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Volume 80 Number 5
THURSDAY
September 9, 2004
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ECU holds annual family weekend
Activities open to all
family members
NICK HENNE
NEWS EDITOR
ECU'S annual family week-
end is being held Sept. 10 -12 and
is offering a variety of activities
for anybody within the ECU
community and their family
members.
Joanna Iwata, director of
student involvement and chair
of family weekend, said family
weekend is open to the entire
campus community and is a great
opportunity for both students
and their families.
"Every year we try to enhance
the event said Iwata.
New events being featured
this year include the art exhibit,
adventure extravaganza, ECU
family fun night, Student Union
foam party, student union movies
and the Saturday activities at the
SRC. The modifications of the
event each year tie in from the
feedback students and family
members give each year.
"Every year, we try to present
some different events, outside
of our standard events that the
event revolves around including
the meal, concert and game
Iwata said.
Another new element this
year is having faculty members
present and helping host events.
Iwata said this started last year
o
Family Weekend
Friday, Sept 10
- Art exhibit gallery exhibit open-
ing In Mendenhall at 4 p.m.
- Pirate pep rally at 6 p.m. with
coach Thompson, cheerleaders
and marching band at 6 p.m.
- Jazz concert - new this year, In
Hendrtx Theater at 7 pm $5student
- Free bowling and billiards from
8 p.m. -10 p.m
- From 9 pm - 11 p.m. in
and received positive response.
"What we discovered is that
families want to know who their
sons' or daughters' instructors
are Iwata said.
The event is meant to be
inclusive and include anyone
from families of ECU students.
Iwata said the event was origi-
nally called "parents weekend
it has been changed to "family
weekend" in an effort to make
the event more inclusive and not
restricted to only parents.
"Generally, from year to
year, we get close to about 2,000
attendants families come from
all over New York, New Jersey,
Virginia and North Carolina
Iwata said.
The event also gives the
parents the chance to reconnect
with their children.
"I think the students benefit
from having their families here
for various reasons Iwata said.
Iwata said students and
their families also get to do
other activities outside of ECU
including dining and shopping
together.
Iwata said the event is over-
all well received each year by
students, family members and
ECU.
"People appreciate the fact
that the university presents an
event like this that is family-ori-
ented and gives them a chance
to interact with the university
faculty and staff Iwata said.
"We encourage all of our
Mendenhall there is an open mic
night and bingo In Mendenhall
Dining Hall.
-Student Union Is hosting a foam
dance party outside from
9 p.m. - 12p.m.
- Midnight movie In Hendrtx
Theater
Saturday, Sept 11
- At 9:30 p.m. The SRC Is offering
a free family pass and is holding
various events Including a power
walk, an aerobic workout
and aqua fitness training
campus community to get
involved this is a collective
endeavor. Even students who
don't have their family visiting
this weekend, these activities are
open to everybody
Cody Squibb, freshman
undecided major, said he feels
the event is a great opportunity
and his family is more than likely
coming.
"I think it's a great way for
the family to see what their kids
are involved with in college life
I think it allows everyone to
have a little fun, get away from
the homework and be able to
interact with other people said
Squibb.
Squibb said the main event
he is looking forward to is the
football game.
Amanda Smith, freshman
nursing major said she is unsure
if her parents are going to make it
for the event, but she thinks they
will benefit if they do attend.
Smith said she feels the event
is important because it allows
parents to learn more about ECU
if they were unable to attend
orientation.
"It also gets the students
and parents together unites
them within the school. The
parents should be involved in
the child's education and know
what is going on with them
said Smith.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
- Open house from 10 a.m. to
noon at both the SRC, Student
Professional Development
and the Science and Technology
building. Each different location
provides different Information
about different parts of campus.
- From 4 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. there Is
a pirate buffet hosted by
faculty and staff of ECU. Tickets
must be purchased In advance
- At 6:30 there Is a pirate spirit
rally before the game.
- ECU v. Wake Forest at 7p.m.
Pee Dee the Pirate welcomes students and their families in ECU'S family weekend game.
Brody surgeon receives
two national awards
Fraternity Rush at ECU begins
Accomplishments get
recognition for ECU
KRISTIN DAY
STAFF WRITER
Dr. W. Randolph Chitwood,
president of the Society for Heart
Valve Disease, founder of the
University Medical Health Center
and senior associate vice chan-
cellor, received several promi-
nent national awards this past
summer.
His first award is called
the Harken Award and pre-
sented by Mended Hearts, a
nonprofit organization
affiliated with the American
Heart Association.
Tim Eisner, director of mar-
keting and communications for
Mended Hearts, said the Harken
Award is their most prestigious
award and is only presented
every two years. The award
is presented in honor of the
founder of Mended Hearts and
cardiovascular surgery pioneer,
Dr. Dwight Harken.
