The East Carolinian, September 16, 2004







volume 80 Number 8
THURSDAY
September 16, 2004
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
i 1 F
U or her'
Sorority sisters seek ECU women interested in Greek life.
ECU Sorority rush
held this week
Recruitment attracts
more than 150 women
World Peace Initiative begins
ADRIANNA DRAKE
STAFF WRITER
More than ISO ECU students
are taking part in the seven-day
sorority recruitment process,
which includes a variety of activi-
ties for recruits in visiting pos-
sible organizations they may be
interested in joining.
Students interested met with
members of the National Panhel-
lenic Council (NPC) and various
members of the nine sororities
within NPC at a Sunday morning
convocation held in the Wright
Auditorium where the recruits
were given a presentation as part
of the rush process.
"It's a chance for new mem-
bers going through recruitment
to see the sorority life we offer
here at ECU said Amanda Lewis,
NPC recruitment director.
From 12:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
the recruits were bused to the
nine different houses to learn
more about each sorority. Each
organization has its own grade
requirements. Some require a 2.S
GPA, while others require a 2.0.
During the second and third
days of recruitment, the women
were divided into groups and
went on house tours. On these
tours, recruits learned much
more about specific organiza-
tions and got a chance to see
houses in greater detail. They also
learned about the house mothers
and other events the particular
sororities are involved in.
Wednesday and Thursday of
recruitment week are known as
Skit Days, where recruits watch
and listen as each sorority per-
forms its own prepared skits
about Greek life through their
eyes and what their sorority is
about.
Jackie Lambertsen, National
Panhellenic president (NPC), said
the sixth day of recruitment is
known as preference day, which
is a more quiet and serious time
for every recruit. During this day,
recruits will choose the three
sororities they are interested in
pledging, with their number one
choice on top. If a recruit is only
interested in one sorority, it is
acceptable to only select the one
of their choice.
The executives for NPC and
sorority members will meet for
what they call "bid matching
While recruits have been scan-
ning each sorority, the sorority
has been scanning them the same
way. During this process, recruits
are matched to a sorority.
Goingthroughrecruitmentwillbe
great for all who choose to participate.
During the seven day recruit-
see SORORITYpage A3
Week offers peace,
remembrance
JOELLEN BIRCH
STAFF WRITER
The third annual World Peace
�g Initiative begins this Sunday and
features a variety of activities and
S5 performances focusing on global
�S peace and understanding.
I Joanna Iwata, director of
student involvement at ECU, said
p World Peace Week began in 2001
g as a reaction to 911.
"Weneededtodo something to
bond the community we hosted
a joint program with campus
ministries that year said Iwata.
The following year launched
the beginning of the national
speakers series with Richard
Picciotti, FDNY battalion com-
mander as the featured speaker.
Last year, Arun Gandhi, grand-
son of Mohandas Gandhi, spoke
about nonviolence in conjunc-
tion with a world peace vigil.
This year, it is an entire week of
activities promoting peace and
understanding on a global scale.
The week begins Sept. 19
with Dances of Universal Peace.
This is an interactive program
involving dancing and live music
from a number of spiritual tradi-
tions around the world, includ-
ing Sufism.
"Sufism is the mystical ele-
ment of the Muslim religion
said Lynn Caverly, assistant
director of student activities.
The ECU world peace vigil
will be held Tuesday at 7 p.m.
in Sonic Plaza, located outside
Joyner Library.
The Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center features a program from
the Social Justice Institution
on Wednesday in the Murphy
Center at 7:30 p.m. Although this
event was not originally a part of
this year's World Peace Initiative,
it became a part of the agenda
because it fits into the spirit of
the week, Iwata said.
The Rumi concert is the
headlining event for the week
and takes place Thursday at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium. Cole-
man Barks, poet and translator
of Rumi, is being accompanied
by cellist David Darling, percus-
sionist Glen Vele and movement
artist Zuleikha in a performance
Students remember 911 and
that interprets story through
music and dance.
"The concert is a collab-
orative effort with musicians and
dancers said Thomas Douglass,
assistant English professor.
The third annual World Peace
Initiative concludes with a poetry,
music and dance workshop Friday
at 10 a.m. in Wright Auditorium
with the cast of the Rumi concert.
its casualties at last year's World
This final event gives students
a chance to speak with the cast
and also learn more about Rumi
and spirituality in an interactive
environment.
"Each student's presence
will add to whatever comes out of
the workshop Caverly said.
"Through our collabora-
tions with our student life and
academic departments plus
Peace Vigil,
our student organizations, we
are able to design innovative
campus-wide events that
promote learning, discovery and
engagement Iwata said.
The first year many students
said it exceeded their expectations.
"I think it's a good
opportunity for students to come
see PEACE page A2
ECU forms partnership with Alaskan University
Partnership intends
to increase speech
pathologists in Alaska
MICHAEL HARRINGTON
STAFF WRITER
ECU and the University of
Alaska Anchorage (UAA) have
recently created a partnership
intending to end the shortage of
speech pathologists in Alaska.
Carolyn Coe, visiting assis-
tant professor in the college
of education at UAA, said the
partnership allows Alaskan UAA
students to take the prerequisite
courses for speech pathology at
UAA and finish up their course-
work for a master's degree by
taking online ECU courses.
The need for this partner-
ship is due to the lack of speech
pathology programs at any of
the Alaskan universities, which
led to a major shortage in speech
pathologists in the state.
This prompted the Alaska
State Department of Education
to partner with the UAA to find a
way to get rid of this shortage.
Coe said ECU was initially
discovered in their search by
several former ECU students
who attend the UAA. These stu-
dents highly recommended ECU,
which led the UAA to seek infor-
mation on the university.
Coe said she then contacted
ECU'S School of Allied Health
Sciences, and was left with a
positive feeling.
"There was a feeling of flex-
ibility and interest it just felt
right said Coe.
Rose Allen, director of the dis-
tance education program in com-
munication sciences and disorders
in ECU's School of Allied Health
Sciences, said the partnership was
formed thanks to the immense
interest shown on ECU's end.
"From the first contact, the
administration was very interested
in this partnership said Allen.
Allen said the program offered
see ALASKA page A2
Five years after Hurricane Floyd, volunteer
still serving in eastern North Carolina
Archaeologists took multiple dives in Alaskan waters in finding
the oldest ship wreck in Alaskan history.
1860 Alaskan shipwreck
identified by ECU
Rediscovered site
recovers pieces of
history
JAMESON COOK
STAFF WRITER
A team of ECU archaeolo-
gists recovered a 19th century
Russian-American trade ship
off Alaska's Spruce Island,
marking the oldest Alaskan
shipwreck discovery.
Jason Rogers and Evguenia
Anichtchenko, two graduate stu-
dents in ECU's Maritime Studies
program, brought the idea for
this project to fruition. Anichtch-
enko and husband Rogers learned
of the ship and the story of its
lost burial site through Anich-
tchenko's past studies and inter-
est in Russian maritime history.
Tim Runyan, director of the
maritime studies program at ECU
and associate Frank Cantelas
led the expedition while Steve
Sellers, director of diving and
water safety at ECU, supervised
the numerous dives that took
place. The remainder of the crew
was made up of members of the
National Oceanic and Atmo-
spheric Administration (NOAA)
and local volunteers.
Upon learning of the recent
discovery, Anichtchenko
approached Runyan and Can-
see SHIPWRECK page A2
GRIFTON, NC (AP) � Billy
Tarlton did not come here to stay.
When he signed on as a vol-
unteer after Hurricane Floyd, his
plan was to be back at work in
Charlotte in five days. He and his
wife, Beddie, came on a Thursday
with a pickup truck and two
suitcases. Just enough to carry
them over until Monday, when
Billy was expected to return to
his construction business.
It was the kind of short-term
mission project the couple had
been doing for 20 years. They'd
line up a job, hammer some nails,
share their faith and head back
home in a week or just a few days.
Hurricane Floyd was no week-
end job. The Sept. 16,1999, storm
dumped 20 inches of rain on
parts of North Carolina that had
just been soaked by Hurricane
Dennis. Floyd did an estimated
$6 billion in damages, affect-
ing more than 2 million people.
"With so much devastation, it
wasn't going to work just doing
it on Thursday, Friday and Satur-
day Tarlton, 52, said. "I said, 'I
can't go back home
He still hasn't. Five
years after Hurricane Floyd,
Tarlton is still here at work.
Since completing recovery
efforts from Hurricane Floyd,
he and other volunteers have
developed a pilot project known
as "Hopebuilders which uses
volunteer labor to rebuild and
make repairs on substandard
housing. He also dispatches
teams of volunteers to areas dev-
astated by hurricanes, floods and
fires. On any given day, his jobs
might include cook, construc-
tion worker and coordinator for
disaster relief at the NC Baptist
Men's site in Grifton.
This small, eastern North
Carolina town was a place the
Tarltons had never seen until
North Carolina Baptists called
and asked them to come help
in the recovery effort after Hur-
ricane Floyd. The couple had just
returned from a mission trip to
Honduras when they navigated
through floodwaters to arrive in
Grifton in October 1999.
Grifton, what was left of it, strad-
dled two counties - Pitt and Lenoir.
There was devastation on both sides
as severe flooding forced hundreds
of residents from their homes.
The Tarltons came in and set up
feeding units and portable show-
ers and helped open the doors
of Grifton's First Baptist Church
for people applying for help.
Tarlton helps in building Grimesland home for Clark family.
"It was just unreal Tarlton
said. "People would start coming
real early in the morning and stay
there until 10,11 o'clock at night
just trying to get signed up. "
As the floodwaters began to
recede, other problems surfaced.
As hurricane victims lined up for
help, Tarlton saw hurting faces.
He saw racism and alcohol and
drug abuse. Not everybody had a
problem that a hammer could fix.
So Tarlton began to reach out
to build friendships as well as
houses. He traveled into neigh-
borhoods that local church lead-
ers had warned him were unsafe.
He took time to pray with addicts.
"It's not about driving the
nails Tarlton said. "It's about
changing lives. I think that's one
of the biggest reasons that it turned
in to be such a long process. "
Working 16 and 18-hour days
made time pass quickly for the
Tarltons. It took six months and
the birth of a grandchild to get
them back to Charlotte for a visit.
Even then, they stayed less than
half an hour.
INSIDE I News: A2 I Comics: B4 I Opinion: A4 I Living: A5 I Sports: Bl
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9-16-C
Page A2 news@theeastcarolin.ian. com 252. 328. 6366
NICK HENNE News Editor KATIE KOKINDA Assistant News Editor
THURSDAY September 16, 2004
Campus News
Correction
A Wednesday Arts & Entertainment
article titled, 'Local band
celebrates release of their newest
CD" gave the wrong date for the
CD release party of the band
Dystonic. The correct date is
Friday, Sept. 17 at Peasants. Doors
open at 10 p.m.
Student Government
The Student Government
Association is accepting
applications for senators
and class officers throughout
this week. Applications can be
picked up at the SGA office in
264 Mendenhall. Specific hours
for filing applications are posted
in the SGA hallway in Mendenhall.
Deadline to file is Friday, Sept. 17
by 5 p.m. For more information,
contact 328-4726.
ECU Dance Team Tryouts
Students interested in trying out
for the ECU Dance Team must
pick up an Information packet
from 304 Ward Sports Medicine
Building. Tryouts are being held
in Minges Coliseum at noon this
Sunday. Call 328-4512 for more
information.
Homecoming Deadline
Homecoming '04, ECU Goes To
the Beach, applications are due
on Friday, Sept. 17 by 5 p.m. to the
SGA office in 264 Mendenhall. No
late applications will be accepted.
There will be a mandatory meeting
on Monday, Sept. 20 at 7 p.m. in
221 Mendenhall.
Sett Defense Class
There will be a self defense class
offered in the Student Health
Center Multipurpose Room at
5:30 p.m This event is sponsored
by the ECU Counseling and
Student Development and the
Wellness Education Team.
For more information contact
328-6794.
Dialogue on Diversity
The Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center presents Dialogue on
Diversity at 6 p.m. Learn more
about the programs and services
offered by the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center. Sponsored by
the Office of Intercultural Affairs.
Jazz Festival
A Latin Jazz Festival will be held
in Mendenhall Brickyard at 7 p.m.
Enjoy a free evening of salsa
dance lessons, food and music,
Sponsored by the Student Union
Cultural Awareness Committee.
Take Back the Night March
Take Back the Night March - meet
at the top of College Hill in front of
Belk, 7 p.m. - Rain date is Sept. 22.
Sponsored by the ECU Counseling
& Student Development and
Wellness Education Team.
For more information contact
328-6794.
ECU Poetry Forum
ECU Poetry Forum - Mendenhall
241 at 8 p.m. - For more
information contact: http:www.
ecu. eduorgpoetryforum
ECU Knights
ECU Knights Chess Club would
like to invite you to our weekly
meetings. We meet every Friday at
5 p.m. to 8 p.m. in 212 Mendenhall.
Join us for a challenge, or just
for fun, regardless ol your level
of play.
Model UN
The Model United Nations club
would like to invite you to a pizza
party. This will be an Informal
and informational meeting about
the club, as well as a great way
to meet current members. The
pizza party will take place on
Sept. 30 at 6 p.m. in the Political
Science Library, located in 109
Brewster C.
Candlelight Vigil
Candlelight Vigil for survivors
of sexual assault - Student
Health Services, Multipurpose
Room, 6 p.m. - Sponsored by
the ECU Counseling & Student
Development and Wellness
Education Team. For more
information contact 328-6794.
Open MIc Night
Open Mic Night - Mendenhall
Pirate Underground, 6 - 9 p.m
Enjoy a relaxing evening of
student entertainment! Sign up
to perform on-site (first come, first
serve). Food and refreshments.
Sponsored by the SU Popular
Entertainment Committee.
News Briefs
LOCU
Homeowner says he had no
use for disk found In his house
WILMINGTON, NC (AP) - The
man who owned a house where
police found a computer disk that
