished scanning at
YearOverallVoters 18-24
19725552V,
19765445
19805343
19845344
19885039
19925546
19964936
20005137
20045942
Election Day drew long lines of students and other Greenville residents to the precincts.
the end of next week.
"Although we have not fin-
ished scanning all of the ballots,
I believe this was the biggest
percentage of youth votes we
have ever seen in Pitt County
Hines said.
"If you asked me in Febru-
ary if I was surprised at these
numbers, I would have said yes,
but we began to realize around
August and September that
the turnout was going to
be big
Hines said on the last day
to fill out a voter registration,
at least 50 percent of the people
registering were under 30.
He said because the United
States is in the middle of a
war, there are a lot of rumors
and speculations on what will
happen next. There has also been
talk of issuing a draft, which
draws an increased number of
younger voters.
Donovan agreed these
issues sparked an interest
among the youth, which increased
the voter turnout.
"Issues in this election,
particularly jobs and the
war in Iraq, really seemed to
resonate with young people, many
of whom are looking for their
first job or know someone who is
fighting in Iraq Donovan said.
According to CIRCLE,
youth voter turnout increased
by approximately the same
amount as overall voters this
election. However, there was
a difference between the
youth and the rest of the
voting population.
On a national scale, voters 18
to 24 favored Kerry over Bush by
a 56 to 43 percent margin.
Hines said this is fairly
consistent with Pitt County's
numbers and younger voters
like the appeal of a younger and
more democratic candidate.
"Typically the younger
population tends to lean
democratic. Democrats like John
Kerry and Bill Clinton definitely
have younger voter friendliness
Hines said.
Local students expressed
their reasons for voting.
"I voted because it is my right
and I wanted to express it said
Michael Celi, Pitt Community
College student.
"I didn't get to vote because
I'm registered in Greensboro
and I wasn't able to get my
absentee ballot in time. I was
pretty disappointed; I didn't know
there was a deadline for
voting early said ECU senior
Kelly Crump.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Student assaulted
on College Hill
Victim seriously injured,
charges pending
NICK HENNE
NEWS EDITOR
Felony charges are pend-
ing on an ECU student after an
aggravated assault took place at
1:50 a.m. Friday when he alleg-
edly struck another student
multiple times in the head with
a pair of high heel shoes.
According to the report issued
by the ECU Police Department,
the incident began when the
victim, William Nobles, and a
female student were returning to
their residence halls from down-
town on an ECU bus when the
suspect, Mathew Leggett, made
provacative comments to Nobles
and the female with him.
When they got off the bus,
the males continued exchang-
ing words and began shoving
each other.
Leggett followed Nobles to
Scott Hall where they contin-
ued to exchange words which
escalated into more shoving.
Leggett said after he was shoved
by Nobles, he took the female's
high heel shoes and hit Nobles
repeatedly in the head.
Leggett said he was eventu-
ally pushed to the ground as he
continued to swing the shoes at
Nobles who was on top of him.
The ECU police were unable
to get a statement from Nobles
because he was rushed to Pitt
County Memorial I Iospital where
he was sedated.
While Nobles' actions played
a part in his being attacked, he
was noted as victim of the inci-
dent because he was the person
who was attacked with a weapon
and sustained multiple injuries.
The Victims Compensation
Act of North Carolina states if a
person is the victim of a crime,
the state will pay for the person's
medical expenses. However, the
state will not pay these expenses
if the victim's actions contrib-
uted to the incident.
"This would be one of those
instances he definitely con-
tributed said J.P. Smith, admin-
istrative captain of the ECU
Police Department.
Smith said Nobles received a
large hemotoma, or knot, to his
head along with eight staples to
the back of his head and seven
stitches to his face.
Both students are being
reported to the ECU Office of
Student Conflict and Resolution
and additional charges are pend-
ing on Leggett for assault with a
deadly weapon.
"If you're having words with
someone on the bus and they're
following you, the best thing to
do is go in your dorm and call the
police Smith said.
"If you're walking and the
person continuously follows you,
runs up behind you and shoves you
you have to defend yourself
Smith said, however, inci-
dents such as these are always
best if they are avoided.
"If you know someone's been
see ASSAULT page A3
ECU leads in security research task force
New technology will help students stay safe in areas where some robberies have occurred.
before the car left the campus
said Powell.
The center believes the
device will also be effec-
tive in non-crime-related
events, such as car situa-
tions and medical incidences.
"The idea is that once a stu-
dent notified authorities, their
personal information would
appear, even showing their
health problems and emergency
contact information DuVall
said.
Amidst speculation that
students might unintentionally
set off the device, Powell said
accidental triggering would be
unlikely, because of the device's
ability to be disabled when
not needed.
The goal of the project is to
incorporate all of the qualities of
ECU's present security systems,
New device could make
students, faculty safer
A.J. WALTON
STAFF WRITER
ECU'S Center for Wireless
and Mobile Computing and the
Office of Advanced Technology
are leading the study on a device
that would remedy ECU's on-
going security dilemma.
The study came underway
last semester after Molly Broad,
president of the UNC-System,
implemented a task force to.
research ways to decrease the
rising crime-rate among North
Carolina campuses.
Shortly after the committee
was established, Barry DuVall,
director for the Center for Wire-
less and Mobile Computing
Office and Matthew Powell, assis-
tant director, were in California
for a project and received an
alert notifying them that an ECU
student had been robbed at knife-
point in Sonic Plaza. At that time,
DuVall said his office decided to
look into technology that would
improve ECU's safety.
"We wanted to find devices
that students could use to call for
help without having to search in
the dark for a blue button on a
pole said DuVall.
"We wanted something that
would not only make ECU a
better place, but also all schools
in North Carolina
After months of research and
investigation, the office finally
found a product that would allow
students to alert help in an imme-
diate and sufficient manner.
The device would come in the
form of a small keychain with
two buttons, when pressed simul-
taneously, blue light poles around
campus would be triggered alert-
ing authorities in up to three sec-
onds to identify the person's exact
location within a 3-5 foot prox-
imity. In residence halls, authori-
ties would be able to tell what
floor an incident took place on.
"In Indiana, a female college
student was kidnapped by her
ex-boyfriend and thrown into
the back of his car. With the use
of this same piece of equipment,
authorities were alerted immedi-
ately pinpointed the student's
location and rescued her
see DEVICE page A3
f) More Info
On Nov. 18, ECU will host the "Per-
sonal Alert Device Safety Confer-
ence" at the Murphy Center. More
than 20 universities and com-
munity colleges are scheduled to
attend, along with representatives
from local establishments, and
select vendors from across the
nation. One-on-one demonstra-
tions by vendors will provide an
opportunity for everyone to share
Ideas and evaluate the systems.
Students are Invited to test the
systems from 2 p.m. - 5 p.m. In
the Jones Room of Murphy Center.
Organization holds drive for homeless
All Stars for the Homeless, conducted by SlayUmstead residential advisers, coordinators and residents from on
and off campus, are conducting a drive to collect articles of clothing and other items for the homeless off 10th
Street in front of the Blount House.
Commit to Quit helps
student smokers
Sixteen students
participating
KATIE KOKINDA-BALDWIN
STAFF WRITER
Sixteen ECU students have
agreed to quit smoking for 18
days as part of an incentive
program, "Commit to Quit
implemented by wellness educa-
tion at ECU.
Georgia Childs, assistant
director for peer health at ECU,
has worked to make the program
a success.
"We tried to center the pro-
gram around 'Great American
Smoke-out which is the third
Thursday in November every
year. This year it falls on Nov.
18, so we're doing an 18 day pro-
gram said Childs.
Students registered to volun-
teer to quit smoking on Nov. 1,
and were submitted to a test to
measure their carbon monox-
ide levels. Non-smokers gener-
ally have 10 or less per million
of carbon monoxide in their
system.
Most college student smokers
fall between 15 and 30, indicat-
ing a one to two packs a day. The
participants are able to contact
wellness education at any time
for assistance during the 18-day
period and on Nov. 18, a party
is being held in honor of the
participants. Each student
will again submit to a carbon
monoxide test and if their mea-
surement is 10 or below, they are
eligible to be part of the drawing
for the grand prize of an Apple
il'od.
"I think typically when we've
had this contest, we've had about
a 25 percent quit-rate. In this
case that would mean probably
four people will go through the
contest, I'm looking at more than
that Childs said.
see QUIT page A2
INSIDE I News:A2 I Comics: A10 I Opinion: A4 I A&E:A5 I Sports: A8





Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian. com 252. 328. 6366
NICK HENNE News Editor KRISTIN DAY Assistant News Editor
WEDNESDAY November 17, 2004
t
Campus News
World Kindness Day
Today is World Kindness Day, so
drop by the Student Health Center
for special information and a
reminder to be kind to everyone.
Apple Grams
The ECU Student Involvement
Team and Campus Dining are
offering free apple grams today
from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. at Wright
Plaza for students who want to
send an encouraging message
to a favorite professor or advisor.
There is a limited supply, so apple
grams will be given on a first-
come, first-serve basis.
World Food Festival
A variety of ethnic foods and
activities are being offered to
students today from 1 p.m. - 3 p.m.
in the Mendenhall Multipurpose
Room.
International Film Festival
Osama, a film inspired by a
true story is about a 12-year-old
Afghan girl and her mother and
the restrictions enforced by the
Taliban, will be shown at 9;30
p.m. tonight in Hendrix Theater.
The ECU Student Union will
sponsor the showing of Maria
Full of Grace, a story about one
woman's journey from a small
Columbian town to the streets of
New York, tomorrow at 7 p.m. and
9:30 p.m.
Alcoholics Anonymous
An Alcoholics Anonymous
meeting will be offered in room
14 Mendenhall Student Center
from noon -1 p.m. The meeting is
open to any person who feels they
may have a problem with alcohol
or would like to explore this issue
further. Meetings will continue as
long as interest and participation
permits.
Gene Therapy
As part of Diversity Week, the ECU
Student Involvement Team and
the ECU Student Union will be
hosting a fascinating interactive
discussion on gene therapy with
Teja Arboleda in order to explore
how to define diversity and wo
to break down the barriers. Come
find out more about the myths
and realities faced in living in a
multicultural world.
The event will take place tomorrow
night from 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. in the
Wright Auditorium.
Marketing Lecture
The American Marketing
Association will host Will Guttu
from the Regional Acceptance
Corporation, a division of BB&T.
Guttu will provide information
about the sales and financing
industry tonight from 5 p.m. - 6
p.m. in 1028 Bate. Free pizza and
beverages will be served and the
event is open to all majors.
Choral Festival
The school of music will host the
ECU High School Choral Festival
at Wright Auditorium and Hendrix
Theater today at 9 a.m. Call 328-
6851 for more information.
Guitar Concert
The school of music will hold
a guitar concert series at A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall today at 8
p.m. The artistic director for the
night will be Elliot Frank. Call 328-
6851 for details.
Workshop
Learn to become a better,
more successful student at this
academic skills workshop called
Catching Up in a Course When All
Hope is Lost The workshop will be
in 205 Brewster D tomorrow from
3 p.m. - 4 p.m. and in 109 Brewster
D, Dec. 1. Call the Academic
Enrichment Center at 328-2645
for more Information.
History Lecture
Peter Green, the King Charles
II Distinguished Professor of
Classics and Ancient History,
will speak Thursday, Nov. 18 at
8 p.m. in OC-307 the Science
and Technology Building. The
lecture is entitled, "Alexander of
Macedon: Icon and Enigma" and
is for the 23rd annual Lawrence F.
Brewster Lecture in History.
American Indian Identity
Dr. Anne Waters, Research
Associate, Interpretation and
Culture, with the State University
of New York. Binghamton will hold
a lecture called 'American Indian
Identity: Thoughts About Who We
Are" Friday, Nov. 19 at 7 p.m. in
1031 Bate Building.
News Briefs
Local
Judge blocks
evidence of husband's affairs
FAYETTEV1LLE, NC - A judge blocked
defense lawyers for accused killer
Michelle Theer from introducing
evidence that her slain husband had
extramarital affairs.
Prosecution witnesses have testified
that Michelle Theer had several
affairs, including one with a soldier
convicted of killing her husband, Air
Force Capt. Marty Theer.
Kirk Osbom, Michelle Theer's lawyer,
wanted to present computer records
showing that Marty Theer had
pursued a relationship through a
Web site and evidence that he spent
a week with a woman in Florida.
Superior Court Judge E. Lynn Johnson
ruled that the records inadmissible,
saying that Michelle Theer's state of
mind, not her husband's, is at issue.
The ruling prevented the first defense
witness, Dr. Debbie Layton-Tholl, from
testifying about how an affair by one
spouse influences whether their
partner has an affair.
Layton-Tholl is a psychologist
who has studied the dynamics of
extramarital affairs.
E-mail messages between Theer and
former Army Staff Sgt John Diamond in
November and December of 2000 show
that Theer cared for Diamond but wanted
their affair to end, Layton-Tholl said.
Diamond reacted to the rejection by
trying to manipulate Theer, she said.
"He's very manipulative when he
threatens to kill himself if she leaves
him she said.
Diamond is serving a life sentence
after pleading guilty in Marty Theer's
death. Theer was shot to death in
Fayetteville in December 2000.
Lejeune Marine killed In Fallujah
BALTIMORE - Cpl. Nicholas L.
