The East Carolinian, November 16, 2004






11-11-04
Volume 80 Number 31
TUESDAY
November 16, 2004
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
www.theeastcarolinian.com
'Down East Heart Walk' a success
The Student Government
Association met Monday to
discuss student fee increases.
SGA votes on
student fee
increases
Accepted proposals
amount to
$161.50 increase
A.J. WALTON
STAFF WRITER
The Student Government
Association met Monday eve-
ning to discuss the proposed
student fees for the 2005-2006
fiscal year.
A $1 increase was given to the
Student Government Association,
a $1 increase for Student Media,
a $.50 increase for the Fine Arts
and Performing Groups Funding
Board and a $2.50 increase for the
University Union were all passed
with little discussion.
Other items presented to the
SGA were not received or as easily
accepted, causing many SGA
members to voice their opinions
on the proposals.
The ECU Recreational Ser-
vices received a $20 increase after
a 29 to 13 vote passed through
the senate floor. The Recreational
Services has not received an
increase since fhe opening of the
center in 1997, with the excep-
tion to an activity fee increase
to support the opening of Blount
Intramural Sports Complex. The
increase will assist the services
with the increasing maintenance
and utilities cost, along with
programs to meet the needs of
students.
The senate approved a $2
increase for the Adult and Com-
muter Services Office. With a 25
to 14 vote in their favor, the new
increase will allow the office to
better its outreach programs to
adult commuters and off-campus
students. After a $2 deduction
last year that left the office under
funded, the increase will allow
them to fully fund its staff and
programs.
Gary Moore, vice-chancellor
for Student Life, discussed a pro-
posal of an increase of $51 for the
Mendenhall Student Center.
Amidst great debate as to
what the $51 would be used for,
Moore said $31 of the increase
would help to maintain the aging
center alone, while the remaining
$20 would go towards the fund-
ing for a new Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center and Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center.
A number of senators ques-
tioned the need for such a large
increase and commented on
Mendenhall's reasons for the
increase.
Representatives of Mendenhall
said a goal would be to make the
center more useful for students.
After a discussion that con-
sisted of a 10 minute recess and
several important questions from
the SGA, the senate approved
a $36 increase for Mendenhall
Student Center, a $15 deduction
from its initial request, with a 22
to 11 to 3 vote.
Senators said $36 would allow
Mendenhall to take care of main-
tenance and safety issues, while
allotting money to help with
future projects.
ECU'S athletics, whose cur-
rent fee is ranked 10th in the
UNC system, requested a $50
increase, bringing its ranking to
third in the system.
Terry Holland, the recently
appointed Athletic Director,
spoke on behalf of athletics. Hol-
land urged the senate to approve
the increase, citing that it will
benefit ECU-and its students in
the long run.
The senate approved all the
proposals, which will result in
a $161.50 increase for ECU stu-
dents.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com
ECU students and the Greenville community spent Saturday morning walking to raise money for heart research
PrOCeedS QlVen tO t'on to furtner research for heart
disease and stroke.
American Heart crystal Herring, director of
Association
NICK HENNE
NEWS EDITOR
The annual Heart Walk took
place on Saturday attracting hun-
dreds of participants from ECU
and the Greenville community,
and raised thousands of dollars
for the American Heart Associa-
corporate relations walk, at the
Greenville office of the Ameri-
can Heart Association, said she
thought the event was a great
success citing the recreational
and leisure studies provided
much support.
She said the event should
accomplish all of the projected
goals established in the event's
planning. The monetary goal was
$127,000 - 30 percent coming
from local and corporate spon-
sors while the other 70 percent
comes from individual walkers
and team dollars.
�Richard Eakin, chair of the
American Heart Walk, said the
event raised a total of $69,275 by
the day of the event and there are
a number of remaining sources
the American Heart Association
is waiting on contributions from.
The community reacted well
to the event.
"I think there was a great
response, especially from ECU
E-coli outbreak hits the
state, raises concern
Health officials urge
awareness, caution
In the past five years, the number of reported E-coli instances
has outnumbered other serious illnesses.
Dr. John Morrow,
director of the Pitt County Health
Department, said if you believe
you are infected or recognize any
of the symptoms, it is important
to seek help immediately.
"See your physician as soon as
you can. It is easy for a food born
illness to infect us without us
being aware of it said Morrow.
"A lot of people who think
they have food poisoning
because they ate in a restaurant
an hour ago and become sick,
they immediately think what-
ever they just ate is what made
them sick and that's usually not
the case
Morrow said it usually takes
anywhere from six to 24 hours
for a food born illness to make a
person sick.
o
E-coli
information
COLE WAHAB
STAFF WRITER
An outbreak of E-coli,
believed to have originated from
the state fair in Raleigh, occurred
last month in North Carolina
causing state officials to issue
various health alerts.
As of Nov. 12, the NC
Health Department reported 40
cases have been confirmed via
laboratory testing and another
107 are under review. The
outbreak has not been recorded
in Pitt County. Wake County
holds the highest number
of infected, currently at 19.
Fraternity holds drive
Delta Chi fraternity brothers are holding a week-long canned food drive event geared
toward supplying the homeless with food for the upcoming holidays.
said Herring.
She said despite the cold
weather and rainy conditions
people still came out showing there
is a definite interest within the
ECU and Greenville community.
They are aware and willing to work
toward heart disease and stroke.
"They realize this is some-
thing we have to come together
and fight I definitely think
everyone sees the importance of
spreading the awareness of heart
disease and stroke Herring said.
The funding will be going
toward the American Heart
Association where it will
then be used for research.
"Our goal is to reduce the rate
at which heart disease and stroke
kill Americans Herring said.
Heart disease is currently the
number one killer of Americans
while stroke is number three.
The American Heart Association
hopes to reduce these numbers by
a significant percentage by 2010.
Herring said she thought the
chair and other planners of the
Heart Walk were successful.
Eakin said the event was a
great success as the many students
and community members came
out on a blistery cold morning.
"I think the fact that these
folks showed up this morning in
such great numbers is a real sign
of commitment on the part of
our community and our students
it's a tribute to all of them that
they would make this contribu-
tion said Eakin.
He said the event was a success
despite the number of people who
did not show up due to the weather.
Eakin said a change in this
year's Heart Walk from last year
was the increase of ECU students
participating as volunteers.
"This says a great deal of the great
students we have at ECU Eakin said.
Eakin said the Ameri-
can Heart Walk is designed
to raise money for a worthy
cause that everyone needs to
pay additional attention to.
He said many people in the
United States take the issue
of heart disease for granted.
see HEART page A3
NASA scientist lectures
on heat and rainfall
E-Coli Is scientifically known as
Escherlcla coli.
Symptoms can include bloody
diarrhea and severe abdominal
cramps, however there Is usu-
ally no fever associated with the
illness.
E-coll Is most often found In
undercooked foods, especially
undercooked hamburger patties.
Morrow said protecting
yourself from E-coli is difficult,
especially since we have become a
society that is constantly on
the move, utilizing the fast food
industry.
"It's very hard, especially if
you're a college student. Even if you
prepared your own food, you're still
at risk somewhat Morrow said.
Morrow said one of the best
ways to protect yourself from
infection is careful preparation
of food and washing your hands
thoroughly with warm water
and antibacterial soap for fifteen
seconds or more.
Morrow said students who
attended the state fair who have
not yet been infected have a small
see E-COU page A2
Profuse rainfall in cities is a recent weather phenomenon.
Event attracts ECU
students, faculty
CHRIS MUNIER
STAFF WRITER
A meteorologist from NASA
spoke to students and faculty on
Friday in Brewster during a lecture
hosted by the geography depart-
ment entitled "I low Cities Create
Their Own Rainfall and Storms
J. Marshall Shepherd, research
meteorologist in the laboratory of
atmospheres at NASA, informed
ECU about rainfall and showed
several graphs and statistical
information about temperature
increases in urban areas. He
focused his presentation on two
recent phenomena in cities: urban
heat islands and profuse rainfall.
Shepherd began his presen-
tation by discussing NASA's
involvement with earth sci-
ence through the use of satellite
technology. Through the use of
infrared sensors, NASA is able
to detect heat areas which has
allowed scientists to find a dis-
parity between the temperatures
in cities and rural areas. This
research has indicated cities are
almost 10 degrees warmer than
rural places, a disparity that has
been growing since the indus-
trial revolution around 1880.
Shepherd showed a map of
the United States from a satellite
perspective exemplifying darker
regions as areas of increased
temperature. Long Island was
jet-black and considered to be an
"urban heat island Other high-
lighted cities included Chicago,
Phoenix, Houston and Atlanta.
Shepherd discussed rates of
rainfall within cities. Rainfall is of
particular importance to coastal
cities because of their vulnerabil-
ity to flooding, making NASA's
work of great importance to flood
control and homeland security.
Shepherd said storms often
split into two once they reach cities
in a process known as bifurcation.
This process occurs due to tfietlffit
of cities combined with the size
of skyscrapers, which alters the
structure of a storm and causes it
to split. Shepherd had a satellite
image that showed a storm hit-
ting Atlanta from the west and
being cut into pieces once it
passed the city. He then showed
an image of the Empire State Build-
ing in New York City blocking a
storm and altering its movement.
Shepherd hypothesizes these
alterations of storms have impacts
on the severity of the storms.
When tall buildings block storms
they seem to form a convection
that insulates storm activity. For
example, storms that form outside
of the Phoenix area often propa-
gate back toward Phoenix. Phoe-
nix is a heat island in a very dry,
hot region of the United States.
NASA is also learning about
the implications aerosol can have
on the environment. NASA's
knowledge of aerosol is not as
extensive as its understand-
ing of methane gases. Shep-
herd said dirty clouds caused
partially by aerosol are con-
tributing to delayed develop-
ment of clouds, which leads
to delayed rainfall and ulti-
mately longer, harsher storms.
Shepherd also showecfimages
of heat increase in locations
throughout the rest of the world.
North and South Korea were cited
as having heat problems near the
city of Seoul.
Shepherd said he was not
trying to make political state-
ments but rather to show his
research and theorize as to what
it might mean.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
INSIDE I News:A2 I Comics: A9 I Opinion: A4 I Scene: A5 I Sports: A7






ife
Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian. com 252.328. 6366
NICK HENNE News Editor KRISTIN DAY Assistant News Editor
TUESDAY November 16, 2004
Campus News
Correction
The following Information is a
correction from the article "ECU
students mentor at risk children"
in our Wednesday, Nov. 10 issue:
ECU friends are considering
working in conjunction with a
program established by Michael
Bassman, director of the honors
program under the proposed
program. Volunteers would start
out working with preschool
children from migrant families
from ages three to four. After
working with the preschool
children, East Carolina Friends
volunteers would be placed with
children from ages 5-12 from the
local school system.
Mix It Up Lunch
Students are asked to et lunch
with someone who is different
than them as an individual as part
of Diversity Week. Friends eat free
at dining hall locations.
World Food Festival
A variety of ethnic foods and
activities are being offered
to students tomorrow from 1
p.m. - 3 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Multipurpose Room.
Dialogue on Diversity
Campus Ministries will be
available to discuss and present
different perspectives on religious
pluralism at ECU. Event held
tomorrow at Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center at 6 p.m.
Open MIc
Via Cappuccino will hold an open
mic night tonight at 8 p.m. Sign up
at Via anytime before the event or
at the door at 409 Evans Street
across from Emerge. Call 439-
0700 for details.
Dissertation Defense
Come see Tim Saltuklaroglu with
the communication sciences
and disorders department's
dissertation defense called The
Role of Gestural Imitation In
the Inhibition of Stuttering The
presentation will be today at
3:30 p.m. In 103 Belk Building
(School of Allied Health). For
more information, e-mail Tim at
ts0712@mall.ecu.edu.
Marketing Lecture
The American Marketing
Association will host Will Guttu
from the Regional Acceptance
Corporation, a division of BB&T.
Guttu will provide information
about the sales and financing
industry tomorrow night from 5
p.m. - 6 p.m. In 1028 Bate. F9e
pizza and beverages will be
served and the event is open to
all majors.
Choral Festival
The school of music will host the
ECU High School Choral Festival
at Wright Auditorium and Hendrix
Theater at tomorrow at 9 a.m. Call
328-6851 for more Information.
Guitar Concert
The school of music will hold
a guitar concert series a! A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall tomorrow
at 8 p.m. The artistic director for
the night will be Elliot Frank. Call
328-6851 for details.
American Indian Identity
Dr. Anne Waters, Research
Associate, Interpretation and
Culture, with the State University
of New York, Binghamton will hold
a lecture called "American Indian
Identity: Thoughts About Who We
Are" on Friday, Nov. 19 at 7 p.m.
In 1031 Bate Building. For more
Information, contact Dee Ann
Suggs at 328-6121.
Grant-In-Aid
Delta Xi is offering financial
support to female students who
will be going into the teaching
profession. Applicants must have
a 3.0 GPA and display financial
need. The aid will be awarded
during-the February chapter
meeting. For questions about
requirements and application,
contact Dr. Katalin Szucs at 320-
1908.
World AIDS Day
On Dec 1, the Wellness Education
staff will be outside of the ECU
student store from 10 a.m. - 2
p.m. playing educational games
and giving out free information
on AIDS. At 7 p.m J. L. King,
author of Men on the Down-low,
will speak about HIV on college
campuses in Hendrix Theater.
On-stte HIV testing will be offered
In the lobby.
News Briefs
Local
News & Observer
reporter arrested
RALEIGH, NC - A News & Observer
reporter was arrested, then released,
after a woman he was trying to
interview for a story charged him with
making harassing phone calls.
Ruth A. Brown, a property room
technician with the Durham Police
Department, filed the complaint
against reporter Demorris Lee, 36,
of Raleigh.
Brown's testimony three years ago
convicted a teenager of robbing her.
It led to a jail sentence of at least
10 years for the teen. Erick Daniels.
Durham police reopened the case
last year and the NC Center for Actual
Innocence also is reviewing it.
Since 2001, Lee has written about
Brown's case and Daniels, who
contends he is innocent of the
robbery.
Lee said he remembers leaving two
voice messages on Brown's home
answering machine last month
when he was working on a story
about Daniels' attempts to clear his
name. Lee said the messages were
respectful and a routine part of the
reporting process.
"I would have been derelict of
my duties if I didn't give her the
opportunity to respond to Erick
Daniels' contention that he was not
the one who robbed her Lee said.
Lee was released without bail Sunday
morning on a written promise to attend
a Nov. 24 court date in Durham.
Arresting a reporter for making
harassing phone calls is extremely
rare, said Durham County Superior
Court Judge Orlando Hudson Jr.
Melanie Sill, The N&O's executive
editor, said that during her tenure at
the paper, a reporter has never been
charged with harassing a source.
"Leaving a telephone message
doesn't constitute harassment Sill
said.
"This doesn't do justice to serious
cases of harassment. This is a waste
of the justice system's time
North Carolina-
based Marine killed In Iraq
MONROE, Conn. - A North
Carolina-based Marine was
killed Saturday while fighting in
Iraq, the Defense Department
announced Sunday.
The agency said Cpl. Kevin J.
Dempsey, 23, of Monroe, Conn died
due to enemy action in Al Anbar
Province while supporting Operation
Iraqi Freedom.
Dempsey was assigned to the
2nd Reconnaissance Battalion, II
Marine Expeditionary Force, in Camp
Lejeune, NC.
"It's a sad day for Monroe said First
Selectman Andrew Nunn.
"It's the first loss that we've had in the
war. Our thoughts go out to his family
and the families of all the soldiers that
are fighting over there
Nunn said he had no information
on the Dempsey family. There
was no telephone listing for the family
in Monroe.
A Marines spokesman based at
Camp Lejeune did not return a
telephone call late Sunday.
Dempsey was the 16th military
member with Connecticut ties to die
in either Iraq or Afghanistan since
March 2002. One civilian from the
state also died in Iraq.
National
Five die In Texas when plane
crashes Into apartment wall
SAN ANTONIO - A small airplane
trying to land in bad weather crashed
near a senior citizens' apartment
complex, killing all five on the plane
and leaving a wing embedded in the
wall of one apartment.
John Clabes, a spokesman for the
Federal Aviation Administration,
said the pilot and a pair of fathers
traveling with their sons, died in the
Sunday afternoon crash. All were
from San Antonio. Their names were
not immediately released.
Joe Rios, a spokesman for San
Antonio police, said all injuries were
on the ground were minor. Some
people were treated for smoke
inhalation. The woman whose
apartmertt suffered the most damage
was not injured.
Rios said part of the 34-foot-long
plane was buried in the ground at
the housing complex and pieces of
it were scattered around the area. He
said one wing disintegrated on impact,
while the other was embedded in the
wall of an apartment. The impact left a
3-foot-by-5-foot hole in the wall.
"It looks like it clipped a tree, clipped
the apartment and went into the
ground Rios said of the plane. He
said there was a small explosion
after the crash.