prosecutors suspect was planted
by police testified that he has
never owned a computer and does
not know how to operate one.
Albert Allen was the third witness
called by the government in the trial of
Lumberton police Lt. Leon Oxendine.
Oxendine is on trial in US. District Court
In Wilmington. He is charged with
tampering with a witness, making false
statements to the FBI and five counts
of making false declarations before
a federal grand jury. All are felonies.
Oxendine, 51, has worked for the
Lumberton Police Department
since 1978 and was placed on
administrative leave without pay in
January 2003.
Federal prosecutors contend that
Oxendine instructed Scott LaClalre, a
police informant, to plant the disk in Allen's
house Sept 6,2001. The disk contains
an image of a counterfeit $100 bill.
Lumberton police investigators
suspected that another man,
James Todd Adams, was selling
drugs out of Allen's house. LaClaire
testified Monday that Oxendine
told him he wanted the disk
planted In Allen's house so
police could charge Adams with
counterfeiting, a federal offense.
Allen testified that he had not seen
the disk that was seized from his
house until the trial.
Camp Lejeune marine reported
missing now back to full duty
CAMP LEJEUNE, NC (AP) - Marine Cpl.
Wassef Ali Hassoun, who was reported
abducted in Iraq and turned up in his
native Lebanon, was restored Tuesday
to full duty, military authorities said.
Medical authorities at this Marine
base where Hassoun has been since
July declared him fit for full duty late
Monday, allowing him to return to
the brigade motor pool where he
worked before he deployed to Iraq in
February, officials said in a release.
The Naval Criminal Investigative
Service continues to look into
Hassoun's disappearance and
release, said officials with the 4th
Marine Expeditionary Brigade.
Hassoun was last seen In Iraq on
June 19. He did not report for duty the
next day and was listed as missing.
On June 27, the Arabic news network
Al-Jazeera showed a photo of
Hassoun, blindfolded, with a sword
behind his head. A group called the
National Islamic Resistance1920
Revolution Brigade claimed to be
holding him and was threatening to
decapitate him unless detainees In
"U.Sled occupation prisons" were
released, Al-Jazeera said.
On July 8, Hassoun contacted
American officials in Beirut, Lebanon,
and he was taken to the American
Embassy there.
NATIONAL
Stewart sets news
conference on sentencing
NEW YORK (AP) - Martha Stewart,
who has said she was considering
serving her prison term quickly,
scheduled a news conference
Wednesday to discuss "matters
related to her sentencing
The millionaire businesswoman was
sentenced in July to five months in
prison and five months of house
arrest after she was convicted of lying
about why she sold ImClone Systems
Inc. stock in 2001.
A federal judge allowed her to stay
out of prison while she pursued an
appeal, but Stewart had said she was
thinking of serving her time anyway
to get the matter behind her and
her company, Martha Stewart Living
Omnimedia.
Stewart planned to a�pear with
Martha Stewart Living executives
and with Walter Dellinger, the lawyer
handling her appeal.
Company spokesmen did not
immediately return calls for comment.
Airports In the West
struggle with delays for hours
LOS ANGELES (AP) - Airport
operations were back to normal early
Wednesday following a radio failure at a
Federal Aviation Administration control
facility that tied up travelers for hours.
At Los Angeles International Airport,
the outage Tuesday afternoon
delayed some 400 flights. Two
dozen flights at the Oakland
International Airport and more than a
dozen at Ontario International Airport
also did not depart or arrive on time.
In all, planes were grounded for
about three hours at airports in
the Los Angeles region, northern
California and parts of Nevada,
Federal Aviation Administration
spokeswoman Laura Brown said.
The outage happened at 4:40 p.m.
Tl lesday at the Los Angeles Air Route
Traffic Control Center in Palmdale. The
station, located in the desert north of
Los Angeles, controls airspace for
a vast region that encompasses
California and Nevada.
Control of the airspace was turned
over to other air traffic control facilities,
including one in Albuquerque, NM,
and about 20 planes were diverted
to the Albuquerque International
Sunport, authorities said.
By 8 p.m. Tuesday, the FAA
allowed flights to resume at 50
ShipWreCk from page
telas with the prospect for an
archaeological expedition. With
generous grants from NOAA and
the National Science Foundation,
the trip was made possible.
Multiple dives into the 80-
foot deep bay led to the identi-
fication of significant shipwreck
artifacts including a large, bar-
bell-like h.unk of brass inscribed
"Kad'yak Russian for Kodiak.
This artifact, believed to
be the hub of the ship's wheel,
single-handedly confirmed the
identity of the ship, making the
Kad'yak the oldest discovered
Alaskan shipwreck.
The expedition also marks
the first time underwater archae-
ology has been done in Alaska.
The Kad'yak, a 132-foot, three-
masted brig used by the Russian-
American Company, was used as a
trade ship for years. In the winter
of 1860, the Kad'yak was depart-
ing Alaska with 356 tons of ice on
board, bound for San Francisco,
when it struck a rock and slowly
filled with water. Archaeologists
have retraced the path of the wreck
and believe the captain and crew
easily evaded peril by boarding
the Kad'yak's lifeboats. The ship
itself, buoyed by the masses of ice
within, floated for three days before
finally sinking to the bottom of
Icon Bay, in the Gulf of Alaska.
NOAA biologist Brad Ste-
phens, studying crabs in Alaska,
heard local stories of the lost ship
and, in researching its history,
was able to pinpoint its location
in the summer of 2003.
"The project was a mile-
stone said Cantelas.
"It will help us interpret the
maritime aspects of the Russian-
American Company
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Alaska
from page A1
to ECU students in Greenville is no
different than the online courses
offered to the Alaskan students.
" Wedon't modify it in anyway.
Whatever we have for our campus
is what we have for our distance
education program Allen said.
There are some obvious
differences between taking
the courses in Greenville and
taking the courses in Alaska.
The students in Alaska receive
class lectures from ECU pro-
fessors, but they receive them
online and can not simply
raise their hands if any ques-
tions arise from the material.
Allen said there are many
individuals who work to
make this partnership pos-
sible, ranging from the fac-
ulty who teach the classes to
the technician who uploads
the lectures to the Internet.
Coe said the partnership has
already received an overwhelm-
ing response from Alaskan stu-
dents. Many of these students are
older and don't have the ability
to pack up and leave the state to
find campuses that offer speech
pathology programs.
This has led the UAA to seek
out another partner so they can
expand their distance education
program in speech pathology.
Morgan Gower, a freshman
recreation therapy major, felt
that distance education programs
sounded like a great idea.
"If another school offers a pro-
gram that's not available at your
school, I think it's really cool that
you can now take that program
said Gower.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
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percent capacity so that airports
wouldn't be flooded with passengers,
said Nancy Castles, a spokeswoman
for Los Angeles International
Airport. Air travel reached full capacity
by early Wednesday, said Diana
Joubert, an FAA operations officer.
WORLD
Chinese dissident Xu
Guang released from prison
SHANGHAI, China (AP) - A member
of a would-be Chinese opposition
party said Wednesday that he has
been released from prison after
completing a five-year sentence for
subversion.
Former environmental protection
bureau technician Xu Guang said
he was resting at his parents' home
in the eastern city of Hangzhou after
his release Tuesday from Zhejiang
province's Qiaosi prison.
"Because of the suffering I endured
in prison, my physical condition
is very weak so I need to take
care of my health at home said
Xu, 37, who joined the China
Democracy Party around the
time of its founding in 1998
"My family is worried that I might be
put back into prison again he said.
Authorities have shown no signs of
letting up pressure against members
of the party, which was suppressed
just months after it was founded in
a bid to challenge the Communist
Party's monopoly on power.
Another party member, Li Guotao, has
been under house arrest in Shanghai
since last week, a fellow dissident
said Wednesday.
Li, a 46-year-old computer technician,
was sentenced to three years in a
labor camp in 2000 after he and 22
others wrote to Shanghai's mayor
appealing for the release of another
arrested party member.
Dai Xuewu, who has also spent
time in labor camps for political
activism, said police detained
him and a friend when they went
Friday to the apartment on the
outskirts of Shanghai where Li lives
with his 83-year-old father.
U.N. nuclear meeting stalls amid
disagreements between U.S.
VIENNA, Austria (AP) - A key meeting
of the U.N. atomic watchdog agency
stalled Wednesday, reflecting
disagreements between the
United States and Europe over how
firmly to deal with Iran and its suspect
nuclear program.
The U.SEuropean rift surfaced
Tuesday, the second day of a key
meeting of the board of governors
of the International Atomic
Energy Agency, the U.Ns nuclear
watchdog agency.
The planned morning session
Wednesday was canceled.and agency
officials said as the day progressed
that it was unlikely the meeting
would reconvene before Thursday.
The pause was meant to
allow informal back door
negotiations on a draft resolution
among the 35 board member nations.
The latest draft resolution, obtained
by The Associated Press and being
circulated informally for reaction from
other delegates, was nearly identical to
one that France, Britain and Germany
came up with Friday - a text that
American officials said was not
acceptable. It ignored suggestions
made by the Americans designed to
toughen up the text.
The American suggestions, also made
available in full to the AP, demanded
that Iran grant agency inspectors
"complete, immediate and unrestricted
access
Peace
from page A1
together and honor world peace
in a positive light, especially
since the events of 911 brought
the reality of terrorism so
close to home. Now we can relate
to the need for peace said Liz
Hibbard, a senior English major.
Iwata said using the
intellect to open the heart results
in compassion.
"If studentscanget in touch with
that compassion energy, then they
can change the world Iwata said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
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9-16-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
ier 16, 2004
iber.
has also spent
nps for political
olice detained
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ment, women from different
sororities have been deemed a
"Pi Chi This group of women
is considered the mentors for
the recruits during the week.
The Pi Chi's and other sorority
executives have disassociated
from their sororities during the
week of rush.
Lambertsen said there are
nine executive women, includ-
ing herself, that oversee the plans
during the week and make sure
everything is running smoothly.
"I think it really helps in get-
ting involved in campus activities
and getting acquainted with ECU
in general said Lambertsen.
"We offer a lot of things as
far as scholarships, volunteer
opportunities and career net-
working. "
Sorority Rush
"Snap bids bids are available
to women Interested In Joining a
sorority who did not attend the
formal recruitment process. Con-
tact Amanda Lewis for more Infor-
mation. acl1125@mail.ecu.edu.
Office of Greek life: 328-4235
Other benefits available
include intramurals, scholas-
tic programing and different
volunteer opportunities.
Lambertsen said Greeks
have higher GPAs than
non-greeks on campus,
and scholarship is something
Greeks strive for.
"We really welcome every-
one to come out and meet the
sorority women of ECU. Being
Greek holds a lot more opportu-
nity than being non-Greek and
we encourage everyone to come
out Lambertsen said.
Besides meeting new friends,
joining a sorority gives you
future career opportunities,
life long friendships, service
opportunities, intramurals and
a chance to get involved more
Rush Calendar for Fall 2004
Remaining events include:
Thursday, Sept. 16:
Skit Day from 5 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.
on Wednesday and 5 p.m. - 7:10
p.m. on Thursday. During these
days, each sorority will perform
with the school.
"It gives you opportuni-
ties you might not have had
otherwise it's a great way
to be involved said Lindsay
Cummings, a junior elementary
education major and president of
Chi Omega sorority.
Accepting a bid and pledging
any one of the sororities also
helps in many other ways.
"It pledging is a great
opportunity, especially to meet
people on campus. I joined a
sorority to meet other people
at ECU, instead of always being
with my friends from high
school. I wanted to branch off
Lewis said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
its own skit
Friday, Sept 17:
Preference Day from 4 p.m. - 8
p.m. where recruits will turn In
their personal choices for the
sororities they wish to
receive a bid from.
tJSREENVULE
703 SE GREENVILLE BIVD
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MALI ABC PHONES LOCATIONS
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252 243-23
SUNDAY SEPTEMBER 2GTH
Pin COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS
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803 BEAST MAIN STREET
252-4443431
lACKSONVIILE
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9107986195
HONDA
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Failed, failed, failed. And then.
PERSISTENCE
Pass It On.
THI rOUNOATIOK '�' k IITTII Mil
www.forbettcrlifc.Drj
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Service Sorority
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fteWeep Sept. 13-16 � g;30 p.w.
Thus sud W�d- 'iUUi 1028 � 'fhtirs- W. Outdoor toot (mLd - tote 1026)
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E-psiloD ligros M$pI
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involved tD 9 -wide -variety of fu� cop)T�UDtty service
projects 9 "Well 9 Vi9vsy excftto� soctel eveotsl
Por more toTorwtfot) eoDteefc L&kOWSerosiUcu.edu
Banner Competition on the Mendenhalt Brickjjgard,
Lawn Decoration M
Residence Hall DecoratSn etition
Monday, OcfofJPF
Skit Competition in Hendrix Theater
Wednesday, October 6
i
Pirate Picnic atTodd Dinning Hail
Midnight Movie: Psycho Beach Party in Hendrix Theater
Thursday, October 7
I
Pirate Fest Beach Party, Mendenhall Brickyard
Midnight Movie: Psycho Beach Party
rjriday, October 8
Homecoming Parade down 5th Street
Family Fare Tales from Around the World at Wright
BEAT TULANEM (2 pm)
aturday, October 9
Wr information, call the Student Government Office at 328-4726
Sponsored by the Student Government Association