Ziolkowski joined the Marines right
out of high school, firmly believing
he could make a difference. He had
been planning his military career
since ninth grade, his mother recalled,
running several miles a day and
"working out constantly
He had been in Iraq since June, and
due to return to the United States
in February.
On Sunday, the 22-year-old from
Towson was killed In fighting in
Fallujah, the Department of Defense
said Monday. He was the third Gl from
Maryland to be killed in combat in Iraq
in four days.
He was assigned to the 1st Battalion,
8th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine
Division, II Marine Expeditionary
Force, Marine Corps Base Camp
Lejeune, NC.
Ziolkowski joined the Marines in 2001,
shortly after graduating from Boys'
Latin School, his mother, Tracy Miller,
said Monday night.
He hoped to study history at Towson
University, where Miller works.
Ziolkowski "was charismatic, caring
and sensitive, making friends
wherever he went his mother said.
At age 17, he took part in the Navy's
Odyssey SEAL Adventure Challenge,
becoming the youngest person ever
to complete the grueling 24-hour
version of ihe SEALS' "hell week his
mother said.
His father, Andrew Ziolkowski of
Germantown, said in a statement
that his son's commanding officer
"wanted 10 guys like Nick
Miller said she last saw her son at
Camp Lejeune shortly before he was
deployed to Iraq. She last spoke with
him on Nov. 5. "We talked about the
courses he was going to be taking at
Towson she said. "I didn't want to say
stuff like 'be careful so I didnt
National
Man sets himself on
fire outside White House gate
WASHINGTON - A man who set
himself afire near the White House
was upset with the way he was
being treated as an FBI informant,
specifically complaining to The
Washii ,gton Po about his inability to
return to Yemen to visit his ill wife.
Mohamed Alanssi, 52, arrived at
the White House gate just before
2 p.m. Monday with a letter
addressed to President Bush.
After talking briefly with uniformed
Secret Service officers, he pulled a
lighter from his pocket and set his
clothing ablaze.
Although the officers, who had been
Quit
from page A1
An ECU student enjoys a cigarrette in Wright Plaza.
"I'm thinking that more
than that will quit. But that's the
typical number and just the fact
that we're able to help anybody
quit smoking, even if it's to give
them a little push with an
incentive prize, we look at that
as a success. It also gets our name
out there for wellness education
and lets people know that we are
a good resource for not just smok-
ing cessation but other health
information on campus as well
According to the Center for
Disease Control, nicotine reaches
the brain within 10 seconds after
smoke is inhaled. It has been
found in every part of the body
and in breast milk.
Wellness education lists
reasons to quit smoking on
their Web site. It also indicates
that 90 percent of lung cancer
deaths each year are due to
cigarette smoking. Even though
ECU is in the middle of 'tobacco
country the risks are the same for
smokers and victims of second-
hand smoke everywhere.
"Most people that quit
smoking usually start back within
a year or six months Childs
said.
She said many people have a
hard time permanently quitting,
so having a set-back is normal.
"Just know that next time
when you try to quit, you did it
for 18 days, try to push for longer
than that
ECU student Elizabeth Cole
is participating in the program
and is optimistic of her goal to
finally quit.
"I am really actually amazed
that I have stuck with it. I really
didn't think 1 could do it said
Cole.
"I've made it through the
worst part now. The first few days
1 was a basket-case, but it's not
quite as bad now. I feel good
and 1 smell good Cole said.
Cole, who has been smoking
on and off for about 8 years, has
tried to quit numerous times
before and has solid reasons
for quitting.
"It stinks, it's unattractive, it's
expensive and cancer runs in my
family Cole said.
"I don't want to die from
cancer regardless why would I
want to cause it?"
The Centers for Disease
Control found that in 2001,
chronic obstructive pulmonary
disease was the fourth leading
cause of death in the United States,
resulting in more than 118,000
deaths and more than 90 percent
of these deaths were attributed
to smoking.
Childs mentioned that
the number of participants
in this year's "Commit to
Quit" had decreased from the
previous year.
"The whole key is getting the
people when they're ready to quit
and that's the most important
time Childs said.
"But even if It's just getting
one person to be smoke-free, that
to us is a success and worth it
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
alerted by the Post, acted quickly
to extinguish the flames, emergency
medical technicians said he
suffered bums on his hands, neck
and face.Alanssi was taken to
Washington Hospital Center for
treatment of non-life-threatening
Injurles.The Post reported that
Alanssi, who also used the name
Mohamed Alhadrami, had informed
the newspaper of his plans early
Monday. He told The Post by fax
and telephone that he was "going to
bum my body at unexpected place
He also faxed a letter to an FBI agent
in New York who has had contact with
him, the Post reported.
The paper said it alerted the New
York agent about its contact with
Alanssi and subsequently informed
District of Columbia police when It
learned from the man in a series of
three telephone calls that he planned
to set himself on fire outside the
White House. The paper said D.C.
police subsequently alerted federal
authorities with jurisdiction around
the White House.
New Jersey governor takes office
TRENTON, N.J. - As Richard J. Codey
officially became New Jersey's acting
governor, he promised to put a new
face on government in a state stunned
by his predecessor's revelation that
he had a gay extramarital affair.
Gov. James E. McGreevey spent his
final day in office out of the public
eye Monday, clearing his belongings
from the governor's mansion and
tending to lingering transition issues
three months after his stunning
resignation announcement.
New Jersey Is one of eight states
without an office of lieutenant
governor. The 57-year-old Codey, the
Democratic state Senate President,
will serve out the final 14 months of
McGreevey's term.
State Sen. Joseph Kyrlllos, the
Republican Party chairman for
New Jersey, called the departure
a "beginning
"This era Is now over. We've got
to look forward to the future
Kyrillos said.
Codey said he will turn his attention
to ethics reforms and a projected $4
billion deficit In the next state budget.
He also was expected to announce
plans Tuesday to form a mental
illness task force.
Codey, a longtime advocate for
the mentally ill, started his first day
as governor with a breakfast at
Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital
in Parsippany, joining about 30 adult
patients in the cafeteria.
McGreevey's departure ended a
strange three-month interlude that
began in August when the governor
declared he was a "gay American"
and had an affair with another man.
The former governor intends
to volunteer with a national
education foundation, working in
New Jersey to help disadvantaged
students, according to state Sen.
Raymond Lesniak, a longtime
McGreevey friend.
International
Abbas asks militants to halt
all violence during campaign
GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip - The Interim
Palestinian leader, Mahmoud Abbas,
has asked Palestinian militants to halt
violence during the campaign for Jan.
9 presidential elections, a participant
in truce talks said Tuesday.
Abbas is trying to work out a deal
with rival Palestinian groups on
a cease-fire and possible power
sharing. He held a joint meeting
with representatives of 13 factions
Monday, and was holding separate
talks with them Tuesday, including
with Hamas, the main opposition
group and the main militant group
carrying out anti-Israel attacks.
Ziad Abu Amr, a lawmaker
participating in the talks, said Hamas
and Islamic Jihad have asked Abbas
to establish a "unified leadership an
umbrella group that would give the
militants a role in decisions, at least
until elections.
Hamas and Islamic Jihad hope that
such a leadership body will allow
them to influence decisions, even
though they apparently will not
compete in the presidential election.
The groups never explained how
power would be distributed in such
a body.
Abbas appeared to be cold to
the idea.
Abu Amr said Abbas told the
opposition groups that "the best
way to achieve a political partnership
is elections In agreeing to a new
leadership body, Abbas would have
given away significant powers.
On the other hand, Abbas needs the
support of the Islamic militants to
govern and will be forced to make
some concessions. As possible
compensation, Abbas said an effort
would be made to hold legislative
and municipal elections four or five
months after the presidential vote.
British seek ban
on public smoking
LONDON - The British government
said Tuesday it would seek a ban
on smoking In most public places,
Including restaurants and any pub
or bar that serves food.
The proposed ban would be phased
In gradually if It is approved by
Parliament, Health Secretary John
Reid announced.
It would first apply on government
premises and eventually in offices,
restaurants and any pub or bar
where substantial food is available,
he said.
Bars and pubs that serve no food
- about 20 percent of England's
drinking establishments, Reid said
- would not be affected by the ban.
"This is a sensible solution, I believe,
which balances the protection of
the majority with the personal freedom
of the minority In England the
health secretary said in announcing
the proposal to the House
of Commons.
"Our starting point is informed choice,
that means an approach that respects
the freedom of Individual choice
he said.
The ban would apply only in England,
which along with Scotland, Wales
and Northern Ireland makes up
Great Britain. Scotland's government
announced last week that it would
seek to ban smoking in all enclosed
public places by 2006.
Ireland's implementation earlier
this year of a ban on smoking in all
enclosed workplaces helped bring
the smoking issue to the forefront
In Britain.
ECU to host PRSSA event
School chapter made
winning pitch
MICHAEL HARRINGTON
STAFF WRITER
The ECU chapter of the Public
Relations Student Society of
America was chosen to host a
regional event this April which
will bring public relations and
crisis management specialists
and about a dozen regional
chapters to campus for sem-
inars and speeches from
these specialists.
ECU'S PRSSA chapter won
the honor of hosting the event
by submitting a successful pre-
sentation at the organization's
national conference in New
York stating what they planned
to do, how many schools
they would invite and where
they would hold the event if
selected as regional host.
The conference In New York
was a joint event held with
the Public Relations Society
of America (PRSA), the parent
organization of PRSSA.
Stacy Ellis, chapter president
of the ECU PRSSA, said she
was elated when ECU's name
was called as a regional host at
the conference because the
event can only bring more expo-
sure and prestige to the PRSSA as
well as the school of communica-
tion at ECU.
"Hopefully, it's going to help
our chapter and the School of
Communication to grow larger
said Ellis.
Ellis said the exact campus
location of the event is still
being worked out, but Wright
Auditorium and the Science and
Technology building are possible
locations that would be able to
accommodate the event.
Thomas Hegele, crisis man-
agement specialist, was asked
to speak at the event, where he
would give each school chapter
a chance to compete and show
how they would solve a par-
ticular crisis of his choosing.
A panel of crisis management
experts will serve as judges to
the competition.
Ellis said an example of a
crisis that would need manage-
ment is when Duke Hospital
accidentally made an Incorrect
blood transfusion that resulted
in a fatality. Since the hospital
has such a high reputation,
someone was needed to main-
tain that reputation and make
sure no further damage Is
done to the hospital through
bad publicity.
Additional activities planned
see PRSSA page A3
Bush picks Rice to replace
Powell as nation's top diplomat
WASHINGTON (AP) � Presi-
dent Bush turned to his most
trusted foreign policy adviser,
Condoleezza Rice, to lead U.S.
diplomacy during his second
term, replacing Secretary of State
Colin Powell, who often was
out of step with more hawkish
members of the administration's
national security team.
A senior administration offi-
cial said Bush on Tuesday would
nominate Rice, another move in
a significant Cabinet shuffle that
has included the exit not only
of Powell, the administration's
most prominent moderate, but
also the resignation of Attorney
General John Ashcrof t, one of the
administration's most outspoken
conservatives.
Rice, who is considered more
of a foreign policy hard-liner
than Powell, has been Bush's
national security adviser for four
years. But while she's known
around the globe, her image on
the world stage does not rival
Powell's. The retired four-star
general has higher popularity
ratings than the president.
"She is a true friend to Israel
Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom
told Army Radio in Israel on
Tuesday.
Colin Powell and Condeleezza
Rice outside the Oval Office.
"Her friendship toward Israel
is very deep and stems from reli-
gious feelings and deep faith
Palestinian Cabinet minister
Saeb Erekat, in an interview with
the Associated Press Television
Network, said, "We have dealt
with Dr. Rice on various occa-
sions. She's a very dignified
person, she has a very analytical,
systematic mind and I believe
she's committed to President
Bush's two-state solution
Rice, SO, worked at the
National Security Council in
former President Bush's White
House and went on to be provost
of Stanford University in Califor-
nia before working in the cur-
rent president's 2000 campaign.
She was widely considered the
president's first choice for the top
diplomat's job, despite reports
that she intended to return to
California or was hoping to
replace Donald H. Rumsfeld as
defense secretary.
Stephen Hadley, Bush's cur-
rent deputy national security
adviser, is expected to replace
Rice, the senior administration
official said on condition of
anonymity.
There had been specula-
tion that Powell, 67, would stay
on, at least for part of Bush's
second term, but he told report-
ers Monday that he had made no
offer to do so. In his resignation
letter dated Nov. 12, Powell, a
35-year Army veteran and former
chairman of the Joint Chiefs
of Staff, told Bush that, with
the election over, it was time
to "step down and return to
private life He said he would
stay on "for a number of weeks,
or a month or two" until his
replacement was confirmed by
the Senate.
4





11-17-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
I
U.S. military investigates report Device
of Marine shooting wounded
from pg A1
NEW YORK (AP) � The U.S.
military is investigating the
videotaped fatal shooting of a
wounded "enemy combatant"
by a U.S. Marine in a mosque in
Fallujah, a Marine spokesman
said Tuesday.
The dramatic footage was
taken Saturday by pool cor-
respondent Kevin Sites of NBC
television. He said three other
insurgents wounded a day
earlier in the mosque were
also shot again Saturday by
the Marines.
The Marine involved in the
fatal shooting has been with-
drawn from the battlefield pend-
ing the results of the investiga-
tion, the U.S. military said.