Clabes said that the Piper Navajo
owned by Dash Air Charter Inc. of
San Antonio was on approach to San
Antonio International Airport shortly
after 5 p.m. The pilot was off course
and was swinging around to try again
when the plane crashed.
"He pulled out of the approach
and disappeared off our radar
Clabes said.
Station owner attempts
suicide over alleged theft
BOSTON - A radio station owner sent
a tape to federal regulators admitting
he bought the station with millions
of dollars he had stolen from clients,
then attempted suicide after sending
the confession, officials said.
Bradford C. Bleidt, 50, was in serious
condition Monday at a Boston
hospital, where he was being treated
for a broken neck, spokesman George
Regan said.
The Securities and Exchange
Commission said Bleidt admitted
on the tape that he stole from
clients of his Boston-based financial
planning firm, Allocation Plus Asset
Management Co. Inc.
Bleidt attempted suicide late
Wednesday or early Thursday,
hours after attending a party at a
Boston hotel celebrating WBIX-
AM's new 24-hour format and new
ownership that is buying the station
from Bleidt, a spokesman told The
Associated Press.
"He's admitting to having stolen tens
of millions of dollars over 20 years
Silvestre Fontes, senior counsel for
the SEC's Boston office, told the AP
on Sunday.
Earlier this month, a client
identified by SEC officials as a Greek
Orthodox church asked for the return
of $1.5 million it had invested through
the investment business, Bleidt said
on the tape.
"There is a client that needs a million
and half dollars wired into their
account that's supposed to be there
this morning, and obviously, It's
not going to be there this morning
because the money's gone. I stole
it. I used it to buy a radio station,
believe it or not Bleidt said on the
tape, portions of which are quoted In
the complaint.
Bleidt said none of his co-workers
were aware of his theft.
World
Iran's nuclear activities
meet some U.N. demands
VIENNA, Austria - The U.N. atomic
watchdog agency gave its support
Monday to Iran's agreement to
suspend all uranium enrichment
activities, the key element of a deal
with European countries aimed
at ensuring Iran does not develop
nuclear weapons.
The United States, which has been
pressing for tough U.N. action against
Iran, has not yet given its position on
any deal, saying it is waiting for word
from Britain, Germany and France,
the three nations negotiating with
Tehran.
The International Atomic Energy
Agency said in a confidential report
made available Monday to The
Associated Press that Iran's promise
to suspend the enrichment activities
by Nov. 22 would satisfy some of the
agency's demands.
The agency said other suspicions
remain about the nature of
nearly two decades of clandestine
nuclear programs.
All nuclear material that Iran had
declared to the agency in the past
year has been accounted for, "and
therefore we can say that such
material Is not diverted to prohibited
weapons) activities said the report,
by IAEA head Mohamed ElBaradei.
But ElBaradei was "not yet
in the position to conclude that
there are no undeclared nuclear
materials" that could have been used
for a weapons program.
Still, in an important departure from
previous reports, the document did
not specifically say that ElBaradei
would report to the next IAEA board
on Iran. Instead it said it would give
an accounting on the country and its
nuclear activities "as appropriate
That wording was expected to be
welcomed by Iran, who for months
has urged the agency to close its file.
The United States, which insists that
Iran's nuclear activities are geared
toward making weapons, was likely to
be unhappy with any suggestion that
future pressure would ease.
Aid agencies
press U.N. to curb violence
NAIROBI, Kenya - A prominent human
rights group on Monday called on
the U.N. Security Council to place
sanctions on Sudan's government
and Arab militias accused of deadly
rampages in the Darfur region, where
a 21-month conflict has left tens
of thousands dead and driven 1.8
million people from their homes.
Sudan has failed to disband the Arab
militias responsible for atrocities and
has even absorbed some into Its
security forces "to 'guard' the camps
of the very same displaced civilians
whom they had originally burned out
of their villages Human Rights Watch
said In its report.
The report, If We Return We WillBeKilled,
was released ahead of the Security
Council's special session on Sudan that
opens in Nairobi, Kenya, on Thursday.
"It's important to understand that
ethnic cleansing In Darfur consists
first of forcibly displacing people,
then preventing them from
returning home safely said Peter
Takirambudde, head of Human Rights
Watch's Africa Division.
"What we are seeing with these raids
and tear-gassing of displaced camps
is the government violently relocating
people to areas otherthan their homes
The United Nations has called Darfur
the world's worst humanitarian crisis,
saying the conflict there has claimed
70,000 lives since March - mostly
from disease, hunger and hardships
from being uprooted.
U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan
told the security council on Nov. 3 that
there are strong Indications that war
crimes and crimes against humanity
were committed "on a large and
systematic scale" in Darfur.
The group said the Security
Council should ensure ethnic
cleansing in Darfur is reversed
through the safe and voluntary
return of displaced people to their
homes and that the government
provide reparations to victims
of abuses by government
forces or militias.
ECU recognizes diversity, intercultural awareness this week
Various activities
open to students
NICK HENNE
NEWS EDITOR
ECU'S annual diversity and
international weeks are being
combinedoffering a number of
activities for ECU students to
take part in.
"A lot of our students are
from North Carolina and may
not have had the opportunity to
be exposed to different aspects
of the world said Bill Mallett,
international student advisor
at ECU.
Joanna Iwata, director of
student involvement at ECU,
said the international education
week and diversity week are
being combined this year in an
effort to heighten the diversity
and intercultural awareness on
campus.
ECU has a history of commit-
ment to diversity by doing more
to promote awareness on campus
specializing on service, learning
and engagement.
" If they can come to the events
and walk away with additional
insight about themselves and their
relations with other people,
this will make them more
aware of what is unique at
ECU regarding this issue and
what challenges we may have to
improve said Iwata.
Iwata said the more students
who can talk about diversity in
a way that is relevant to us, the
more of a broader movement
they would have in addressing
the challenges that come with
living together in a diverse com-
munity.
"We are exposed to diversity
through what we read and study,
but more interactive events can
help us too Iwata said.
"It would open up their lives
to new and different ways of how
we live and work in the world
that has cultural pluralism in
action
She said this additional expo-
sure to diversity would lead to
increased awareness that would
then lead people to take on
new responsibilities in making
changes. This would help people
in taking on leadership positions
throughout their lives.
Iwata said ECU students will be
working with a variety of people in
the future who will have a
variety of backgrounds that are
important to consider.
She said while students
do get a culturally diverse
experience by going to ECU
with the diverse community of
students and faculty, pro-
grams like this also allow
people to expand their cultural
education.
Iwata said there is a
growing interest of diversity due to
situations that have always been
prevalent on campus that has chal-
lenged and tested the ECU commu-
nity. Students have in the past con-
ducted sit-ins at Ledonia Wright
Center to make their
voices heard about differ-
ent diversity related issues.
"Many of the protests or sit-
ins took place because of a lack
of communication" said Lathan
Turner, director of the Ledonia
Wright Cultural Center.
Turner said the purpose
of this week is to promote
diversity to ECU students in
different ways. He said ECU made a
commitment several years ago to
concentrate on diversity issues
and this week is a way to elevate
the focus.
"Certainly we hope students
will be enlightened by the activi-
ties that occur next week and
broaden their perspective of
their basic things they don't
understand about each other
Turner said.
"Anytime we are able to take
a moment to reflect on some-
thing learned we should be able
to then use that information to
place ourselves in a better situa-
tion in life
Turner said the activi-
ties would have different
impressions on different stu-
dents. Depending on how a
person has arrived where they
are now, they may or may not
be open to change, but the
week is certainly geared toward
opening them to the idea of the
possibility of change. This would
help students when they leave
ECU because the outside world
is different.
"Employers now expect
there to be some type of
cultural education or diversity
education offered to students in
college because they too are going
through educational program
and experiencing the benefits of
such turning points Turner said.
"We have to start somewhere
and if we can be more proactive,
see DIVERSITY page A3
Gospel choir performs in 29th annual fall concert
The ECU Gospel Choir gave a
Performers uplift
audience through song
ALICIA WILLIAMS
STAFF WRITER
The ECU gospel choir concert,
themed "It's Our Time was held on
Thursday in I lendrix Theater attract-
ing various students and attendants.
The fall concert is an
annual event generally directed
toward thestudentsand faculty ofECU
that has been going on for 29 years.
Arturo Cummings, sopho-
performance themed "It's Our
more music education major and
business manager of the choir,
said the event is usually the first
opportunity and privilege to give
something back to ECU and rep-
resent the university with pride.
The fall concert is an event
put on by the gospel choir. The
choir started off with a walk down
the aisle, followed by a number of
selections. An intermission per-
formance took place performed
by feature guest artist Kristlan
Herring, director of Salvation
and Deliverance Church Choir
and his brother Jeremy Herring.
Time" on Thursday.
They sang two selections before
the choir resumed the stage.
The people that came to the
fall concert were impacted in
numerous ways.
One audience member said
she was going through a lot of
hardships in her life. When a
song called "Silent Tears" was
sung, she said it had an effect on
her. Another girl e-mailed and
said the concert really dealt with
the circumstances in her life and
rededicated her life to the Lord.
"This is just a good representa-
tion of how the audience could relate
to the songs and how they changed
their lives said Cummings.
Larry Hoggard, sophomore
business major and vice
president of the choir,
said the gospel choir is an
organization where college stu-
dents can come together and
exercise their gifts and abilities
through voice and music.
"In this way, we unite an
effort to worship through song
and praise said Hoggard.
The gospel choir celebrates
through singing at various places
such as churches, schools and
charity events.
The choir has a number of
upcoming events scheduled.
They will be at the book store sale
singing Christmas carols and will
be having their anniversary in
February. They will sing at other
various times throughout the
school year on campus as well.
A major event coming up
in the spring for the choir is
the annual spring tour during-
spring break.
"The ECU gospel choir is highly
distinguished among other col-
lege organizations Hoggard said.
This writer can be contacted at
newi@theeaitcaroiinian.com.
E-COll
from page A1
chance of contracting the illness,
but they could get it from another
person who was there.
"If they're not already
sick, then they're outside the
incubation period. They could
be part of secondary or tertiary
transmission, where they get it
from someone else who's been
sick Morrow said.
Joe Gallman, sophomore
communication major, said he
hopes the investigation reveals
the cause soon, eliminating the
mark on the state fair.
"It's a very serious issue.
So many people go to the state
fair expecting a good time and
it's sad now they have to worry
about getting really sick. I hope
they find the cause soon, so next
year's fair can be a great time for
everyone again said Gallman.
Although most strains
of E-coli are harmless and
live in the intestines of most
healthy animals and humans,
this specific strain of E-coli
can produce a powerful toxin,
causing the infected individual
to become seriously ill.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
I





11-16-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
Peterson must now fight to save his life, win appeal
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A makeshift memorial sits on the front lawn of Scott and Laci
Peterson's home in Modesto, Calif.
REDWOOD CITY, Calif. (AP)
�The jury that convicted Scott
Peterson saw a man with two
faces. In public, he was a loving
father-to-be with a steady job
and stable home. In private he
was a cheating husband who
yearned for bachelorhood and
was willing to kill for it.
Convicted I'riday of murder-
ing his pregnant wife and her
fetus, Peterson must now present
a unified image on two fronts
- he must convince jurors that
his life is worth sparing while
arguing to the courts that he was
wrongly convicted.
Some experts said he might
have a chance to win an appeal,
given the dismissal of two jurors
during deliberations. After his sen-
tencing, defense investigators are
likely to interview panelists, look-
ing for any signs of misconduct.
"These jurors are about to
go under the microscope said
Loyola Law School professor
Laurie Levenson.
Peterson faces life in prison
or the death penalty for the
first-degree murder of his wife,
Laci, and second-degree murder
of the fetus.
While the first part of the trial
focused oh evidence, the penalty
phase, beginning Nov. 22, will
be laced with raw emotion as
rules of evidence that prohibit
inflaming jurors are cast aside.
Blockbuster testimony is
expected from Laci Peterson's
mother, Sharon Rocha, who will
testify about losing a 27-year-old
daughter and the grandson she
HGdrt from page A1 DlVGTSlty from page A2
t' H 11 r a t I rt n nannla t i l i n n fV�- m nm r i 1. . r�� i . . i , I . n A
was waiting for.
"She's going to get up there
and she's going to break down.
Her voice is going to crack
said Daniel Horowitz, a
criminal defense attorney and
regular trial observer.
Peterson is unlikely to take
the stand and beg for mercy -
doing that would require him to
admit to the murders, and throw
away any chance of arguing his
innocence. Instead, testimony
will likely include pleas from his
parents to spare his life.
Jury consultant Ed Bronson
said Peterson's defense attor-
ney, Mark Geragos, will try to
tap any lingering doubt over
whether Peterson was a cal-
culated killer. The defense is
expected to remind jurors that
the 32-year-old former fertilizer
salesman has no criminal record
or history of violence.
"Areyou so surethat you are will-
ing to kill this man?" Bronson said.
But even if jurors unani-
mously vote for death, Peter-
son might not be executed for
decades, if ever. Only 10 execu-
tions have been carried out since
California brought back capital
punishment in 1978. None of the
650 current condemned - some
of whom have been awaiting
death for decades - have com-
pleted their appeals.
Education, people taking
part in additional exercise
and eating better would lead
to a decrease of heart disease.
Students showed positive
reactions to the event.
Josh Nelms, sophomore com-
munication broadcast journalism
major, said he thought the event
was well organized and he enjoyed
helping out for a good cause.
"1 know it heart disease is
the leading cause of death in
America said Nelms.
Kareem Saved, senior biol-
ogy and pre-med major, said the
event had a good turnout despite
the cold and rainy conditions.
"Everybody came out repre-
senting their own organizations I
thinkitwasabig success saidSayed.
He said negative stereotypes
are often associated with col-
lege students and this event
shows ECU students really
do care about national issues
and are willing to volun-
teer to make improvements.
This writer con be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
ART.
ASK FOR
MORE.
For more information about tho
nporumoa or aria nduoation. pleaao oontanl
www.AmnnriinaFurThoArui.org.
AMERICANS
"ARTS
then more people can under-
stand why certain things occur.
If we implement structure and
programs now, then the hope for
outcome is to evolve into a better
understanding
He cited incidents like the
James Byrd lynching and Mathew
Shepherd, the homosexual man
in Wyoming killed because of
his sexual preference. Issues such
as these have been seen at ECU
in several cases over the past
several years. They have included
ECU students who disfigured
black history posters or students
carelessly making racial slurs.
"Every time we make
progress something happens to
shake things up and remind us
we still have a long way to go
Turner said.
Turner said cultural
centers in general have
been established around the
country because of a lack of
support and appreciation of
students of color.
The Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center is co-hosting the
multi- cultural reading day, the
mix it up lunch on Tuesday
at noon, hosting dialogue on
diversity Wednesday at 6 p.m
co-hosting a pep rally and
handing out diversity pins on
Saturday at the football game.
The purpose of the mix it up
lunch is to find someone who
they do not know well, to share
lunch with them and learn more
about who they are.
Mallett said the week is to
show American and domes-
tic students there are a lot of
educational opportunities
out there that incorporate
international education and
study abroad programs as part
of ECU's mission.
International education
week began with collaboration
among the U.S. Department
of State and the United States
Department of Education.
The purpose of the week is to
encourage individuals who are
interested in international
education to sponsor activi-
ties and prepare Americans to
become more globally involved.
Mallet said many colleges and
schools around the nation are
recognizing this week including
several schools within the UNC
system.
"This is one of the UNC sys-
tem's objectives said Mallett.
"It's an opportunity for us
to get our international students
on campus involved so they can
share their culture and their
activities
The ECU student union has
worked to promote this week and
is showing several international
films.
"One of the things we would
like to do is for our international
students share their cultures
Mallett said.
During the international
affairs, there is a food festi-
val, a Japanese international
student does origami and a Native
American student is dress up in
clothes like their ancestors wore.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
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Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
AMANDA Q. UNGERFELT Editor In Chief
TUESDAY November 16, 2004
Our View
Diversity and International
Education celebrated at ECU
With this being "Diversity and International
Education Week TEC feels both students and
staff need to be more appreciative of what a
diverse school ECU is.
Diversity, according to Webster's Unabridged
Dictionary, is "the multiplicity of difference,
multiformity and variety These words are the
essence of ECU students and staff.
One of the most noticeable ways ECU'S
population is diverse is seen by a quick walk
through Wright Plaza on any day of the week.
There are students of all races and genders
represented. No one has to worry about
whether or not they will be accepted, they can
be themselves and either sit down for a break
between classes or visit one of the club booths
that are set up that day.
ECU has organizations to represent all dif-
ferent kinds of people. If you would like to
become involved in politics either in college,
or as a future career, you have the opportunity
to get involved with the Student Government
Association. If you really enjoy sports, anything
from karate to goalball to riding horses, ECU'S
Club Sports Department gives you the oppor-
tunity to participate in one of their many clubs.