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o
Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366
AMANDA 0- UNGERFELT Editor in Chief
THURSDAY September 16,2004
Our View
Our Staff
Nick Henne
News Editor
Robbie Derr
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Nina Coefield
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Slstrunk
Photo Editor
Katie Koklnda
Asst. News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Asst Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst Sports Editor
Rachel Landen
Special Sections Editor
Herb Sneed
Asst Photo Editor
Alexander Marciniak Jenny Hobbs
Web Editor Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
252.328.6366
252.328.6558
252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editor@theeastcarollnian.com or to The East
Carolinian, Student Publications Building, Greenville,
NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more
information. One copy of TEC Is free, each additional
copy is $1.
Hurricane season will pick up to full force this
weekend with two storms predicted to hit North
Carolina during the next five days.
Officials at the National Weather Service predict
that rains from Hurricane Ivan will first hit the
North Carolina mountains on Thursday evening,
with rain increasing Friday and Saturday, total-
ing close to 15 - 20 inches.
Neil Dixon of the National Weather Service told
the Associated Press that the mountains may
receive gusts of 40 - 60 miles per hour.
Residents in the western part of the state are
still recovering from the flooding caused by
Hurricane Frances. This past week, many resi-
dents of mountain cities were without power
and running water, and streets were shut down
due to flooding. The threat of Hurricane Ivan
has caused many locals to leave this part of
the state.
Strong winds, heavy rain and flooding aren't the
only concerns of these residents. Tornadoes
are also possible with Ivan, along with mud and
rock slides caused by the heavy rain.
With many ECU students planning on traveling
home or to visit friends this weekend, TEC urges
you to practice extreme caution during these
adverse weather conditions.
Before heading out on a road trip, we urge
you to check the news for all warnings and
hurricane advisories. If you are going to be in
an area that is in the path of Ivan, we suggest
familiarizing yourself with all safety measures,
and stocking up on can goods and water.
Although Hurricane Ivan poses a large threat
to the western part of the state, another storm
is brewing that could directly affect the eastern
part of the state as well. Tropical Storm Jeanne
hit Puerto Rico Wednesday, leaving 30,000
people without water and two dead. The storm
is predicted to reach hurricane status as it
moves into the Atlantic Thursday and could
reach North Carolina by Sunday or Monday.
TEC has compiled the following list of Web sites
to help you stay informed of the progression of
Ivan and Jeanne:
- National Weather Service Tropical Prediction
Center: www.nch.noaa.gov
- Weather Channel: www.weather.com
- ECU Campus Emergency Announcements:
www.ecu.edualert
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Opinion Columnist
Sharon government in jeopardy
Thousands protest against
planned withdrawal
PETER KALAJIAN
OPINION WRITER
Last Sunday, tens of thousands of
Israeli citizens filled the streets of Jeru-
salem in protest of the long awaited,
long overdue Israeli withdrawal of
approximately 8,000 Jewish settlers
from Gaza. This, after an Israeli heli-
copter assassination killed 3 suspected
militants and injured several others in
the West Bank town of Jenin, prompt-
ing Israeli security officials to close
checkpoints and increase security in
fear of possible retaliation. All too
often, the Palestinian people are vll-
lanized as nothing more than suicide
bombers and religious fundamental-
ists, blamed for the occupation under
which they have lived since 1948 and
brushed under the rug of international
politics.
Although Ariel Sharon has been
able to muster a scant majority within
the Israeli government in support of his
proposed withdrawal, large sections of
the Israeli population do not support
the plan. Many fear that a pullout
from occupied Gaza would precipitate a
move to withdraw from the West Bank,
where the Jewish populations are much
larger and much more entrenched. The
crowd on Sunday carried signs reading,
"Israel for the Israelis" and "What has
happened to you, Mr. Sharon?"
Indeed, Mr. Sharon, what has hap-
pened? You have orchestrated the most
targeted assassinations in Israeli his-
tory. You have built a wall separating
portions of Palestine from Israel (taller
than the Berlin Wall, by the way) and
subjected the Palestinian people to
forced occupation and identity checks
mercilessly. You were elected as a hard-
liner and made it initially clear that
there would be no withdrawal, of any
Jewish settlements. Are you saying that
now, after thousands of Palestinians
and hundreds of Israelis have been
killed in the Intifada, you are willing
to make concessions to the Palestinians
and give them back some of the land
you stole?
Well Mr. Sharon, good for you.
Perhaps Sharon has finally realized
that while there is no obvious cure-
all solution to the Palestinian issue,
assassination and intimidation are not
"effective tools for encouraging peace.
Sharon is a politician, and like all poli-
ticians, he has one thing clearly on his
mind: His own survival. Now, political
survival in the U.S. and Western Europe
is not the same thing as political sur-
vival in the Middle East. Lest we forget,
In 1995, then Israeli Prime Minister
Yitzhak Rabin was assassinated in Tel
Aviv. No, not by a Muslim extremist
bent on destroying Israel. He was shot
by a disgruntled Israeli citizen and
religious zealot who was upset about
Rabin's proposed Peace Plan with the
Palestinians, which included return-
ing some of the land taken by Israel in
the 1967 war. If Bush is not re-elected
(here's to hoping), he will not die. He
will take some job with some corpora-
tion he made friends with while in
office, or he'll tour the country, making
30,000 dollars an hour giving speeches,
like Bill Clinton does. If Sharon follows
his heart and does what he obviously
knows is the right thing, he is in real
risk of assassination.
It will be interesting to see how it
plays out, but I imagine, in the end,
Sharon will tuck tail and cancel the
withdrawal, bowing to the protests
of some of his people and once again
having to fear only the specter of a
suicide bomber, instead of assassination
plots from within his own party and
government.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. once
said that "violence begets violence
Until one side or the other comes to
understand Dr. King's words, the vio-
lence and death in Israel will continue
indefinitely.
Guest Editorial
JOANNA IWATA
STUDENT INVOLVEMENT TEAM
Learning. Discovery. Engage-
ment. What do these three words have
in common? When you reflect upon
these words, what images immediately
come to mind? Do you envision one of
your favorite professors giving an out-
standing lecture? Are you reminded of
a campus event you recently attended
or a robust conversation with a group
of people that left you wanting more?
Or how about a profound moment in
meditation or prayer, singing or playing
music or doing a community service
project wherein you experienced this
sense of awe?
When I think of these three words,
independently and together, they rep-
resent to me three unique synergies
that can occur whether we are inside
or outside of the classroom - thus I will
refer to it as the "metacurricular" expe-
rience. Can you imagine what It would
be like to find ourselves immersed in a
world wherein we could all transform
an ordinary event or encounter into an
extraordinary one at the university?
The term "meta" to me suggests
something "beyond" ourselves and
thus when we can apply this to our
teaching or how we design our student
Involvement programs it could pos-
sibly infuse a whole new dimension
to our discussions and interactions
with one another. For instance, how
do you suppose this would change
and enrich our interactions between
our students and their professors in
the classroom or our student involve-
ment at our different campus wide
events?
Learning. In teaching COAD
1000 last fall, many of my first-year
students shared with me they learned
more from certain professors who were
passionate about their subjects and
who could turn them on to what they
were studying versus being in classes
where their instructors simply read
from their texts.
The noticeable impact these ener-
getic encounters would have upon my
students made me more aware of the
important role I played to enliven the
classroom experience as their instruc-
tor. So when we consider how our stu-
dents learn best and what is required
to teach them in engaging ways, what
I discovered was simple. The key to
opening their minds and their hearts
was not simply by how I designed my
coursework or delivered my lectures but
it revolved around encouraging them
to get involved in our campus wide
activities where they can apply their
new learning.
Discovery. The other administra-
tive hat I wear revolves around driving
major university events with various
teams on campus. Thus it is extremely
important that when we design and
plan our events, we do so intention-
ally. When our students can walk away
from an event with one new insight or
having made several new connections
with people they would not normally
interact with before we then see a
new phenomenon emerge as students
talk about being part of something
larger than themselves. Too when our
students can connect and interact with
what they may learn in the classroom
with others then we see yet another
unique synergy arise that being engage-
ment.
Engagement. When two or more
people come together for a common
cause or interest which they are either
curious about or passionate about
- this is where I believe both learning
and discovery evolve into engagement.
There are some unique opportuni-
ties for everyone to note coming up
this fall with events such as World
Peace Week, Deaf Awareness Week,
Career Expo, Women's Leadership
Conference, DiversityInternational
Education Week and Service Friday
on campus (just to mention a few) to
promote our engagement as a com-
munity.
In fact, next week our entire campus
community will have an opportunity
to get involved in a special series of
metacurricular experiences whether it
be through a sacred dance and move-
ment workshop, peace vigil, a concert
featuring a renowned Sufi scholar and
his ensemble or a social ustice lecture.
And it's free to our students. Bring a
friend. Get engaged.
So when we consider what best
promotes the three synergies of learn-
ing, discovery and engagement at the
university perhaps what we may
discover is that the "metacurricular"
experiences we seek and desire are
all around us. If anything, perhaps
it is then up to us to discern how
best to transform our ordinary expe-
riences and encounters into some-
thing extraordinary and then pass it
on to other groups at the university.
Thus, if we were given a choice to
have an ordinary life or an extraordi-
nary one at ECU what would you
choose?
Pirate Rant
Editor's note: The Pirate Rant is
an anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
sent to editor&theeastcarolinian.
com. The editor reserves the right
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.
I just found out my tuition is
helping pay for the ever growing
cheerleading squad's tanning
and hair styling bills. Funny, I
don't see how that is helping my
education. Besides it isn't like
they are the only ones represent-
ing our university. Can the rest
of us get some free tanning and
haircuts too?
Why is ECU so against Coca-
Cola?
If Michael Moore has diarrhea
of the mouth, then George Bush
has idiocy of the mouth.
Why are Halloween costumes
sold in "one size fits all?" They
really should say, "one size fits
none
Promiscuity in not a becom-
ing quality in anyone. Talking
about your various exploits in
class while all of us who don't
care have to listen is not cool. You
are degrading yourself and every-
one in your particular gender.
How come ten minutes before
closing seems to be the time
everyone wants to shop?
Bojangles' cures all hang-
Ladies, please, dress a little
more modestly. If I have to see
one more girl walking through
campus with shorts so short her
butt cheeks show I swear I'm
going to go off. As much as some
of us would like to think other-
wise, guys like it when a little
(and in this case it is very little)
is left to the imagination.
Why do food stores on campus
charge so much for the items they
make when we get such a limited
amount of money on our meal
plan to pay for it?
No one died when Clinton
lied.
Why do they sell cake mix
at the Spot? I don't know about
you, but when I tried to bake a
cake in my microwave, it didn't
taste so good.
"They've lost about
a million jobs. They
haven't created
one new net job.
The numbers don't
lie. If Bush and
Cheney had run this
country from its very
inception, not one
American would have
worked. We'd all be
hunter-gatherers
- Comedian and liberal talk-
show host Al Franken
i