"We follow the law of armed
conflict and hold ourselves to
a high standard of account-
atv'ty said Lt. Gen. John F.
Sattler, commanding general of
the 1st Marine E- peditionary
Force. "The facts of i his case
will be thoroughly pursuei. "
make an informed decision
and to protect the rights of all
persons involved
The Marine statement said
the investigators would look at
"an allegation of the unlawful
use of force in the death of an
enemy combatant
"The purpose of this investi-
gation is to determine whether
the Marine acted in self-defense,
violated military law or failed to
comply with the Law of Armed
Conflict it said.
Florian Westphal, a spokes-
man for the International Com-
mittee for the Red Cross, said he
This image taken from pool video shows a U.S. marine raising
his rifle toward Iraqi prisoners lying on a mosque floor.
could not say for sure whether
the men were prisoners or not.
"The fact that was reporte .
was that he was wounded, I Jt
whether he was already a ris-
ner or not was not clear to me
We: pi' il said.
V e cannot, on the basis of
TV images - no matter how dis-
turbing and sconcerting they
are - arrive at a judgment about
an incident. We were not on
the spot so we cannot be aware
of all the circumstances of this
incident he said.
"It's clearly recognized that
people in combat situations
are under enormous strain
Westphal said.
He said the Geneva Conven-
tions are clear about the protection
of wounded combatants once they
are out of action as a basic rule.
The incident played out as
the Marines 3rd Battalion, 1st
Regiment, came to the uniden-
tified Fallujah mosque Satur-
day. Sites was embedded with
the unit.
Sites' report said the man
who was shot to death didn't
appear to be armed or threaten-
ing in any way and there were no
arms visible in the room.
He reported that a different
Marine unit had come under
fire from the mosque on Friday.
Those Marines stormed the
building, killing 10 men and
wounding five, Sites said. The
Marines said the fighters in the
mosque had been armed with
rocket-propelled grenades and
AK-47 rifles.
Fight breaks out during taping of Vibe
awards, one person was stabbed
Rapper Snoop Dogg, center, watches from the stage shortly after a fight broke out in the
audience at the Second Annual Vibe Awards at Barker Hangar Monday.
SANTA MONICA, Calif. (AP)
� A fight broke out near the stage
at the Vibe awards ceremony as
rapper Snoop Dogg and producer
Quincy Jones were preparing to
honor Dr. Dre and one person
was stabbed, authorities and wit-
nesses said.
Dozens of people sitting near
the stage Monday inside a hangar
at the Santa Monica airport
began shoving each other as the
show wound down about 7:30
p.m. News video showed chairs
being thrown, punches flying,
people chasing one another and
some being restrained.
It was unclear if the stabbing
preceded or followed the fight.
The victim, a 26-year-old man,
was taken to a hospital and was
listed in stable condition.
No arrests were made.
Witness Frank Williams said
Dr. Dre was involved in the
brawl.
"I saw Dr. Dre fighting some-
body Williams told KCAL-TV.
"1 don't know if he was fight-
ing back. But there was a guy
taken out basically bloodied
The Los Angeles Times, citing
an unnamed associate of Dr.
Dre, said the melee broke out
as the acclaimed hip-hop pro-
ducer was sitting at a front-row
table waiting to receive the Vibe
Legend Award. A man walked up
to Dr. Dre's table and punched
him, and Dr. Dre's bodyguards
went after the man, the associ-
ate said.
Dr. Dre was about to join
Jones and Snoop Dogg on stage
to receive the award for his life-
time contributions to hip-hop.
"Come on, you're messing up
my rap, man Jones said.
Andrea Ferguson, employed
by a public relations firm that
worked with Vibe for the second
annual awards ceremony, called
the incident a "disruption" but
declined to provide details. She
added the show was allowed to
continue but it was halted for
about five minutes.
"My understanding is that it
was somewhat chaotic in there
Police Lt. Frank Fabrega said in
a press conference following
the fight.
About 1,000 people attended
the event; some scurried for the
exits when the melee began. The
show was taped Monday and was
expected to be broadcast on the
UPN network Tuesday.
"It's really important that
we don't take a negative inci-
dent like this and do away with
the awards Suge Knight told
reporters.
Dr. Dre, Snoop Dogg and the
late Tupac Shakur were among
the artists signed to Knight's
Death Row Records during its
height in the early 1990s. After
leaving the label, Dr. Dre started
the highly successful Aftermath
Records, which has signed stars
including Eminem.
When Knight was released
in 2001 from a five-year prison
term for assault and weapons
violations, Dr. Dre obtained a
court order to keep Knight away
from him, The Times said. It
was unclear whether the order
remained in effect Monday.
Vibe magazine focuses on
urban culture and entertain-
ment. The awards are voted on
by music journalists and "regional
tastemakers R&B singer
Usher led the awards with five
nominations, followed
by Alicia Keys, who has
four nominations.
but with new advanced capabili-
ties and more effectiveness.
"Our goal is to be more proac-
tive than reactive Powell said.
Beth Williams, sophomore
elementary education major,
said she thinks the new device
is a great idea.
"Not only will it make us
feel safer, but it will also make
notifying the police easier and
will probably lower the chances
of crime even taking place on
ECU'S campus in the future
said Williams.
Costs of the projected technol-
ogy have not yet been determi ned.
Both Powell and DuVall
said if the project is received
well, the cost would decrease
substantially and the device
could go into trial testing as early
as the spring.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Assault
from pg A1
drinking and they are follow-
ing you and looking for a fight
you just need to walk away
Smith said.
"If you can avoid it at all,
avoid it
Smith said it is especially
important to avoid these situ-
ations when there is alcohol
involved. The report indicated
Nobles had a considerable
amount to drink that night.
"The victim was drunk
you cannot reason with a drunk
Smith said.
It is undetermined if Leggett
had consumed alcohol that night.
"If you're thinking as a ratio-
nal adult, then your thought
process should have been, 'this
guy is drunk I just need to get
away from him Smith said.
"It's certainly not worth
having a felony charge follow
you for the rest of your life
Whether or not Leggett is
convicted with the pending
charges of assault with a deadly
weapon, the felony will stay with
him for the rest of his life. Job
applications question whether
the applicant has ever been
charged with a felony, regardless
if they have been convicted.
This is the second aggravated
assault that has occurred on
ECU'S campus this year.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
PRSSA
from page A2
for the event include speakers
who will talk about what they
have seen and done in the field
of crisis management and
an etiquette tutorial in
which participants will be
taught proper table manners.
Amber Pitter, event planner
for the ECU chapter of PRSSA,
said she is thrilled to have the
opportunity to plan and host
this event.
"I think it will bring
prominence to our chapter
said Pitter.
"We were so excited when we
were chosen
The PRSSA was founded in
1968 as an offshoot of the PRSA;
Their declared purpose is "to
cultivate a favorable and mutu-
ally advantageous relationship
between students and public
relations professionals
Ellis said membership in the
organization is not contingent
on being a communication major
and business and marketing stu-
dents whose fields are related
are more than welcome to join.
Pamela Hopkins, ECU
communication instructor,
said the event will be helpful
to students.
"They have reputable folks
from around the area coming
said Hopkins.
"It's a great opportunity for
our students
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Job prospects look brighter for college seniors
Bently College senior Eric
Golden talks on his phone.
BOSTON (AP) � The recov-
ering economy and looming
retirement of the baby boomers
are making this a very good
year to be a college senior look-
ing for a job after graduation.
Recruiters, career counselors and
students say the fall recruiting
season has been the most active
since the dot.com boom.
Accountants are again
finding increased demand for
their services - thanks to the
wave of post-Enron regula-
tions - but theirs is just one of
several hot fields. Technology
companies, investment banks
and consulting firms appear to
be picking up the pace, as do
some defense contractors and
even smaller businesses that
haven't traditionally recruited
on campus.
"I haven't been to school
in the last three weeks because
of my interview schedule said
Eric Golden, a senior at Bentley
College, a business-oriented
school in the Boston suburb of
Waltham. He feels lucky to be
graduating this year.
Friends with similar
credentials who graduated earlier
often ended up taking posi-
tions that weren't their top
choices - "just to have a job
Golden said. He's been juggling
about a dozen interviews with
companies including money
managers, investment banks and
General Electric.
College hiring is expected to
increase 13 percent over last year,
according to a new survey from
National Association of Colleges
and Employers. Seven out of 10
employers said they expected
to increase salary offers to new
college grads with an average
increase of 3.7 percent.
Four in five employers called
the job market for new grads
good, very good or excellent;
last year fewer than two in
five did.
Michigan State's College
Employment Research Institute
will release a report Thursday
that director Phil Gardner said
will show overall campus hiring
is up as much as 20 percent this
year, depending on the region.
Experts say hiring still isn't
approaching the intensity of
the late 1990s. A population
boom among college students
has tightened competition and
employers remain gun-shy about
big bonuses.
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. �

n
L3lON
Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
AMANDA Q. UNGERFELT Editor in Chief
WEDNESDAY November 17, 2004
Our View
ECU prepares for historical
match up against NC State
It's that time of year again. The weather is get-
ting cold, Thanksgiving break is right around
the corner and students are starting to become
restless.
The end of fall semester is almost here again,
which means the end of Pirate football season
is almost here as well. This seasdn has been
full of ups and downs for the Pirate football
team.
With just two games left in the season Pirate
fans are very anxious and optimistic about the
outcome of this season. This weekend will be
the last chance for football fans to tailgate at
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
However, this does not put a damper on fans
because the last game of the season, ECU vs.
NC State, is probably the game that fans have
been looking forward to the most.
Pirate fans have a good reason to look forward
to the State game, because the past two times
ECU has faced NC State in football, ECU has
come out on top.
Pirate fans are hoping that ECU can make it a
three-pete with a win over NC State in Charlotte
over Thanksgiving break. It might seem strange
to some people that the game, which is techni-
cally a home game for the Pirates, is going to be
held in Charlotte. But when you look back at the
historic rivalry between ECU and NC State the
reason behind the decision to have the game
in Charlotte makes a little more sense.
The last time ECU faced Miami, the game had
to be played at NC State's Carter Finley Stadium
due to a hurricane. After ECU beat Miami, ECU
fans tore down the NC State goal posts. NC
State would not allow this year's game to be
played at NC States' stadium.
They also were not in favor of having the game
at Dowdy-Bcklen stadium, so the game is going
to take place in Charlotte. TEC would like to
remind all Pirate football fans when you are
at a football game you are representing our
school. Please act in a mature and responsible
manner.
Go Pirates!
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Opinion Columnist
Media 'remembers' Yasser Arafat
Our Staff
Nick Henne
News Editor
Robbie Den-
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Nina Coefield
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Slstrunk
Photo Editor
Kristin Day
Asst News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Asst Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst. Sports Editor
Rachel Landen
Special Sections Editor
Herb Sneed
Asst. Photo Editor
Arafat will be judged
by his God
Six to 7 percent, not nine to 10!
That was President Bush's margin of
victory over John Kerry.
I made a rather silly math error,
twice, (counting my double check) in
last week's column. I have fellow stu-
dent Mr. "T" to thank for pointing that
out. He not only pointed out my error,
he also proved my point about rarely
being the first to admit my mistakes.
Thanks for keeping me honest.
Now on to other things.
Yasser Arafat died last week. Veter-
an's Day to be exact. Because of that,
we were treated to the experience of the
media giving more coverage to the death
of an avowed and unapologetic terror-
ist than to the celebration of America's
fighting men and women, some of
who are currently fighting terrorists.
The outrage over that is still sound-
ing in many corners of the country.
Yasser Arafat was a terrorist, lie
never denied that nor denounced the
use of terrorism. He also encouraged
terrorist acts. Calling him a terrorist is
not an insult in any way, just a state-
ment of fact.
Yasser Arafat was also one of the big-
gest obstacles to peace in Middle East.
Peace according to other's (i.e. Western)
standards, not his.
Arafat for decades had spoken the
words of "peace" to the West that they
wanted to hear, all the while calling for
jihad and the destruction of Israel when
he spoke among his own people. Any
research of his speeches will bear that
out. He was a consummate politician
and played the game well. He also did
not appear to be in charge at times.
Years ago, Israel shocked everyone
by agreeing to give Arafat 90 percent of
what he claimed to want. That included
Israel withdrawing from territory,
dismantling settlements, the works.
The Western world rejoiced. What did
Arafat do? He refused the offer. Why?
It appears that in a moment of total
honesty, Arafat once said that if he
accepted an Israeli offer, he would be
killed. Not by Israel or the West, but
by other Arabs. That speaks for itself,
does it not?
Evidence has come to light recently
that Arafat was skimming millions of
dollars each month from the fuel pro-
gram for the Palestinians. That is each
month, not year. Millions that should
have gone to help alleviate the suffer-
ing of his people instead went into his
pockets. And that is just one of the ways
Arafat was skimming money meant for
his people. Others have been identified
already.
There is also evidence that Arafat
and the PLO have direct ties, including
financial, to other terrorist groups. The
more time that passes the more informa-
tion surfaces.
There is currently a major power
struggle taking place in the Palestin-
ian Authority. The ultimate winner in
this struggle may well determine the
direction Middle Eastern politics in the
coming decades.
There has been the stated hope
that with Arafat gone there may finally
be a chance for lasting peace between
Israel and the Palestinians. That may be
wishful thinking, as was evidenced by
recent events.