"Chitwood was chosen
because of his dedication to
cardiovascular health and his
expertise in complex valvular
surgery said Eisner.
According to Mended Hearts'
biography on Chitwood, he is
one of the nation's preeminent
cardiothoracic surgeons and a
noted researcher in the field of
cardiac surgery.
Chitwood also received the
Phi Kappa Phi National Scholar
award in Albuquerque.
Dr. Ronald Nowaczyk, presi-
dent of ECU'S Phi Kappa Phi
chapter, said this award is only
given out every three years. The
recipients must demonstrate the
ideals of the society through
their activities, achievements and
scholarship.
"These awards really come
see BRODY page A3
i'K I z.At �1K
Fraternity
RUS"
28-47
EX 9
dm
Banner displays fraternities participating in this week's rush.
ADRIANNA DRAKE
STAFF WRITER
Rush for social fraternities is
being held this week from Tues-
day, Sept. 7 - 10 and is offering
membership opportunity to all
male ECU students.
Jim Strieker, recruitment
director of this year's fall semes-
ter fraternity rush, said a number
of changes have taken place in
the process which he hopes will
improve the overall recruitment
process. During the first two
nights, all of the men interested
in rushing are meeting at the
Wright Auditorium at 7 p.m
where they will hear several
different speakers including
Strieker, Terry Gore, president of
the Interfraternity Council and
Ion Outterbridge, the director of
Greek life.
The group will also view a
slide show and numerous pho-
tographs educating them about
rush and Greek life in general
at ECU.
They will then be broken up
into several groups, and taken to
all of the different rush locations
of each fraternity over the course
of the two nights. This will allow
each person to see what each
organization has to offer, Strieker
said. ECU buses are providing
transportation for these nights.
During Thursday and Friday
nights, a more informal rush
is taking place, where students
interested are free to travel to
any fraternity's rush location
they choose. Students can begin
the rush process on these nights
if they did not attend the formal
rush nights.
Transportation during these
nights is up to each individ-
ual fraternity. Strieker said he
encourages every male student
to participate in this year's fall
rush and take advantage of what
Greek life has to offer. He said he
feels people should look beyond
the stereotypes that exist today
about fraternities and give the
Greek system a chance.
"Every group of people has
its stereotypes a lot of the ste-
reotypes of fraternities that exist
come from the 1970s and 1980s
and no longer hold true today
Strieker said.
Gore agreed with Strieker and
said fraternities offer numerous
benefits for any individual look-
ing to seek them.
"Greek life gives you network-
ing experience, academic experi-
ence and the ability to utilize
your strong leadership skills
Gore said.
Gore said the leadership skills
of the Greek system are prevalent
among ECU'S campus, with many
of the past Student Government
Association presidents being
see RUSH page A3
Project HEART receives federal grant, looks to expand
Program helps at risk
teens in local counties
KRISTIN DAY
STAFF WRITER
Project HEART, a program
designed to help at risk teenag-
ers who are struggling with their
schoolwork, recently received a
$578,000 grant from the federal
government to broaden its service.
Project HEART (High Expec-
tations for At Risk Teens) is a
tutoring program incorporated
within ECU'S College of Educa-
tion.
When local schools discover
a student is having difficulty,
they advise Project HEART and
match the student with a tutor.
Each tutor works with an average
of 10 students.
AmeriCorps, a program
approved by former President
Bill Clinton in 1993 to help
support projects in education,
health, environment and safety,
provided the grant.
Betty Beacham, director of
Project HEART, said the addi-
tional funding would allow
for more staff and members to
help as many children as pos-
sible.
"The increase in funding is
really to put as many tutors out
in the field to make a difference
said Beacham.
College student members are
required to complete 900 hours
of community service to receive a
$5,000 non-taxable living allow-
ance. They are also eligible for an
extra $2,363 once they complete
all the hours and other compo-
nents of the program.
High school students must
complete 300 hours and receive
a $1,000 scholarship. They also
are eligible to receive credit for
an elective class while they tutor
during the day.
Aside from the scholarship
money, members and staff have
other reasons for joining Proj-
ect HEART. Yolanda Mitchell
currently attends ECU, but has
been a member since she was in
high school.
"I felt that this would be good
exposure for my future goals of
being a teacher said Mitchell.
"I wanted to make a differ-
ence in the lives of young chil-
dren, especially those at risk
Some students begin the pro-
gram with different career plans,
but leave wanting to pursue a
career In teaching.
"We have had some of
our members who never even
thought about teaching, after
being involved in this program,
have gone back or changed
their majors and now they are
getting a degree to go back in the
classroom Beacham said.