Fraternities and sororities of all types - aca-
demic, service and special interest - are all
represented at ECU. Even if you are a special
interest group such as B-GLAD, which repre-
sents students with other sexual preferences,
you are welcome at ECU.
We are all very lucky to have so many limitless
opportunities at our fingertips. But why, if all
of these opportunities are available, do more
people not take advantage of them? We at TEC
do our best to keep students and staff involved
and informed of everything going on at ECU,
but students and staff have a responsibility to
themselves to get out there and participate.
Everyone is interested in something, whether
it is a sport, a club or a social organization.
There is undoubtedly something at ECU for
everyone, and if there isn't, take the initiative
to start an organization.
For more information about what clubs and
organizations are currently in place at ECU,
visit www.at.ecu.edu.
Appreciate and participate in all of the diversity
ECU has to offer. This is a very culturally diverse
school with students and staff from around the
world, let's get out there and show it.
Our Staff
Nick Henne
News Editor
Robbie Den-
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Nina Coefleld
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Kristin Day
Asst. News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Asst Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst Sports Editor
Rachel Landen
Special Sections Editor
Herb Sneed
Asst Photo Editor
Alexander Marciniak Jenny Hobbs
Web Editor Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
252.328.6366
252.328.6558
252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity) We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to edltor@theeastcarolinian.com or to The East
Carolinian, Student Publications Building, Greenville,
NC 27858-4353 Call 252-328-6366 for more
information One copy of TEC is free, each additional
copy is $1.
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Opinion Columnist
Thanksgiving Break is right on time
Refuel with turkey, time off
RACHEL LANDEN
STAFF WRITER
Around this time next week, ECU's
campus will resemble something of a
ghost town. Sure, maybe I'm making
an assumption, considering that I won't
be here to prove it right or wrong. Yet I
do promise that I will be doing my part
to ensure that the classroom buildings,
library, rec center and other campus
facilities will be emptier than usual.
Next Wednesday will be the start of
Thanksgiving Break, my signal to drop
the academics for a few days of freedom
and pretend that those looming assign-
ments don't exist. Although perhaps I
shouldn't encourage such behavior in
a university publication, I'll make an
exception this once and recommend
that you do the same.
We all need a vacation right about
now anyway, don't we? For me, Thanks-
giving Break couldn't have come at a
better time. 1 think I've reached that
point in the semester where I begin
to feel burnt out, yet I recognize that
those end-of-the-semester deadlines
and exams are approaching rapidly.
It's a blessing and a curse. I can see
the light at the end ol the tunnel but
before I reach it, I know that I have to
trudge a little harder through darker
and steeper terrain.
Before I tackle the task at hand,
though, 1 think my best bet is to refuel
and refresh. What better way than to
eat some turkey, drink some cider and
sleep on the couch while the televi-
sion shows one football game after
another?
Sound typical?. Maybe, or maybe
not. I would have to throw in a lot
more relatives, a slice (or two) of key
lime pie and a walk to work off the pie
and escape the relatives. Just kidding,
family.
It's nearly the same thing every
year, a predictable theme with only
slight variations. Still, it's just what 1
need for one day out of 365: a relaxed
environment with no sense of hurrying
and no time constraints, the feeling
that we have nothing to do and all day
to get it done. For someone goal-ori-
ented, driven and constantly checking
her watch, it sounds like pure torture.
But no, it isn't quite like that. It's actu-
ally the exact opposite.
I take the time to sit down and talk
to people that I haven't spoken with
since our previous Thanksgiving meet-
ing. I don't even get inpatient as I wait
in line to serve my plate for dinner. I
couldn't, not on a day devoted to giving
thanks for our blessings.
I feel especially fortunate to have a
huge feast laid out in front of me, but
more importantly, I get to share it with
family members and with friends who
have been assimilated into our stock.
We take the time to stop and smell the
roses, or in this case, the turkey and
dressing. It's a simple reminder of the
good that we can depend on when so
often it is easy to get bogged down by
the deadlines, drama and disasters of
everyday life.
After all, Black Friday will follow
soon enough as shoppers head out into
the chaotic aisles of shopping malls
and super centers. It seems that we as
a society can't stand to take a break
from the rat race for too long. One day
of relaxation and relatives is all we
can take - the next day, we're battling
strangers for the last Cabbage Patch Kid
or Tickle Me Elmo.
However, when Monday morning
arrives, I'm sure we'll all want to hit the
snooze button a few times. Then again,
maybe those days away and that time
off will give you enough motivation
to plod through the next few weeks.
They are sure to be busy and demand-
ing before the semester officially winds
down but I promise you the end is
nearly in sight.
In the meantime, I hope professors
will understand the importance of
allowing their students a little respite
over Thanksgiving Break. It may seem
like a great time to catch up and move
ahead, but I say, just let them eat turkey.
That would really give us all something
to be thankful for.
Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
1 am writing in response to the
scathing attack in a letter to the editor
about Peter Kalajian's post-election
opinion column in Nov. 4 edition of
TEC. The author, Mr. Mizelle, makes
many claims condemning Kalajian for
being an idealist. He advises Demo-
crats, Kalajian and undoubtedly any
others that disagree with Mr. Mizelle
"must sing the same song that most
Americans are singing This advice is
not only close-minded, but dangerous.
There is nothing wrong with lis-
tening to what voters want and trying
to identify with them, but it seems
that Mr. Mizelle is suggesting that
Democrats abandon their ideals, and
focus instead, upon agreeing with the
majority of people. Unfortunately, I
believe that Mr. Mizelle, along with an
alarming number of Americans reflect
a growing trend of lazy and submissive
ideals. Indeed, why contemplate change
and challenge the status quo when we
could simply step into line behind the
next person, and agree with them for
fear of being deemed wrong? Give me
a break!
Where would we be without free
thinking? Perhaps we should have
agreed with the rest of Americans in
the early 1900s when they scoffed at
the idea of women's suffrage as well?
Moving on to Mr. Mizelle's condescend-
ing "life lesson" to Kalajian, stating
that he would one day grow out of
his idealism, I am honestly appalled.
Hopefully, Kalajian and others like
him are not weak enough to allow
their ideals to corrode as they grow
older. And since when is realism syn-
onymous with conservatism? I submit
to Mr. Mizelle, and others that believe
a conservative is a realist, that you are
blind. Conservatism can be defined as
the inclination, especially in politics,
to maintain the existing or traditional
order. What, pray tell, is realistic about
having a rigid frame of mind? Change is
not only necessary, but imminent, and
it is realistic to believe that change will
happen and to prepare for it.
It seems that Mr. Mizelle also sug-
gests that conservatives are more in
touch with responsibility. However,
I submit to him, and other readers,
that it is in fact irresponsible to follow
the beliefs of others blindly instead of
thinking for yourself. Free thinking
and idealism are the only hope for a
nation that is consumed by fear - fear
of change, and those that question. My
advice is to think for yourself, never
settle for less than what we as a nation
deserve, and to quote Maggie Kuhn,
"speak your mind, even if your voice
shakes
Nikki Jones
ECU sophomore theater arts major
Dear Editor,
So George Bush won. And no, my
hat will not be tipped to the Republi-
cans that elected him or to the presi-
dent himself. I find it disheartening
that our country has recently been
brainwashed and divided by what some
call a "moral majority The moral
majority is a group of citizens with
extreme beliefs, forcing their will on
others In the name of Christianity. And
most importantly, anyone who exists
outside of the box will be subject to
eternal damnation.
Some used the abortion argument
against Kerry. Others used same-sex
marriage. And for a few it was stem
cell research. The issues are not always
black and white, as Tony McKee and his
right-wing fundamentalists want you to
believe. His recent article demanding
that Democrats need to get in touch
with the rest of society, and that the
good ol' boys have a mandate now is
ludicrous and asinine. I feel obligated to
share with you John Kerry's and other
Democrats stances on these issues.
Pro-Choice and Pro-Abortion are
certainly not the same thing. Those
that think otherwise haven't researched
the issues and are incompetent. Kerry
personally opposes abortion, but
doesn't think that he should force his
own will on anyone who may differ in
belief. Nor does Kerry think a young
girl who is raped by her father should
be forced to deliver the child. (George
Bush on the other hand forces his faith-
based legislation and war-schemes like
a playground bully). Same-sex marriage
- Kerry opposes it, but feels that since
the states have always had the final say
so regarding marriage, the government
shouldn't mandate a ban that may force
his personal opinion on states that feel
differently than he does. Separation of
church and state still exists, thus Kerry
chooses to make his faith public, yet
doesn't let the church's stances inter-
fere with the principles of American
politics.
Many fundamentalist Conserva-
tives confuse church with state, science
with Christianity and use the Bible
as a replacement for the Constitu-
tion. Certainly faith should, and will,
affect one's outlook of like, but beliefs
are personal and the United States is
secular. It should concern us all that a
proclamation of faith is enough to win
a "moral majority and should concern
us even more than folks like McKee rant
and rave about Democrats joining the
crowd. We don't want to be a part of
your right wing cult, Mr. McKee. We
choose to investigate the issues rather
than practice blind allegiance. I'm
sure the folks that object to this are
the ones that think Iraq is a "mission
accomplished that foreign countries
love us, we have billions in surplus,
gas prices are low, jobs are up and the
weapons of mass destruction are still
out there somewhere.
Nathan Lean
ECU sophomore music major
Pirate Rants
When someone holds a door
open for you, could you please
say "thank you?" Also, could you
not bring 20 friends to walk in
behind you?
Here's a tip to some profes-
sors: If you want our presenta-
tions done a certain way, let us
know before hand. Don't let
us present it, give us a failing
grade and then tell us what we
should have done. I know it
sounds crazy, but if we know
what we're supposed to do, we
might actually do it and then you
don't have to give us lectures on
what horrible presenters we are.
Kudos to the people already
starting projects downtown.
Some of the places are starting to
look really well and I can't wait
to see what the city looks like in
seven years.
When you walk on the side-
walk three to a group the least
you could do is step aside for
other students walking on the
correct side of the sidewalk.
Could you please bring some
new blood into the opinion sec-
tion of the paper? It's the same
three people with the same three
points of view, saying the exact
same thing every week.
Don't zoom around someone
to get a parking spot that they are
waiting for. That is just unbeliev-
ably rude and hateful. Find your
own damn parking spot - they
looked and found that one.
Teachers, do you have to
have a student start a presenta-
tion with four minutes until the
end of class? We are ready to go
and will not give the student the
appropriate attention.
Why does The East Carolinian
insist on only displaying photos
and writing articles of white
students on the front page? If
TEC is really a newspaper for all
students, I think TEC needs to
be more culturally and racially
diverse.
Can someone please tell me
what a metrosexual is?
Summertime is gone and
women everywhere are putting
away their shorts and skirts
and pulling out their jeans and
slacks. While these business-type
pants are flattering and accent
what your momma gave ya, please
invest in thongs. The bunched up
panty line just isn't flattering.
lam so sick of fire alarms. Why
do we pay to live in a dorm if
there are going to be five fire
alarms before 5 p.m.? If we are
supposed to consider the dorms
our home away from home, then
the fire alarms need to be some-
thing for emergencies.
In Iraq, Americans aren't
the most popular people there
right now. So, let's do something
smart like invade and conquer
a city in order to get people to
accept our form of democracy.
Hey, it worked for the Germans
in France and Poland.
Someone ranted that the
separation of church and state
isn't mentioned in the U.S. Con-
stitution. That is true. However,
the founding fathers were very
clear about keeping church and
state separate. Go read a copy
of Madison's "A Memorial and
Remonstrance which clearly
outlines his beliefs on the sub-
ject. The phrases "separation of
church and state" and "wall of
separation" come straight out
of the writings and speeches of
Jefferson and Madison. Seeing as
Madison wrote the First Amend-
ment, he probably knew a thing
or two about what It means. Let's
not revise history to fit the agenda
of the Christian right, okay?
Why does the sports section
get a giant front-page layout,
giving their sports picks, when
the features section usually adds
up to no more than a single page?
You can get news and sports
anywhere you turn, but features
and opinion give this paper per-
sonality, but always tend to get
the short end of the stick.
Editor's Note: The Pirate Rant is
an anonymous way for students and
1 aI in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
submitted anonymously online at
www.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-
mailed to editorCHheeastcarolinian.
com. The editor reserves the rixht
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.





w
w
Page A5 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 ROBBIE Dtnfl Features Editor CAROLYN SCANDURA Assistant Features Editor
TUESDAY November 16, 2004
Announcemnts:
Make plans to participate in
Diversity and International
Education Week at ECU. There
will be events each day, Nov.
16-20.
Tuesday, Nov. 16: SGA is
sponsoring "Bold Promise" from
10 a.m. - 2 p.m. in Wright Plaza. At
12 p.m. in the campus dining halls,
there will be a "Mix It Up Lunch"
sponsored by the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center, SGA and Campus
Dining. Have lunch with someone
who is a different kind of individual.
The Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center will hold a Multicultural
and International Reading Day at
3 p.m. In Hendrix Theater. There
will be a BIG Brothers and Sisters
formal discussion on different
students' perspectives on how to
bride the interracial gaps from 7
p.m. - 9 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 17: The
Student Health Center will be
having a "World Kindness Day
Celebration" from 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
sponsored by Wellness Education
and Student Health Services.
Stop by for special information
and ideas on how to perform
random acts of kindness. In the
Wright Plaza from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
the "Bold Promise" and "Apple
Grams" will be taking place. The
"World Food Festival" will be
taking place in the Mendenhall
Multipurpose Room from 1 p.m.
- 3 p.m. In the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center at 6 p.m. there
will be a "Dialogue on Diversity"
where campus ministries will
present different perspectives
on religious pluralism at ECU.
The "International Film Festival"
will begin at 9:30 p.m. at Hendrix
Theater featuring a film about the
rise and fall of the Taliban.
Thursday, Nov. 18. From 10 a.m.
- 2 p.m. in Wright Plaza, SGA
is sponsoring "Bold Promise
From 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. at the
International House, there will be a
"Fulbright & International Scholars
Reception From 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium there will
be a presentation called "Gene
Therapy" with Teja Arboleda.
The "International Film Festival"
will begin at 9:30 p.m. at Hendrix
Theatre featuring a film called
Maria Full of Grace.
Friday, Nov. 19: At the
Christenbury Gym from 3:30 p.m.
- 6 p.m. there will be a "Community
Festival" featuring a youth carnival
with games and activities for
children of all ages. From 6 p.m.
- 7 p.m. there will be a "Cookout
and Pep Rally" in the Mendenhall
Brick Yard. The "International Film
Festival" will begin at 9:30 p.m.
and at 11 p.m. at Hendrix Theater
featuring a film called Dangerous
Living.
Saturday, Nov. 20: Encore
showings of the International
Rim Festival will start at 12 p.m.
in Hendrix Theater. From 12 p.m.
- 2 p.m. at the gates of Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium there will be a
free "Diversity Pin" giveaway for
football game patrons. Celebrate
diversity at ECU.
Names in the News:
National treasure, pop music
sensation, American sweetheart:
Britney Spears. Twice married
and trying to get pregnant. Or is
she already? That's what the tabs
are saying about Britney Spears,
who has made no secret about
her wish to start a family with new
hubby Kevin Federllne.
Two giants in American filmmaking
have joined forces to bring a
compelling component of western
culture to TV. According to Variety
George Clooney and Steven
Soderbergh are producing a 10-
hour project for FX based around
the Ten Commandments. Set
in modem times, each episode
will explore spiritual and moral
issues surrounding each of the
commandments.
Rich people are not always happy
people. Wealth can, indeed, be
a burden. So sayeth Madonna,
whose revelations about riches
and "tristesse" will come In the
last of the singer-come-writer's
five-book children's series, "Lotsa
de Casha a popup book about an
Italian greyhound, who, according
to publisher Nicholas "has all
the money in the world but no
happiness The book is due out
for consumers next summer.
Apparel, Interior Merchandising
Organization sponsores fashion show
Models pose to "Vogue" at AIMO fashion show, which benefited the Family Violence Program. Clothes from My Sister's Closet and C3's were modeled for the show, store profits
went to the Family Violence Program. President of AIMO, April Colciasure, plans another fashion show next semester and volunteers are welcome to participate.
Filmmaker brings Portugal to life on ECU screen
Grant Foster pries
inside many wonders
of overlooked country
LISA TUMBARELLO
SENIOR WRITER
World-renowned filmmaker,
Grant Foster, provides an insid-
er's look into Portugal as one
of Europe's hidden treasures.
His travel film, The Best of Por-
tugal, takes a look at the often
overlooked majestic sights anc
culture that are so abundant in
Portugal.
In The Best of Portugal, nar-
rated live by Foster himself, he
takes audiences through the
scenic and cultural highlights
of the country. The grand circle
tour begins on the banks of the
Tagus River in Lisbon, a sea-
fare town with ancient streets,
extraordinary architecture and
sophisticated shopping. Lisbon
is an old-world town with new
luxuries. Here, travelers will
partake in a streetcar ride and
visit the famous St. Jorge castle
which at one time housed royal
families, prisoners and military
servicemen.