Arafat's temporary successor,
Mahmoud Abbas, a man who has
spoken out against violence and for
a moderate approach to Israel, was
targeted by gunmen during a mourn-
ing session for Arafat. At least two
people were killed and more were
injured. Not a hopeful sign that a
peaceful transfer of power will occur.
Everything that I have included here
can be easily found with a simple search.
Why it has not been widely reported I
have no idea. It is a part of who Yasser
Arafat was and needs to be considered.
Yasser Arafat undeniably did many
things that benefited the Palestinian
people. No one argues that. He also did
many things that did not.
Am I judging Yasser Arafat? Absolutely
not. I only present an alternative view.
Yasser Arafat will be judged by his
people, history and more importantly,
his God.
In My Opinion
Finding better ways to build healthy relationships
Alexander Marciniak Jenny Hobbs
Web Editor Production Manager
Newsroom252.328.6366
Fax252.328.6558
Advertising252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5.000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our view" Is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editor@theeastcarolinlan.com or to The East
Carolinian, Student Publications Building, Greenville.
NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more
information. One copy of TEC is free, each additional
copy is $1.
(KRT) � My first roommate sat
silently watching television. I sat at
the table, eating cereal. Suddenly, he
turns and yells, "Do you have to slurp
your milk?
This followed weeks of growing
tension over dishes, splitting bills and
more.
Ah, relationships. Whether with
your roommate, significant other, boss,
friends or family, they can be quite the
challenge.
So, too, is dealing with stress and
anger. I've been driven to road rage
once. OK, twice. I've even become
angry enough to kick a hole in the
wall.
But while sex education is common
in schools, what about relationship
and stress-management education?
Unfortunately, such classes are few and
far between.
Last week, Washington state offi-
cials drafted guidelines for a more
standardized sex-education curriculum
statewide. This is partly because some
conservative legislators and Christian
groups still oppose sex education and
contraceptives in schools.
Hut both those who wish to pre-
pare students through sex education
and those who object to sex ed should
be able to agree on the importance
of healthy relationships and coping
skills.
Yet when the question of relation-
ship or "life skills" education comes up,
many often say young people should
learn such lessons at home or simply
through experience. But many kids
aren't raised in the healthiest environ-
ments, and expecting teens to learn
from peers is Inadequate and risky.
Ultimately, there's a big difference
between the random, uncertain and
often painful process of learning by
trial and error, and someone handing
you a guidebook up front.
And if avoiding unwanted pregnan-
cies is worth providing a class, what
about not getting stuck in a miserable
marriage or not fighting with family?
A quick Google search delivers
dozens of studies that show that
healthy relationships and coping
skills reduce substance abuse, eating
disorders, suicides, job and unemploy-
ment stress, health problems, crime
and violence.
While Washington state has some
programs that address these issues, most
are targeted at already "troubled" teens
in school or juvenile corrections.
A program called "Reconnecting
Youth for example, was piloted in
Seattle high schools, teaching about
600 "at risk" students to develop more
personal control, communication
skills, positive coping behaviors and
better relationship skills. May sound
like touchy-feely mumbo-jumbo, but
we're talking basic life skills here, not
group hugs.
The program had great results: a
20-percent increase in GPA, 60-percent
drop in drug use, stronger and more
positive relationships with family and
peers, and better personal control and
anger management.
But why limit such programs to "at
risk" students?
We should push for such classes,
ones that also cover commitments,
finances, family crises, dating prepara-
tion and stress management as part of
our state's high-school curriculum for
all students.
The additional costs now will be
far less than those paid in health- and
crime-related costs later.
Pirate Rants
I'm very upset with the fact
that twice now when reading
about the Peterson trial, TEC has
referred to the double murder vic-
tims as "his wife, Laci and fetus
They were both human beings,
so treat not only Laci Peterson,
but also her baby, with respect.
Rest in peace, Ol' Dirty Bas-
tard. Thanks for the years of real
hip-hop, utter insanity and keep-
ing the entertainment industry
on its toes. ODB, aka Big Baby
Jesus, aka Osiris, aka Dirt McGirt,
you will be deeply missed.
What is a metrosexual? In
Theater 1000, we learned about
a character type called a "fop"
which is defined as "a man who
is devoted to or vain about his
appearance or dress" and a "silly
or foolish person Further, a
metrosexual is a straight man
who embraces the homosex-
ual lifestyle, i.e. refined tastes
in clothing, excessive use of
designer hygiene products, etc.
Opinion articles are get-
ting boring in TEC. Find new
topics or stop writing. People
tend to respond to controversy.
Someone asked what a
metrosexual is. It is a guy that
preps more than a female but
isn't gay. Like he will pluck
his eyebrows, shave, trim his
hair so there isn't a strand out
of place before going over to
his boy's house to get insanely
trashed, watch some football
and play a game of beer pong.
Ladies: Now is the time to
wear those warm snow boots
because it is freezing. But 1 think
you all still have it backwards.
You wear the boots because it
is cold, now you should stop
wearing the short mini skirts
because it is no longer 90 degrees
out. This isn't rocket science.
Reality TV is just getting
stranger and stranger. He's A
Ladyl The Real Gilligan's Island!
No thanks. I'll just stick with
reruns of my favorite old shows.
Is anyone else concerned
about all the recent resignations
in Bush's cabinet? First, Com-
merce Secretary Don Evans,
then Attorney General John
Ashcroft, now Secretary of State
Colin Powell. What's next?
Can the Greek community
finally get some good publicity? Sat-
urday morning hundreds of Greeks
showed up at the intramural fields
to walk for the American Heart
Association Heart Walk. Everyone
was wearing their letters and com-
pleted the walk with pride. Also, if
I might add, we were there at 8 a.m.
Why does the athletic
department get a $50 per stu-
dent increase while art only
gets $.50? We are students of
a school not an athletic team.
ECU should be known for aca-
demics because we certainly
are not known for sports. The
communication department
does not have working cameras,
but by God we have new jerseys.
If you are going to park next
to a brand new clean car that is
parked 100 yards away from the
store, please have the common
courtesy to not lick your finger
in an effort to remove the dent
you just placed on the door.
Jessica Simpson was right
- playing golf with boobs sucks!
If you are a vegetarian and
think that it is "cruel" to kill
animals for food, why are you
wearing leather shoes, hypocrite.
OK, one more time kids -
Cover your mouth when you
sneeze and cough! No one wants
all of yourcommunicablediseases.
I am an exhibitionist, I just
don't have anyone to show off too.
To the idiot who think
women should wear thongs to
get rid of panty lines: Do you
want a piece of string up your
a all day long, I don't know
about you, but I can certainly
do without the butt floss, it's
my choice whether or not my
underwear shows, so get over It.
Editor's Note: The Pirate Rant Is
an anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
submitted anonymously online at
www.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-
mailed to edttor(atheeastcarolinian.
com. The editor reserves the right
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.
ii





II
Page A5 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 ROBBIE DERR Features Editor CAROLYN SCANDURA Assistant Features Editor
Announcements
The Children's Hour will be
performed at McGinnis Theatre
Thursday, Nov. 18 - Tuesday, Nov.
23. Shows will be performed each
day at 8 p.m. except for Sunday
when the show will be performed
at 2 p.m. A rumor is started about
two teachers at a girls' school.
Irreparable damage has been
done by the time the gossip Is
exposed. This play contains adult
subject matters.
November 17, 2004
Mendenhall Movie:
Wed. 7 p.m. There will be a
National Treasure Sneak Preview.
Advance Ticket Required!
Top5s:
Top 5 Movies:
7. The Incredibles
2. Polar Express
3. After the Sunset
4. Bridget Jones: The Edge ot
Reason
5. Seed of Chucky
Top 5 TV Shows:
1.CSI
2. Desperate Housewives
3. Without a Trace
4. Survivor; Vanuatu
5. Extreme Makeover: Home
Edition
Top 5 DVDs:
1. Day After Tomorrow
2. Garfield: The Movie
3. White Chicks
4. Van Helsing
5. Dawn of the Dead
Top 5 CDs:
1. Now That's What I Call Music
2. A Perfect Circle
3. Nelly
4. Usher
5. Rod Stewart
Top 5 Books:
1. Hour Game
2. Metro Girl
3. The Da Vinci Code
4. The Five People You Meet in
Heaven
5. Heaven Plot Against America
Horoscopes:
Arias: Your friends are about to
come to your rescue, and not a
moment too soon. You'd do it for
them, so don't get all goofy when
they do something nice for you.
Taurus: A person with high ideals
is good to know, If somewhat
amusing. You provide the practical
touch he or she Is so sadly
lacking.
Gemini: A pleasant distraction
could make you late for an
appointment or for meeting a
deadline. Take care, the boss Is
watching.
Cancer: Money's tight, so go over
your budget carefully. You're the
perfect person for this job. You're
a master at saving money.
Leo: Your mate or partner has
an idea that seems, at first, quite
Inspiring. Don't rush right Into
agreement, though. It may have
a fatal flaw. Investigate.
Virgo: Paperwork interferes
with what you'd rather be doing.
Dig into it now and be better
prepared for a meeting the day
after tomorrow.
Libra: You yearn for a quiet, yet
meaningful conversation with one
who truly understands. Don't do It
on company time, however. That
would be too expensive.
Scorpio: Don't schedule lots of
outside activities for tonight. Stay
close to home and mull over all
the stuff going on in your head.
Sagittarius: You'll find it easier
to study for the next couple
of days. It's also easier to fix
things, because It's easier to read
instructions.
Capricorn: Don't brag to your
friends about a bonus that may or
may not be coming. Walt until the
check clears before you discuss
It or spend It.
Aquarius: You're growing In
power, but this doesn't necessarily
make your life easier. A person
who'd like to dominate you is
getting a little worried.
Ptece8:Take care of paperwork for
the next couple of days. Postpone
travel and fun. Well, you can have
fun, but use It as a prize to keep
yourself motivated.
Search for 'National Treasure
at your local theater Friday
Unlock many
marvelous mysteries
DANIELLE WIGGINS
STAFF WRITER
From the producers of Pirates
of the Caribbean, The Rock and
Armageddon, Walt Disney Pic-
tures presents you with National
TYeasure. This movie features a
collaboration of producers, from
Jerry Bruckheimer, who was
responsible for Bad Boys, and Jon
Turtletaub, who produced While
You Were Sleeping.
This is a film that is sup-
posed to be jammed packed
with action, adventure and
mystery and a series of chase
scenes. With producers of
outstanding award-winning
films and a leading Academy
Award winning actor, this movie
is sure to attract a crowd.
Cast includes, The Lord of
The Ring's, Sean Bean and Diane
Kruger. This movie is expected
to match up to its standards
with an exciting plot twist and
Nicolas Cage, action movie star
of all time. National TYeasure is
bound to receive good ratings
and nominations. The movie is
rated PG for family audiences as
a Disney movie. It opens up in
theaters on Nov. 19.
Nicolas Cage plays Benjamin
Franklin Gates, an archaeologist,
who is an 18th descendent of a
family who has gone through
each generation building on
clues and puzzles in search of
National Treasure looks to make a killing at box offices when it opens this Friday.
a treasure. Ben Gates spends
most of his life finding clues of a
treasure chest hidden away as an
emergency for depression in the
Revolutionary War by our found-
ing fathers. All the years spent
looking for his treasure in various
locations he discovers the clues
are right under his nose in Wash-
ington, D.C. Things we see in
everyday life are overlooked and
become possible clues that lead
to a treasure. Gates comes to the
realization that the map to this
treasure is right on the back of the
Declaration of Independence and
clues of a buried treasure on the
dollar bill. Faced with FBI agents
and Sean Bean, his adversary,
a rich British adventure also in
search for the same treasure,
Gates takes it into his own hands
to protect the treasure by taking
the Declaration of Independence
before Sean Bean has the chance
to steal it.
"Here's to the men who did
what was considered wrong in
order to do what they knew was
right says the character Benja-
min Gates.
With the help of Kruger,
a museum curator at the
Smithsonian, curiosity of his
findings gears him towards fur-
ther clues of a 2,000 year old
mystery. What he thinks to
be the ending of his discovery
is only the beginning of his
mystic adventure.
Writers spent six years work-
ing on this movie project before
it was given the OK. The hard
work put into this film will
reflect through the quality of its
performance. Critics are wonder-
ing whether Nicolas Cage's string
of adult movie acting parts will
hurt Disney's reputation. Disney
is opening up toward different
varieties of movies including
action, as long as they are kept
PG and G rated films.
National Treasure was planned
to start a few days before Thanks-
giving for the infamous "week-
end after Thanksgiving" rush.
The release date is moved up a
few days to Nov. 19. Show times
are not available at this time,
but Mendenhall Student Center,
Hendrix Theater is hosting a free
sneak preview on Nov. 17 at 7
p.m. So hurry, pick up your passes
at the Central Ticket Office.
National Treasure is both
entertaining and encouraging.
"It opens up more and more
possibilities for what makes a
Disney movie said Nina Jacob-
son, president of Buena Vista
Motion Pictures Group, part of
the Disney Company Web site.
Indeed it does bring more
ideas to future blockbuster Disney
movies. It encourages the kids to
see history as exciting and some-
thing fun to learn about. The
"what if" plot of this movie has
some wondering, "could there
be something out there that we
didn't learn in history class?"