Amanda Hodges, program
coordinator for AmeriCorps
Project HEART, decided to work
with the program because she has
a history of community service and
liked the ideals of Project HEART.
"Community service has
been a large part of my life said
Hodges.
"This position gave me an
opportunity to do work with
students and work with others
in education
Quanteria Cooper, a member
of Project HEART, said she has
gained much more respect for
teachers since she began tutoring.
"I used to think that it was so
easy and that they took their jobs
for granted said Cooper.
"Trying to steer kids into the
right path and to help them to
become more academically suc-
cessful is not an easy task, and
it takes a lot of time, love and
patience
Beacham said Project HEART
is a win-win situation for both the
children and the ECU community.
However, Cooper said that
working for Project HEART is not
always easy.
"Anytime you work with kids,
you're going to have those rough
times Cooper said.
"Most of the time, if you're
in it for the right reasons, it
will always turn out to be very
rewarding for both the project
member and the tutee
Any person over age 17 is eli-
gible to apply for Project HEART,
but there is no age limit on who
can become a member. Each
applicant must complete an inter-
view, and if they have enough
time and fit a certain profile, they
can be chosen to participate.
Project HEART works with
Pitt County, as well as local
areas such as Beaufort and Rocky
Mount. The program is always
expanding. Beacham said she
has received calls from schools
In Clinton and Wilson who are
interested in joining the pro-
gram.
"My goal if we continue
to be funded, is to provide this
kind of service to every child
in eastern North Carolina
Beacham said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
INSIDE I News: A2 I Comics: A4 I Opinion: A5 I Living: A6 I Sports: Bl





EWS
9-9-04
Page A2 news@theeastcarolinlan.com 252.328.6366
NICK HENNE News Editor KATIE KOKINDA Assistant News Editor
THURSDAY September 9,2004
CAMPUS NEWS
Fraternity Rush
Fraternity Rush will be Tuesday,
Sept. 7 - Friday, Sept. 10. ECU
busses will provide any person
interested in joining a fraternity
transportation to each fraternity's
rush location on Tuesday and
Wednesday. Busses will stay at all
of the 17 locations for 20 minutes.
On Thursday and Friday, students
are free to go to whatever fraternity
they like. Fraternities will provide
transport for these dates. Rush
begins at 7 p.m. each night.
Blngol
Evening of bingo is taking place
sponsored by the Student Union
in Mendenhall Dining Hall at 9:30
p.m. Free food and drink. Grand
prize is $100
Art Exhibit
Artistsculptor Kahll Bendlb
from Berkeley, Calif. Is putting
on an exhibit on campus in
the Mendenhall Student Center
Friday, Sept. 10 from 4 p.m. - 6
p.m.
Sorority Rush
Sorority Rush Is taking place
on Sept. 12 - 18. Buses will
transport anyone interested to
each sorority house. For more
Information, contact Amanda
Lewis. Late registration for sorority
recruitment is Sept. 11 from 5 p.m.
- 8 p.m. at 224 at the Greek office
In Mendenhall 224.
Pirate Pep Rally
The ECU Marching Band,
Cheerleaders and Coach
Thompson are conducting a rally
at Mendenhall Student Center
at 6 p.m. (Event is cancelled if
It rains)
Screenings provided
The college of education is
conducting screenings in the
ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic
at Belk Annex 1 at the School of
Allied Health Sciences, near the
intersection of Charles Street and
the 264 bypass. No appointment
Is needed. Sign In begins at 4:45
p.m. and ends at 5:45 p.m. at the
west entrance of the clinic. Must
sign up prior to 5:45.
Campus Safety Week
Campus safety week is taking
place next week put on by the
Student Government Association.
A table is going to be set up in the
Wright Place all week conducting
surveys, a Campus safety walk
is being held Wednesday night
looking for areas of campus that
could use improved security and
a self defense class is being held
Thursday in Mendenhall.
Get a Clue
Get a Due, a student organizational
fair, will be Wednesday, Sept. 15
from 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. in the
Wright Place. Various student
organizations and activities are
taking place at this event enabling
students to learn more about
activities going on and become
more involved.
Try Scuba Event
The ECU Scuba Club Is offering an
opportunity for all ECU students
or faculty to Try Scuba" at Minges
dive pool. Event dates are Thurs.
Sept. 16, Wed. Sept. 29 and Oct.
13 from 8:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. All
equipment provided. Cost is $10.
Sign up Is required at least 3 days
prior to event. Contact Jason
Wright at JasonLWrlght gmail.
com or 328-7271 for more
information.
www.ecu.eduorgdlveclub
Chamber Music Festival
The Brentano String Quartet will
come to campus for their second
appearance in the Four Seasons
Chamber Music Festival on Friday,
Sept 24 in the A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall.