After that, it's on to coastal
fishing villages, sandy beaches
and luxury resorts sounds very
inviting. However, not every trip
Foster brings the marvelous architecture of Portugal to ECU.
can be all fun and games. There
is always the occasional stop to
pick up some historical facts.
Travelers get to experience local
museums such as the National
Museum of Coaches and others
completely devoted to ceramic
tiles and maritime.
After indulging in several his-
torical exhibits it's off to Oporto,
the original home of Port wine.
Here, travelers experience the
traditional ways of harvesting
wine where smashing grapes
with your feet is the primary
mode of production. Onlookers
also get to participate in a wine
boat race.
Viewers also get to experience
one of Portugal's biggest festivals.
In Viano de Castelo, tourists
get a sneak peak at this cultural
festival and get to experience the
beauty of Portugal first hand.
The trip to Portugal is rounded
out with a stop to eat at the
restaurant where Winston
Churchill painted, unloading
the catch of the day at the Sagres
fishing port, milking cows by
hand and getting a bit hot at Sao
Miguel's volcanic lake.
Foster has been dubbed
"Film Ambassador" in his native
of New Zealand. He has been
awarded many honors and is
highly respected among the
film community. Foster won the
World Championship Cup in
France for Amazing New Zealand,
The movie will feature buildings
which was honored as the best
travel film submitted in 10 years.
He also received international
acclaim for his 10-part natural
history film series, Land of Birds.
There will be a ques-
tion and answer session with
Foster after the film, which is
approximately 80 min-
utes long with one
intermission.
Anyone who has interest
in other cultures, sociology,
anthropology, geography or just
likes films, should partake in
Foster's journey and discovery of
this delightful country.
This writer can be reached at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
like the above St. Jorge castle.
tt
FYI
'The Best of Portugal'
Screening Sunday, Nov. 21
at 3 p.m.
- Hendrix Theater, MSC
- Q and A with filmmaker Grant
Foster after the screening
- ECU students get in free with
ticket, $9 for ECU faculty and staff
and $10 for the public
- Central Ticket Box Office, MSC,
328-4788 or1-800-ECU-ARTS
The Children's Hour' takes center stage at McGinnis
Play about truth, life
MARTHA HILL
STAFF WRITER
Once again, the students and
faculty of the school of theatre
and dance have been busy pre-
paring for another production
at ECU Loessin Playhouse in
McGinnis Theatre. The produc-
tion of The Children's Hour will
be presented Nov. 18 - 23.
The Children's Hour explores
the power of a lie and its detri-
mental irreversible effects. The
malicious intent of a child ruins
the lives of more than one person
in this exhilarating drama.
"I think it's an interesting
piece for audiences to see because
of its relevance today said
Robert Caprio, director of The
Children's Hour.
"Who's telling the truth, who
lies and how it destroys lives.
I don't think that's changed. I
mean, the play is 70 years old
An associate professor
in the school of theatre and
dance, Caprio teaches acting
and directing.
"Robert Caprio is a genius,
an absolute genius said Tiffany
Porter, a BFA professional acting
major.
Under the direction of Caprio,
Porter will be performing her first
major role in The Children's Hour.
Porter is playing Martha, one of
the headmistresses at an exclusive
school for girls, who is accused
of amoral behavior by one of her
students.
"Scenes are very high energy,
very charged. You're on the edge
of your seat wondering what's
going to happen Porter said.
"You're going to hate
some of the characters. You're
going to feel for some of the
characters. You're actually
going to loathe one of the char-
acters. It's going to be a great
experience
Lillian Hellman, one of the
best-known modern playwrights,
wrote The (Children's Hour in 1934.
Controversial in its day due to the
subject matter of lesbianism, the
show was a huge success and ran
more than 700 performances on
Broadway.
"The set is the most remark-
able thing. There is a huge piece
of parchment reading 'Life is
truth. Truth is life said Tracy
Donahue, associate professor of
the school of theatre and dance.
"The set always reminds you
that this is a universal question.
This isn't a gay play, it's a play
about truth Donahue said.
Donahue teaches acting,
voice and articulation in the
school of theatre and dance. She
is cast in the play as Mrs. Tilford,
the grandmother of one of the
girls attending the school.
"Once Mrs. Tilford tells the
lie, the damage is done. It can
never be fixed. Whether it is true
or false, it's done enough damage
as if it were true Donahue said.
If you would like a peek at
the set you can go to the McGin-
nis Theatre Web cam. Log on to
theatre-dance.ecu.eduCameras.
If you're lucky you can watch the
cast and crew before their first
performance on Thursday.
"Everyone has worked really
hard. It's definitely worth
seeing said Whitney Madren,
freshman and intended BFA pro-
fessional acting major who is cast
in the show.
The Children's Hour will be
performed at 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, Nov. 18 - 23. Sunday's
performance will be at 2 p.m,
Tickets can be purchased at
McGinnis Theatre Box Office
or the Central Ticket Office.
To purchase over the phone:
McGinnis Theatre Ticket Office
328-6829, Central Ticket
Office 328-4788, Toll Free 1-
800-ECU-ARTS or VoiceTTY
328-6799. Tickets are $8 for
students,10 for seniors and12
for others. Parents are advised,
the play contains adult subject
matter.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Vance Daniels and Lauren Davis rehearse a scene together.





Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
AMANDA Q. LINGERFELT Editor In Chief
TUESDAY November 16, 2004
Our View
Diversity and International
Education celebrated at ECU
With this being "Diversity and Internationa)
Education Week TEC feels both students and
staff need to be more appreciative of what a
diverse school ECU is.
Diversity, according to Webster's Unabridged
Dictionary, is "the multiplicity of difference,
multiformity and variety These words are the
essence of ECU students and staff.
One of the most noticeable ways ECU'S
population is diverse is seen by a quick walk
through Wright Plaza on any day of the week.
There are students of all races and genders
represented. No one has to worry about
whether or not they will be accepted, they can
be themselves and either sit down for a break
between classes or visit one of the club booths
that are set up that day.
ECU has organizations to represent all dif-
ferent kinds of people. If you would like to
become involved in politics either in college,
or as a future career, you have the opportunity
to get involved with the Student Government
Association. If you really enjoy sports, anything
from karate to goalball to riding horses, ECU'S
Club Sports Department gives you the oppor-
tunity to participate in one of their many clubs.
Fraternities and sororities of all types - aca-
demic, service and special interest - are all
represented at ECU. Even if you are a special
interest group such as B-GLAD, which repre-
sents students with other sexual preferences,
you are welcome at ECU.
We are all very lucky to have so many limitless
opportunities at our fingertips. But why, if all
of these opportunities are available, do more
people not take advantage of them? We at TEC
do our best to keep students and staff involved
and informed of everything going on at ECU,
but students and staff have a responsibility to
themselves to get out there and participate.
Everyone is interested in something, whether
it is a sport, a club or a social organization.
There is undoubtedly something at ECU for
everyone, and if there isn't, take the initiative
to start an organization.
For more information about what clubs and
organizations are currently in place at ECU,
visit www.at.ecu.edu.
Appreciate and participate in all of the diversity
ECU has to offer. This is a very culturally diverse
school with students and staff from around the
world, let's get out there and show it.
Our Staff
Nick Henne
News Editor
Robbie Derr
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo Brandon Hughes
Sports Editor Asst. Sports Editor
Nina Coefield Rachel Landen
Head Copy Editor Special Sections Editor
Tanesha Slstrunk Herb Sneed
Photo Editor Asst Photo Editor
Alexander Marclnlak Jenny Hobbs
Web Editor Production Manager
Kristin Day
Asst. News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Asst. Features Editor
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
252.328.6366
252.328.6558
252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday. Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brartty) We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editor@theeastcarolinian.com or to The East
Carolinian, Student Publications Building, Greenville,
NC 27858-4353 Call 252-328-6366 for more
information. One copy of TEC is free, each additional
copy is $1.
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Opinion Columnist
Thanksgiving Break is right on time
Refuel with turkey, time off
RACHEL LANDEN
STAFF WRITER
Around this time next week, ECU'S
campus will resemble something of a
ghost town. Sure, maybe I'm making
an assumption, considering that I won't
be here to prove it right or wrong. Yet I
do promise that I will be doing my part
to ensure that the classroom buildings,
library, rec center and other campus
facilities will be emptier than usual.
Next Wednesday will be the start of
Thanksgiving Break, my signal to drop
the academics for a few days of freedom
and pretend that those looming assign-
ments don't exist. Although perhaps 1
shouldn't encourage such behavior in
a university publication, I'll make an
exception this once and recommend
that you do the same.
We all need a vacation right about
now anyway, don't we? For me, Thanks-
giving Break couldn't have come at a
better time. I think I've reached that
point in the semester where I begin
to feel burnt out, yet I recognize that
those end-of-the-semester deadlines
and exams are approaching rapidly.
It's a blessing and a curse. I can see
the light at the end of the tunnel but
before I reach it, I know that I have to
trudge a little harder through darker
and steeper terrain.
Before I tackle the task at hand,
though, I think my best bet is to refuel
and refresh. What better way than to
eat some turkey, drink some cider and
sleep on the couch while the televi-
sion shows one football game after
another?
Sound typical?. Maybe, or maybe
not. I would have to throw in a lot
more relatives, a slice (or two) of key
lime pie and a walk to work off the pie
and escape the relatives. Just kidding,
family.
It's nearly the same thing every
year, a predictable theme with only
slight variations. Still, it's just what I
need for one day out of 36S: a relaxed
environment with no sense of hurrying
and no time constraints, the feeling
that we have nothing to do and all day
to get it done. For someone goal-ori-
ented, driven and constantly checking
her watch, it sounds like pure torture.
But no, it isn't quite like that. It's actu-
ally the exact opposite.
I take the time to sit down and talk
to people that I haven't spoken with
since our previous Thanksgiving meet-
ing. I don't even get inpatient as I wait
in line to serve my plate for dinner. I
couldn't, not on a day devoted to giving
thanks for our blessings.
I feel especially fortunate to have a
huge feast laid out in front of me, but
more importantly, I get to share it with
family members and with friends who
have been assimilated into our stock.
We take the time to stop and smell the
roses, or in this case, the turkey and
dressing. It's a simple reminder of the
good that we can depend on when so
often it is easy to get bogged down by
the deadlines, drama and disasters of
everyday life.
After all, Black Friday will follow
soon enough as shoppers head out into
the chaotic aisles of shopping malls
and super centers. It seems that we as
a society can't stand to take a break
from the rat race for too long. One day
of relaxation and relatives is all we
can take - the next day, we're battling
strangers for the last Cabbage Patch Kid
or Tickle Me Elmo.
However, when Monday morning
arrives, I'm sure we'll all want to hit the
snooze button a few times. Then again,
maybe those days away and that time
off will give you enough motivation
to plod through the next few weeks.
They are sure to be busy and demand-
ing before the semester officially winds
down but I promise you the end is
nearly in sight.
In the meantime, I hope professors
will understand the importance of
allowing their students a little respite
over Thanksgiving Break. It may seem
like a great time to catch up and move
ahead, but I say, just let them eat turkey.
That would really give us all something
to be thankful for.
Letters to the Editor
Dear Editor,
I am writing in response to the
scathing attack in a letter to the editor
about Peter Kalajian's post-election
opinion column in Nov. 4 edition of
TEC. The author, Mr. Mizelle, makes
many claims condemning Kalajian for
being an idealist. He advises Demo-
crats, Kalajian and undoubtedly any
others that disagree with Mr. Mizelle
"must sing the same song that most
Americans are singing This advice is
not only close-minded, but dangerous.
There is nothing wrong with lis-
tening to what voters want and trying
to identify with them, but it seems
that Mr. Mizelle is suggesting that
Democrats abandon their ideals, and
focus instead, upon agreeing with the
majority of people. Unfortunately, I
believe that Mr. Mizelle, along with an
alarming number of Americans reflect
a growing trend of lazy and submissive
ideals. Indeed, why contemplate change
and challenge the status quo when we
could simply step into line behind the
next person, and agree with them for
fear of being deemed wrong? Give me
a break!
Where would we be without free
thinking? Perhaps we should have
agreed with the rest of Americans in
the early 1900s when they scoffed at
the idea of women's suffrage as well?
Moving on to Mr. Mizelle's condescend-
ing "life lesson" to Kalajian, stating
that he would one day grow out of
his idealism, I am honestly appalled.
Hopefully, Kalajian and others like
him are not weak enough to allow
their ideals to corrode as they grow
older. And since when is realism syn-
onymous with conservatism? I submit
to Mr. Mizelle, and others that believe
a conservative is a realist, that you are
blind. Conservatism can be defined as
the inclination, especially in politics,
to maintain the existing or traditional
order. What, pray tell, is realistic about
having a rigid frame of mind? Change is
not only necessary, but imminent, and
it is realistic to believe that change will
happen and to prepare for it.
It seems that Mr. Mizelle also sug-
gests that conservatives are more in
touch with responsibility. However,
I submit to him, and other readers,
that it is in fact irresponsible to follow
the beliefs of others blindly instead of
thinking for yourself. Free thinking
and idealism are the only hope for a
nation that is consumed by fear - fear
of change, and those that question. My
advice is to think for yourself, never
settle for less than what we as a nation
deserve, and to quote Maggie Kuhn,
"speak your mind, even if your voice
shakes
Nikki Jones
ECU sophomore theater arts major
Dear Editor,
So George Bush won. And no, my
hat will not be tipped to the Republi-
cans that elected him or to the presi-
dent himself. 1 find it disheartening
that our country has recently been
brainwashed and divided by what some
call a "moral majority The moral
majority is a group of citizens with
extreme beliefs, forcing their will on
others in the name of Christianity. And
most importantly, anyone who exists
outside of the box will be subject to
eternal damnation.
Some used the abortion argument
against Kerry. Others used same-sex
marriage. And for a few it was stem
cell research. The issues are not always
black and white, as Tony McKee and his
right-wing fundamentalists want you to
believe. His recent article demanding
that Democrats need to get in touch
with the rest of society, and that the
good ol' boys have a mandate now is
ludicrous and asinine. I feel obligated to
share with you John Kerry's and other
Democrats stances on these issues.
Pro-Choice and Pro-Abortion are
certainly not the same thing. Those
that think otherwise haven't researched
the issues and are incompetent. Kerry
personally opposes abortion, but
doesn't think that he should force his
own will on anyone who may differ in
belief. Nor does Kerry think a young
girl who is raped by her father should
be forced to deliver the child. (George
Bush on the other hand forces his faith-
based legislation and war-schemes like
a playground bully). Same-sex marriage
- Kerry opposes it, but feels that since
the states have always had the final say
so regarding marriage, the government
shouldn't mandate a ban that may force
his personal opinion on states that feel
differently than he does. Separation of
church and state still exists, thus Kerry
chooses to make his faith public, yet
doesn't let the church's stances inter-
fere with the principles of American
politics.
Many fundamentalist Conserva-
tives confuse church with state, science
with Christianity and use the Bible
as a replacement for the Constitu-
tion. Certainly faith should, and will,
affect one's outlook of like, but beliefs
are personal and the United States is
secular. It should concern us all that a
proclamation of faith is enough to win
a "moral majority and should concern
us even more than folks like McKee rant
and rave about Democrats joining the
crowd. We don't want to be a part of
your right wing cult, Mr. McKee. We
choose to investigate the issues rather
than practice blind allegiance. I'm
sure the folks that object to this are
the ones that think Iraq is a "mission
accomplished that foreign countries
love us, we have billions in surplus,
gas prices are low, jobs are up and the
weapons of mass destruction are still
out there somewhere.
Nathan Lean
ECU sophomore music major
Pirate Rants
When someone holds a door
open for you, could you please
say "thank you?" Also, could you
not bring 20 friends to walk in
behind you?
Here's a tip to some profes-
sors: If you want our presenta-
tions done a certain way, let us
know before hand. Don't let
us present it, give us a failing
grade and then tell us what we
should have done. I know it
sounds crazy, but if we know
what we're supposed to do, we
might actually do it and then you
don't have to give us lectures on
what horrible presenters we are.
Kudos to the people already
starting projects downtown.
Some of the places are starting to
look really well and I can't wait
to see what the city looks like in
seven years.
When you walk on the side-
walk three to a group the least
you could do is step aside for
other students walking on the
correct side of the sidewalk.
Could you please bring some
new blood into the opinion sec-
tion of the paper? It's the same
three people with the same three
points of view, saying the exact
same thing every week.
Don't zoom around someone
to get a parking spot that they are
waiting for. That is just unbeliev-
ably rude and hateful. Find your
own damn parking spot - they
looked and found that one.
Teachers, do you have to
have a student start a presenta-
tion with four minutes until the
end of class? We are ready to go
and will not give the student the
appropriate attention.
Why does The East Carolinian
insist on only displaying photos
and writing articles of white
students on the front page? If
TEC is really a newspaper for all
students, 1 think TEC needs to
be more culturally and racially
diverse.