Don't get too many ideas. The
movie was made for entertain-
ment purposes. So, if you are
looking for the Indiana Jones
type of adventure, this is the
movie to see, but if you are
looking forward to this being
closely related to the History
Channel, don't count on it.
Could history be this fun? Wait
and watch National Treasure
in Mendenhall at 7 p.m. and
don't forget your passes. See you
there!
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Let The Futureheads take
you into the unknown
���: I
The Futureheads try to appeal to the punk crowd
Catchy punk band
deserves attention
JESSICA CRESON
SENIOR WRITER
The Futureheads are a four
piece band from Sunderland.
Ross Millard, 22, is the guitarist,
Barry Hyde, 23, also plays guitar,
Dave Hyde, 19, is the drummer
and Jaff (yes, he only has one
name) plays bass. They all are
singers, but Barry and Ross are
the main singers.
Their first gig was at the Ashe-
brooke Cricket Club and their set
was four songs long, lasting seven
minutes. Four years later, their
sets are much longer, but their
attitude is still the same. Within
the past year, The Futureheads
have opened for Franz Ferdi-
nand, a band similar in sound
and style.
They tried to have "as much
of a punch in the face as we could
make it" in those four songs,
said Millard.
The Futureheads self-titled
debut album is a delightful blend
of aggression, melodies and
rhythm. Their influences are
Devo, Queen, Fugazi and Kate
Bush. They are closely related to
The Clash.
The Futureheads were a part
of the lottery-funded Sunderland
City Detached Youth Project.
This organization offered gui-
tars, drums and pianos as a way
to keep teenagers off the streets.
Barry worked as a tutor for the
kids and was already in a band
with Jaff. Millard was somewhat
of an artsy outcast who wanted to
find others with the same inter-
ests as well as free rehearsal space.
The boys did a few songs for the
project's public service mission
called "Do You Sniff Glue?" and
"The Condom Song
Dave, Barry's younger brother,
joined as the drummer just before
they began their tour in Europe.
This 14-gig tour was 14 nights
long, and they spent each night
on someone's floor.
After putting out a self-
released album, The Futureheads
put out two albums on Fantastic
Plastic, which is a London Indie-
Rock label. This allowed them to
tour much more and, eventually,
they signed with Sire.
The Futureheads are repeat-
edly compared to European
bands such as XTC, Devo, The
Clash, Wire and the Slits, but the
band members are bigger fans of
punk and Indie-Rock of the U.S
like Pavement, Shellac, Fugazi
and Les Savvy Fav.
"By and large we're a punk
rock band, but with twists and
turns all over. The idea is to be
hard and aggressive and in your
face, but also really danceable, cel-
ebratory and fun Millard said.
They played locally for so
long they felt they got to know
each member of the audience and
had a strong following. Leaving
London was uncomfortable at
first for the band. Being eccentric
and having accents, as they had
to learn, was OK and people liked
that about the band.
Critics have tried to put this
band into a box more than ever
since Gang of Four's Andy Gill
produced a few. songs on the
record and Paul Epworth, who
has been the soundman for The
Liars and The Rapture, produced
the rest of the album.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Josh Zuckerman hopes to make it big with his new CD.
Josh Zuckerman
offers new, great
'sensational' sound
Olive Garden comes to Greenville
Managers, staff trained
to provide foods, wines
cultivated in Italy
JASON A. FREEMAN
STAFF WRITER
Monday, Nov. 15 at 4 p.m the
Olive Garden Italian Restaurant
opened its doors in Greenville for
the first time. The restaurant is
located at 540 South Greenville
Blvd and the managers and staff
have been training long and hard
to get ready to serve the public.
The Olive Garden serves a
wide variety of foods and bev-
erages developed in Italy to fit
the palate and diets of Ameri-
can diners. In addition to the
"Garden Fare" items that have
been developed for those striving
to eat lighter, many of the dishes
on the menu were developed at
Olive Garden's Riserva di Fiz-
zano Culinary Institute which
is located in the hills of Tuscany,
Italy and are denoted as such on
the menu. Periodically, manag-
ers are sent to the institute for
training and to visit the many
vineyards that supply the restau-
rant with wine.
The Olive Garden specials,
called "Italian Inspirations
include Stuffed Chicken Marsala
which, is "Oven-roasted chicken
breast stuffed with Italian
cheeses and sun-dried tomatoes,
topped with mushrooms and a
creamy marsala sauce. Served
with garlic Parmesan mashed
potatoes Stuffed Chicken
Limone which is, "Oven-roasted
chicken breast stuffed with Ital-
ian cheeses, topped with sun-
dried tomatoes and a white wine
lemon-butter sauce. Served with
seasoned broccoli
If this food seems a bit exotic,
the menu includes pizza made
personally for the "guests
their "Lasagna Classico" (clas-
sic lasagna) and the famous
soup, salad and bread sticks
mentioned in the
many Olive Garden
advertisements. The Olive
Garden will start serv-
see OLIVE GARDEN page A7
It's all about love
REID DORSETT
STAFF WRITER
"To the ear of the beholder"
is all that can truly be said about
Josh Zuckerman and his new CD,
A Totally New Sensation. Perhaps
after throwing back a beer or two,
this CD may sound better. In fact,
that is where I would expect to
hear his music, in some bar in
southern Georgia. The pseudo-
cowboy offers a style that is a
mixture of country rock with a
new alternative twist. It's hard to
believe he just finished a second
international tour.
Zuckerman composes his
own music and is accompanied
by Edward Dalley and Armando
Cabrera on the CD. Along with a
very distinct voice, the alterna-
tive country rock mix is some-
thing that is not typically heard
on mainstream radio stations.
This gives the listener a fun
soundtrack for an adventurous
afternoon or evening of almost
anything imaginable. There is
no doubt this album creates an
energetic emotion that is not
easily created by popular music
today.
The lyrics are thoughtful
and emotional, coming straight
from the heart and experience of
this composer. They offer a wide
range of emotions and world life
experiences, giving an anthem
for any feeling of the week.
It's not fair to say this CD is
terrible. There are many good
things about this musician. Zuck-
erman is an extremely talented
musician being able to play the
guitar, violin and sing. In a ren-
dition of "The Devil Went Down
To Georgia Zuckerman rocks
out the fiddle playing as well as
Charlie Daniels in the original
song. Also to add, many reviews
have praised this young musi-
cian. Aquarian Weekly said the
CD has a "radio-friendly modern
pop sound that could easily fit in
the rotation of both Top 40 and
alternative rock stations
A more recognizable maga-
zine, New York Resident, described
Zuckerman's voice as "raw and
sexy, with a rockin' sound tinged
with a southern twang
Zuckerman was raised in the
see ZUCKERMAN page A7





PAGEA6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
11-17-04
11-17-1
�:
I
Eminem's 'Encore' experiences
Seagrove, NC held its annual pottery exhibition. Seagrove has held the festival for 23 years.
Pottery Festival takes shape
Sculpting future traditions
MEREDITH STEWART
STAFF WRITER
For the past 23 years, more than 100 pot-
ters and traditional craftsmen have gathered in
Seagrove, NC for the Annual Seagrove Pottery
Festival. This traditional event allows the talented
sculptors to display and sell their work. They all
offer a wide variety of styles, shapes and textures
of homemade pottery they personally sign and
date. Each piece of art is unique because each
is specially created and sculpted with delicacy.
This pastime is a passion that requires patience
and dedication.
"I admire the potters whose work includes
designs and small details said Doris Bell, a resident
of Greenville who has been collecting pottery for
more than 10 years.
On Sunday, Nov. 21 an auction will be held. The
auction will consist of limited edition pottery that
has been signed and dated for this specific event.
Seagrove, NC is one of the largest communities of
potters in the U.S. This 23rd annual event dates
back to the late 18th Century. Homemade crafts
and other specialty items will be sold by a variety
of craftsmen. The majority of potters are local, but
some travel from as far as Maryland to attend this
special event.
Guests enjoy freshly prepared food such as
barbecue and grilled chicken each year. Pottery
lovers attend this event seeking rare, odd and
unique pieces.
"I attended the Seagrove Pottery Fesiival last
year for the first time. I'm gathering some of my
friends this year so they can go and experience this
celebration said Harriet Stewart, a pottery lover
from Fayetteville, NC.
Each year the Seagrove Pottery Festival selects
one featured potter to represent hundreds of
outstanding potters and craftsmen in the area.
This year the honor goes to Sandy Cole and her
husband Kevin Brown. Cole's family tradition
roots back more than 200 years ago. Cole's father
became ill, this was when she developed her
passion for sculpting. She loves to create clowns,
witches and a variety of animals. Her husband,
who moved from New Hampshire, became
interested when her uncle entertained people by
throwing large pots.
"The art is in the form of the pot, its feel,
its line and shape. The glaze is more like a
signature said G.F. Cole, both Sandy's uncle and
a wonderful potter.
Rebecca pitchers, angels, casseroles, piggy
banks and Christmas items are a few objects
Kevin and Sandy often make. All their work
is great, but their face jugs are what collectors
value the most. Kevin usually turns the jugs
and Sandy sculpts the faces. Sandy has created
caricatures of famous people such as Abraham
Lincoln and Jay Leno, but most of her face jugs
are pure imagination. The first face jugs were
made by the slaves and appeared in the United
States around the mid 1800s. Many experts
believe the face jugs were used as grave mark-
ers to keep the evil spirits away from the dead.
Others believe they were used to scare children
away from the moonshine stored inside, while
some still believe a widow could only remarry
after their face jug broke. All of these beliefs
are only theories, no one really knows the main
purpose or function of these beautiful and
unique creations.
In 1990, the couple bought their first place,
North Cole Pottery. They came up with the name
because Kevin is from the North and Sandy's last
name is Cole. They typically work 60 to 70 hours a
week modeling their creations and sculpting only
what their imagination limits. They are both very
proud to have the opportunity to represent hun-
dreds of potters.
Whether you're a long time collector or only
a beginner, be sure to attend the Seagrove Pottery
Festival, the oldest celebration of North Carolina's
world famous pottery tradition.
This writer can be contacted
at features@theeastcarolinian. com.
(KRT) � Encore, Eminem's
first album since his star-making
turn in the 2002 hit movie "8
Mile finds him at a crossroads:
Will he continue to roll with the
bad-boy sarcasm that made him
hip-hop's most notorious voice
or will he try to buff his vulner-
able, leading-man Hollywood
credentials in a bid for wider
mainstream acceptance?
A little bit of both, it turns
out. By turns high-minded and
juvenile, introspective and crass,
"Encore" is the dreaded transi-
tional album in the career of an
i artist who wants to grow up but
still hasn't figured out how. Just
as Britney Spears had her forget-
table "I'm not a Girl, Not Yet
a Woman" phase and Michael
Jackson struggled to be taken
seriously as a solo artist after sing-
ing "Ben" and "Rockin' Robin
Eminem is trying to figure out
what he'll do for an encore after
being rap's No. 1 controversy
magnet for the last five years.
In this context, "growing up"
is not necessarily a compliment:
Some of the best bits on "Encore"
are the most uninhibited and
silliest. When Eminem takes his
material and himself more seri-
ously, he sometimes stumbles.
There are a few show-stopping
moments but not nearly enough
to justify all 77 minutes of his
latest Marshall Plan for world
conquest.
"Encore" arrives as the year's
most anticipated album, rush-
released by Interscope Records
for release Friday, instead of the
scheduled Nov. 16, after it was
leaked on the Internet. More
than 3 million copies of the
album have been snipped, and
it's likely to debut at No. 1 on
the Billboard album chart with
well over 1 million copies sold
in its first week alone. Though
its commercial success is pre-des-
tined, its aesthetic impact is more
problematic. Like all of Eminem's
albums, its killer songs are imbed-
ded in lard-heavy filler. But its
marketing campaign is spinning
like a perfectly balanced top.
In an attempt to portray a
more mature image, Eminem
dresses in a business suit and
strikes a thoughtful pose on the
cover of the current issue of Roll-
ing Stone magazine. Encore picks
up the theme with a few tracks
that are among the most intro-
spective of the rapper's career.
On one song, Eminem addresses
one of the innumerable contro-
versies that have dogged him
in recent years. Last January, a
homemade tape from Eminem's
teenage years surfaced in which
he is heard spouting several racial
slurs after breaking up with an
African-American girlfriend. "I
singled out her whole race, and
for that I apologize, I was wrong
he raps on "Yellow Brick Road
The song, which plays out
over a tense string arrangement,
finds the rapper wrestling yet
again with the question of race,
and reveals his sincere but mis-
guided attempts to fit in with
black culture as a teen growing
up in Detroit. He finds that he
is not welcome in either world,
despised "from the black side to
the white side
On "Mockingbird addressed
to his 9-year-old daughter, Hailie,
Eminem comes perilously close to
delivering a maudlin ballad over
moody piano chords. But the
rapper's open-hearted delivery, in
which he recounts his failures as
a young father, redeems it.
"Like Toy Soldiers" builds
a dramatic musical bed out of
the chorus from Martika's 1989
hit "Toy Soldiers" and a martial
drumbeat, and Eminem weaves
a cautionary warning about the
violent consequences of once-
innocent battle rhymes.