Film Series
The Travel-Adventure Film &
Theme Dinner Series opens at
Hendrix Theater on the main floor
of Mendenhall Student Center,
with Bavaria and the Black Forest
by Fran Reidelberger on Sunday,
Oct. 3 at 3 p.m.
News Briefs
Local:
Kerry takes attack against
outsourcing to North Carolina
GREENSBORO, NC - John Kerry is
promising North Carolina workers
he will fight the forces sending U.S.
jobs overseas, a timely topic in a
state losing jobs to the manufacturing
slump and international
competrtion.
"Because of George Bush's wrong
choices, this country is continuing
to ship good jobs overseas - jobs
with good wages and good benefits,
Kerry said in remarks prepared
for delivery at town hall meeting
Tuesday. "All across America,
companies have shut their doors,
putting hardworking people out of
a job, leaving entire communities
without help or hope
Kerry was taking his message about
jobs and outsourcing to a state with
industries vulnerable to international
competition, like textiles and apparel.
North Carolina is also a state that
the campaign sees as competitive
territory that could be tipped in Kerry's
direction, helped by having North
Carolina Sen. John Edwards as his
running mate.
Kerry hopes to capitalize on
statements made by Bush
administration officials to portray
the president as unsympathetic to
job losses caused by international
competition.
Labor Secretary Elaine Chao said
during the Republican convention
that "the anxiety belles the
numbers' that she said show foreign
companies create more jobs In
the United States than the
number lost to foreign workers.
Treasury Secretary John Snow
has said job outsourcing is an
aspect of trade that "makes
the economy stronger
Bush won North Carolina
easily four years ago,
yet with manufacturing
employment in the state
down more than 20 percent since
2001, economic woes have eaten
into Bush's popularity In the state.
NC voters still say economy, Jobs
key concern In the state
RALEIGH, NC (AP) - While the war on
terrorism Is the top national concern,
economy and jobs are the top priority
among North Carolina's voters,
according to a statewide poll.
The economy and outsourcing of
jobs topped the list when 600 likely
voters were asked, "What is the
most important issue facing North
Carolina?" according to the poll,
conducted by the Maryland-based
polling firm Research 2000 for The
News & Observer of Raleigh, WRAL-
TV In Raleigh and WUNC radio In
Chapel Hill.
Thirty-five percent of those polled
said the economy and jobs were
the most important Issue In the
state. Taxes and state spending (23
percent), health care (19 percent)
and education (18 percent) were the
other key issues In the poll, which
was conducted statewide Monday
through Wednesday of last week.
The- poll has a margin of sampling
error of no more than plus or minus
4 percentage points.
North Carolina has lost thousands
of jobs during a downturn In the
technology sector that began about
three years ago. Thousands more
jobs have been lost as textile mills
closed or laid off workers.
SDH, August was North Carolina's sixth
consecutive month of job growth
and the state has added 57,300 jobs
this year, sixth best In the nation.
The state's seasonally adjusted
unemployment rate fell to 5 percent
in July from a high of 7.0 percent In
April 2002, according to the state
Employment Security Commission.
Nation:
Kerry says Bush broke promises,
set wrong course In Iraq
CINCINNATI (AP) - John Kerry, at the
site where President Bush described
Iraq as a threat to the United States,
was arguing the president left a trail
of broken promises on the path to war
and squandered money that could be
put to better use at home.
"George W. Bush's wrong choices
have led America In the wrong
direction on Iraq and left America
without the resources we need here
at home the Democratic presidential
candidate said in remarks prepared
for delivery Wednesday. 'I would
not have made the wrong choices
that are forcing us to pay nearly the
entire cost of this war - more than
$200 billion that we're not Investing
In education, health care and job
creation here at home
The speech showed Kerry shifting
from a defensive stance, fending off
charges of Inconsistencies on the
war, to an aggressive challenge of
Bush's decisions In the run-up and
aftermath of war.
Unking the choice to go to war with
its budgetary consequences, Kerry
sought to tie Iraq to health care,
education, jobs and other areas
where Kerry says the administration
followed a misguided path.
"While we've spent that $200 billion in
Iraq, 8 million Americans are looking
for work - 2 million more than when
George W. Bush took office - and
we're told that we cant afford to invest
in job training and job creation here
at home Kerry said.
"He doesn't believe that America can
be strong In the world while we also
make progress here at home. He
believes we have to choose one or
he other. That's a false choice, and
I reject It"
Cheney says'wrong
choice' on Election Day
would risk terrorist attack
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) - Vice
President Dick Cheney says the
United States will risk another terrorist
attack if voters make the wrong choice
on Election Day, suggesting Sen.
John Kerry would follow a pre-Sept
II policy of reacting defensively.