Can someone please tell me
what a metrosexual is?
Summertime is gone and
women everywhere are putting
away their shorts and skirts
and pulling out their jeans and
slacks. While these business-type
pants are flattering and accent
what your momma gave ya, please
invest in thongs. The bunched up
panty line just isn't flattering.
Iamsosickoffirealarms. Why
do we pay to live in a dorm if
there are going to be five fire
alarms before 5 p.m.? If we are
supposed to consider the dorms
our home away from home, then
the fire alarms need to be some-
thing for emergencies.
In Iraq, Americans aren't
the most popular people there
right now. So, let's do something
smart like invade and conquer
a city in order to get people to
accept our form of democracy.
Hey, it worked for the Germans
in France and Poland.
Someone ranted that the
separation of church and state
isn't mentioned in the U.S. Con-
stitution. That is true. Flowever,
the founding fathers were very
clear about keeping church and
state separate. Go read a copy
of Madison's "A Memorial and
Remonstrance which clearly
outlines his beliefs on the sub-
ject. The phrases "separation of
church and state" and "wall of
separation" come straight out
of the writings and speeches of
Jefferson and Madison. Seeing as
Madison wrote the First Amend-
ment, he probably knew a thing
or two about what it means. Let's
not revise history to fit the agenda
of the Christian right, okay?
Why does the sports section
get a giant front-page layout,
giving their sports picks, when
the features section usually adds
up to no more than a single page?
You can get news and sports
anywhere you turn, but features
and opinion give this paper per-
sonality, but always tend to get
the short end of the stick.
Editor's Note: The Pirate Rant is
an anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can he
submitted anonymously online at
www.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-
mailed to editormheeastcarolinian.
com. The editor reserves the right
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.
- �





S
-
Page A5 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 ROBBIE Dtnfi Features Editor CAROLYN SCANDURA Assistant Features Editor
TUESDAY November 16, 2004
Announcemnts:
Make plans to participate In
Diversity and International
Education Week at ECU. There
will be events each day, Nov.
16 - 20.
Tuesday, Nov. 16: SGA is
sponsoring "Bold Promise" from
10 a.m. - 2 p.m. in Wright Plaza. At
12 p.m. in the campus dining halls,
there will be a "Mix It Up Lunch"
sponsored by the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center, SGA and Campus
Dining. Have lunch with someone
who is a different kind of individual.
The Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center will hold a Multicultural
and International Reading Day at
3 p.m. In Hendrix Theater. There
will be a B.I.G Brothers and Sisters
formal discussion on different
students' perspectives on how to
bride the interracial gaps from 7
p.m. - 9 p.m.
Wednesday, Nov. 17: The
Student Health Center will be
having a "World Kindness Day
Celebration" from 8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
sponsored by Wellness Education
and Student Health Services.
Stop by for special information
and Ideas on how to perform
random acts of kindness. In the
Wright Plaza from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
the "Bold Promise" and "Apple
Grams" will be taking place. The
"World Food Festival" will be
taking place in the Mendenhall
Multipurpose Room from 1 p.m.
- 3 p.m. In the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center at 6 p.m. there
will be a "Dialogue on Diversity"
where campus ministries will
present different perspectives
on religious pluralism at ECU.
The "International Film Festival"
will begin at 9:30 p.m. at Hendrix
Theater featuring a film about the
rise and fall of the Taliban.
Thursday, Nov. 18: From 10 a.m.
- 2 p.m. in Wright Plaza, SGA
Is sponsoring "Bold Promise
From 4 p.m. - 6 p.m. at the
International House, there will be a
"Fulbright & International Scholars
Reception From 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium there will
be a presentation called "Gene
Therapy" with Teja Arboleda.
The "International Film Festival"
will begin at 9:30 p.m. at Hendrix
Theatre featuring a film called
Maria Full of Grace.
Friday, Nov. 19: At the
Christenbury Gym from 3:30 p.m.
- 6 p.m. there will be a "Community
Festival" featuring a youth carnival
with games and activities for
children of all ages. From 6 p.m.
- 7 p.m. there will be a "Cookout
and Pep Rally" in the Mendenhall
Brick Yard. The "International Film
Festival" will begin at 9:30 p.m.
and at 11 p.m. at Hendrix Theater
featuring a film called Dangerous
Living.
Saturday, Nov. 20: Encore
showings of the International
Rim Festival will start at 12 p.m.
in Hendrix Theater. From 12 p.m.
- 2 p.m. at the gates of Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium there will be a
free "Diversity Pin" giveaway for
football game patrons. Celebrate
diversity at ECU.
Names In the News:
National treasure, pop music
sensation, American sweetheart:
Britney Spears. Twice married
and trying to get pregnant. Or is
she already? That's what the tabs
are saying about Britney Spears,
who has made no secret about
her wish to start a family with new
hubby Kevin Federllne.
Two giants in American filmmaking
have joined forces to bring a
compelling component of western
culture to TV. According to Variety
George Clooney and Steven
Soderbergh are producing a 10-
hour project for FX based around
the Ten Commandments. Set
in modern times, each episode
will explore spiritual and moral
issues surrounding each of the
commandments.
Rich people are not always happy
people. Wealth can, Indeed, be
a burden. So sayeth Madonna,
whose revelations about riches
and "trlstesse" will come in the
last of the singer-come-wrlter's
five-book children's series, "Lotsa
de Casha a popup book about an
Italian greyhound, who, according
to publisher Nicholas "has all
the money in the world but no
happiness The book is due out
for consumers next summer.
Apparel, Interior Merchandising
Organization sponsores fashion show
Models pose to "Vogue" at AIMO fashion show, which benefited the Family Violence Program. Clothes from My Sister's Closet and C3's were modeled for the show, store profits
went to the Family Violence Program. President of AIMO, April Colclasure, plans another fashion show next semester and volunteers are welcome to participate.
Filmmaker brings Portugal to life on ECU screen
Grant Foster pries
inside many wonders
of overlooked country
USA TUMBARELLO
SENIOR WRITER
World-renowned filmmaker,
Grant Foster, provides an insid-
er's look into Portugal as one
of Europe's hidden treasures.
His travel film, The Best of Por-
tugal, takes a look at the often
overlooked majestic sights and
culture that are so abundant in
Portugal.
In The Best of Portugal, nar-
rated live by Foster himself, he
takes audiences through the
scenic and cultural highlights
of the country. The grand circle
tour begins on the banks of the
Tagus River in Lisbon, a sea-
fare town with ancient streets,
extraordinary architecture and
sophisticated shopping. Lisbon
is an old-world town with new
luxuries. Here, travelers will
partake in a streetcar ride and
visit the famous St. Jorge castle
which at one time housed royal
families, prisoners and military
servicemen.
After that, it's on to coastal
fishing villages, sandy beaches
and luxury resorts sounds very
inviting. However, not every trip
Foster brings the marvelous architecture of Portugal to ECU.
can be all fun and games. There
is always the occasional stop to
pick up some historical facts.
Travelers get to experience local
museums such as the National
Museum of Coaches and others
completely devoted to ceramic
tiles and maritime.
After indulging in several his-
torical exhibits it's off to Oporto,
the original home of Port wine.
Here, travelers experience the
traditional ways of harvesting
wine where smashing grapes
with your feet is the primary
mode of production. Onlookers
also get to participate in a wine
boat race.
Viewers also get to experience
one of Portugal's biggest festivals.
In Viano de Castelo, tourists
get a sneak peak at this cultural
festival and get to experience the
beauty of Portugal first hand. .
The trip to Portugal is rounded
out with a stop to eat at the
restaurant where Winston
Churchill painted, unloading
the catch of the day at the Sagres
fishing port, milking cows by
hand and getting a bit hot at Sao
Miguel's volcanic lake.
Foster has been dubbed
"Film Ambassador" in his native
of New Zealand. He has been
awarded many honors and is
highly respected among the
film community. Foster won the
World Championship Cup in
France for Amazing New Zealand,
The movie will feature building;
which was honored as the best
travel film submitted in 10 years.
He also received international
acclaim for his 10-part natural
history film series, Land of Birds.
There will be a ques-
tion and answer session with
Foster after the film, which is
approximately 80 min-
utes long with one
intermission.
Anyone who has interest
in other cultures, sociology,
anthropology, geography or just
likes films, should partake in
Foster's journey and discovery of
this delightful country.
This writer can be reached at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
3 the above St. Jorge castle.
Ofyi
'The Best of Portugal'
Screening Sunday, Nov. 21
at 3 p.m.
- Hendrix Theater, MSC
- 0 and A with filmmaker Grant
Foster after the screening
- ECU students get In free with
ticket, $9 for ECU faculty and staff
and $10 for the public
- Central Ticket Box Office, MSC,
328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS
'The Children's Hour' takes center stage at McGinnis
Play about truth, life
MARTHA HILL
STAFF WRITER
Once again, the students and
faculty of the school of theatre
and dance have been busy pre-
paring for another production
at ECU Loessin Playhouse in
McGinnis Theatre. The produc-
tion of The Children's Hour will
be presented Nov. 18 - 23.
The Children's Hour explores
the power of a lie and its detri-
mental irreversible effects. The
malicious intent of a child ruins
the lives of more than one person
in this exhilarating drama.
"I think it's an interesting
piece for audiences to see because
of its relevance today said
Robert Caprio, director of The
Children's Hour.
"Who's telling the truth, who
lies and how it destroys lives.
I don't think that's changed. I
mean, the play is 70 years old
An associate professor
in the school of theatre and
dance, Caprio teaches acting
and directing.
"Robert Caprio is a genius,
an absolute genius said Tiffany
Porter, a BFA professional acting
major.
Under the direction of Caprio,
Porter will be performing her first
major role in The Children's Hour.
Porter is playing Martha, one of
the headmistresses at an exclusive
school for girls, who is accused
of amoral behavior by one of her
students.
"Scenes are very high energy,
very charged. You're on the edge
of your seat wondering what's
going to happen Porter said.
"You're going to hate
some of the characters. You're
going to feel for some of the
characters. You're actually
going to loathe one of the char-
acters. It's going to be a great
experience
Lillian Hellman, one of the
best-known modern playwrights,
wrote The Children's Hour in 1934.
Controversial in its day due to the
subject matter of lesbianism, the
show was a huge success and ran
more than 700 performances on
Broadway.
"The set is the most remark-
able thing. There is a huge piece
of parchment reading 'Life is
truth. Truth is life said Tracy
Donahue, associate professor of
the school of theatre and dance.
"The set always reminds you
that this is a universal question.
This isn't a gay play, it's a play
about truth Donahue said.
Donahue teaches acting,
voice and articulation in the
school of theatre and dance. She
is cast in the play as Mrs. Tllford,
the grandmother of one of the
girls attending the school.
"Once Mrs. Tilford tells the
lie, the damage is done. It can
never be fixed. Whether it is true
or false, it's done enough damage
as if it were true Donahue said.
If you would like a peek at
the set you can go to the McGin-
nis Theatre Web cam. Log on to
theatre-dance.ecu.eduCameras.
If you're lucky you can watch the
cast and crew before their first
performance on Thursday.
"Everyone has worked really
hard. It's definitely worth
seeing said Whitney Madren,
freshman and intended BFA pro-
fessional acting major who is cast
in the show.
The Children's Hour will be
performed at 8 p.m. Thurs-
day, Nov. 18 - 23. Sunday's
performance will be at 2 p.m,
Tickets can be purchased at
McGinnis Theatre Box Office
or the Central Ticket Office.
To purchase over the phone:
McGinnis Theatre Ticket Office
328-6829, Central Ticket
Office 328-4788, Toll Free 1-
800-ECU-ARTS or VoiceTTY
328-6799. Tickets are $8 for
students, $10 for seniors and $12
for others. Parents are advised,
the play contains adult subject
matter.
This writer can be contacted at '
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
� �B W Mil
U 1 5 jL.
Vance Daniels and Lauren Davis rehearse a scene together.





PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN -CAMPUS SCENE
11-16-04
Student Opinion of Instruction Survey
ARE YOU
Surveys coming to
classrooms near you
CYNTHIA JONES
CONTRIBUTED WRITER
The SOIS of face-to-face
courses will be conducted from
Nov. 29 - Dec. 5. Through this
survey students can express
their opinions about the
instruction received during the
fall semester. With a few excep-
tions, only courses that meet
face-to-face and have enroll-
ments of six or more students will
be surveyed.
All students should be aware
that results from the SOIS are
an important consideration in
decisions of instructor promo-
tion and tenure, and they are an
important way in which students
can help to improve the quality
of their instruction.
Courses with more than
two instructors, courses in the
school of medicine and distance
education courses (e.g web-
based) are not surveyed with
the SOIS. The SOIS provides
information to the university
that is part of the teaching evalu-
ation process. The survey is
only one of several sources of
data collected about teaching
(other methods include peer
observations and review of course
materials). However, the SOIS is
widely used, and students should
provide carefully considered
feedback. The data is confidential
and instructors will not receive
the results of the fall survey until
January 2005.
SOIS forms for each
course are packaged in
confidential envelopes and
are distributed to departments
about a week before the survey
administration period. Infor-
mation about administering
the survey is printed directly on
the envelopes. Instructors are
requested to read survey instruc-
tions to their students and to not
be in the room during the survey
administration. A student survey
administrator is to distribute and
collect the survey forms. The
instructor is to read the following
instructions to the class:
"At this time you can share
your opinion of the instruction
in this class by completing a short
multiple-choice survey form.
This will take about 15 minutes.
Your participation is voluntary.
Your identity is not requested,
so that your responses will be
anonymous. Also, the forms are
handled confidentially. Bubbles
on the answer form must be com-
pletely filled in with a number
two pencil. Forms completed in
ink cannot be scanned, and
responses on those forms will not be
included in the survey. The results
of this survey are used by instruc-
tors to improve teaching skills and
develop courses and results are
used by administrators in deci-
sions of tenure, promotion and
merit. After grades are posted, your
instructor will receive a report of
the results along with written com-
ments separated from the forms.
When completing the form,
please note that a rating of 'seven'
indicates that you strongly agree
with a statement, while a rating-
of 'one Indicates that you
strongly disagree with a state-
ment. Every survey form that
can be scanned will be included
in the results, including those
with all one's or all seven's
The student opinion of
instruction survey is admin-
istered by the Office of Insti-
tutional Planning, Research,
and Effectiveness. Questions
should be directed to Dr. Michael
Poteat (call 328-9484 or e-mail
poteatg@mail.ecu.edu) or to Dr.
Cynthia Jones (call 328-9485 or
e-mail jonescy@mail.ecu.edu).
With college costs soaring, many
grads are starting life in deep hole
(KRT) � Even before Tasha
Taylor completed her education
at Hamline University in St. Paul,
Minn three years ago, she was
determined to be a social worker.
She had watched her mother
heroically raise six children after
losing a business in her 40s, and
Taylor wanted to help welfare
recipients rebuild their lives the
way her mother had.
Now, immersed in that work,
she has no regrets and no plan to
change professions. But the pres-
sures of massive college debt are
weighing heavily on her.
At 26, she has $50,000 in
college loans hanging over her
future - about a quarter of the
cost of a starter home. And she
worries about it every day.
At $15 an hour, her pay
doesn't stretch far enough each
month to provide for her daugh-
ter and pay $555 in health insur-
ance, $600 for a "hole-in-the-
wall" apartment and about $500
for student loans. Taylor eased
the pressure recently by sharing
an apartment with her boyfriend
and refinancing the loans so she
pays only $200 a month. But to
get the payments down, she had
to extend them for 25 years.
That means paying thou-
sands more in interest, and the
loans will nag at her decision-
making until she's 51.
Taylor is a member of what
has been dubbed "Generation
Broke These are young Ameri-
cans starting their lives deeply in
the red because of student loans
and credit card debt accumu-
lated in college. With a tight ob
market since the 2001 recession,
they struggle with stagnant pay,
temporary jobs and an unem-
ployment rate that has recently
been higher for college graduates
than for high school dropouts.
As a result, it's common
for young Americans like
Taylor to wrestle with career
ideals that don't mesh with
their financial burdens.
"One in five significantly
changed their career plans
because of student loans, nearly
40 percent delayed buying a
home and 20 percent reported
their debt burden caused them
to postpone having children
says researcher Tamara Draut,
who conducted a study of 18 to
34-year-olds for Demos USA, a
New York think tank.
The average person leav-
ing college now has $18,900 in
student loans, compared with
$9,000 for 1992 graduates. In
addition, they have $3,262 in
credit card debt - a 134 percent
increase since the mid90s.
College costs rose 35 per-
cent over the past decade,
and requests for federal loans
went up 56 percent. Without
enough low-interest college loan
money to cover overall costs, stu-
dents borrow money from private
lenders at higher interest rates.
About a quarter of students
even use credit cards to cover
some college expenses, according
to the College Board - a much
more expensive and volatile way
to finance college. After college,
Draut says graduates manage to
make minimum payments on
credit cards but are so strapped
they take on more debt.