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Page A5 features@theeastcaroiinian.com 252.328.6366 ROBBIE DERR Features Editor CAROLYN .SCANDURA Assistant Features Editor THURSDAY September 16, 2004
Announcements:
Healthy Bodies: Student Rec
Center
Sept 14 - Nov. 14
Tuesday and Thursday
5:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Self Defense: Student Rec
Center
Sept 15 - Oct. 6
Wednesday
8 p.m. - 9 p.m.
Naked Weight Training: Student
Rec Center
Sept. 18
Saturday
10 a.m. -12 p.m.
Healthy Hints:
Wash your hands regularly, many
people don't Consider all of the
germs you are carrying when
you get on the bus, touch the
bathroom door or when you Sit in
a desk in class.
Drink two liters of fluid each day,
if you are sick - drink three liters
to flush out the toxins.
Try to get enough sleep to
decrease the risk of getting sick.
People who don't get enough
sleep have weakened immune
systems.
Exercise regularly. 30-45 minutes
of cardiovascular workouts, three
times a week will keep your body
strong.
Don't forget about using the Food
Guide Pyramid to plan meals.
Don't fight. Don't ever argue with
anyone. Now don't even disagree
with me about this. It does more
than put you in a bad mood.
Research at Ohio State University
shows it can affect hormone
levels, thus weakening the
Immune system perhaps causing
an increased risk of illness. This
affects women more than men.
So keep things peaceful.
Sadly, cigar-smoking has become
popular and is encouraged by
cigar magazines. Cigar smokers
have a lung cancer rate that's 3
times higher than non-smokers,
according to the Journal of the
National Cancer Institute. The risk
of dying from laryngeal, oral and
esophageal cancers is 4 to 10
times greater for cigar smokers
than non-smokers, according to
the American Cancer Society. So
tell your cigar-smoking friends
they'd better quit today.
If you increase the amount of
starchy foods you eat you're
energy levels will rocket. By eating
more rice, potatoes and pasta you
will Increase the amount of slow-
burning carbohydrates that give
you energy all day long.
Recipe:
Tuna & Pasta Cheddar Melt
PrepCook Time: 20min.
Cheesy, creamy noodles laced
with tuna and topped with
seasoned crumbs make a hearty,
pleasing dinner in just minutes.
Ingredients:
1 can (10 oz) Campbell's
Chicken Broth
1 soup can water
3 cups uncooked corkscrew
pasta
1 can (10 34
oz) Campbell's Cream of
Mushroom Soup OR 98 Fat
Free Cream of Mushroom Soup
1 cup milk
1 can (about 6 oz) tuna, drained
and flaked
1 cup shredded Cheddar
cheese
2 tbsp. Italian-seasoned dry
bread crumbs
2 tsp butter or margarine, melted
Directions:
HEAT broth and water to a boil
In skillet. Add pasta and cook
until just tender, stirring often. Do
not drain.
ADD soup, milk and tuna. Top
with cheese. Mix bread crumbs
with butter. Sprinkle on top. Heat
through. Serves 4.
Recipe From:
www.campbellkltchen.com
Smoking: New trend or old hat?
Students' outlook on
smoking produces
shocking responses
CARMIN BLACK
STAFF WRITER
It is safe to say that in this
new era of extreme health aware-
ness and total body conscious-
ness, men and women young and
old know the hazards of smoking
cigarettes.
A team of writers at TEC
wanted to open up the topic of
on-campus smoking to see why,
if so many people have been
bombarded with warnings by the
surgeon general, they continue to
"puff away
A questionnaire was given to
a diverse group of ECU students
on their opinion of smoking
on campus, astonishingly the
responses may surprise you.
Ironically of all of the stu-
dents who were approached,
48 percent admitted to being
"smokers as compared to the
52 percent who claimed to be
"non-smokers
When the "smokers" were
asked if they felt that most people
chose to smoke because it had
currently become a trend or a
fashion statement, 38 percent
said "yes" they felt some people
smoked to look "cool" in front
of peers, as compared to the 62
percent of students who didn't
at all associate smoking with any
current trend, or need to make a
statement of fashion.
On the other hand non-
smoking students were asked
a similar question, if they felt
students only smoked because it
was "trendy" or because of peer
pressure.
Seventy-three percent of non-
smoking students said "yes they
felt smokers must chose to smoke
because of its appeal or pressure
from peers, as opposed to the 27
percent who felt trends had noth-
ing to do with a person's choice
to be a smoker.
As John Dickens, a male non-
smoking student put it, "I feel
smokers start smoking because of
peer pressure but that's not why
they continue to do so, they're
just hooked
The group of "non-smok-
ers" were then asked if they felt
smoking on campus was a prob-
lem, 38 percent of "non-smok-
ers" said "yes as compared to
the much larger 62 percent that
said "no
Emily Sloan, a transfer stu-
dent from UNC-W said "Yes
smoking on this campus is a
huge problem, today when it was
With increasing health concerns, smoking on campus has become a major concern among students, faculty and staff
pouring down rain I was trying to
get into Brewster and almost got
burnt by someone holding their
cigarette
Then each group of students
were asked if they were involved
in any group activities, clubs or
played any kinds of sports on or
off campus.
Astonishingly 77 percent of
all non-smoking students said
"yes" they did participate in
some extracurricular activities
which included the NAACP, swim
club and everything in between,
whereas 23 percent of non-smok-
ers said "no
On the opposite end of the
spectrum, only 38 percent of
smoking students said "yes" they
were involved in some activity
with the majority, 62 percent
saying "no they currently par-
ticipated in nothing.
However, the smoking stu-
dents who are involved in onoff
campus activities did say they felt
their club or organization had
nothing to do with their decision
to smoke.
Lastly, the non-smoking stu-
dents were asked if they refrained
from smoking because it is detri-
mental to their health and sur-
prisingly enough, 90 percent said
"yes" as compared to the meager
10 percent who said "no
Chris Meyers a male non-
smoking student claimed he
didn't refrain from smoking
because of health risks, rather he
said "I tried to smoke but couldn't
do it, I cried through the entire
cigarette
Funny as this comment may
be, most students would not
consider trying a cigarette or
even smoking in itself such an
emotional event but as for this
young man, guilt and coughing
proved enough to serve as his
"anti-inhalant
As risky, and as fatal as ciga-
rettes have proven themselves to
be, college students right here at
ECU, are still choosing to ignore
all warnings, and continue to
"light up" daily.
Does smoking serve a pur-
pose? Some seem to think so,
with it's calming effects and
power to alleviate boredom.
Senior Christopher Hart said,
"Yah, I started smoking in high
school but my justification for
my habit is that I have a better
chance of being killed in a car
accident then ever dying of lung
cancer
This kind of attitude towards
the dangers of smoking may be
the exact reason so many col-
lege students continue with their
dependency on cigarettes.
Until this type of ignorance
is banished we may continually
have to spend millions each year
on trying to educate people on
why it is imperative to quit this
deadly addiction.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Therapy options for smokers
Ways to break
the smoking habit
Now it's a habit,
how can I stop?
DANIELLE WIGGINS
STAFF WRITER
i
Having a support group is a simple way for smokers to make quitting less stressful.
Nonprescription
alternatives to
quit smoking
MARTHA HILL
STAFF WRITER
Anyone who has tried to quit
smoking knows it's a difficult
process. Luckily for students
there are many options available
on and off campus, if and when
one is ready. Georgia Childs, the
assistant director for Peer Health
Services, located in Student
Health Services, can give inter-
ested students the information
needed to begin the path to a
healthier lifestyle. Her job is to
give students different alterna-
tives to quit smoking and let
them pick which method will
work best for them.
Counseling and support
groups are options people don't
usually consider. Interested
people can set up an appoint-
ment and talk to a professional
about their concerns. When
asked about counseling and its
effectiveness:
"A few people will come by
the office to let me know if it's
working or if they need help
see THERAPY page A6
FYI
� For help to quit smoking, an
appointment can be made with a
health education specialist at the
ECU Student Health Services by
calling 328-6794.
To successfully stop smoking
one must truly want to quit
� The American Lung Association
can give online Information and
support to quit smoking.
It's all a mind game.
"Those who want to quit
must start off being mentally
motivated said Dawn Neigh-
bors, Eckerd Pharmacist.
Quitting is not as easy as
starting, mainly because of the
addicting chemicals found in
cigarettes. You have to decide
whether it is something you
really want to do. Next, you have
to take a realistic approach. First
ask yourself this question, "will
I be able to maintain this goal?"
Those who decide to quit turn
to nicotine alternatives. Others
ease off smoking a little at a time,
from smoking one pack a day to
one cigarette a day, until the crav-
ing is only one cigarette a month.
Some are lucky to have enough
self-control to stop smoking
without buying products to help.
There are plenty of ways to
help quit smoking, ranging from
patches, gum and nasal sprays.
Some are over the counter and
others are available through
the pharmacy. These products
are available at local stores like
CVS, Eckerd, Wal-Mart and even
grocery stores. Some products are
made so that every time you have
a craving, you can substitute that
product instead. Nicotine alterna-
tives only work if used correctly,
so read the directions carefully.
Also, do a little research, 'Truth'
commercials on television may
change your mind. Do you actu-
ally know what that tiny tube of
tobacco contains? If you have any
problems, pharmacists are very
friendly and willing to help find
what you need.
"Most nicotine alternatives
require training your body to use
the product Neighbors said.
"Other than your usual chew-
ing gum and patches, people
have turned to hypnosis
It also helps to ask around.
Ask those you know that have
stopped. What helped them
stop smoking? Nicotine alterna-
tives available on shelves would
be Nicoderm patches, Nicarette
chewing gum, Smoke Away tab-
lets, lozenges and withdraw
control sprays, as seen on televi-
sion.
"We usually see a lot of people
purchase these systems around
New Years Eve, many make it a
goal to quit as their New Year's
resolutions Neighbors said.
Why wait until January, why
not set up your own day and time
before then? How many people
do you know keep up with New
Year's resolutions? Quitting takes
time and patience. However, in
the end it can be quite rewarding.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.





PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � LIVING
9-16-04
Cabernet is an affordable luxury
WHAT IS A CABERNET
SAUVIGNON?
(KRT) � If you were looking
for the rideofyour life, you proba-
bly wouldn't consider taking a cab.
But in the world of wine, cab - as in
cabernet sauvignon - is king. This
rich, red wine comes from what
is considered the ultimate French
wine grape. Good cabernets can
also come from the United States,
Chile, Australia, New Zealand
and Argentina. Most are finely
made and highly priced, but
there is no shortage, it is the most
widely planted wine grape variety
in the world. Often a cabernet
sauvignon will havea small amount
of another red grape blended into
itto improve the wine.
WHY IS CABERNET SO
EXPENSIVE?
Why are many cabernets
expensive? The wine costs more
to make because it takes more
time. Sometimes the answer is
simply scarcity. Some of the most
desirable wines in the market-
place (and hence the most expen-
sive) are made in extremely small
amounts because there is no big
winery behind them - some
are literally made in garages in
Europe, and are called garagistes.
In California they're called "cult
wines These wines are usually
handcrafted with much attention
to detail. But not all cabernets
are costly - very drinkable cabs
are found for $15 or less. Also
remember most wines are
cheaper by the dozen or half-
dozen. If you find a wine you
especially like, ask about a six-
bottle or case discount.
HOW LONG DO I HAVE
TO WAIT?
Most lower-priced
cabernets are made to enjoy
right away. But higher-priced
cabernets or blends containing
mostly cabernet are some of
the top wine collectors' items
in the world. They age well and
should not be drunk too young
or they will seem harsh. Tannins,
the drying and bitter chemical
compounds found in grape seeds
and skins, allow these wines
to age and develop over time.
(Tannins are in white
wines, too, but in much less
concentration.) They are also
the property in red wine that
gives you that mouth-puckering
sensation. Tannins change over
time, progressing from young and
hard to mellow and soft. Collectors
like to watch - or taste - red wine's
development over many years,
buying a case and drinking
a bottle each year to note
how it evolves.
WHAT IS A "BORDEAUX
BLEND"?
It's the wine that has given
the pre-eminent red wine region
in the world, the Bordeaux area
of France, its classy reputation.
These are complex red wines that
are primarily cabernet sauvignon
blended with two other grape
varieties, cabernet franc and
merlot. They are among the most
expensive wines in the world.
They are perhaps most valued
for their longevity, so if you see
such a wine and it is older than
anything else on the wine list,
don't be put off. The British dub
this wine a "claret And because
Italy, another of the world's top
wine regions, did not want to be
left out, it started creating its own
version called the "Super Tuscan
Sometimes cabernet stands alone
in this coveted wine and some-
times it is blended with sangiovese
or other native Italian grapes.
WHAT AM I LOOKING
FOR?
Don't expect a light aperitif.
Cabernet is a "serious" mouth-
ful with a full, silky texture.
The more expensive ones reveal
layer upon layer of flavors. You
may taste intense flavors of black
cherry, raspberry, cassis, mint,
black pepper, vanilla, chocolate
and coffee. Its firm tannins are
perhaps its most striking feature,
and this very characteristic is
why some people find it's too
powerful or bitter for them. For
these people, cabernet may be an
acquired taste.
SHOULD I EAT MEAT
WITH CABERNET?
Red wines pair well with fat-
rich foods, such as beef, lamb
and sausages. Because of their
high tannins, cabs do especially
well with these foods. To choose
a wine for beef, you should also
keep in mind how the beef is
prepared. If it's a plain, juicy
steak or a slab of prime rib, a
robust wine such as a cabernet
sauvignon would stand up to
it and help cut the fat that will
coat your mouth. Cabernet sau-
vignon would also go well with
an Italian dish that contains beef
but also flavorful ingredients
such as garlic, tomatoes, olives
or cheese.
And for vegetarians: A heavy
wine like cabernet sauvignon
goes well with strong cheeses
such as camembert and robust,
starchy vegetables like corn,
roasted potatoes and green beans
pair well because they bring out
the fruit in the wine. Cabernet
sauvignon can also work well
with bean dishes.
WHAT ABOUT DES-
SERT?
Here's a surprising combina-
tion: cabernet sauvignon with
chocolate. For those who think
a cabernet is too harsh for their
taste buds, the chocolate Is a
perfect antidote The sweetness
of the chocolate softens and
enhances the red wine and brings
out its yummy fruit. First, bite
into the chocolate or taste a
small spoonful of chocolate
syrup, and coat your mouth
with it. Then take a sip of red
wine. You'll be surprised at what
you experience.
HOW COLD SHOULD IT
BE?
Almost everyone still clings to
the notion that red wine should
not be chilled. But red wines are
actually best enjoyed at slightly
cooler than room temperatures.
That doesn't mean chilling them
as much as whites, but you should
put your red wine in the refrigera-
tor - if only for 10 to 30 minutes.
When the wine is too warm,
its alcohol can jump out at you
so that you taste more alcohol
than fruit - not a good thing.
Bolder cabs would be at the
high end of the scale of 55 to
70 degrees; and lighter wines,
such as Beaujolais, pinot noir,
sangiovese and Chianti would
be at the lower end. So what are
you supposed to do - take the
temperature of a glass of wine
before drinking it?
Such wine geek gadgets do
exist, but if you're not so inclined,
use these simple rules of thumb:
A red wine bottle should feel
cool to the touch, but not cold.
If it's too cool, leave it at room
temperature for 30 minutes or so.
If it's too warm, refrigerate it for
about 30 minutes
WINE GENIUS RECOM-
MENDS:
Expensive cabs are plentiful,
but I'm going to concentrate on
some of the bargains available
in the current competitive wine
market. Good value as well as
good wine comes from Australia,
and two examples are Evans &
Tate Gnangara 2002 Cabernet
Sauvignon ($11) and Black Opal
Cabernet Sauvignon 2002 ($8).
Closer to home, Guenoc's 2000
North Coast Cabernet Sauvignon
($14) is juicy and delicious.
From the usually pricey Napa
Valley, there's Edge 2002 Napa
Valley Cabernet ($18). Wine
country retailer Paul Root raves
about the value. "It's delicious, a
quintessential example of what
good deals are still out there
And for an example of what the
fat cats drink, try the opulent
2001 Cardinale Red Proprietary
Wine ($125).
Therapy
from page A5
because they've started smoking
again said Childs.
She stressed that everybody
is different, so what might work
for one person might not work
for another.
Unfortunately, there are not
any support groups or classes
currently offered on campus;
however, if there were enough
Interest Student Health would be
open to offering such services.
For help with quitting, an
appointment can be made with a
health education specialist at the
ECU Student Health Services by
calling 328-6794.
Another alternative is the
Internet. There are many online
support groups that are just
a keyboard stroke away. The
American Lung Association and
the American Cancer Society is a
good place to start.
Acupuncture is another
choice when treating problems
with chemical dependency. This
is a natural alternative where fine
needles are inserted into various
points of the body. Some studies
have shown acupuncture and edu-
cation has helped to significantly
reduce cigarette consumption.
There are several certified
acupuncturists in the Greenville
area. Although this is not the
most popular method for ces-
sation, Dr. Bruce D. McCrea of
Greenville Pain Relief and Preven-
tion said he had a patient come
in for this type of treatment.
"The most important thing
in any type of therapy is a mul-
timodal effect. Acupuncture,
counseling and the use of herbal
supplements would be the most
effective form of treatment. Just
using one or the other is not
enough said Dr. McCrea.
Hypnosis is another method
that some people will use to quit.
It can be a successful alternative
if one follows all parts of the
therapy.
At Improve Your Health Hyp-
nosis Center located in Kinston
for $200 a person attends a one-
time session to learn self hypno-
sis and then participants listen to
a 15 to 25 minute personalized
CD for three months.
"Hypnosis helps to teach your
subconscious mind to be more
pioductive for you said Anthony
r. Mullen, the owner of Improve
Your Health Hypnosis Center.
Although this type of therapy
is more involved, results are usu-
ally successful.
Interestingly enough, each
person interviewed did say that a
person must truly want to quit in
order to stop smoking for good.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Mark A. Ward
Attorney at Law
Board Certified Specialist In State Criminal Law
15 Years Experience In Criminal Defense
� Traffic Offenses
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9-16-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � LIVING
PAGE A7
ozy One &Two BedroomOne Bath Units
�Free Water and Sewer
�Central Heat &. Air in Two Bedrooms
�Wall AC Unit in One Bedroom
�WasherDryer Connections
�1st Floor Patio with Fence
�2nd Floor Patio or Back Patio
�Pets Allowed with Fee
�Energy Efficient
�On ECU Bus Route
�Spacious One ccTwo BedroomOne Bath
Units
�Free Water and Sewer
�Central Heat 8c Air
�WasherDryer Connections
�Dishwasher
�Ceiling Fan
�Each Unit has a Patio or Balcony
�Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
�Energy Efficient
New college dorms aim to be homey
onogement
Office Hours
Monday-Friday 9am-5ptr
Sjtmdav 9om-2pni
Apartments & Rental Houses
PO Box 873 � 108 Brownlea Drive Suite A
Greenville, NC 27835-0873
phone (252) 758-1921 Ext. 60 � fax (252) 757-7722
Optometry Resource Fair
Meet representatives from
several optometry schools
Learn more about
optometry as
a career
All interested
Monday, September 20th stu deiltS are
3:00 p.m5:00 p.m.
Multipurpose Room invited tO
Mendenhall Student Center attpnH I
open mlc night, September 16th, 7-9PM
@ the pirate underground (FREE PIZZA!)
(KRT) � Room and board
on college campuses doesn't just
mean box-size rooms with group
showers anymore.
More universities are build-
ing dormitories with comforts
and amenities that students are
accustomed to at home.
At Washington University
in St. Louis, the newest dorm,
Forsyth House, features wood-
paneled walls, a great room
with a gas fireplace, a winding
staircase and equipped kitchens
on each floor.
For students who don't want
to trek across campus, there's
a music practice room, a larger
community kitchen on the
ground floor and an art room
with a mess sink for more cre-
ative projects.
The four-story dorm opens
this fall with housing for 176
students.
Justin Carroll, dean of stu-
dents at Washington University,
said there's more of an effort to
provide students with everything
they need so they don't have to
leave campus often.
"It's a place for students to
grow personally and intellectu-
ally and where they can have
more personal contact with
faculty and student services and
academic support right at their
door Carroll said.
Campuses across the country are trying to draw in new students
by adding cozier dorm rooms to their campuses.
David Coleman, an archi-
tect with Christner Inc said
universities are requesting more
high-end, finished spaces where
students can feel almost like
they're right at home.
"Especially for freshmen and
sophomores, these types of hous-
ing build that sense of commu-
nity that is vital and keeps them
connected to the institution
Coleman said.
"That feeling increases reten-
tion so students don't feel iso-
lated. They want to stay on
campus for all four years
But it isn't cheap. Single
rooms at Forsyth House - plus
required activity fees - amount
to $7,322 a year per student;
double rooms are $6,402; and
triples are $4,538.
The Virginia Avenue Housing
and Dining Project at the Univer-
sity of Missouri-Columbia will
open this fall with beds for 721
students. A single room there,
including a full meal plan, can go
up to $8,630 a year per student
and a double room is around
$7,650 a year.
The new dorms offer lounge
space on each dorm floor, with
soft chairs and couches, ground-
floor laundry rooms, and a kitch-
enette on each floor.
University Terrace
3 Bedroom 3 Bath Condominiums
Monthly Rent : $875 Security Deposit : $500
2 Bedroom Option Available
Please Call For Details
�Kitchen appliances w
dishwasher and disposal
�Full size laundry room
with hookups
�Internet capability in
each bedroom
�On ECU Bus route
�5 blocks from ECU
� 1230 Sq. Feet
�Energy efficient
�Central Heat & Air
�Sorry, No pets allowed
PINNACLE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT OF NC, INC
MDfTIMMrKmUE r�:S�7(7
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UNDEBS
SGfl Heeds You!
Filing is now open for the Student Government Association Fall Election.
lile are currently accepting applications for the following positions:
Residence Hall and Day Senators
President and Uice-President for all 4 classes
SecretaryTreasurer for the Senior Class
Stop by Mendenhall Room 264 before 500PM
Friday, September 17th to apply.
Hurry! Filing ends soon! Contact the SGA office at
328-4726, if you have any questions.