"It's absolutely essential that eight
weeks from today, on Nov. 2, we make
the right choice, because if we make
the wrong choice then the danger Is
that we'll get hit again and well be hit
In a way that will be devastating from
the standpoint of the United States
Cheney told supporters at a town-hall
meeting Tuesday.
Democrats reacted quickly.
"Dick Cheney's scare tactics crossed
the line today, showing once again that
he and George Bush will do anything
and say anything to save their jobs
said a statement issued by vice
presidential candidate John Edwards.
�Protecting America from vicious
terrorists is not a Democratic or
Republican Issue and Dick Cheney
and George Bush should know that.
John Kerry and I will keep America
safe, and we will not divide the
American people to do It
If Kerry were elected president Cheney
said the nation would risk falling back
intoa"pre-911 mind-set" that terrorist
attacks are criminal acts that require
a reactive approach. Instead, he said
Bush's offensive approach works to
root out terrorists where they plan
and train, and pressure countries that
harbor terrorists.
Cheney pointed to Afghanistan as a
success story in pursuing terrorists
although the Sept. 11 mastermind,
Osama bin Laden, remains at large.
In Iraq, the vice president said,
the United States has taken out a
leader who used weapons of mass
destruction against his own people
and harbored other terrorists.
"Saddam Hussein today is In jail,
which Is exactly where he belongs
Cheney said.
Bush on Tuesday accused Kerry of
changing positions on the Iraq war
by adopting the language of one-time
presidential candidate Howard Dean
when Kerry called the conflict "the
wrong war in the wrong place at the
wrong time
World:
Southwestern China
begins cleanup from
floods that killed at least 161
SHANGHAI, China (AP) - Rain-soaked
residents of southwestern China
began digging out Wednesday after
floods and landslides that killed at
least 161 people, while authorities
warned of further rains over parts of
the disaster area.
Days-long showers had stopped
over Sichuan province's hard-hit
Dazhou area, where the death
toll stood at 89, with 41 missing
and about 10,000 people sick
and injured, said He Rongjun, a
spokesman for the provincial disaster
relief office.
In sprawling Chongqing municipality
just east of Sichuan, 72 people were
dead and 23 missing, the official
Xinhua News Agency reported.
However, he said meteorologists
have warned at least three major
storms will strike in coming weeks,
and that authorities were alert for
further damage.
"Even though the rain has stopped,
we will not be moving any rescue
workers from the front line so soon
he said by telephone from Sichuan's
capital, Chengdu.
Authorities put the enormous
Three Gorges hydroelectric project
on alert as flood crests passed
through the swollen Yangtze River.
Navigation through the dam's locks
was suspended, although Xinhua
said traffic would be restored on
Thursday.
Summer rains wreak havoc across
the flood-prone Yangtze practically
every year, with torrents rushing down
denuded slopes to menace low lying
plains In central China.
Residents of Chongqing's
mountainous Kaixian county
were being allowed back
to homes devastated
by the floods and mudslides,
Xinhua said. The area accounted
for 54 of Chongqing's deaths.
More than 200 medical workers were
disinfecting the area and 18 disease
monitoring stations were being set up
to guard against outbreaks, Xinhua
said. Electricity was expected to
be restored to the entire county by
Wednesday.
California wild fires out of control
Los Angeles County firefighters work to control the blaze.
GEYSERVILLE, Calif. (AP)
� Firefighters were hampered
by erratic wind and low humid-
ity Monday as they made slow
progress against a fire that had
burned nearly 12,000 acres and
four homes in the Northern Cali-
fornia wine country.
The fire, which started Friday
northeast of Sonoma County,
had been 20 percent contained,
and full containment was not
expected until Wednesday, said
Janet Marshall, spokeswoman for
the state Department of Forestry
and Fire Protection.
The unpredictable wind and
dry vegetation, compounded by
uneven and often steep terrain,
made the situation dangerous
for the 1,875 firefighters, Mar-
shall said.
"These are very erratic winds,
which can be blowing perpen-
dicular to one another she said.
"You never know where they're
coming from, and that's a huge
safety concern for firefighters
A layer of moist air was
expected in the area Tuesday
morning, Marshall said. "If we
get through the dry night, we
can exhale tomorrow morning
she said.
Six firefighters had been
injured, but none critically.
In addition to the four homes,
eight outbuildings and 12 cars
had been destroyed. About 40
residents had been evacuated
from the area, about 60 miles
north of San Francisco, including
occupants of six homes ordered
evacuated Monday morning,
Marshall said.
Others living in the area
were urged to have evacuation
plans ready because the blaze
was threatening 200 other houses
and five businesses.
The fire also threatened
major power lines from 21 gen-
erating plants in the Geysers, the
world's largest geothermal power
facility.