The result: The average col-
lege graduate has a starting
salary of $36,000, or $2,058 a
month. Once they have paid
$307 toward student loans
and credit cards, plus covered
rent, utilities, food and trans
portation, only $34 is left over
for child care, entertainment,
clothing, furniture or emergency
expenses, says Draut.
The generation is "slipping
into a downward debt spiral that
is unmatched in modern his-
tory she says.
"Young adults starting off in
the red will find that it impacts
their financial security for years
to come
Maggie Bolton-llenly of St.
Paul already worries about get-
ting sucked into the spiral, even
though she hasn't completed her
final year at Willamette Univer-
sity in Oregon.
With $20,000 in college
loans, "I do know that once I
graduate, money will be a main
factor in choosing a job because
I do have so many loans to pay
back, " she says.
She's worried she will end up
like a number of people she sees
"who are completely unhappy
in their jobs and not passionate
about what they are doing but
feel trapped because they have
bills and loans to pay
She is flirting with becom-
ing a lawyer - not out of a deep
passion for the profession but
because she thinks it would
assure her high pay and the abil-
ity to retire loans.
Yet, going to law school would
probably triple her debts initially,
and raises the question: How
much student debt is too much?
It's a question students
should consider as they select
colleges and careers, says
Sandy Baum, an analyst for the
College Board and a Skidmore
College economist.
College itself is a proven and
worthy investment, but students
who take on total debt that will
exceed their annual pay may be
stretching too far, she says.
Over their working lives, the
typical college graduate earns
about 73 percent more than the
typical high school graduate, and
those with advanced degrees earn
two to three times as much as
high school graduates, according
to the College Board, which stud-
ies trends in education finance.
Earnings are greater for people
from all ethnic backgrounds.
And despite the burden of
debt, the College Board says the
typical graduate, who started
college at 18, has earned enough
by age 33 to compensate for both
tuition and fees at the average
public four-year institution. At
private colleges, the age is 40.
As high school seniors eye
college choices this time of year,
Baum says they should try to
compare their likely college debts
with their likely salary.
There's a rule of thumb
to have loan payments no
larger than 8 percent of your
expected income, she says.
But that's not a hard and fast
rule. While even 8 percent may
be difficult to bear if someone
is making only $20,000 a year,
a person with a $60,000 income
could devote more than eight
percent, she says.
To consider debt levels with
salaries, check themint.org. Click
on "earnings" and "careers" and
"starting salaries
Parents also must be careful
about taking on too much debt.
Too many endanger their
retirements by spending too
generously or taking on loans
themselves to finance college,
says financial aid consultant
Ray Loewe of College Money in
Marlton, N.J.
He notes that stu-
dents have a lifetime of
earnings to pay off college loans,
but if parents have extended
themselves too far, no one is
going to give them a loan at age
75 to provide money for groceries.
Consequently, he suggests
that before agreeing to pay for
expensive colleges, parents cal-
culate first how they are doing
in saving for retirement. If they
are on target to have 75 percent
of their income for each year of
retirement, he says, parents can
feel relatively secure about paying
for college. But most parents are
far behind with saving.
The average person within
15 years of retirement has saved
only $55,000.
To judge how well prepared
you are with retirement saving,
try the calculators at chooseto-
save.com.
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Page A7 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY ZOPPO Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
TUESDAY November 16, 2004
APT.P25 pjrates Bull-ied in Tampa, 41-17
No.School RecordPrev fn iQiratinn rparhPS ����������BaHiiHI M Mi itiDcnc rDnti
No. School
1USC
2 Auburn
3 Oklahoma
4 California
5 Utah
6 Texas
7 Michigan
8 Louisville
9 Wisconsin
10FSU
11 Georgia
12 Miami (FL)
13 Boise State
14 SU
15 Tennessee
16 Virginia Tech
17 Iowa
18 Virginia
19 Boston College
20 Arizona St.
21 West Virginia
22 Texas A&M
23 Ok. State
24 UTEP �
25 Bowling Green
10-0
10-0
10-0
8-1
10-0
9-1
9-1
7-1
9-1
8-2
8-2
7-2
9-0
7-2
7-2
7-2
8-2
7-2
7-2
8-2
8-2
7-3
7-3
7-2
8-2
1
3
2
5
7
6
9
12
4
11
8
18
14
17
15
16
19
10
21
20
13
22
25
23
NR
Others Receiving Votes: Pittsburgh
31, Georgia Tech 21, Flordla 11,
Alabama 6, Purdue 5, Texas Tech
5, Toledo 5, UCLA 4, Southern
Miss 2, Notre Dame 2, Fresno
State 1, Michigan St. 1, Navy 1,
New Mexico 1.
Coach's 25
No. SchoolRecordPrev.
1 use10-01
2 Oklahoma10-02
3'Auburn10-03
4 California8-16
5 Texas9-17
6 Utah10-08
7 Michigan9-19
8FSU8-212
9 Wisconsin9-14
10 Georgia8-25
11 Louisville7-114
12 Boise State9-013
13 Miami (FL)7-217
14LSU7-215
15 Virginia Tech7-216
16 Tennessee?-218
17 Iowa8-219
18 Virginia7-211
19 Boston College7-221
20 West Virginia8-210
21 Arizona St.8-220
22 Texas A&M7-323
23 Ok. State7-324
24 Bowling Green8-2NR
25 UTEP7-2NR
Others Receiving Votes; Northern
Illinois 24, Texas Tech 20, Georgia
Tech 15, Fresno State 9, Purdue 9,
Navy 6, UCLA 6, UAB 5, Michigan
St. 4, Pittsburgh 3, Florida 3,
Alabama 2, Memphis 2, Miami
(OHIO) 2, Southern Miss 2, Iowa
State 1, Colorado!
This day in
1957 - Notre Dame ends
Oklahoma's NCAA record 47-game
winning streak with a 7-0 triumph.
1957 - Bill Russell of the Boston
Celtics sets an NBA record with
49 rebounds in a 111-89 victory
over the Philadelphia Warriors.
1962 - Wilt Chamberlain scores 73
points, including 45 in the first half,
to lead the San Francisco Warriors
to a 127-111 victory over the New
York Knlcks.
1968 - Ron Johnson rushes
for 347 yards and scores five
touchdowns to lead Michigan to
a 34-9 rout of Wisconsin.
1980 - Doug Williams of the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers passes for 486
yards and fourtouchdowns in a 38-
30 loss to the Minnesota Vikings.
1982 - The NFL Management
Council and the NFL Players'
Association announce settlement
of a 57-day player strike.
1991 - Gerry Thomas of No. 1
Florida Slate misses a 34-yard
field goal with 25 seconds left,
giving No. 2 Miami a 17-16 victory.
1996 - Byron Hanspard of Texas
Tech becomes the sixth major
college player to run for 2,000
yards in a season, rushing for 257
yards and fourtouchdowns in the
Red Raiders' 56-21 victory over
Southwestern Louisiana
1996 - Corey Dillon sets an NCAA
rushing record for a quarter.gaining
222 yards oh 16 carries In the first
period as No. 15 Washington
overwhelms San Jose State 53-10.
Frustration reaches
new heights for ECU
ERIC GILMORE
STAFF WRITER
What can go wrong will go
wrong. From injuries to question-
able coaching decisions, nothing
seemed to go right for the Pirates
on Saturday night. Murphy's Law
was in full effect as the ECU foot-
ball season took yet another turn
for the worse in Tampa, Fla.
The Pirates (2-7, 2-5) man-
aged a little more than a whimper
to South Florida (4-4, 3-3) as
they took a 41-17 shellacking in
Raymond James Stadium. The
ungracious hosts tossed ECU
around like rag dolls, adding to
the embarrassment, which has
become a reoccurring theme for
this season.
ECU never really had a
chance. It seemed doomed before
the game even started. The mash
unit of Pirates that made the trip
became even thinner when slated
starting running back Art Brown
twisted a knee during pre-game
warm-ups.
Andre Hall made sure ECU
defense would continue its gra-
ciousness to opposing running
backs. The unit, that ranks 114th
in total defense resembled more
of a red-rover game than a Divi-
sion 1-A defense. Hall ran for 161
yards, 82 in the first quarter.
After ECU failed to score on
their opening drive, USF took the
ball with relative ease 83 yards
on 12 plays. Patrick Julmiste
recorded his first of two rushing
touchdowns on a one-yard sneak.
After a Santiago 30-yard field
goal, ECU had their best oppor-
tunity tonight. Chris Moore's
diving fumble recovery provided
ECU with decent field position. In
a microcosm of the season, ECU
failed to reach the end zone after
reaching first and goal from inside
the USF one-yard line. The Pirates
had to settle for a 20-yard field
goal by senior Cameron Broadwell.
And then the floodgates
opened.
USF scored two consecu-
tive touchdowns from Clenton
Numbers from
the gridiron
10
The Pirates are currently second
to last In the Conference USA
Standings, narrowly ahead of
Army due to the fact that the
Pirates beat the Black Knights
three Saturdays ago.
9
The number of consecutive
games In which James Pinkney
has thrown at least one
touchdown pass.
29
Andre Hall added his name to the long list of tailbacks that have torched ECU this season.
Crossley and Hall respectively.
Both were nine play drives of
more than 80 yards. The two
Bulls' backs were punching the
smaller Pirates in the mouth
with no retaliation. During the
latter drive, 220-pound Julmiste
lowered his shoulder and popped
Moore off his feet and onto the
turf. Julmiste finished with 233
yards on 12-of-16 attempts.
ECU came within striking dis-
tance when Hall fumbled the ball
directly into the hands of outside
linebacker Jamar Flournoy. The
junior-college transfer ran 36 yards
for his first touchdown as a Pirate.
The Pirates were poised to
take the ball back when Head
Coach John Thompson made a
costly decision. The Bulls had
the ball third and 14 from their
own 35-yard line when they were
flagged for holding. Instead of
The amount ot rushing touchdowns
ECU has given up this season.
They have also allowed over a
combined 2,000 rushing yards.
349
The amount of total points the
Pirates have allowed this year.
declining the penalty and forc-
ing fourth down, ECU chose to
take the penalty. Russian roulette
backfired as Julmiste hit Johnny
Peyton on a 56-yard strike to
the ECU 19 yard line. Just two
see FOOTBALL page A8
Pirates rebound, defeat
George Washington
The Lady Pirates are seeded ninth for the C-USA tourney.
Lady Pirates split
weekend games
ECU Swimming and Diving will wrap up their fall season at the Nike Cup and U.S. Open.
Men's team moves
6-0 for season
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Coming off a heartbreaking
and controversial loss to Duke
last weekend, the ECU Women's
Swimming and Diving Team was
looking to get back on track
as they headed up to Wash-
ington D.C. to take on George
Washington Saturday after-
noon at Charles E. Smith Center
Pool. They did just that, down-
ing the Colonials 155-80. The
men also came up victorious and
moved to 6-0 on the season with
a 130-100 triumph.
"We really swam well today
said ECU Head Coach Rick
Kobe.
"We are where we need to
be going into the Nike Cup
next week
The Pirate women sped out
early and took the first seven
events of the day.
Senior Diane Parker con-
tinued to be the Pirates bread
and butter with a victory in the
100 freestyle (53.62). Parker,
along with teammates Elizabeth-
Claire Moore, Kate Gordon and
Adrienne Williams opened the
meet with a convincing win in
the 400 medley relay (3:58.07),
while freshmenKim Brewer and
Meghan Pulaski took the 1000
freestyle (10:33.17) and 500 free-
style (5:07.79) respectively.
On the men's side, Senior
Casey Cronin came up big for
the Pirates once again, winning
the 200 freestyle with a time of
1:43.44. Gavin Stark took the 100
freestyle event in a winning time
of 47.37, while teammate Kelly
1 lendrick grabbed the 50 freestyle
(21.45). Josh Barthlow, Cronin,
Matt Donohue and Josh Curnutte
also won the 400 medley relay in
a victorious time of 3:29.86.
In the diving pool, freshman
Ryan Hunt won the three-meter
event scoring a season-hih
282.23. Hunt also won the one-
meter competition with a score
of 256.50.
George Washington was led
by Bryan Ferretti who won the
1000 freestyle (9:45.24) and the
500 freestyle (4:47.11). He also
swam on the Colonials' 400
freestyle relay team that finished
first (3:18.07).
On another up note for
the Pirates, Diane Parker was
recently named Conference USA
Swimmer of the Week for the
first time this season. The two-
time C-USA Swimmer of the
Meet and Female Swimmer of
the Year notched victories in
the 200 Individual Medley with
a time of 2:05.83 and the 200-
yard Breaststroke with a time of
2:18.84 against Duke in Durham,
NC. Both times were her season-
best and tops for the conference
so far in 2004.
The Pirates will compete
again when the team travels to
Chapel Hill, NC on Thursday,
Nov. 18 for the Nike Cup. The
cup will run through Saturday,
Nov. 20.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
ECU looking forward to
C-USA tournament
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Volleyball Team
went into last weekend in hopes
of finishing the season with
two wins. Having already been
accepted in the Conference USA
tournament, the Lady Pirates were
playing for a higher seed. Wins
last weekend would also give ECU
momentum as they head into
the tournament this weekend.
The Lady Pirates started
play last weekend against
DePaul on the wrong foot.
ECU committed nine attack
errors and were out-hit .316 to
106 as the Lady Blue Demons
won game one 30-22.
Game two was much differ-
ent for ECU as freshman Kelley
Wernert and junior Pam Ferris
stepped up to lead the team.
Both players combined for 11
kills and Ferris compiled a .455
hitting percentage as the Lady
Pirates came away with the win
30-26.
In game three, ECU appeared
to have the game wrapped up
leading 20-13, just to have the
game slip away with a final score
of 33-31. Junior Johanna Bertini
did manage 23 digs in the loss:
Though down, the Lady Pirates
were not out as they bounced
back in game four to come away
with the victory 30-27. Junior
Paige llowell was instrumental
in the win posting six kills.
In the final game of the night
ECU came out hard leading 8-0.
The Lady Pirates did not look
back as they maintained the lead
and won the game and match.
Wernert led the Lady Pirates
throughout the night with a
career-high 20 kills. Ferris racked
up 17 kills and also had a season-
high 19 digs.
With one more game left
on their schedule, the Lady
Pirates returned to action the
following day to face Marquette.
Despite coming out strong, win-
ning their first game against the
Lady Golden Eagles 30-24, ECU
lost their next three and the
match 30-27, 30-25 and 30-24.
"We played two different
types of teams this weekend said
assistant coach Ryan Manning.
"I actually feel we played
harder against Marquette.
They were just more expe-
rienced. The girls were
ready to play last weekend
With the one win weekend
the Lady Pirates ended regu-
lar season with an 11-17 (5-8).
The record stands as ECU'S best
conference record since joining
C-USA in 2001. The win also
earned the team the ninth spot in
C-USA Tournament where they
will face Houston in round one.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinan.com.





PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � CAMPUS SCENE
11-16-04
Student Opinion of Instruction Survey
Surveys coming to
classrooms near you
CYNTHIA JONES
CONTRIBUTED WRITER
The SOIS of face-to-face
courses will be conducted from
Nov. 29 - Dec. 5. Through this
survey students can express
their opinions about the
instruction received during the
fall semester. With a few excep-
tions, only courses that meet
face-to-face and have enroll-
ments of six or more students will
be surveyed.
All students should be aware
that results from the SOIS are
an important consideration in
decisions of instructor promo-
tion and tenure, and they are an
Important way in which students
can help to improve the quality
of their instruction.
Courses with more than
two instructors, courses in the
school of medicine and distance
education courses (e.g web-
based) are not surveyed with
the SOIS. The SOIS provides
information to the university
that is part of the teaching evalu-
ation process. The survey is
only one of several sources of
data collected about teaching
(other methods include peer
observations and review of course
materials). However, the SOIS is
widely used, and students should
provide carefully considered
feedback. The data is confidential
and instructors will not receive
the results of the fall survey until
January 2005.
SOIS forms for each
course are packaged in
confidential envelopes and
are distributed to departments
about a week before the survey
administration period. Infor-
mation about administering
the survey is printed directly on
the envelopes. Instructors are
requested to read survey instruc-
tions to their students and to not
be in the room during the survey
administration. A student survey
administrator is to distribute and
collect the survey forms. The
instructor is to read the following
instructions to the class:
"At this time you can share
your opinion of the instruction
in this class by completing a short
multiple-choice survey form.
This will take about 15 minutes.
Your participation is voluntary.
Your identity is not requested,
so that your responses will be
anonymous. Also, the forms are
handled confidentially. Bubbles
on the answer form must be com-
pletely filled in with a number
two pencil. Forms completed in
ink cannot be scanned, and
responses on those forms will not be
included in the survey. The results
of this survey are used by instruc-
tors to improve teaching skills and
develop courses and results are
used by administrators in deci-
sions of tenure, promotion and
merit. After grades are posted, your
instructor will receive a report of
the results along with written com-
ments separated from the forms.