But Eminem contradicts this
stance elsewhere on the album
as he verbally executes a barrel
full of fishes named Michael
Jackson, Madonna and Hilary
Duff. In tweaking Jackson over
his child-molestation case in
"Just Lose It Eminem instantly
retracts himself: "That's just a
metaphor, I'm just psycho On
"Never Enough he justifies his
most outrageous rhymes by basi-
cally saying, "I can't help myself
and blames his "evil deeds" on
his dysfunctional upbringing.
Just as these cop-outs start
to rankle, Eminem fires off a
self-deprecating rhyme from
the perspective of a listener not
unlike the doomed "Stan" (the
most resonant song on The Mar-
shall Mathers IP in 2000): "Woe
is me, there goes poor Marshall
again. That little rich poor
white bastard needs to take some
of that cash out of the bank and
take a bath in it
At his best, Eminem plays
off these personas and perspec-
tives with devilish charm, his
priut and self-doubt battling for
supremacy, tinged by humor and
pathos. He shifts voices, perspec-
tive and angles of verbal attack
from song to song and sometimes
within the same song, his word-
play is so sharp, his personality
so potent that he drives the music
into the background, where it
lurks almost unnoticed.
At his worst, he succumbs
to the vile name-calling and
juvenile humor that tainted even
his best albums. Once again, he
bashes his former wife, Kim, in a
foul-mouthed tirade punctuated
by the sound of someone vio-
lently retching. "Crazy in Love"
portrays the couple's love as a war
zone, where fists are exchanged
as often as kisses, spousal abuse
as a sign of endless commitment.
Typical of the album's weaker
tracks, its musical frame hangs
on a weak and obvious sample
from Heart's hard-rock hit "Crazy
on You "My First Single" suc-
cumbs to more bathroom humor
with suitably disgusting sound
effects, and adds a spritz of
snarky homophobia.
Dec 1,2004
Wellness Education & PiCASO
Present World AIDS Day at ECU
Day Events
� Healthy RI.RAT.E.S.on the yard 10am-2pm
� Free goody bag after getting HIV test
at Student Health Service
Main Events
� J. L King, author of the book. Men on the Down Low
and expert on HIV prevention, will be speaking
at Hendrix Theater at 7pm
� Book signing afterwards (bring your own book)
� FREE World AIDS Day T-shirt for 1st 100 people who attend
� Obtain volunteer hours for attending the event
� Q&A session with Mr. King, Student Health physicians
and an individual living with HIV
� Raffle of FREE giveaways
� Get a FREE HIV test on site!
As seen on Oprah, CNN,
Discovery, JET, Ebony, People,
Ny Times and many more
GET TESTED TODAY
SAVE A LIFE TOMORROW.
Special thanks to
ECU Campus Living and
Ledonia Wright Cultural Center
for their sponsor ship.
Free tickets at ECU Central ticket office for students
$3 dollars for faculty, staff, and general public
5 Day
Parly W
Jamai
Ethii
www S
1-8
"Individuals requesting accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA) should contact the Department for Disability Support Services at
least 48 hours prior to the event at (252) 328-6799 voice(2S2)328-0899 TTY"





11-17-04
11-17-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT
PAGE A7
ces
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ior Marshall
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inem plays
nd perspec-
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i sometimes
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New season, new CD
TREVOR WORDEN
STAFF WRITER
Where can you turn to for
good times, good music, good
fashion and a great TV show?
Try Fox around 8 o'clock on a
Thursday night. Finally after
the longest summer of my entire
life The OC is back on the air. It
was a long wait, but this new
season is guaranteed to be better
than the first. After the season
finale, most teenagers in America
experienced mild heart attacks.
No lawsuits were filed and the
polls now show that recoveries
are underway and everyone is
ready for the new season.
This year's new season of
the best show ever on television,
does have some predictable story
lines. This in no way discredits
the TV show, but some things
are just expected. Marissa will
probably hook up with a couple
guys and then cry about it. Ryan
will most likely beat up some
of the guys Marissa hooks up
with. Sandy and Kirsten will
most likely have to hold down
the mess that is Newport Beach.
Julie will most likely follow
where the men with the most
money lead her. Caleb might
end up in jail. Theresa will have
her baby, unless she changes her
mind again. Seth will listen to
good music and represent cool
emo nerds, but it is true not all
emo nerds have hot girlfriends.
Speaking of girlfriends,
Summer's story is a bit more
unpredictable, she is a true girl,
so we will all have to watch to
see what happens to this sultry
goddess of love.
So with this new happen-
ing season there is also another
happening CD that the folks at
Fox put out, for those who are as
obsessed over the show as 1 am.
The OC is known for its music.
There are always some new
bands on the show and the music
they put out is usually pretty
good. So with this new CD,
expectations were high. All who
follow the show, or at least like
the music put on the show, were
expecting a great new CD with
fresh new music and some
great new music from the more
established bands. The music
producers for The OC did put
out a great new CD. It's a mix
of fast and slow songs, goofy
and serious songs, a remake
of a goocf oldie and some
brand-spanking new music.
Some of the music came from a
few episodes off the first season,
which 1 am expecting will show
up on season two, either way it
is still good music.
The people behind The OC
pride themselves in allowing
bands play on their show, bands
that would normally not have
a venue to play for. This allows
up and coming groups to get
their music out, and allows
consumers to get out and buy
their music. This CD is no
different. The bands are new
and fresh, innovative and each
have their own really good,
unique sound. The CD features
songs from bands like Death Cab
for Cutie, Interpool, Jem, The
Killers, The Thrills, Keane and
some other lesser known bands.
If you are someone who
likes new music, new bands
then I would encourage you to
get this CD. This CD will help
you become more acquainted
with bands that are not
necessarily going to be popular
soon. I think this CD will prove
to be a valuable addition to
anyone's collection. So even if
you aren't a fan of the show, the
CD is still an excellent CD.
For more information about
The OC: Mix 2 check out their
Web site at fox.comtheoc.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com
Olive Garden is now open to
ing lunch Saturday, Nov. 20.
While genuine Italian food is
a draw for many, the more than 40
wines listed on the menu are what
makes the Olive Garden unique.
"We trained intensively for
well over a week said Tracy
Hyman, a bartender preparing
for the upcoming opening.
In addition to doriiestic wines
we serve, the Olive Garden works
in conjunction with wineries in
Italy and their wines will be a
new experience for the residents
of eastern North Carolina.
"We are big on wines
Hyman said.
"We look forward to educat-
ing our guests on wine
For the wine connoisseurs out
there, Hyman said "We have our
own signature wine label created
and produced by the Cavit Winery
located near Trentino, Italy
the Greenville community.
"Our signature wine label is
Principato, which is not a 'house'
wine Hyman said.
"It's our favorite wine to share
with our guests
The Olive Garden was
founded in 1982 and is "a divi-
sion of Darden Restaurants,
Inc. Olive Garden was origi-
nally developed by General
Mills Restaurants, a division of
General Mills, Inc. In June of
1995, General Mills spun off its
restaurant division into Darden
Restaurants, Inc
The Greenville restaurant
currently has more than 200
employees. General Manager
Peder Mattson-Boze, who comes
to Greenville from the Midwest,
heads the management staff.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Zuckerman
from page A5
great music city of St. Louis,
Miss. At age eight he began to
play the violin and continued
with the education for five years.
Eventually, his taste in music
shifted toward Rock'n Roll.
He played with a few cover
bands but wanted to play his
own music.
He toured with an interna-
tional group called Up With
People and performed many
shows including the 1996
Summer Olympics in Atlanta,
Ga. as well as the 1998 World
Expo in Lisbon, Portugal.
The CD is energizing and
soulful. The CD is worth listen-
ing to at least once. It is also
likely to find some of the songs
on a radio station very soon.
Check out A Totally New Sensa-
tion and remember Zuckerman's
motto: "Be who you are and
it's all about love
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
hop BOTH LOCATIONS!
Never, never, never
give up.
Bgaggesagi
Pass It On.
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Diversity ,
International Education Week
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Celebrating Local Flavor
November 15-20, 2004
Wed. Nov. 17
World Food Festival
1PM - 3PM (Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room)
Have a taste of the world around and participate ii
some special activities. . .
Dialogue on Diversity
6PM (Ledonia Wright Cultural Center)
Thurs. Nov. 18
Fulbright & International Scholars Reception
4PM - 6PM (International House)
Come visit with ECU faculty and administrators for informal
conversation and refreshments
"Gene Therapy" with Teja Arboleda
7PM - 9PM (Wright Auditorium)
Fri. Nov. 19
Community Festival
3:30PM - 6PM (Christenbury Gym)
ECU is celebrating diversity through a special youth carnival
with games and activities for children of all ages. If you
are interested in volunteering at this event please call 328-2735
or e-mail volunteer@mail.ecu.edu.
Cookout and Pep Rally
6PM - 7PM (Mendenhall Brickyard)
Sat. Nov. 20
Distribution of Diversity Pins
12PM - 2PM (Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium Student Gate)
Nov.l7:Osama@ 9:30PM
Nov.l8:Vlaria Full of Grace @ 7& 9:30PM
Nov.19:Dangerous Living @ 9:30PM & 11PM
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Nov.21 .Osama @ 3PM, Maria Full of Grace @ 5PM
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Toy Drive Benefit Concert � November 19th @ 7
Pirate Underground � Mendenhall Student Center





Page A8 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY ZOPPO Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
WEDNESDAY November 17, 2004
r
spb Men must improve for BCA �m Greece
MontgomeryGalnes
cases delayed
Hearings in the doping cases
of American sprinters Tim
Montgomery and Chryste Galnes
have been delayed until the
middle ol next year, the Court of
Arbitration for Sport said Tuesday.
The sports world's highest court
said Montgomery's hearing will
start June 6 In San Francisco and
Galnes' case will begin July 10 In
New York The hearings had been
set to begin In early November, but
were postponed at the request of
all parties. Montgomery, world
record holder in the 100 meters
who lives near Raleigh, NC, and
GainesJhavebBen charged by
the US. Antl-Doping Agency and
face lifetime bans If found guilty.
Neither tested positive for drugs,
but each was charged based on
evidence gathered In Ihe Bay Area
Laboratory Co-Operatlve case
Two BALCO executives, as well
as a track coach and the personal
trainer of baseball star Barry
Bonds have been charged with
distributing steroids to dozens
of top athletes They all have
pleaded not guilty and await trial.
CAS secretary-general Matthleu
Reeb said each case is likely to
last three or four days. CAS rulings
are final, with no opportunity for
appeal.
Sharapova
defeats Serena
Serena Williams' injury-Induced
weakened serves drove Maria
Sharapova to distraction. Two
games from ending the season
in defeat, the Russian teenager
focused on holding her own
serve. Sharapova overcame
the early third-set mental lapse
and beat WiUiams for the WTA
Championships title 4-6,6-2, 6-4
Monday night In a rematch of their
Wimbledon final The 17-vear-old
Russian will rise to a career-high
fourth when the year-end WTA
rankings are released Tuesday.
Sharapova stunned Williams
for the Wimbledon title In July,
propelling the blond teenager
to International stardom. She
finished the year with five titles.
Williams trailed 5-2 In the second
set when she called for a trainer
after straining her abdominal
muscle. The injury greatly affected
Williams' serve, usually a 120-mph
weapon but reduced to the 86-
mph puff of a weekend hacker.
Williams left the court for five
minutes and returned to have
her serve broken in losing the
set 6-2. She rolled to a 4-0 lead
m the third, including winning the
first 11 points ofthe set and twice
breaking a flustered Sharapova
After the third game, the trainer
reappeared to wind a large wrap
around Williams stomach.
Urlacher Injured again
Just when their defense was
playing at a high level and
sparking a three-game winning
streak, the Chicago Bears lost
star linebacker Brian Urtacher.
Urlacher will be out four to six
weeks after suffering an injury
to his lower left leg that required
a surgical procedure Monday to
relieve the pressure of Internal
bleeding.The four-time Pro Bowler
was Injured during Sundays 19-17
victory over the Tennessee Titans.
but the severity did not surface
until later. Urlacher didn't miss
a game In his first four seasons
but he hurt his hamstring In the
first practice ot training camp and
sat out the entire preseason. He
played two regular-season games
before the hamstring forced him
out ol games against Minnesota
and Philadelphia, both losses.
Sunday's Injury was a downer
for a defense that has been in
attack mode, especially Ihe last
two weeks In road wins! Chicago
had seven sacks and got five
turnovers to beat the Giants. And
Sunday, defensive end Michael
Haynes returned an interception
for a TD and the Bears won in
overtime when defensive end
Alex Brown sacked Billy Volek
for a safety. Urlacher's injury was
not immediately apparent. He is
pictured on the cover of Monday's
Chicago Sun-Timea making the
sign tor a safety moments after
the Bears'vlumy mmf
The Full Court
PRESS
ROBERT LEONARD
STAFF WRITER
I have
an idea for a
new chant;
purple
(pause) gold
(pause) just
doesn't do
anything for
me. I pro-
pose we as
students do
something
a little more
original. We
should do something that rep-
resents what we are thinking
instead of shouting out
two colors any art major
will tell you don't even
truly exist.
Maybe something like "All
Hail Cook That's more of what I
was thinking as he single handedly
saved the Pirates from disaster.