On Saturday, two-thirds of
the plants and two transmission
lines were shut down, said Kent
Robertson, a spokesman for Cal-
pine Corp which owns the lines.
The company rerouted electricity
from other plants, and no outages
were reported.
The Geysers has major power
lines from 21 generating plants
crossing over rugged terrain
near the fire, and that creates
the possibility of blackouts, said
Kent Robertson, a spokesman for
Calpine Corp.
In San Diego County, fire-
fighters put out a brush fire that
consumed 65 acres in the San
Pasqual Valley. Several homes
had been threatened, but no
structures were damaged.
Accidental explosion started panic
that led to end of hostage situation
MOSCOW (AP) � The mili-
tants who raided a school in
southern Russia last week were
led by a man dubbed the Colonel,
who enforced obedience by kill-
ing three fellow attackers - two
by detonating the explosives they
had strapped to their bodies.
Two days later, the attackers
were moving the explosives they
rigged around the gym where
hundreds of hostages were held,
and a bomb went off accidentally.
That began the spiral of panic
that led to the bloody conclusion
of the standoff, in which more
than 320 people were killed.
Those details were among
several disclosed by Prosecutor-
General Vladimir Ustinov on
Wednesday, in the government's
first formal attempt to account
for the tragedy last week. It
came as Russia offered more
than $10 million for informa-
tion that helps "neutralize" two
well-known rebel leaders from
breakaway Chechnya accused of
planning the attack.
Ustinov, who met with Presi-
dent Vladimir Putin, said 326
hostages had been killed and 727
wounded in the attack, which
ended Friday in a wave of explo-
sions and gunfire as hostages
tried to flee, and special forces
and armed civilians tried to help
them. He said 210 of the bodies
had been identified, and foren-
sic workers were also trying to
identify 32 body fragments. The
death toll could rise, said Ustinov.
Various officials had previ-
ously leaked some details of the
investigation, but the govern-
ment had not set out its own
version of events until now.
The approximately 30 attack-
ers, including two women, had
gathered in a forest early on the
morning of Sept. 1 and arrived
at School No. 1 in Beslan in a
military-type truck and two
jeeps, packed with weapons and
ammunition, Ustinov said.
They herded people who had
gathered to mark the first day of
school to the gym. Some of the
militants objected to seizing a
school, and their leader, who
went by the name Colonel, shot
one of them. He said he would do
the same to any other militants
or hostages who did not show
"unconditional obedience
Later that day, he detonated
the explosives worn by two
female attackers, killing them, to
enforce the lesson, Ustinov said.
One of the militants was sta-
tioned with his foot on a button
that would set off the explosives,
Ustinov said. If he lifted his foot,
the bombs strung up around the
school gymnasium would deto-
nate, he said.
On Friday, the militants
decided for unknown reasons
to reposition the explosives, and
apparently set off one bomb
by mistake, Ustinov said. That
sparked panic, as hostages tried
to flee, and the attackers opened
fire.
That led Russian forces to
storm the building.
Ustinov said his information
was based on interviews with
witnesses and the one alleged
attacker who has been confirmed
detained, Identified as Nur-Pashi
Kulayev. Officials believe the
attack In the city of Beslan was
orchestrated by militants from
breakaway Chechnya.
Ustinov's deputy, Sergei Fri-
dinsky, said that the bodies of 12
of the attackers had been identi-
fied, and that some of them had
taken part in a June attack in the
neighboring Russian republic of
Ingushetia that targeted police
and killed 88 people.
Some 1,200 hostages had been
taken at the school, Ustinov said.
It was the first official admission
that the number of hostages had
been so high - initially, the gov-
ernment said about 3S0 people
had been seized, and over the
weekend, a regional official said
the number had been 1,181.
Ustinov's report came as
the Federal Security Service,
the main successor to the KGB,
offered more than $10 million
for information leading to the
arrests of Shamil Basayev and
Asian Maskhadov.
The FSB said they had been
responsible for "Inhuman ter-
rorist acts on the territory of the
Russian Federation
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9-9-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
Rush
from page A1
Lacoste Trunk Show
Men's, Ladies, &c Children
Thursday 8c Friday
September 9th & 10th
Coffman's LACOSTE Red Banks Rd
Eastbrook & Village Green
Apartments
We have what you need at a price you can afford
Live Off Campus and still have
$$$$ your pocket!
-1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartment homes priced just right
with a variety of floor plans & convenient locations!
-FREE cable TV & water!
-3 swimming pools & ECU bus service!
-24-hr. maintenance & 24-hr. laundry facilities!
-Small pets are welcome, too!
-Best of all, our values range from
$350 to $595 PER APARTMENT, NOT PER PERSON
Call or visit us today & ask about
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www.eastbrookvillagegreen.com
Greek members.