When completing the form,
please note that a rating of 'seven'
indicates that you strongly agree
with a statement, while a rating-
of 'one Indicates that you
strongly disagree with a state-
ment. Every survey form that
can be scanned will be included
in the results, including those
with all one's or all seven's
The student opinion of
instruction survey is admin-
istered by the Office of Insti-
tutional Planning, Research,
and Effectiveness. Questions
should be directed to Dr. Michael
Poteat (call 328-9484 or e-mail
poteatg@mail.ecu.edu) or to Dr.
Cynthia Jones (call 328-9485 or
e-mail jonescy@mail.ecu.edu).
With college costs soaring, many
grads are starting life in deep hole
(KRT) � Even before Tasha
Taylor completed her education
at Mainline University in St. Paul,
Minn three years ago, she was
determined to be a social worker.
She had watched her mother
heroically raise six children after
losing a business in her 40s, and
Taylor wanted to help welfare
recipients rebuild their lives the
way her mother had.
Now, immersed in that work,
she has no regrets and no plan to
change professions. But the pres-
sures of massive college debt are
weighing heavily on her.
At 26, she has $50,000 in
college loans hanging over her
future - about a quarter of the
cost of a starter home. And she
worries about it every day.
At $15 an hour, her pay
doesn't stretch far enough each
month to provide for her daugh-
ter and pay $555 in health insur-
ance, $600 for a "hole-in-the-
wall" apartment and about $500
for student loans. Taylor eased
the pressure recently by sharing
an apartment with her boyfriend
and refinancing the loans so she
pays only $200 a month. But to
get the payments down, she had
to extend them for 25 years.
That means paying thou-
sands more in interest, and the
loans will nag at her decision-
making until she's 51.
Taylor is a member of what
has been dubbed "Generation
Broke These are young Ameri-
cans starting their lives deeply in
the red because of student loans
and credit card debt accumu-
lated in college. With a tight job
market since the 2001 recession,
they struggle with stagnant pay,
temporary jobs and an unem-
ployment rate that has recently
been higher for college graduates
than for high school dropouts.
As a result, it's common
for young Americans like
Taylor to wrestle with career
ideals that don't mesh with
their financial burdens.
"One in five significantly
changed their career plans
because of student loans, nearly
40 percent delayed buying a
home and 20 percent reported
their debt burden caused them
to postpone having children
says researcher Tamara Draut,
who conducted a study of 18 to
34-year-olds for Demos USA, a
New York think tank.
The average person leav-
ing college now has $18,900 in
student loans, compared with
$9,000 for 1992 graduates. In
addition, they have $3,262 in
credit card debt - a 134 percent
increase since the mid90s.
College costs rose 35 per-
cent over the past decade,
and requests for federal loans
went up 56 percent. Without
enough low-interest college loan
money to cover overall costs, stu-
dents borrow money from private
lenders at higher interest rates.
About a quarter of students
even use credit cards to cover
some college expenses, according
to the College Board - a much
more expensive and volatile way
to finance college. After college,
Draut says graduates manage to
make minimum payments on
credit cards but are so strapped
they take on more debt.
The result: The average col-
lege graduate has a starting
salary of $36,000, or $2,058 a
month. Once they have paid
$307 toward student loans
and credit cards, plus covered
rent, utilities, food and trans
portation, only $34 is left over
for child care, entertainment,
clothing, furniture or emergency
expenses, says Draut.
The generation is "slipping
into a downward debt spiral that
is unmatched in modern his-
tory she says.
"Young adults starting off in
the red will find that it impacts
their financial security for years
to come
Maggie Bolton-Ilenly of St.
Paul already worries about get-
ting sucked into the spiral, even
though she hasn't completed her
final year at Willamette Univer-
sity in Oregon.
With $20,000 in college
loans, "I do know that once I
graduate, money will be a main
factor in choosing a job because
I do have so many loans to pay
back, " she says.
She's worried she will end up
like a number of people she sees
"who are completely unhappy
in their jobs and not passionate
about what they are doing but
feel trapped because they have
bills and loans to pay
She is flirting with becom-
ing a lawyer - not out of a deep
passion for the profession but
because she thinks it would
assure her high pay and the abil-
ity to retire loans.
Yet, going to law school would
probably triple her debts initially,
and raises the question: How
much student debt is too much?
It's a question students
should consider as they select
colleges and careers, says
Sandy Baum, an analyst for the
College Board and a Skidmore
College economist.
College itself is a proven and
worthy investment, but students
who take on total debt that will
exceed their annual pay may be
stretching too far, she says.
Over their working lives, the
typical college graduate earns
about 73 percent more than the
typical high school graduate, and
those with advanced degrees earn
two to three times as much as
high school graduates, according
to the College Board, which stud-
ies trends in education finance.
Earnings are greater for people
from all ethnic backgrounds.
And despite the burden of
debt, the College Board says the
typical graduate, who started
college at 18, has earned enough
by age 33 to compensate for both
tuition and fees at the average
public four-year institution. At
private colleges, the age is 40.
As high school seniors eye
college choices this time of year,
Baum says they should try to
compare their likely college debts
with their likely salary.
There's a rule of thumb
to have loan payments no
larger than 8 percent of your
expected income, she says.
But that's not a hard and fast
rule. While even 8 percent may
be difficult to bear if someone
is making only $20,000 a year,
a person with a $60,000 income
could devote more than eight
percent, she says.
To consider debt levels with
salaries, check themint.org. Click
on "earnings" and "careers" and
"starting salaries
Parents also must be careful
about taking on too much debt.
Too many endanger their
retirements by spending too
generously or taking on loans
themselves to finance college,
says financial aid consultant
Ray Loewe of College Money in
Marlton, N.J.
He notes that stu-
dents have a lifetime of
earnings to pay off college loans,
but if parents have extended
themselves too far, no one is
going to give them a loan at age
75 to provide money for groceries.
Consequently, he suggests
that before agreeing to pay for
expensive colleges, parents cal-
culate first how they are doing
in saving for retirement. If they
are on target to have 75 percent
of their income for each year of
retirement, he says, parents can
feel relatively secure about paying
for college. But most parents are
far behind with saving.
The average person within
15 years of retirement has saved
only $55,000.
To judge how well prepared
you are with retirement saving,
try the calculators at chooseto-
save.com.
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Page A7 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY Z0PP0 Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
TUESDAY November 16, 2004
�ptop25 pirates Bull-ied in Tampa, 41-17
No. School
1USC
2 Auburn
3 Oklahoma
4 California
5 Utah
6 Texas
7 Michigan
8 Louisville
9 Wisconsin
10FSU
11 Georgia
12 Miami (FL)
13 Boise State
14 SU
15 Tennessee
16 Virginia Tech
17 Iowa
18 Virginia
19 Boston College
20 Arizona St.
21 West Virginia
22 Texas A&M
23 Ok. State
24 UTEP �
25 Bowling Green
Record Prev Frustration reaches
new heights for ECU
10-0
10-0
10-0
8-1
10-0
9-1
9-1
7-1
9-1
8-2
8-2
7-2
9-0
7-2
7-2
7-2
8-2
7-2
7-2
8-2
8-2
7-3
7-3
7-2
8-2
1
3
2
5
7
6
9
12
4
11
8
18
14
17
15
16
19
10
21
20
13
22
25
,23
NR
Others Receiving Votes: Pittsburgh
31, Georgia Tech 21, Flordla 11,
Alabama 6, Purdue 5, Texas Tech
5, Toledo 5, UCLA 4, Southern
Miss 2, Noire Dame 2, Fresno
State 1, Michigan St. 1, Navy 1,
New Mexico 1.
Coach's 25
No. SchoolRecord Prev.
1USC10-01
2 Oklahoma10-02
3Auburn10-03
4 California8-16
5 Texas9-17
6 Utah10-08
7 Michigan9-19
8FSU8-212
9 Wisconsin9-14
10 Georgia8-25
11 Louisville7-114
12 Boise State9-013
13 Miami (FL)7-217
14LSU7-215
15 Virginia Tech7-216
16 Tennessee7218
17 Iowa8-219
18 Virginia7-211
19 Boston College7-221
20 West Virginia8-210
21 Arizona St.8-220
22 Texas A&M7-323
23 Ok. State7-324
24 Bowling Green8-2NR
25 UTEP7-2NR
Others Receiving Votes; Northern
Illinois 24, Texas Tech 20, Georgia
Tech 15, Fresno State 9, Purdue 9,
Navy 6, UCLA 6, UAB 5, Michigan
St. 4, Pittsburgh 3, Florida 3,
Alabama 2, Memphis 2, Miami
(OHIO) 2, Southern Miss 2, Iowa
State 1, Colorado 1.
This day in
1957 - Notre Dame ends
Oklahoma's NCAA record 47-game
winning streak with a 7-0 triumph.
1957 - Bill Russell of the Boston
Celtics sets an NBA record with
49 rebounds in a 111-89 victory
over the Philadelphia Warriors.
1962 - Wilt Chamberlain scores 73
points, including 45 in the first half,
to lead the San Francisco Warriors
to a 127-111 victory over the New
York Knlcks,
1968 - Ron Johnson rushes
fof 347 yards and scores five
touchdowns to lead Michigan to
a 34-9 rout of Wisconsin.
1980 - Doug Williams of the Tampa
Bay Buccaneers passes for 486
yards and four touchdowns in a 38-
30 loss to the Minnesota Vikings.
1982 - The NFL Management
Council and the NFL Players'
Association announce settlement
of a 57-day player strike.
1991 - Gerry Thomas of No. 1
Florida Slate misses a 34-yard
field goal with 25 seconds left,
giving No, 2 Miami a 17-16 victory.
1996 - Byron Hanspard of Texas
Tech becomes the sixth major
college player to run for 2,000
yards In a season, rushing for 257
yards and four touchdowns In the
Red Raiders' 56-21 victory over
Southwestern Louisiana
1996 - Corey Dillon sets an NCAA
rushing record for a quarter, gaining
222 yaKte on 16 carries In the first
period as No. 15 Washington
overwhelms San Jose State 53-10.
ERIC GILMORE
STAFF WRITER
What can go wrong will go
wrong. From injuries to question-
able coaching decisions, nothing
seemed to go right for the Pirates
on Saturday night. Murphy's Law
was in full effect as the ECU foot-
ball season took yet another turn
for the worse in Tampa, Fla.
The Pirates (2-7, 2-5) man-
aged a little more than a whimper
to South Florida (4-4, 3-3) as
they took a 41-17 shellacking in
Raymond James Stadium. The
ungracious hosts tossed ECU
around like rag dolls, adding to
the embarrassment, which has
become a reoccurring theme for
this season.
ECU never really had a
chance. It seemed doomed before
the game even started. The mash
unit of Pirates that made the trip
became even thinner when slated
starting running back Art Brown
twisted a knee during pre-game
warm-ups.
Andre Hall made sure ECU
defense would continue its gra-
ciousness to opposing running
backs. The unit, that ranks 114th
in total defense resembled more
of a red-rover game than a Divi-
sion I-A defense. Hall ran for 161
yards, 82 in the first quarter.
After ECU failed to score on
their opening drive, USF took the
ball with relative ease 83 yards
on 12 plays. Patrick Julmiste
recorded his first of two rushing
touchdowns on a one-yard sneak.
After a Santiago 30-yard field
goal, ECU had their best oppor-
tunity tonight. Chris Moore's
diving fumble recovery provided
ECU with decent field position. In
a microcosm of the season, ECU
failed to reach the end zone after
reaching first and goal from inside
the USF one-yard line. The Pirates
had to settle for a 20-yard field
goal by senior Cameron Broadwell.
And then the floodgates
opened.
USF scored two consecu-
tive touchdowns from Clenton
Numbers from
the gridiron
10
The Pirates are currently second
to last in the Conference USA
Standings, narrowly ahead of
Army due to the fact that the
Pirates beat the Black Knights
three Saturdays ago.
9
The number of consecutive
games In which James Pinkney
has thrown at least one
touchdown pass.
29
Andre Hall added his name to the long list of tailbacks that have torched ECU this season.
Crossley and Hall respectively.
Both were nine play drives of
more than 80 yards. The two
Bulls' backs were punching the
smaller Pirates in the mouth
with no retaliation. During the
latter drive, 220-pound Julmiste
lowered his shoulder and popped
Moore off his feet and onto the
turf. Julmiste finished with 233
yards on 12-of-16 attempts.
ECU came within striking dis-
tance when Hall fumbled the ball
directly into the hands of outside
linebacker Jamar Flournoy. The
junior-college transfer ran 36 yards
for his first touchdown as a Pirate.
The Pirates were poised to
take the ball back when Head
Coach John Thompson made a
costly decision. The Bulls had
the ball third and 14 from their
own 35-yard line when they were
flagged for holding. Instead of
The amount of rushing touchdowns
ECU has given up this season.
They have also allowed over a
combined 2,000 rushing yards.
349
The amount of total points the
Pirates have allowed this year.
declining the penalty and forc-
ing fourth down, ECU chose to
take the penalty. Russian roulette
backfired as Julmiste hit Johnny
Peyton on a 56-yard strike to
the ECU 19 yard line. Just two
see FOOTBALL page A8
Pirates rebound, defeat
George Washington
The Lady Pirates are seeded ninth for the C-USA tourney.
Lady Pirates split
weekend games
ECU Swimming and Diving will wrap up their fall season at the Nike Cup and U.S. Open
Men's team moves
6-0 for season
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Coming off a heartbreaking
and controversial loss to Duke
last weekend, the ECU Women's
Swimming and Diving Team was
looking to get back on track
as they headed up to Wash-
ington D.C. to take on George
Washington Saturday after-
noon at Charles E. Smith Center
Pool. They did just that, down-
ing the Colonials 155-80. The
men also came up victorious and
moved to 6-0 on the season with
a 130-100 triumph.
"We really swam well today
said ECU Head Coach Rick
Kobe.
"We are where we need to
be going into the Nike Cup
next week
The Pirate women sped out
early and took the first seven
events of the day.
Senior Diane Parker con-
tinued to be the Pirates bread
and butter with a victory in the
100 freestyle (53.62). Parker,
along with teammates Elizabeth-
Claire Moore, Kate Gordon and
Adrienne Williams opened the
meet with a convincing win in
the 400 medley relay (3:58.07),
while freshmen"kim Brewer and
Meghan Pulaski took the 1000
freestyle (10:33.17) and 500 free-
style (5:07.79) respectively.
On the men's side, Senior
Casey Cronin came up big for
the Pirates once again, winning
the 200 freestyle with a time of
1:43.44. Gavin Stark took the 100
freestyle event in a winning time
of 47.37, while teammate Kelly
Hendrick grabbed the 50 freestyle
(21.45). Josh Barthlow, Cronin,
Matt Donohue and Josh Curnutte
also won the 400 medley relay in
a victorious time of 3:29.86.
In the diving pool, freshman
Ryan Hunt won the three-meter
event scoring a season-high
282.23. Hunt also won the one-
meter competition with a score
of 256.50.
George Washington was led
by Bryan Ferretti who won the
1000 freestyle (9:45.24) and the
500 freestyle (4:47.11). He also
swam on the Colonials' 400
freestyle relay team that finished
first (3:18.07).
On another up note for
the Pirates, Diane Parker was
recently named Conference USA
Swimmer of the Week for the
first time this season. The two-
time C-USA Swimmer of the
Meet and Female Swimmer of
the Year notched victories in
the 200 Individual Medley with
a time of 2:05.83 and the 200-
yard Breaststroke with a time of
2:18.84 against Duke in Durham,
NC. Both times were her season-
best and tops for the conference
so far in 2004.
The Pirates will compete
again when the team travels to
Chapel Hill, NC on Thursday,
Nov. 18 for the Nike Cup. The
cup will run through Saturday,
Nov. 20.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
ECU looking forward to
C-USA tournament
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Volleyball Team
went into last weekend in hopes
of finishing the season with
two wins. Having already been
accepted in the Conference USA
tournament, the Lady Pirates were
playing for a higher seed. Wins
last weekend would also give ECU
momentum as they head into
the tournament this weekend.
The Lady Pirates started
play last weekend against
DePaul on the wrong foot.
ECU committed nine at'tack
errors and were out-hit .316 to
106 as the Lady Blue Demons
won game one 30-22.
Game two was much differ-
ent for ECU as freshman Kelley
Wernert and junior Pam Ferris
stepped up to lead the team.
Both players combined for 11
kills and Ferris compiled a .455
hitting percentage as the Lady
Pirates came away with the win
30-26.
In game three, ECU appeared
to have the game wrapped up
leading 20-13, just to have the
game slip away with a final score
of 33-31. Junior Johanna Bertini
did manage 23 digs in the loss:
Though down, the Lady Pirates
were not out as they bounced
back in game four to come away
with the victory 30-27- Junior
Paige Howell was instrumental
in the win posting six kills.
In the final game of the night
ECU came out hard leading 8-0.