Cook put up 27 points in the
final exhibition game of the pre-
season against Barton last Thurs-
day. Along with Japhet McNeil,
their double figure scoring per-
formance was the only statistic in
double digits. No one pulled down
10 or more rebounds, no one dished
out 10 or more assists and no one
else scored more than 10 points.
Let me paraphrase. Against
Barton we only had two, TWO,
double figure performances.
Barton is a Division II School with
no one listed as a center on their
roster. Let that sink in for a second.
And the numbers only get
worse. With 9.07 remaining,
the Pirates held a one-point lead
against Barton.
They are still D-2 and no one
is playing center yet.
Perhaps the biggest ovation
during those painful 11 min-
utes of the worst basketball
I have seen in my time here
came with 14:54 left to go. The
6-foot, 11-inch gentle giant
known as Moussa made his
first appearance this season.
I was starting to think his
thumb had finally healed to the
point where he was back to 100
percent; after all, he did record
seven blocks against Barton. My
thoughts quickly changed when
Moussa was on a fast break and
lost control on the ball while
dribbling with his bad hand.
Without Moussa throwing
stuff left and right on one side
of the court and Mike dropping a
very quiet 17 in the first half, the
Pirates would most likely have
be down at the half. The team
as a whole looked terrible in the
first half.
The Pirates headed to a place
at haiftime where I would not
want to be, close to coach Her-
rion. I'm confident what he said
was not positive. Only up by eight
to a D-2 school at the half is not
something to be satisfied with.
Whatever he said in that locker
room seemed to work because the
Pirates dominated the second
half and coasted to the worst
25-point win I have even seen.
Never In my life have I been
dissatisfied with a 25 point win
until Thursday night.
If you look at the statistics, it's
obvious why ECU struggled like
they did. It wasn't the defense. The
Pirates forced 23 turnovers, had
12 blocks and held Barton to 30.9
percent shooting from the floor.
It wasn't free throw shoot-
ing for once. They shot 74.2
percent, which is still low,
but a dramatic improvement
from the previous exhibition.
The problem came down to
scoring and rebounding. No one,
except Mike, did anything on
the offensive side of the floor.
The Pirates' 41 percent shooting
performance cannot happen at a
consistent basis if this team wants
to win. Everyone must start scor-
ing, but more importantly, taking
smarter shots.
The fact that we were out-
rebounded by a D-2 school was
equally pathetic. We had entirely
too many players breaking down
the court as shots went up, leav-
ing only two Pirates under the
basket to Barton's four or five.
That cannot happen again.
Hopefully this week for the
BCA we can all chant "All Hail
The Pirates" instead of just "All
Hail Cook
The writer can be contacted at si
iports@theeastcarolinian.com. Mike Castro needs to play big In the paint for the Pirates In the BCA Invitational.
Lady Pirates open play in two days
Coach Sharon Baldwln-Tener has been working her Lady Pirates hard this week
to prepare for Duquesne on friday. Game time Is at 7 p.m. In Mlnges Coliseum.
Women's team, fans
anticipating opener
Welcome
one and all
to another
installment
of Points from
the Paint. The
first game of
the season is
finally draw-
ing near.
The Lady
Pirates play
their season
opener this
Friday at 7
p.m. against Duquesne. This
should be a good game and
a big test for the Lady Pirates
because Duquesne made it to the
NCAA tournament last season.
I spoke with various members
of the Lady Pirates and the con-
sensus was the same, everybody
Is fired up and excited about the
first game. They all want to make
a good showing and get some
excitement started about wom-
en's basketball at ECU. Although
they lost a key member of the
BRANDI RENFRO
SPORTS WRITER
team last year, Courtney Willis,
they have gelled well together
and they should be quite exciting
this year.
Shanita Sutton has been
doing a great job in practice thus
far and she may be the person
to fill the role of Willis. Sutton
is a different type of post player
because she is not just a back-to-
the-basket type of player. She can
shoot the 15-footer. Due to her
improved quickness she can get
down the court well, and I see her
scoring at least 10 points a game.
The Lady Pirates have also
added a new person to their
roster; Jihan Howard was added
last week and should add some
much needed depth to the post
position. Howard is a 6-5 fresh-
man from Raleigh, NC and a
good rebounder. She partici-
pated in her first few practices
last week and showed some
good rebounding skills and
post moves. Howard has a lot
of learning to do, but once she
adapts to the Lady Pirate system
she should be a good spark off of
the bench.
I spoke with a few Lady Pirate
see POINTS page A9
OSU hoping to spoil Michigan's season
(KRT) � COLUMBUS, Ohio
Oh, the Buckeyes know what's at
stake for Michigan on Saturday.
Without question corner-
back Dustin Fox said.
Beat Ohio State, and the Wol-
verines win the Big Ten outright
and go to the Rose Bowl. Lose,
and they need Wisconsin to lose
to Iowa or they settle for a split
title and probably the Capital
One Bowl.
But as much as the Buckeyes
would love to mess up things for
Michigan, they would like to sal-
vage something for themselves.
"We're coming in as the
spoiler quarterback Troy Smith
said. "But then again, I hope my
team doesn't come out with that
sense of, We're just trying to
spoil Michigan's season We have
to win this game for us
It's been an awful autumn at
Ohio State on and off the field.
The Buckeyes won their first
three games, and they were
ranked sixth in the coaches' poll
and seventh in the media poll.
But they lost their next three,
won their next three and lost
their next one, and now they're
unranked.
"I am shocked Fox said. "At
Ohio State, you don't expect to
lose four games in a season. You
expect to win every game
Along the way, there was
the strip-club controversy
involving tailback Lydell Ross,
a senior captain. After the Buck-
eyes lost their third in a row,
Ross went to a place called Pure
Platinum. A few days later, the
managers filed a complaint
alleging Ross had paid a dancer
with $50 worth of fake or stolen
in-house currency called
Platinum Bills. Police deter-
mined the bills weren't fake
they were an old version and
found no evidence they were
stolen. Still, Ross was embar-
rassed and apologized.
Then last week, former run-
ning back Maurice Clarett came
out in ESPN The Magazine with
allegations that coach Jim Tressel,
his staff and boosters had helped
him get grades, cars and money.
see MICHIGAN page A9
Senior Martin Jackson (3) and the Michigan defense stifled the OSU attack last
year, holding the Buckeyes to seven points in the first half. UM won 35-21.
to Greenville
ECU'S 8th Annual
Adapted Sports Day a
success once again
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
STAFF WRITER
For eight years, the SRC in
association with sponsors has put
together what they call Adapted
Sports Day. Adapted Sports Day
is a day set aside for persons with
special needs and volunteers to
participate in adapted sports at
the SRC. The events allow for the
public to get somewhat of a feel
for what it's like to be disabled
and to further be educated on
the topic, as well as having fun
in the process.
When I was first assigned to
cover the 8th Annual Adapted
Sports Day, I did not know what
to expect. I have never been
or participated in any form of
adapted sports. My knowledge
of the subject was limited to the
few ARISE articles I have written
in the past. I never had seen the
actual sports in person.
I first arrived at the SRC last
Saturday morning and was imme-
diately met at the door with volun-
teers asking me if I wanted to sign
up and volunteer myself. Unsure
of what to expect, I explained to
them I was there to write a paper
on the event and I continued
on my way into the building.
Everyone gathered around as
the Vice Chancellor for Student
Life Garrie Moore gave an intro-
duction speech to welcome every-
one to the 8th annual event at
9:30 a.m. After Moore's speech,
David Gaskins, associate director
of programs at the SRC, took the
stage. Gaskins thanked the spon-
sors of the program and further
explained the events of the day.
It was then time for a five-minute
inspirational video that displayed
past clips of the event over the
previous seven years.
As I was walking away from
the meeting I was approached
by another volunteer. This time
I was asked to participate In an
event called the Slalom Course.
The Slalom Course was basi-
cally an obstacle course that
participants had to maneuver
through in their wheelchair. I was
reluctant to participate, as I
had never even sat down in a
wheelchair before. After a little
persuasion, I eventually gave in
and was open to try the experi-
ence.
A volunteer guided me along
the obstacle course in the wheel
chair around barrels and through
zigzags forward and backward.
My arms were already tired from
pushing myself on the first run
through, but it was time for my
second one, the timed one, the
one that really mattered.
On the whistle I darted away
as fast as I could through the
course, at what I thought had to
be record time. It was a little frus-
trating learning how to maneuver
the chair around the barrel back-
ward and forward, but I hung in
there till I crossed the finish line
at two minutes and 30 seconds,
a time in which I thought was
never going to be broken. Unfor-
tunately, my record lasted only
10 minutes as it was replaced by
another participant who went
through the same course in just
50 seconds.
My arms were sore from the
event partially from my heavy
weight and also due to my lack
of working out in the past few
months. My sore arms, however,
changed the way I felt about
those with special needs. I had
been in the wheelchair for only
five minutes and was already
tired, I began to think about
those who had to be in one for
their entire lives. At the moment
I stood out of the chair I gained
a new found respect for everyone
with special needs and realized I
needed to volunteer.
I went back to the front of
the recreation center where I was
approached earlier and signed up to
volunteer the event. I felt good after
signing up, as if I had really done
something that made a difference.
I continued around the SRC
volunteering and watching some
of the adapted events such as
wheelchair volleyball, the climb-
ing wall and the slalom course
until it was time for the keynote
speaker. To my surprise the key-
note speaker was none other than
Jean Drlscoll.
I have heard of Driscoll before
on TV, but I never thought she
would be at this event. Driscoll
was a world class athlete, who
among other things has won the
see GREECE page A8





11-17-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE A9
ACC football has enjoyed success Michigan
from page A8
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After a little
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Miami, VT add new
blood to conference
MATTHEW SAUNDERS
STAFF WRITER
Normally, about this time in
the college football season you
hear about how great the SEC
conference is, or how the Big
Ten and Big Twelve are hoping
tcyget one of their great teams
into the National Championship
game. Then you hear about the
ACC and realize it's always just
a notch below and Florida State
is the only legitimate national
title contender in the confer-
ence. This season we have seen
a monumental shift in how
we look at the conferences in
college football. With the addi-
tions of Miami and Virginia
Tech to the conference, the ACC
is shaping up to have maybe its
most exciting finish ever. There
are four teams in the confer-
ence who still have a legitimate
shot at winning it, with those
teams being Florida State and
Virginia along with the newcom-
ers Miami and Virginia Tech.
The winner will get to play in
a BCS game, this year being the
Sugar Bowl.
There has been a share of
exciting moments this season
in college football. Who can
forget that great finish between
Oklahoma and Texas A& M last
week, or that thrilling triple
overtime game between Michi-
gan and Michigan State and how
about Auburn beating LSU in
the waning moments to really
solidify themselves as the team
to beat in the SEC? Those games
were great, but if you were to ask
anyone their opinion on the most
exciting college football game
this season, 1 bet they would tell
you it was UNC vs. Miami. That
game was truly a battle between
David and Goliath. UNC at the
time was a down-on-their-luck,
perennial loser who was on the
verge of firing their coach, and
Miami was this powerhouse that
looked like it would roll through
the ACC all the way to, well
Miami, to play for the National
Championship in the Orange
Bowl. Instead, UNC held its own
throughout the game against
the mighty U, and their kicker
Connor Barth nailed a 42-yard
field goal with time expiring
to give UNC an almost surreal
31-28 win. It was truly a game
for the ages, and one the folks
in Chapel Hill will be talking
The arrival of Miami and Virginia Tech has given the ACC a legitimate claim to
calling themselves one of the best football conferences in the nation.
about for years to come. That
game was not only significant
for the Tar Heels, but for the
entire ACC in general because
it really captured the nation's
attention and showed once and
for all the ACC is no longer
a basketball only conference.
This season we could see
as many as seven ACC teams
making bowl appearances, and
at the moment there are four
teams ranked in the top 20 of
the AP top 25 poll. Next season's
newcomer, Boston College, is
also ranked in the top 20. If
this season is any indication,
the ACC has a bright future in
football. Even though conference
Commissioner John Swoford
with his attempts to expand the
conference met heavy criticism,
and in some circles still does,
he has to be smiling at the tre-
mendous excitement this season
has generated. With only two
weeks left in this college football
season. The best games in the
ACC may be yet to come. We've
still got pivotal games between
Virginia Tech, Virginia and
Miami and Virginia Tech still to
be played.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Athletic director Andy Geiger
called the allegations "bogus"
and said many already had been
found baseless in investigations
by the NCAA and the school.
Still, NCAA officials were back
on campus Monday to begin
digging again.
"I get kind of frustrated,
because 1 don't think (Tressel
and Geiger) would do anything
wrong kicker Mike Nugent said.
"So when someone says some-
thing like that, I think you've just
got to think about the source
As if that weren't bad enough,
former men's basketball coach
Jim O'Brien has sued the univer-
sity for up to $6 million. Geiger
fired O'Brien on June 8, six weeks
after O'Brien admitted giving a
recruit $6,000. O'Brien contends
he shouldn't have been fired until
after the NCAA investigation.
"There's been a lot of specu-
lations about the things going
on around here said Smith,
"and just getting a win against
Michigan hopefully will make a
lot of it just go away
"I don't think we as players
worry about the stuff off the field
too much. Stuff like this has been
going on for a while around us.
But I think around the program,
the fans and everything, a win
here I think makes everyone in
Columbus and Ohio sleep a little
better throughout the whole
year said linebacker, A.J. Hawk
This rivalry has a rich history
of teams playing spoiler.