Ion Outterbridge, director of
Greek life, said Greek organiza-
tions are strong academically
holding a 90 percent graduation
rate. In the spring of 2004, the
average GPA for Greek members
was at 2.773, which is higher
than average of ECU's general
population of students.
Another benefit of involve-
ment in Greek organizations
is the opportunity to apply for
various scholarships.
Each Greek organization,
whether classified as social or
service, is very much the same.
They all like to have parties and
meet new friends, but they also
like to volunteer and raise money
for various non-profit organiza-
tions throughout Greenville and
Pitt County, Outterbridge said.
According to Outterbridge,
each organization has its own set
rt
Fraternity Rush
Rush Schedule:
Tues, Sept. 7 through Frt. Sept. 10
Formal Recruitment was held on
Tuesday and Wednesday
evenings. Rushees met at
Wright Auditorium at 7p.m. to view
slide show of all fraternities and
be Introduced to Ion Outterbridge.
Terry Gore and other Executive
board members of the Interfrater-
nlty Council.
Afterwards, rushees began to
visit fraternity rush locations by
provided transportation. Buses will
requirements from its National
Office on the number of service
hours that must be completed
each term.
There are also those benefits
that people on the outside world
do not see; the bonds that are
built, the brothers that are made
for life and the chance to learn
responsibility and leadership
skills for the many years beyond
college, Outterbridge said.
Nick Genty, president of
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity, said
he agrees there is much avail-
able to students who choose to
participate in Greek life.
While pledging, each
organization wants to make
sure their members keep their
grades up and put schooling first,
Genty said. Academic assistance
and tutors are available to any
student who is struggling.
"Being Greek gives you
visit houses on Fifth St and Tenth
St These will be split up between
Tuesday and Wednesday. Rush will
end at approximately 11p.m.
Informal Recruitment Is taking
place Thursday and Friday nights.
On these nights, rushees will be
free to visit any house of their
choosing to learn more. Transpor-
tation will be provided
by the Individual organizations.
To learn more about Rush or any
Greek organization, visit
www.greekecu.edu
Fraternities within the Interfrater-
nlty Council:
many connections in the
corporate world it gives
you a chance to get involved
in intramurals, homecoming
extracurricular activities
Genty said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
o
Fraternity Rush
Approximately 80 students regis-
tered for formal recruitment.
Fraternities may give "snap bids
granting students membership
after the formal recruitment period.
Students with questions can call the
Interfratemlty Council at 328-4706.
Beta Theta Pi
Chi Phi
Delta Chi
Delta Sigma Phi
Kappa Alpha Order
Kappa Sigma
Lambda Chi Alpha
Phi Kappa Psl
Phi Kappa Tau
Pi Kappa Alpha
Pi Kappa Phi
Sigma Alpha Epsllon
Sigma Nu
Sigma Phi Epsllon
Sigma PI
Tau Kappa Epsllon
Theta Chi
Brody
from page A1
to the institution, not the indi-
vidual said Chitwood.
Chitwood is currently a
faculty member of Phi Kappa
Phi and won the 2003 South-
east Region Scholars Awards.
He said he won mainly due
to his work with the da Vinci
Surgical System.
Chitwood said da Vinci is a
development in robotic surgery
that began in the 1990s. Under
this surgery system, instead of
making a large incision and
leaving the patient with what he
calls a "zipper" down his chest,
da Vinci enables the surgeon to
make a small incision under the
breast and work with robotic
instruments to operate.
Nowaczyk said it was an
easy decision to nominate Chit-
wood again for the national
award. Chitwood was selected
unanimously by the chap-
ter's executive committee.
"Dr. Chitwood is an aca-
demic and clinical superstar
his level of scholarly productivity
is even more impressive in the
light of his extensive administra-
tive responsibilities Nowaczyk
said in the nomination letter.
Chitwood accepted the
award at the 2004 Phi Kappa
Phi National Convention.
Nowaczyk said that out of all the
presenters, Chitwood received
the only standing ovation.
As the National Scholars
Award recipient, Chitwooctjlso
receives $5,000.
He said the money will prob-
ably go toward research, but the
award is not about money - it's
about the recognition.
"He has brought recogni-
tion and prestige to the uni-
versity Nowaczyk said.