PAGEA8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � LIVING
9-16-04

mmmmm
�1LLAG E
ooo
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Those "all inclusive" Apts
$385-325 per monthperson
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Roommate matchingjust like the dorms
Computer room onsite
Fitness center
Utilities includedusually only a limited
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Cable included
$357 average rental price
per person per month
Eastgate Village
$237.50 per person
2 bedroom apts.
YOU pick your roommmate
You probably already own a computer
Multi-millionrec. center on campus paid for
by your ECU tuition
Energy efficient- average utility bill is only $90
Cable is Included
$302.50 average rental price
per person per month
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call: 56RENT
Now leasing for Spring and Fall 2004
www.pinnaclepropertymanagement.com
M,
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our pi
BRANDC
Assists





9-16-04
Page B1 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY ZOPPO Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
THURSDAY September 16, 2004
TEC weekend predictions
SPORTS STAFF
BRANDON HOGHES
Notre Dame
Vs.
Michigan State
49
Score:
ND-14
MSU -10
TONY ZOPPO
BRENT WYNNE
TRENT WYNNE
ERIC GILMORE
!H
Score:
ND-24
MSU -13
Ohio State
Vs.
NC State
Score:
OSU - 27
NCSU -17
West Virginia
Vs.
Maryland
p
Score:
West Va. - 31
Maryland - 23
W
Score:
ND-21
MSU-7
4
Score:
ND-14
MSU -11
$j)
Score:
ND-17
MSU-9
Score:
OSU - 23
NCSU-10
Score:
OSU - 24
NCSU -16
Score:
OSU -17
NCSU - 20
Score:
OSU -17
NCSU- 28
ROB LEONDARD
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
W
Score:
ND-21
MSU-0
4$
Score:
ND-23
MSU-7
Louisiana State
Vs.
Auburn
a
Score:
LSU -17
Auburn - 20
Florida
Vs.
Tennessee
Score:
West Va. - 21
Maryland - 24

Score:
West Va. - 24
Maryland-19
F
Score:
West Va. - 21
Maryland -14
Score:
West Va. - 35
Maryland -17
Score:
OSU - 24
NCSU -16
Score:
OSU - 21
NCSU -13
Xb
Score:
West Va. - 26
Maryland -17
s
Score:
LSU -16
Auburn -17

ocore:
LSU -14
Auburn -13
Score:
LSU-20
Auburn -14
s
Score:
LSU -18
Auburn - 21
Score:
Florida - 24
Tenn. - 21
Panthers
Vs.
Chiefs
Score:
Florida - 28
Tenn. - 21
Score:
Florida - 27
Tenn. - 24
?
Score:
Florida - 23
Tenn. - 26
Score:
Florida - 23
Tenn. -17
MATT SAUNDERS
MATTHEW FOSTER
TOTALS
System for TEC top 10,
Our picks this weekend
BRANDON HUGHES
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Welcome to the weekly
football forecast for this
eekend's action. This column
vtll be a mainstay each Thursday
id above are the selections from
ur sports writers.
Each writer will select a
nner from 10 games every
ek, five from the college ranks
five NFL games. Season
Cords will be displayed in each
W
Score:
ND-16
MSU -10
W
Score:
ND-
Michigan �
w
Score:
OSU-9
NCSU -17
Score:
Ohio - 26
NCSU - 21
A

Score:
West Va. - 22
Maryland-17
Score:
LSU - 21
Auburn -13
Score:
Panters -14
Chiefs - 31
Redskins
Vs.
Giants
Score:
Redskins - 21
Giants-10
Eagles
Vs.
Vikings
Score:
Panters -17
Chiefs - 35
Score:
Panters -16
Chiefs-13
Score:
Panters-13
Chiefs - 27
Score:
Panters -10
Chiefs - 24
Score:
Redskins - 27
Giants-10
Score:
Redskins - 30
Giants -14
Score:
Redskins -17
Giants - 7
Score:
Redskins - 20
Giants - 9
EflGLF.S
Score:
Eagles - 31
Vikings - 27
Colts
Vs.
Titans
Score:
Eagles - 30
Vikings - 38
Score:
Eagles - 28
Vikings - 35
Eam.KK
Score:
Eagles - 31
Vikings - 23
Score:
Eagles - 24
Vikings - 28
Score:
Florida - 23
Tenn. -14
3
Score:
West Va. - 21
Maryland -16
Score:
West Va. - 28
Maryland - 23

Score:
LSU - 24
Auburn -10
Score:
Florida - 23
Tenn. - 20
Score:
Panters -17
Chiefs-15
Score:
Panters - 20
Chiefs-17
Score:
Redskins - 27
Giants - 7
Score:
Redskins - 28
Giants -14
�il.ES
Score:
Eagles - 33
Vikings - 30
o
Score:
Colts - 24
Titans-16
o
Score:
Colts - 33
Titans-13
o
Score:
Colts - 28
Titans -14
u
Score:
Colts - 27
Titans -16
u
Score:
Colts - 38
Titans -14
Eagles
Score:
Eagles - 31
Vikings - 23
Score:
LSU -16
Auburn - 9
- ifc3H3mLi A
Score:
Florida - 30
Tenn - 28
Score:
LSU -12
Auburn - 7
6&
9-0
6-3
8-1
6-3
Score:
Florida - 21
Tenn. - 20
8-1
Score:
Panters - 21
Chiefs-13
Score:
Panters -18
Chiefs-13
5-4
Score:
Redskins - 38
Giants - 23
Score:
Redskins -29
Giants-12
o
Score:
Colts - 34
Titans - 20
o
Score:
Colts - 24
Titans-17
Score:
Eagles - 31
Vikings - 42
Eaclf,
Score:
Eagles - 28
Vikings - 27
9-0
Eaci.i;
5-4

Score:
Colts-13
Titans -17
o
Score:
Colts - 23
Titans-13
o
8-1
Seahawks
Vs.
Bucs
Score:
Seattle -10
Tampa - 6
Score:
Seattle -14
Tampa -13
Score:
Seattle - 20
Tampa -10
Score:
Seattle - 21
Tampa - 9
Score:
Seattle-10
Tampa - 0
Score:
Seattle - 21
Tampa -14
Score:
Seattle -12
Tampa - 0
Score:
Seattle -14
Tampa - 0
Score:
Seattle-13
Tampa - 3
9-0
edition. Below are my predictions
for this week's games.
Notre Dame vs. Michigan
State
No one knows what to make
of the Irish. One week after
an embarrassing loss to BYU,
Notre Dame upsets Michigan.
Fortunately for them, the
Spartans don't pose much of a
threat. The Irish will win in ugly
fashion 20-12.
Maryland vs. West Vir-
ginia
Many consider the Moun-
taineers the dark horse to win
the National Championship. I
don't, but look for them to keep
rolling with a 30-14 win over
the Terps.
Ohio State vs. NC State
The Wolfpack will play a
tough schedule this season
with the Buckeyes coming into
Raleigh. NC State's defense is
vastly underrated so expect a
close one, a 28-25 victory for
Ohio State.
LSU vs. Auburn
The LSU Tigers were upset
in their opener and still have
several weaknesses. A loss is
in their future and I think it's
coming on Saturday. Auburn
pulls off the stunner at home
22-20.
Florida vs. Tennessee
Gators quarterback Chris
Leak has matured after a year of
seasoning in the SEC, while the
Volunteers play two freshman
signal callers. Florida rolls into
Tennessee with a convincing
31-17 win.
Minnesota Vikings vs.
Philadelphia Eagles
The Eagles are the favorites
to represent the NFC in the
Super Bowl. Both teams were
impressive in the opener, but I like
Donovan McNabb and Philly in
this one, 28-19.
Washington Redskins vs.
New York Giants
Joe Gibbs is back in town but
what about the Skins' defense last
week against the Bucs. Tampa was
completely helpless on offense.
Expect the offense to start
rolling soon as Kurt Warner and
the G-men fall 24-13.
Carolina Panthers vs.
Kansas City Chiefs
This match-up should be the
most exciting of the week with
a great Chief offense against the
stingy Panthers. Jake Delhomme
will have something to prove this
season. A Steve Smith-less Caro-
lina team loses 31-20.
Indianapolis Colts vs.
Tennessee Titans
It's all about New England
and the Colts in the AFC. Indy
is hungry after falling to the
Patriots in the season opener and
should beat the Titans 27-10.
Seattle Seahawks vs.
Tampa Bay Buccaneers
The Buccaneers had a
solid defensive game against
Washington, but their offense
was stifled. Seattle is the new
fad in Super Bowl picks and
shouldn't have a problem
dropping Tampa to 0-2. The
Seahawks win 17-10.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.





PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
9-16-04
Heated rivalry between Lady
Pirates, Camels continues
Women's soccer set to
host Campbell Friday
ROBERT LEONARD
STAFF WRITER
Rivalries are what makes
sports fun. The thrill of victory
and pure love of competition is
an important element in sports;
without these, sports wouldn't be
as important in society.
Rivalries seem to inflate
these elements and take them to
another level. The ECU women's
soccer team has a few rivals of
their own and the biggest rival
may not come from Conference
USA.
The team in question is the
Camels of Campbell University.
The Camels (2-1-2) and the
Pirates (2-3-0) are not only in-
state rivals, but also have history
between them.
ECU assistant coach Chris
Webb held the same title at
Campbell for two seasons before
coming to Greenville. Webb
also attended graduate school
at Campbell where she received
her master's degree in exercise
science.
Although these two teams did
not meet last season, there's some
bad blood between the schools.
Coach Rob Donnenwirth knows
the Camels will be ready for
this game.
"We are one of Campbell's
bigger games this season said
Donnenwirth.
"They will be fired up and emo-
tionally ready just because of that
With a defense that was, as
Donnenwirth put it, "embar-
rassed" last weekend 8-0 by the
Clemson Tigers, the Lady Pirates
look to rebound against the
Camels. The ladies will need to
score quickly and take advantage
of every opportunity that comes
their way.
"Campbell likes to play people
up Donnenwirth said.
"We can take advantage of
this and go right over the top
of them
One player the defense will
need to look out for is Campbell's
leading scorer, midfielder Susan
Persson. Persson, a senior from
Sweden, is leading her team in
shots with 18, shots on goal with
nine, goals with two and points
with four. Part of the Pirates' plan
on defense will include keeping
track of Persson at all times.
"She's a really good player
Donnenwirth said.
"She likes to score, and some-
times doesn't get back on D. We
need to exploit that. We need to
keep a body on her and always
know where she's at
Even if Persson does score, the
Pirates should be able to counter
with their forwards and midfield-
ers. Megan McCallion is coming
off a below average performance
in the Furman tournament and
looks to bounce back. Sarah Stoltz
needs to keep playing well in the
midfield and help control not
only Persson, but the tempo of
the game as well.
No matter the outcome, the
rivalry will continue this Friday
at Bunting Field at 4 p.m.
The writer can at contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
3140-C Moseley Drive � Greenville, NC
252-551-3048
1 Month-
Unlimited
Tanning
Buy 1 Tan
Get 1
FREE