Three years ago, the Buckeyes
were 6-4 and coming off a loss,
just as they are now. The Wolver-
ines were 8-2, in a similar posi-
tion to the one they're in now
at 9-1. They were trying to tie
Illinois for the Big Ten title and
go to the Fiesta, Sugar or Orange.
Ohio State won, 26-20.
"In 2001 Fox said, "it kind
of erased some of that bad taste
in our mouth from some of the
losses we had that season
If only the Buckeyes could
makeMichigan mouthwash again.
"This year our season
hasn't worked out as well as
we wanted it to, but we know
we have a great opportunity
this week to right some wrongs
in beating Michigan Hawk
said. "It could really help
things out and make all those
losses a lot easier to swallow
Greece
from page A8
Boston Marathon eight times and
set the world record in the 10,000
meter track event. Sports Illus-
trated for Women even recognized
her as one of the top 25 female
athletes of the 20th century.
As Driscoll spoke everyone
was glued to her words. She
spoke of her life and how she
overcame her disability that has
left her in a wheelchair since she
was a child.
"There are so many things
that we experience in life that
build on one another that help
us get to that next level in life
said Driscoll in her speech.
"Don't set limitations on
yourself, be yourself doing big
things and know that you have
incredible lives before you
The crowd applauded with
approval after Driscoll was
finished with her speech.
Soon after the speech
everyone went to lunch. At lunch
I talked to Rachel Alligood.
sophomore recreational therapy
major, about her experience so
far throughout the event.
"It has been a lot of fun, a
lot more fun than I thought it
was going to be, everyone was
really excited about
being here and doing the
activities said Alligood.
"I really think this is a
good event
"It's good for everyone to
come out and see how everybody
can play together and to see
how everyone with or without
disabilities can interact together
Alligood said.
Junior Brandon Buck was
a participant in the events
this year. It was his fifth time
participating and he said he
would continue to come.
"It is an excellent, excel-
lent event. It is an awesome
way for people throughout the
community to realize what
activities the rec center provides
through the ARISE program,
to the disabled community
said Buck.
"I come every year and it is a
blast. You meet so many people
that you don't see but once a
year and you meet new people
with your disability, different
people in wheelchairs, it's just an
awesome experience
As the day rolled on, 1 watched
as some of the other events
played out such as wheelchair
basketball, goalball and even
wheelchair rugby. Eventually
3:30 p.m. rolled around and the
event was coming to a close.
I began to sit and think about
how the event in just a short
time being there, made such
an impact on the way I felt and
thought. I wondered about how
many others the event touched,
just like me. With close to 100
volunteers, I wondered if there
were 100 just like me, feeling the
same way I felt.
There were a few things 1
did knpw, however. I knew the
8th Annual Adapted Sports Day
was a success, I have made a
difference in others lives by
choosing to volunteer and this
event is something I would gladly
return to next year whether I am
writing an article on it or not.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Points
from page A8
fans over the weekend and I
asked them what they thought
about the upcoming season.
Most of them said they can't
wait to see how the team reacts
without the presence of Willis
in the paint and others said due
to her absence others on the
team will step up tremendously.
I personally think this will be a
season full of surprises because
no one knows who will step
up consistently or if different
people will step up on differ-
ent nights. I think they have to
have at least three people score
in double digits every night and
they have to be aggressive in the
post. Overall, 1 think this team
will surprise a few teams and
completely crush some.
Well Lady Pirate fans, that's
all the news I have to share for
this week. I hope I see all of you
at the season opener against
Duquesne. Until next week, adios
misamlgos.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
Failed, failed, failed. And then.
PERSISTENCE
Pass It On.
THE FOUNDUION '�� � BETTER LIFE
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COMICS
Page A10
WEDESDAY November 17, 2004
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Parkway fillers
5 Church
assembly
10 Foundation
14 Chills and fever
15 Nettle
16 Coffee servers
17 Rational
18 Sadat of Egypt
19 Sacred bird of
ancient Egypt
20 Quakes
22 Slanted
24 Vow falsely
25 Offspring
27 Symbols of
slowness
30 Screen parts
31 Salesman's
goods
32 Took the plunge
33 Actor Danson
36 Declare
37 Seethed
38 Salami seller
39 Green color
40 Solitary one
41 Played again
42 Approximately
43 Laying asphalt
44 Prepare to
remove
47 Simple card
game
48 Pestle's partner
49 Accords
53 Champagne
description
54 Turn inside out
57 Wight or Man
58 Actor Jannings
59 Suit-able
material?
60 Kiln
61 Evaluate
62 Guide
63 Refusals
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players
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Ancient
alphabet
character
More proper
Lets live
Cravings
7 Fresh
8 Latin eggs
9 Jumped the
tracks
10 Erects
11 AnnMl
12 Shoot from
cover
13 City on the
Ruhr
21 Old Masters
medium
23 Rosebud, e.g.
25 War (1853-
56)
26 Remain
suspended in air
27 Trade
28 Basilica section
29 Neighborhood
32 Ninny
33 Garr of "Tootsie"
34 Distinctive flair
35 Fender flaw
37 Stronghold
38 Piety
40 Kudrow of
"Friends"
Solutions
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42 Cows and bulls
43 Football team
member
44 Brown pigment
45 Actress
Shearer
46 Outcome
49 Prevail upon
50 Aoki of golf
51 Otherwise
52 Match parts
55 Dog's doc
56 Afore
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World Kindness Day
Celebrate World Kindness day at ECU
Wednesday, November 17
10-12 Applegrams Wright plaza
Sponsored by student involvement team and campus dining
Send an encouraging message to your professor or advisorl Pick up your
FREE applegram! Limited supplyl
All Day BGTY (Be Good To Yourself) Student Health Center
Sponsored by Healthy Pirates and Wellness Education
Free giveaways to brighten up your dayl
1 PM- 3 PM World Food Festival Mendenhall Student Center,
Multipurpose Room
Sponsored by campus Dining and Office of International Affairs
Free samples of different international foods and interactive
activities!
6 PM Dialogue on diversity Ledonia Wright Cultural Center
Sponsored by SGA, Ledonia Wright Cultural Center,
Campus Ministry Association Topic: Religious Pluralism
Dances for
Universal Peace
Dances for Universal Peace
Sunday, November 21
Mendenhall Student Center 244, 4-6 PM
Come and join us for an afternoon of interactive and meditative activities focus-
ing on peace. The Dances of Universal Peace are simple circle dances set to live
music and sacred phrases from many different spiritual traditions throughout the
world. No previous dance or musical experience necessary. The movements and
songs are drawn from over 400 dances that include themes of peace, healing, and
the celebration of life. FREE! Sponsored by ECU Student Involvement Team. For
more information contact 328-5596
vm





: 2004

ft
IUV.COM
i
r
Page A11
WEDNESDAY November 17, 2004
For Rent
For Rent- 2 Bedroom 1 bath
brick duplex, central air,
Stancill Drive. Walking distance
to ECU. $540month. Pets
OK wfee. Call 353-271
Wesley Common North- 1 &
2 bedroom. Stove, refrigerator
and watersewer included. Pet
allowed with fee. Short-term
lease available. Close to ECU. For
more information call Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
2 BR1 BA East 2nd Street
$600mo. Hardwood floors,
WD, dishwasher, small pets OK.
Available December oranuary. Call
252-328-1276 or 443-621-2338.
3 bedroom 3 bath house across
from baseball stadium available
now or next semester. New
houses with all appliances
and washerdryer. $1050 per
month. Call Chip 355-0664.
Blocks to ECU, 2 or 3 BDRM (1
each), all appliances, central
heatAC, call 321-4712 or
collegeunlversityrentals.com.
Cannon Court & Cedar Court- 2
bedroom, 1 12 bath townhouse.
Stove, refrigerator and dishwasher.
Located on the ECU bus stop. Basic
cable included with some units.
Short term leases available. For
more information call Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
Ceorgetowne Apartments. Pre-
lease now for spring semester.
Located downtown across
from the ECU Student Rec.
Center. Spacious 2 BR, 1 12
bath townhouses. Remodeled
kitchen and bathrooms.
$675. Call 757-0079 and ask
about our pre-lease specials.
Spacious 3 bedroom townhouse
full basement, enclosed
patio, WD hook-up, ECU
bus route, no pets. 752-7738,
7:30-4:30 available January, includes water, sewer, & cable.
408 4th Street- 3 BDRM, 12 block
from downtown, 1500 SF, central
heatingair fully remodeled,
washerdryer included. Call Jeff at
252-327-4433, new windows low
utilities, available immediately.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments,
walking distance to campus, WD
conn pets OK no weight limit,
free water and sewer. Call today for
security deposit special-758-1921.
Three Bedroom duplex for rent
near ECU. Available immediately.
Rent $565- Call 752-6276.
For rent University Area Wyndam
Court 3 bedrooms 2 baths.
Call Renee Carter 347-2602.
5 Bedroom for rent two blocks
from campus one block from
City Market $1075.00 per month.
Call 355-1895 leave message.
Seeking Christian non-smoker
to share beautiful 2BR duplex.
Fully furnished, all appliances,
WD, security system, fenced-in
backyard, your own bathroom.
7 min. from ECU, $300month
12 Ut. phone. Call Laura @ 321 -
5748 or Ies0903@mail.ecu.edu.
Beautiful House, 3BDR, 2 Bath
one block from campus, females
non-smoking; high speed
wireless internet option; WD,
all kitchen appliances, parking,
furnished, security system,
no pets. Please call 347-1231.
EastgateWoodcliff-1 & 2 bedroom
apartments. Stove, refrigerator
and watersewer included.
Short term leases available. For
more information call Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
Wildwood Villas 2 BR, 2 12
bath townhouse. Unfinished
basement, includes washer and
dryer. Available now! Short
term lease available. $575 per
month. Call Chip 355-0664.
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015-1 & 2
BR apts, dishwasher, CD, central
air & heat, pool, ECU bus line, high
speed internet available, 9 or 12
month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
112 E. 9th Street-3 BDRM, 1 bath
house, 1 block from SACCampus,
central heatingair, washerdryer
included, available immediately.
Call Jeff @ 252-327-4433.
Beech Street Villas- 3 bedrooms
and 2 bath apartment. Stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher and
washerdryer connections.
Cat allowed with fee. Water
sewer included. Short term
leases available. For more
information call Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
Wyndham Circle Duplex 2
bedroom, 2 bath, available (an
1 and June 1, $625 month,
newly decorated, cathedral
ceiling, nice landlord, rents
fast so call 321-4802, No Pets.
Cotanche Street, Cypress
Gardens and Park Village. 1 &2
bedroom apartments. Located
near ECU. Watersewerbasic
cable included with some units.
Short term leases available. For
more information call Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
101 S. Woodlawn- 3 BDRM, 1 bath
house, 3 blocks from campus,
central heatingair, washerdryer
included, available immediately.
Call Jeff at 252-327-4433.
12 block to ECU, 1 bedrm all
appliances, call 321-4712 or
collegeunlversltyrentals.com
Rent Special- Gladiolus & Jasmine
1 & 2 bedrooms. Lease ends
June 30, 2005. Close to ECU.
Pet allowed with fee. For more
information call Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
College Town Row- 2 bedroom,
1 bath Duplex. Close to ECU. Pet
allowed with fee. Stove, refrigerator
and washerdryer connections.
Short-term lease available. For
more information call Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
Roommate Wanted
Seeking responsible roommate
to sublease room in 3BD3BA
in Pirate's Place. $275mo. plus
13 utilities and cable (high
speed internet included).
Available Dec. 21 (336)339-7673.
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Greek Personals
Alpha Delta Pi would like to
announce our 2nd annual Silent
Holiday Auction taking place
Sunday Nov. 21 from 11am-
5pm. All proceeds will go the
the Ronald McDonald House.
Congratulations to the Teddy Bear
Run girls for being nominated
Kappa Delta's sisters of the week.
Thank you Kappa Sig, Theta
Chi, and ADPi for the quad
last Thursday. We had a ton
of fun! Love- Zeta Tau Alpha
The ladies of ZTA would like to
thank the Delta Sig brothers
for a great social Friday
night. Love- Zeta Tau Alpha
Congratulations to our new
members on their initiation.
Zeta Tau Alpha would like to
welcome home our new sisters
Juliana Allen, Sarah Daughtrey,
Shelby Fowler, Maria Geremina,
Maggy Jones, Michelle Kwak,
Mary Craig Misenheimer,
Jennifer Parks, Kelly Paramore,
Amy Pruitt, Nicole Schray,
Holly Seaton, Canaan Sewell,
Krista Small, Megan Trzcinski
and Choe Tupper. Love, ZTA.
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Report news students need to know. f�C
Accepting applications tor STAFF WRITERS
� Leam Investigative reporting skills
� Must have at least a 2,0 GM
Apply al our office located on the 2nd lloor otlhe Student Publications Building, or call 328-6366.






THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
11-17-04
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ILLEGAL DOWNLOADING
Inappropriate for All Ages
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Pursuant to the Copyright Act (17 U.S.C. Section 504(c)), statutory damages can be as much
as $30,000 per motion picture, and up to $150,000 per motion picture if the infringement is willful.
c 2004 Motion Picture Association of America, Inc.


Title
The East Carolinian, November 17, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 17, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1775
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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