The Lady Pirates did not look
back as they maintained the lead
and won the game and match.
Wernert led the Lady Pirates
throughout the night with a
career-high 20 kills. Ferris racked
up 17 kills and also had a season-
high 19 digs.
With one more game left
on their schedule, the Lady
Pirates returned to action the
following day to face Marquette.
Despite coming out strong, win-
ning their first game against the
Lady Golden Eagles 30-24, ECU
lost their next three and the
match 30-27, 30-25 and 30-24.
"We played two different
types of teams this weekend said
assistant coach Ryan Manning.
"I actually feel we played
harder against Marquette.
They were just more expe-
rienced. The girls were
ready to play last weekend
With the one win weekend
the Lady Pirates ended regu-
lar season with an 11-17 (5-8).
The record stands as ECU's best
conference record since joining
C-USA in 2001. The win also
earned the team the ninth spot in
C-USA Tournament where they
will face Houston in round one.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinan. com.





PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
11-16-04
Pirates open second half smokin 'Cook'
Bulldogs en route to 78-53 victory
Sophomore guard
drops 27 in win
TREWT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Men's Basketball
Team opened the second half of
Thursday's night contest with
the Barton Bulldogs on fire.
A 26-6 run coming out of the
break propelled the Pirates to
their second win of the season,
78-S3.
"I think it was a little dis-
appointing how we came out
tonight said sophomore guard
Mike Cook.
"I don't feel like we were
playing as hard as we could
The Pirates were in a battle
throughout the entire first half
fighting off a pesky Bulldog squad.
"Give Barton tremendous
credit said Head Coach Bill
Herrion.
"They played really hard, very
physical and they did not back
down from us the whole night
Barton would trim an eight-
point Pirate lead to as little as
one with a little more than nine
minutes to go in the opening
half. ECU responded by reel-
ing off 11 straight, but enter ?d
the locker room only up eight
after a Casey Moore three-point
buzzer-beater.
"Thank God Mike Cook
had 17 points at the half and
the Moussa was able to play,
because if those two things did
not happen, then we would have
probably been behind at the
half Herrion said.
Moussa Badiane made his
season debut after suffering from
an injured thumb which kept
him out of the season opener
with Newberry College. It didn't
take long at all for "Moose" to
find his way again as he was back
to his old self, swatting seven
shots in the first half.
"I just Wanted to get my feet
wet before the regular season
started and that is what 1 did
said Badiane.
"I brought something to the
team tonight and that is what I
wanted to do
Badiane's playing time was
limited in the second half due to a
small ankle injury, but the Pirates'
26-6 run out of the locker room
proved they did not need the big
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Cook and the Pirates will start play in the BCA Invitational against Pepperdine this week.
man to finish off the Bulldogs.
"I was very pleased with the
way our kids responded the first
five to 10 minutes of the second
half Herrion said.
Cook added another eight
points during the run and fin-
ished the contest with a game
high 27 points.
"I just wanted to come out
and have a good game before
the regular season started and
show the young guys how to play
hard Cook said.
ECU improved on its foul
shooting performance from the
first game as they went a solid
74.2 percentage at the charity
stripe. The biggest concern from
last game, however, was the
play in the post, something that
might have taken a step back in
the victory as the Pirates were
out-rebounded 47-43.
"We got moved around the
bucket a little bit too much
tonight and that has me wor-
ried Herrion said.
"We have held two teams
back-to-back to 30 percentage
shooting from the floor, so we
are guarding. We just need to
clean up the backboard
The Pirates can afford these
mistakes now as Herrion pointed
out in the post game press con-
ference saying Thursday's con-
test was what the kids needed
in preparation for the regular
season, which takes a road to
Raleigh tomorrow afternoon.
"I think we have to go to
Raleigh and play with a chip on
our shoulder and be ready to beat
every team Cook said.
Herrion knows that the trial
period for his young Pirates has
come to an end as they face Pep-
perdine in the BCA's opening
game at noon.
"Pepperdine is a veteran,
experienced, basketball team
with size so it has to happen
Wednesday Herrion said.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Football
from page A7
plays later, Julmiste was true for
his second touchdown on the
game.
On the ensuing drive, the
warrior that is James Pinkney
willed his team down the field.
The six-play drive was capped by
a Chris Johnson 18-yard touch-
down catch. Pinkney now has a
touchdown pass in nine consecu-
tive games. The Delray Beach,
Fla. native was 14-of-24 for 131
yards and one interception.
ECU failed to secure an
onsides kick with nearly eight
minutes left in regulation. USF
backup kicker Justin Geisler
replaced Santiago Gramatica
because of a pulled groin and
scored on a 34-yard field goal.
On the ensuing possession,
backup quarterback Desmond
Robinson threw a pass directly
into the hands of C.J. Lewis.
Lewis saluted Robinson on a
26-yard interception return that
concluded the rout.
Robinson replaced Pinkney
with less than two minutes to
go. Pinkney, who was sacked
five times, was visibly frustrated
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when he came off the field. The
sophomore quarterback has been
one of the few bright spots on a
team that has virtually no light
at the end of the tunnel.
After the game, Moore stated
ECU's performance over the
last two years has erased what
inroads were made during the
mid to late 1990s. The junior,
who finished with 13 tackles,
couldn't be more right. This team
has not won away from home and
barely competed. ECU is now 3-
17 under Thompson and the
Pirate Nation is seemingly fed up.
After the game, Thompson
likened his team to a sick patient.
However, he is the lifeblood of
this team and is dually responsi-
ble for its well-being. Injuries are
only so much of the problem.
The Pirates will honor their
seniors on Saturday inside
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium when
they play host to a red-hot
Memphis team. Those
seniors are a reminder of the
past times for ECU when
they competed for conference
championships and bowl games
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Chris Moore has dropped off
were regular occurrences.
South Florida has never lost
to the Pirates, their fifth win
against ECU in only their ninth
year of existence. The Bulls are
leaving the Pirates in the dust
after this season when they will
make the jump to the Big East. It
the radar for ECU this year.
was only fitting that the Pirates
were manhandled by a team that
has what the Pirates have aspired
to have over the years - to be in
a BCS conference.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolmian. com.
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Page A9
,
TUESDAY November 16, 2004
For Rent
For Rent- 2 Bedroom 1 bath
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BR apts, dishwasher, CD, central
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Beech Street Villas- 3 bedrooms
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Cannon Court & Cedar Court- 2
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Short term leases available. For
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For rent University Area Wyndam
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Call Renee Carter 347-2602.
Seeking Christian non-smoker
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Short term leases available. For
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Rent Special- Gladiolus & Jasmine
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according to class schedules. This
program will run from November
29 through the beginning of
March. Salary rates start at $6.25
per hour. For more information,
please contact the Athletic Office
at 329-4550, Monday through
Friday, 10 am until 7 pm, Apply
at the City of Greenville, Human
Resources Department, 201 Martin
L. King Dr. Phone 329-4492.
Bartending! $250day
potential. No experience
necessary: Training provided.
(800) 965-6520 ext. 202.
Greek Personals
The sisters of Alpha Omicron
Pi would like to thank the
brothers of Pi Kappa Alpha
for a great night of bowling!
The sisters of Alpha Omicron
Pi had an awesome time
hanging out with the brothers
of Theta Chi this weekend!
Hope to do it again soon!
Sigma Sigma Sigma would like
to thank everyone who got
sponsors and participated in
the American Heart Walk. Sigma
ladies use these next few days
to find a date New members
keep up the good work, you are
getting so close, we love you
with a deep dark purple passion!
Gamma Chi Epsilon sorority
would like to thank all students,
faculty, and staff who participated
in the Red Cross Blood Drive
on November 4th, 2004.
Alpha Delta Pi would like to
announce our 2nd annual Silent
Holiday Auction taking place
Sunday Nov. 21 from 11am-
5pm. All proceeds will go the
the Ronald McDonald House.
Other
Spring Break 2005 Challenge
find a better price! Lowest prices,
free meals, free drinks, hottest
parties! November 6th deadline!
Hiring reps- earn free trips and
cash! www.sunsplashtours.
com. 1800-426-7710.
All year round- SKYDIVE!
Tandem skydive or learn to
jump on your own. www.
lumpRaeford.com 910-904-0000.
Contact us today for details.
It could be a Beaming Broblem
Get your kid Belp now!
l-888-GRrj.MIND-www dboutLDotq
ADVENTURES OFGIVING US THE COLD SHOULDER.
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57 Recombinant
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58 Statute





PAGEA10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
11-16-04
Wake backcourt best in nation
(KRT) � After one season of
playing in the wide world of ACC
basketball, Chris Paul already
understands the value of think-
ing locally.
"People ask me how I feel
about being the best player in
the country says Paul, second-
ranked Wake Forest's sophomore
point guard and a consensus pre-
season All-American. "I tell them
I'm not sure I'm the best player in
my own dorm room
So it will go this season in the
ACC, where the quality of play in
the guard position will be as high
as it's ever been.
How else can it be explained
that Paul, a sophomore who is the
league's preseason player of the
year and last season's top fresh-
man might lose a one-on-one
game with his roommate? Well,
the roommate happens to be his
backcourt mate, a guy named
Justin Gray and a first-team all-
ACC guard.
In any other league in any
other year, a Paul-Gray back-
court that includes senior Taron
Downey coming off the bench
might be untouchable. But not in
the ACC, not this season.
Duke's J.J. Redick might be the
country's top shooter. Daniel Ewlng
was the ACC tournament most
valuable player two seasons ago.
Georgia Tech's Jarrett Jack,
B.J. Elder and Will Bynum played
big roles in the Yellow Jackets'
run to last season's NCAA cham-
pionship game.
Maryland's John Gilchrist and
Chris McCray took the Terps to the
ACC tournament championship.
North Carolina's Raymond
Felton and Rashad McCants
helped the Tar Heels get back to
the NCAA tournament after a
two-year absence.
NC State's Julius Hodge was
last season's ACC Player of the
Year. Transfer Tony Bethel led
Georgetown in assists in 2002.
Virginia's J.R. Reynolds and
T.J. Bannister helped the Cavaliers
to a late-season turnaround.
This might be as talented
a group of guards as the ACC
has seen since 1986. Remember
Duke's Johnny Dawkins and
Tommy Amaker, Georgia Tech's
Mark Price and Bruce Dalrymple,
North Carolina's Kenny Smith,
NC State's Nate McMillan and
Wake Forest's Muggsy Bogues?
"I'm a basketball historian
says Virginia Tech's Seth Green-
berg, whose Hokies play in the
ACC for the first time this season.
"I can remember when a
league had each team with an
excellent guard. But I've never
seen a league with great back-
courts like this one. You can go
down the line. That's what the
ACC has this year
The Deacons have as much
in their backcourt as any team,
including a Paul-Gray combina-
tion that becomes more formi-
dable when coach Skip Prosser
elects to use Downey in a three-
guard lineup.
mump
Premiere
pri
Pre-Thanksgiving
Friday, Nov. 19th thru Sunday, Nov. 21st
aii Clothing 20 OFF
All Accessories 10 OFF
420-B East Arlington Blvd.
(252) 321-4884
BOTH LOCATIONS1 Fusion Skate ParkPrp Shop
S04 West 10th Street
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THIS WEEK AT STUDENT UNION
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Sat. 9:30PM
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Nov. 21 - Celebrate Diversity Week with Dances of Universal Peace.
For more information please call 252.328.2306
Mendenhall Student Center Auditorium 244 FREE and open to ALL FREE Refreshments
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
Diversity
International Education Week
Diversity Across the Globe:
Celebrating Local Flavor
November 15-20, 2004
Tues. Nov. 16
Mix If Up Lunch
12PM (Campus Dining Halls)
This is an opportunity to swap seats in the dining halls,
step out of your comfort lone and connect with new people
and bridge the divide.
Multicultural & International Reading Day
3PM (Ledonia Wright Cultural Center)
Meet the Chancellor.
Wed. Nov. 17
World Food Festival
1PM - 3PM (Mendenhall Multi-Purpose Room)
Have a taste of the world around and participate in
some special activities.
Dialogue on Diversity
6PM (Ledonia Wright Cultural Center)
MOVIES
November 20th (Saturday) @ 5pm
November 21 st (Sunday) @ 8pm
Devdas
Rated PG
Runtime: 165 minutes
Devdas shared a magnetic childhood with his lovely playmate Paro where supreme love
was felt before it was understood. When youth beckoned, the loved intensified. But, alas,
a fateful moment of weakness on the part of Devdas created a permanent wall of
separation between him and his beloved Paro. On one side of the wall was a heartbroken
Paro who became the wife of another. And on the other, was a completely shattered
Devdas. Unable to bear the agony of a life without Paro, Devdas made alcohol his
constant companion. But that could not make him forget the piercing pain. Even the
unflinching devotion of a beautiful courtesan Chandramukhi, did not ease the heartache
of losing Paro. It was only when his eyes closed to a permanent sleep, did the pain begin
to fade.
Thurs. Nov. 18
Fulbright & International Scholars Reception
4PM - 6PM (International House)
Come visit with ECU faculty and administrators for informal
conversation and refreshments
"Gene Therapy" with Teja Arboleda
7PM - 9PM (Wright Auditorium)
OSAMA
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November 17th.(Wednesday) @ 9:30pm
November 20th (Saturday) @ 3pm & midnight
November 21st (Sunday) @ 3pm
Osama
Rated PG-13
Runtime: 83 minutes
A 12-year-old Afghan girl and her mother lose their jobs when the Taliban
closes the hospital where they work. The Taliban have also forbidden women to leave their
houses without a male "legal companion With her husband and brother dead, killed in
battle, there is no one left to support the family. Without being able to leave the house, the
mother is left with nowhere to turn. Feeling that she has no other choice, she disguises
her daughter as a boy. Now called Osama, the girl embarks on a terrifying and confusing
journey as she tries to keep the Taliban from finding out her true identity. Inspired by a
true story, Osama is the first entirely Afghan film shot since the rise and fall of the Taliban.
Fri. Nov. 19
Community Festival
3:30PM - 6PM (Christenbury Gym)
ECU is celebrating diversity through a special youth carnival
with games and activities for children of all ages. If you
are interested in volunteering at this event please call 328-2735
or e-mail volunteer@mail.ecu.edu.
Cookout and Pep Rally
6PM - 7PM (Mendenhall Brickyard)
Sat. Nov. 20
Distribution of Diversity Pins
12PM - 2PM (Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium Student Gate)
November 18th (Thursday) @ 7pm & 9:30pm
November 19th (Friday) @ midnight
November 20th (Saturday) @ 9:30
November 21st (Sunday) @ 5pm
Maria Full of Grace
Rated R
Runtime: 101 minutes
Winner of the Dramatic Audience Award at the 2004 Sundance Film Festival and two
major awards at the Berlin FilmFestival, Maria Full of Grace is one young woman's
journey fr&m a small Columbian town to the streets of New York. A bright, spirited 17-
year old, Maria Alvarez (Catalina Sandino Moreno) lives with three generations of her
family in a cramped house in rural Columbia and works stripping thorns from flowers in
a rose plantation. The offer of a lucrative job involving travel - in fact, becoming a drug
"mule" - changes the course of her life. Far from the uneventful trip she is promised,
Maria is transported into the risky and ruthless world of international drug trafficking.
Her mission becomes one of determination and survival and she finally emerges with the
grace that will carry her forward into a new life.
November 19th (Friday) @ 9:30pm & Upm
November 20th (Saturday) @ 8pm
November 21st (Sunday) @ 11pm
Dangerous Living
Not Rated
Runtime: 58 minutes
The majority of nations entered the 21st century with horrific laws keeping gay and lesbian
citizens locked away in their closets, and, at times, prison. In some countries, "getting
caught" can even incur the death penalty. This documentary uncovers the struggle of
lesbians, gays, bisexuals and transgender people seeking basic human rights in the face
of severe oppression. Few people in the West knew about this historic social upheaval
until 52 men in Cairo were arrested on the Queen Boat discotheque. Dangerous Living
opens with Ashraf Zanati, one of the Cairo 52 defendants, who was tortured, humiliated,
beaten and forced to spend 13 months in prison. His simple, but powerful statement
sets out the basic theme of the struggle: "My sexuality is my own sexuality. It doesn't
belong to anybody. Not to my government, not to my brother, my sister, my family. No
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Diversity & International Education Week Sponsors
Campus Dining, Department of English and International Studies,
ECU Student Involvement Team, ECU Student Union, Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center, Office of International Affairs, Division of Student Life,
Student Government Association, Volunteer & Service-Learning
Center, Wellness Education and Student Health Services
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ILLEGAL DOWNLOADING
Inappropriate for All Ages
Pursuant to the Copyright Act (17 U.S.C. Section 504(c)), statutory damages can be as much
as $30,000 per motion picture, and up to $150,000 per motion picture if the infringement is willful.
c 2004 Molion Piclure Association ol America. Inc.


Title
The East Carolinian, November 16, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 16, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1773
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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