Try Breeze
Canned Tan
Touch Up And
Body Tanner
9-1
Ri
dec
�Lb
Mi
Appl
I
Being struck by lightning is rare. Having a disability is not. One in five Americans will acquire a disability
in his or her lifetime. TjJce Barbara Gordon. At age 29, she was diagnosed with macular degeneration
and was soon legally blind. But with the help of Easter Seals, she was able to rebuild her life and return
to work. Please support the work of Easter Seals. Creating solutions, changing lives.
Campus Events calendar September 2004
World Peace Vigil
Tuesday, September 21
Steps of Joyner Library, 7pm
Join us for a special evening of reflections and musical performances focusing'on world pence
featuring the Gospel Choir, Native American DrummerSingers (Gray Wolf Jr.), Modem and
faculty speakers and more!
Sponsored by the ECU Student In i vhxment Team. Fbr more information call 128-4790.
Sunday, September 19 - Dances (or Universal Peace, 4-6pm, Mendenhall 244. FREE Spon-
sored by the ECU Student Involvement Team.
Tuesday, September 21 - ECU World Peace vlgllUnlted Nations International Day of Peace, Joyner
Library (steps facing the mall), 7pm. FREE Sponsored by the ECU Student Involvement Team.
Wednesday, September 22 - Social Justice Institute: Speaker (Topic: "What Have We Come
To? Wars Between the Generations 7:30pm, Murphy Center. FREE Sponsored by the Ledonla
Wright Cultural CenterOffice of Intercuftural Affairs.
Thursday, September 23 - The Rumi conceit A Turning Night of Stars with Coleman Barks
(Internationally renown poet and translator of Rumi), David Darling (cello), Glen Velez (percussion),
Zulelka (dance), 8:00pm, Wright Auditorium Free for ECU students wOne Card$5.00 for ECU fac-
urtystaff S10.00 public.
'Friday, September 24 - Arts for Peace: PoetryMusicDance Workshop with Coleman Barks,
David Darling, Glen Velez, Zulelka, 10am-12:30pm, Wright Auditorium. FREE
FREE Student Tickets: RUMI CONCERT
"Sponsors of Coleman Barks twoday residency at ECU include: ECU Student Involvement
Team, Student Union, Ledonia Wright Cultural CenterOffice of Intercultural Student Affairs,
Center for Off-Campus LivingOffice of Adult & Commuter Student Services, Division of
Student Life, Carol Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professorship Endowment, College of
Fine Arts and Communication (School of MusicSchool of Art & Design), Thomas Harriot
College of Arts and Sciences, and the English Writers Reading Series





9-16-04
9-16-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B3
Report newsstudents need to know, tor
Accepting applications lor STAFF WRITERS
� Leam Investigative reporting skills
� Must have at least a zo GW
tea
Apply at our office located on the 2nd tool the Student PuMcatons BuMnq, or cal 328-6366.
.
CONVERSE
$:
FT!
oJl
A�M
O f.
M9160
O v
� Ot
ity
O '
M9622
u
M9006
' W�
r
ement
: Affairs,
sion of
lege of
Harriot
HIBBETT SPORTS
7U East Greenville Blvd.
Cross Country on brink of success
Men and women could
have breakout season
BRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Under the direction of a new
coaching staff, the Pirate men's
and women's cross country
teams race into the 2004 season
with high hopes of improving
on identical eighth place finishes
a year ago in the Conference
USA championships.
Former coach Len Klepack,
who served six years at ECU,
was hired by Texas during the
off-season to serve as an assistant
coach in the Longhorns' track
and field program. Klepack will
also serve as head women's cross
country coach.
Joe Catania, who brings 10
years of collegiate coaching
experience to the Pirate program,
was named as an assistant to the
track and field program at ECU.
His primary duties, according
to track and field coach Matt
Munson, will be to coach the
distance runners, cross country
and the horizontal jumpers for
both the men's and women's
teams.
Catania spent his last six
years at Indiana State where
he held the positions of head
cross country and assistant
track and field coach. Catania's
accomplishments as a coach are
quite impressive.
In 1984, he was named Divi-
sion II coach of the year, as well
as producing 13 Missouri Valley
Conference Champions, 90
All Conference members and
nine national qualifiers in cross
country and track and field.
Catania has also served as a track
and field official at a number of
prominent events including the
1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta
and the NCAA Championships.
With the addition of Catania,
Munson believes both the men's
and women's teams are poised to
have a great season.
"Joe has done an absolute
fantastic job said Munson of
Catania's work up to this point.
"Our kids are running like
gang-busters and they all are
responding well to him. The
team's morale is the highest it has
ever been
Catania inherits a Pirate
squad that returns a solid core of �
runners on both the men's and a
women's side of competition. n
For the men, senior Kyle 8 I
McKenzie, who set a number of a I
course and school records last .
season en route to an individual � I
C-USA title, will anchor a men's �
team who has the advantage E(U s yle Mckenzie had a stellar season last year and looks
to have an even better campaign in 2004.
sureoffof Kyle, from him feeling petitive team come conference
of having big race experience,
something Munson says will
come in handy when champion-
ship time rolls around.
"I think as a group we were
ready to race last year at confer-
ence time Munson said.
"We have kids that have been
there before, and that experi-
ence will be so valuable late in
the season
Individually speaking,
Munson believes that senior
Matt Hanlon will challenge the
speedy McKenzie for individual
honors and that may prove to be
helpful for both of them.
"It will take some of the pres-
like he has to be number one all
the time Munson said.
"Having Matt coming up and
running with Kyle this early in
the season is tremendous for the
team in the long run
Complimenting the two
senior speedsters will be Matt
Gorman, Craig Schmidt, Kristia
Jorgensen, John Loehr and Ste-
phen Tausend, all of whom have
the ability to have huge races.
"All those guys can really
pack up and give them a nice
solid group as far as scoring and
I think we'll be a pretty com-
time Munson said.
"It's really not about who's
your number one and two
runners, it's about who your
number five runner and when
your fifth runner is closer
to your number one, you're
going to do well in meets
On the women's side, senior
Johanna Allen will be the cat-
alyst for the team's success.
"Johanna (Allen), as a senior
came back in fantastic shape
and she will be the leader day
see CROSS page B6
I'm a Student and a Plasma Donor
Name: Elizabeth
Class: Junior @ ECU
Major: Phys Ed
Hobbies: Water Sports, Hanging out
with friends
Why do I donate Plasma?
I donate for weekend spending cash.
Earn up to $170mo. donating plasma in a friendly place.
DCI Biologkals of Greenville � 252-757-0171
2727 E.lOth Street � Down the Street from ECU
Emewald crfCy
BiUfcrads SpontsBan DaraceCLub
The Riuettgate Shopping Centen 7'$70500
Ladies Always Fnee! Available por Pnivate Panties
Thursday, Sept. 16th
The Chippendale,
THE ULTIMATE LADIES NIGHT OUT!





PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
9-16-04
Heated rivalry between Lady
Pirates, Camels continues
Women's soccer set to
host Campbell Friday
ROBERT LEONARD
STAFF WRITER
Rivalries are what makes
sports fun. The thrill of victory
and pure love of competition is
an important element in sports;
without these, sports wouldn't be
as important in society.
Rivalries seem to inflate
these elements and take them to
another level. The ECU women's
soccer team has a few rivals of
their own and the biggest rival
may not come from Conference
USA.
The team in question is the
Camels of Campbell University.
The Camels (2-1-2) and the
Pirates (2-3-0) are not only in-
state rivals, but also have history
between them.
ECU assistant coach Chris
Webb held the same title at
Campbell for two seasons before
coming to Greenville. Webb
also attended graduate school
at Campbell where she received
her master's degree in exercise
science.
Although these two teams did
not meet last season, there's some
bad blood between the schools.
Coach Rob Donnenwirth knows
the Camels will be ready for
this game.
"We are one of Campbell's
bigger games this season said
Donnenwirth.
"They will be fired up and emo-
tionally ready just because of that
With a defense that was, as
Donnenwirth put it, "embar-
rassed" last weekend 8-0 by the
Clemson Tigers, the Lady Pirates
look to rebound against the
Camels. The ladies will need to
score quickly and take advantage
of every opportunity that comes
their way.
"Campbell likes to play people
up Donnenwirth said.
"We can take advantage of
this and go right over the top
of them
One player the defense will
need to look out for is Campbell's
leading scorer, midfielder Susan
Persson. Persson, a senior from
Sweden, is leading her team in
shots with 18, shots on goal with
nine, goals with two and points
with four. Part of the Pirates' plan
on defense will include keeping
track of Persson at all times.
"She's a really good player
Donnenwirth said.
"She likes to score, and some-
times doesn't get back on D. We
need to exploit that. We need to
keep a body on her and always
know where she's at
Even if Persson does score, the
Pirates should be able to counter
with their forwards and midfield-
ers. Megan McCallion is coming
off a below average performance
in the Furman tournament and
looks to bounce back. Sarah Stoltz
needs to keep playing well in the
midfield and help control not
only Persson, but the tempo of
the game as well.
No matter the outcome, the
rivalry will continue this Friday
at Bunting Field at 4 p.m.
The writer can at contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
3140-C Moseley Drive � Greenville, NC
252-551-3048
1 Month
Unlimited
Tanning
Buy 1 Tan
Get 1
FREE
Try Breeze
Canned Tan
Touch Up And
Body Tanner
9-16-
Rep
Accept
�Learn
�Must
Apply j
I
at
Being struck by lightning is rare. Having a disability is not. One in five Americans will acquire a disability
in his or her lifetime. Tajce Barbara Gordon. At age 29, she was diagnosed with macular degeneration
and was soon legally blind. But with the help of Easter Seals, she was able to rebuild her life and return
to work. Please support the work of Easter Seals. Creating solution, changing ttm.
ArKV
CAMPUS EVENTS CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 2004
World Peace Vigil
Tuesday, September 21
Steps of Joyner Library, 7pm
Join us tor ;i special evening of reflections and musical performances focusing on world peace
featuring the Gospel Choir, Native American DrummerSingers (Gray Wolf Jr.), student and
faculty speakers and more!
Sponsored by the ECU Student Ini vh ement Team. For more information ;all. 12S-4790.
i
Sunday, September 19 - Dances for Universal Peace, 4-6pm, Mendenhall 244. FREE. Spon-
sored by the ECU Student Involvement Team.
Tuesday, September 21 - ECU World Peace vlgilUnlted Nations International Day of Peace, Joyner
Library (steps facing the mall), 7pm. FREE Sponsored by the ECU Student Involvement Team.
Wednesday, September 22 - Social Justice Institute: Speaker (Topic: "What Have We Come
To? Wars Between the Generations 7:30pm, Murphy Center. FREE Sponsored by the Ledonla
Wright Cultural CenterOffice of Intercultural Affairs.
Thursday, September 23 - The Ruml concert A Turning Night of Stars with Coleman Barks
(Internationally renown poet and translator of Ruml), David Dadlng (cello), Glen Velez (percussion),
Zulelka (dance), 8:00pm, Wright Auditorium. Free for ECU students wOne Card$5.00 for ECU fac-
ultystaff$ 10.00 public.
'Friday, September 24 - Arts for Peace: PoetryMusicDance Workshop with Coleman Barks,
David Darling, Glen Velez, Zulelka, 10am-12:30pm, Wright Auditorium. FREE
FREE Student Tickets: RUMI CONCERT
?Sponsors of Coteman BartetwcKty
Team, Student Union, Ledonia Wright Cultural CenterOffice of Intercuftural Student Affairs,
Center for Off-Campus LivingOffice of Adult & Commuter Student Services, Division of
Student Life Carol Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professorship Endowment College of
Rne Arts and Communication (School of MusicSchool of Art & Design), Thomas Harriot
College of Arts and Sciences, and the English Writers Reading Series.





9-16-04
9-16-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B3
Report news students need to know, tec
Accepting applications lor STAFF WRITERS WT
� Learn Investigative reporting skills
� Must have at least a 2.0 GW
Apply at our office located on the 2nd�oor of the Student Publications Bulldlna or cat 32W366
co
nVERSE
FFSk
FT!
OLM
Tli StS
O Vy
M9160
4ND
E
� v
� '
ity
� v
M9622
II
M9006
M9621
1K023
.
cement
Affairs,
sion of
ege of
Harriot
HIBBETT SPORTS
7K East Greenville Blvd.
Cross Country on brink of success
Men and women could
have breakout season
BRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Under the direction of a new
coaching staff, the Pirate men's
and women's cross country
teams race into the 2004 season
with high hopes of improving
on Identical eighth place finishes
a year ago in the Conference
USA championships.
Former coach Len Klepack,
who served six years at ECU,
was hired by Texas during the
off-season to serve as an assistant
coach in the Longhorns' track
and field program. Klepack will
also serve as head women's cross
country coach.
Joe Catania, who brings 10
years of collegiate coaching
experience to the Pirate program,
was named as an assistant to the
track and field program at ECU.
His primary duties, according
to track and field coach Matt
Munson, will be to coach the
distance runners, cross country
and the horizontal jumpers for
both the men's and women's
teams.
Catania spent his last six
years at Indiana State where
he held the positions of head
cross country and assistant
track and field coach. Catania's
accomplishments as a coach are
quite impressive.
In 1984, he was named Divi-
sion II coach of the year, as well
as producing 13 Missouri Valley
Conference Champions, 90
All Conference members and
nine national qualifiers in cross
country and track and field.
Catania has also served as a track
and field official at a number of
prominent events including the
1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta
and the NCAA Championships.
With the addition of Catania,
Munson believes both the men's
and women's teams are poised to
have a great season.
"Joe has done an absolute
fantastic job said Munson of
Catania's work up to this point.
"Our kids are running like
gang-busters and they all are
responding well to him. The
team's morale is the highest it has
ever been
Catania inherits a Pirate
squad that returns a solid core of
runners on both the men's and a
women's side of competition. nj
For the men, senior Kyle
McKenzie, who set a number of a
course and school records last .&
season en route to an individual �
C-USA title, will anchor a men's �
team who has the advantage
of having big race experience,
something Munson says will
come in handy when champion-
ship time rolls around.
"I think as a group we were
ready to race last year at confer-
ence time Munson said.
"We have kids that have been
there before, and that experi-
ence will be so valuable late in
the season
Individually speaking,
Munson believes that senior
Matt Hanlon will challenge the
speedy McKenzie for individual
honors and that may prove to be
helpful for both of them.
"It will take some of the pres-
ECU's Kyle Mckenzie had a stellar season last year and looks
to have an even better campaign in 2004.
sure off of Kyle, from him feeling petitive team come conference
like he has to be number one all
the time Munson said.
"Having Matt coming up and
running with Kyle this early in
the season is tremendous for the
team in the long run
Complimenting the two
senior speedsters will be Matt
Gorman, Craig Schmidt, Kristia
Jorgensen, John Loehr and Ste-
phen Tausend, all of whom have
the ability to have huge races.
"All those guys can really
pack up and give them a nice
solid group as far as scoring and
I think we'll be a pretty corn-
time Munson said.
"It's really not about who's
your number one and two
runners, it's about who your
number five runner and when
your fifth runner is closer
to your number one, you're
going to do well in meets
On the women's side, senior
Johanna Allen will be the cat-
alyst for the team's success.
"Johanna (Allen), as a senior
came back in fantastic shape
and she will be the leader day
see CROSS page B6
I'm a Student and a Plasma Donor
Name: Elizabeth
Class: Junior @ ECU
Major: Phys Ed
Hobbies: Water Sports, Hanging out
with friends
Why do I donate Plasma?
I donate for weekend spending cash.
Earn up to $170mo. donating plasma in a friendly place.
DCI Biologicals of Greenville � 252-757-0171
2727 E.lOth Street � Down the Street from ECU
BfLLicrads SpontsBarz DanceClub
The Rivengate Shopping Centeu 757-0500
Ladies ALcuays Fnee! Available fon Pnivate Panties
UFAMOUS.
TONIGH
Thursday, Sept. 16th
The Chippendale
THE ULTIMATE LADIES NIGHT OUT!





r
Page B4
THURSDAY September 16, 2004
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Masseuse
employer
4 Actress Moore
8 Perfect society
14 That man
15 "Havana" star
Lena
16 Seattle pros
17 Etching process
19 Astonishes
20 Feminist Orbach
21 Dawn lawn layer
23 Movie industry,
casually
24 Swarm
25 Kind of
mushroom
27 Paper quantity
30 Want
31 N.A. reindeer
33 Diamond stat
34 Long-time
companions
36 Got by
39 Paradigms
40 Some football
plays
44 Exist
45 More whimsical
46 Ford fuel
49 Polanski film
51 Bear and Berra
52 Bathe
53 Unhappy
55 NT. book
56 Cowboy's rope
57 Slurs over
60 Went over again
62 Doddering
63 Writer
Murdoch
64 Wrap up
65 Lansbury or
Bassett
66 Egyptian
cobras
67 Pig's digs
DOWN
1 Type of daisy
2 Provoked
3 Entertains
4 Overplay the
TLC
5 New Haven
alum
6 Island south of
Luzon
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EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Social Justice Institute 1
Dr. Michael Eric Dyson
.sdiol.ilbest-sclJing author "who has forged
a unique role: he is a compelling spokesman for
the concerns ol the Hack community, and also
I leader who has a genuine rapport with that
community, particularly with urban youth
1 he Social Justice Institute is designed to increase
awareness of cultural and societal misconceptions
and to examine effective resolutions. Sponsored by
the Office of Intercultui.il Student Affairs and
the Lcdonia Wright Cultural (enter.
A book signing will follow the event.
it
tifll Ha
Wars Between the
Gener tions
i
� �

AdmlSSlOH: Students 2 free with ID; high school or local students,
faculty and staff $3 with ID; all others S5. for additional information,
please contact the l-odonia Wright Cultural Center at 328-6495 or
visit our website at WWW.ICU.adHIWCC
Wed September 22, 2004
7:30 p.m. � Harvey Hall in
the Murphy Center
East Carolina University
Individuals requesting accommodation under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should contact the Department for Disability Support
Services at least 48 hours prior to the event at (252) 328-6799 volce(2S2) 328-0899 TTY.
Tickets can be picked up at the ECU Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall





6, 2004

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THURSDAY September 16,2004
m�
What do you see? Every day, The New York Times helps you see the world around
you in whole new ways. Pick up your copy of The Times today. And to subscribe at
a very special student rate of more than 50 off, call 1 -888-NYT-COLL and
mention media code S84AJ. Or visit nytimes.comstudent. THE NEW YORK TIMES.
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For Rent
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Chocowinity Veterinary Hospital is
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Great opportunity for Pre-Vet!
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Three bedroom duplex for rent
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Tired of apartment living?
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Water and trash included. Call
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Sub-Lease Wesley Commons South
one bedroom, pets accepted,
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For Sale
Gateway Computer for sale.
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required. Hiring for mornings,
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Cypress Glen Retirement
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Announcements
Salsa Dance! Come join us for the
September 17 salsa dance! Lesson
by Procopio and Heidi, 7:30-
8:30; dance, 8:30-11:00 p.m.
DJ: Ramon. Admission: students
$3; Folk Arts Society member
$5; general public $8. Location:
Willis Building, 1st and Reade sts.
downtown. Sponsors: ECU Folk
and Country Dancers, 752-7350,
and Folk Arts Society of Greenville.
Come alone or bring a friend! An
alcohol- and smoke-free event.
Blues Concert! Come and enjoy
blues artist Lightnin' Wells on
Saturday, Sept. 18, at the Willis
Building, 1st and Reade streets
downtown. He'll feature a mix
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country, gospel, novelty, and
classic standard repertoires.
Admission: students $3; Folk
Arts Society members $5;
general public $8. Location:
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downtown. Sponsors: ECU Folk
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PAGE B6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
9-16-04
Rec Race to
start Sunday
Registration still
available day of race
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Put down the sodas and
pick up those Gatorade bottles
because it is time again for the
ECU Recreational Services 2nd
annual "Run From the Rec Road
Sk Race this Sunday at 2 p.m.
The event will start at the Stu-
dent Recreational Center, with all
runners meeting together at the
outdoor pool before the begin-
ning of the race.
The actual start point will
be located at Chico's, where the
course will make a single loop
around downtown Greenville
and the ECU campus.
Race director, Todd Riddick is
hoping to improve upon last year's
turnout in its inaugural running.
" Last year we had about 40-plus
turnout, 90 percent of which signed
up on the day of said Riddick.
"However, this year we
already have about 25 people
pre-registered to race, so we are
expecting 75-100 people if the
weather cooperates
To ensure the safety of this
year's event, race officials will not
allow animals, skates or bicycles
in the event. Racing wheelchairs
and baby strollers will be permit-
ted, however, and are more than
welcome into the race.
The event will consist of
seven different age groups, which
are as follows: 15 and under, 16-
19, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49, 50-59,
60 and over. Trophies will be
awarded during the awards cer-
emony at the conclusion of the
race (located at the SRC outdoor
pool) to the top male and female
In each age group and also the
top three male and female overall
winners. The top three race chairs
and top three baby strollers will
also receive the hardware as well.
Students and the community
are both encouraged to come out
and join the race. Entry fee for
students will be $6 with a valid
ECU OneCard.
The community will be
charged a $15 entry fee. Both
Students and the community will
need to have a completed entry
form available on the day of the
race and are encouraged not to
mail these forms In past today.
Registration for runners not
pre-registered will be held from
12:30 p.m 1:45 p.m. on the day
of the event.
All entry fees and proceeds
will benefit the Dream Factory.
"It is sort of like Make a Wish
Foundation, in which the organi-
zation provides opportunities for
kids that have either been sick or
are still sick Riddick said.
This writer can be contacted at
sports&theeastcarolinian. com.
Cross
from page B3
in and day out Munson said.
"She is definitely a woman on
a mission
Supporting Allen on the
women's side will be junior vet-
erans Caitlin Littlefield, Jessica
Collins and Rebekah Bishop.
According to Munson, fresh-
man Hayley Flynn has come in and
had an immediate impact as well.
"She will be a real strong
competitor come the end of the
year Munson said.
Both teams got their first taste
of competition this past Saturday
as they competed in the Wake
Forest Invitational, as the men
and women placed fourth and
fifth respectively in the overall
standings, llanlon led the Pirate
men in the 5k race with a time
of 15:34. He was followed closely
by McKenzie, who posted a time
of 15:42.
In the women's race, Allen
paced the lady Pirates with a time
of 18 minutes flat, followed by
Collins who ran the 5K course
in 18:45.
Munson believes that racing
against teams like Wake Forest
and Carolina early in the season
will only help the Pirates down
the stretch.
"Wake Forest is in the top ten
and Carolina is always up there
and Davidson has really started
to build a program over the last
few years. It really shows us where
we are right now and shows us
where we can go Munson said.
The Pirates will hit the road
again this weekend to run at the
Adidas Raleigh Invitational on
Saturday. With some of the most
dominant cross country programs
on the east coast participating in
the meet, Pirate runners will gain
experience that is a must come
championship weekend.
This writer can be contacted at
sports9theeastcarolinian.com.
ECU to host Disc
Golf Tournament
Event to be
held this weekend
MATTHEW SAUNDERS
STAFF WRITER
Robert Leonard, president of
ECU'S Disc Golf Club, will over-
see the Professional Disc Golf
Associations (PDGA) tour stop on
campus this weekend.
The tournament will host
players from across the state
competing for a top prize of
$200 and another crack at
$200 for winning the skins
game. Tee time for this two-day
event will be at 10 a.m. Saturday
and 9 a.m. on Sunday.
Leonard has been
president of the disc golf club since
his sophomore year, and has
seen disc golf grow leaps and
bounds.
"Disc golf in general has
grown a lot here at ECU
said Leonard.
Just the fact that we are
hosting a tour event is amaz-
ing in itself. I am glad to be
running it, and hope that (Hur-
ricane) Ivan holds out.
Disc golf uses many of
the same rules and scoring
system as golf, but it isn't nearly
as pricey.
"You can buy a used disc for $3
andanew one for$8 Leonard said.
"There is no cost to play, so
literally you can play for the rest
of your life for $3
As of now, 57 people have
pre-registered for the disc golf
club here at ECU, and Leon-
ard expects around 70 to 90
people overall.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
.jam
Microsoft ILiMM
Office
� 2003 Office Pro: $68.00
� Office Mac 2004: $57.00
� Windows XP Pro
Upgrade OS: $68.50
Offer available to currently enrolled ECU students only.
Must display valid ECU 1 Card. Limit one discounted copy
per student. Additional copies may be purchased at the
educationally priced retail rate.
JH:

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Student Stores
Wrisht Bulldins � 328-6731
Monday-Thursday: 7:30 am-7:30 pm
Friday; 7:30 am-5:00 pm
Saturday: 11:00 am-3:00 pm
www.studentstores.ecu.edu
NO COMMITMENT
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 16, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 16, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1750
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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