"Simply put, The Eastern
Carolina Cardiovascular Center
would not even be on the table
except for Dr. Chit wood's efforts
Phi Kappa Phi is the oldest
honor society open to all aca-
demic disciplines. According
to the society's Web site, about
34,000 people are initiated each
year.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Skit Competition in Hendrix Theater
Wedriesday, October 6

Pirate Picnic at Todd Dinning Hall
Midnight Movie: Psycho Beach Party in Hendrix Theater
Thifrsday, October 7
Pirate Fest Beach Party, Mendenhall Brickyard
Midnight Nljbvie: Psycho Beach Party
iday, October 8
�ecomiifg Parade down 5th Street
Family Faft Tales from Around the World at Wright
BEtTTULANE(2pm)
"Saturday, October 9
information, call the Student Government Office at 328-4726
Sponsored by the Student Government Association





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edltor@theeastcarollnian.com 252.328.6366
AMANDA Q. UNGERFELT Editor in Chief
THURSDAY September 9,2004
Our View
Saturday, two men were shot and killed while
they were tailgating before a North Carolina
State University football game, reinforcing just
what can happen when a situation becomes
out of control.
According to eyewitnesses, Kevin McCann of
Chicago and 2nd Lt. Brett Harman, a Camp
Lejune Marine, noticed two men recklessly
driving around the tailgating field. McCann
and Harman approached the drivers, brothers
Timothy Johnson and Tony Johnson, and a
fight ensued.
Eyewitnesses said about a half hour later,
the Johnson brothers came back looking for
McCann and Harman, armed with a gun.
The Johnson brothers are currently being held
in jail without bond. Each faces two counts of
first-degree murder.
Wednesday, two more arrests were made in I
conjunction with the murders. Ashley Brown
of Tarboro and Rachel Louise French of Apex �
were both charged with accessory after the fact
to murder, for attempting to help the Johnson j
brothers escape arrest.
Both the suspects and the families of the
deceased are continuing to dispute the exact
events of the day, however there is no escap-
ing the facts. Because of this incident, two
men are dead, four people are being held in
jail, families are destroyed ,and the security of
a once carefree public event has now forever
been compromised.
A situation like this could have occurred on
any tailgating field, on any given game day.
Granted, this was one isolated incident, but it
reminds us that we can never be too careful
- even during tailgating, a ritual enjoyed by
many here at ECU.
With the first home game approaching in a few
short days, TEC would like to remind students,
faculty, staff and Pirate fans alike to be aware of
your surroundings and to stay as safe as pos-
sible. If you notice conflict arising or something
suspicious happening, please notify the police
patrolling the tailgating fields.
We regret that a tradition as simple and as inno-
cent as tailgating has turned into yet another
reason to be jaded and cautious, however
the incident at NCSU proves that we need to
become more aware of our surroundings.
Our Staff
Nick Henne
News Editor
Robbie Den-
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Nina Coefleld
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Katie Kokinda
Asst. News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Asst Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst Sports Editor
Rachel Landen
Special Sections Editor
Herb Sneed
Asst Photo Editor
Alexander Marclnlak Jenny Hobbs
Web Editor Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
252.328.6366
252.328.6558
252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the i
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editor@theeastcarolinian.com or to The East
Carolinian, Student Publications Building, Greenville,
NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more
information. One copy of TEC is free, each additional
copy is $1.
Opinion Colunmist
Bush: War on Terror is unwinnable
Admission or Freudian slip?
PETER KALAJIAN
OPINION WRITER
Last week, in an interview with
Matt Lauer, President Bush stated that
the current War on Terror is an unwin-
nable proposition. Now, the last thing
that President Bush wants to look like is
a flip-flopper, considering the national
Republican campaign to paint the Presi-
dents Democratic rival, John Kerry, as
precisely that. Heading off a looming
press nightmare before the quote hit
the AP and was transmitted all over
the country, Bush's top handlers were
quick to assert that the President had
misspoken, a Freudian slip. These same
political Svengalis were also quick to
point out there would be no major
shift in U.S. policies concerning the
international War on Terrorism, despite
what the leader of the free world had
said on camera to a respected member
of the journalistic community. The
entire quote was a mistake.
Mistake? Pish Posh. The man has
finally come to his senses. Perhaps not
entirely, but I think that Matt Lauer was
lucky enough to be present during one
of Bush's rare and shocking moments
of thoughtfulness, or as alcoholics refer
to them, moments of clarity. For one
amazing moment, the skies opened
up; the Earth came into perfect align-
ment with Jupiter, and Bush thought
before he spoke. Sinte it contradicts
everything that the War on Terror
has come to mean in this country, his
advisors quickly wrote the comment off
as another one of Bush's grammatical
mistakes (a perfectly reasonable expla-
nation, considering the President's
penchant for butchering the English
language beyond recognition during
speeches and interviews), and changed
the subject. Call it what you like: Alle-
gorical mistake, slip of the tongue,
whatever. Deep inside the President's
psyche, at that very moment, I wit-
nessed an awakening. Subconsciously,
the man finally admitted to himself
that his much lauded "international
War to stamp out terror" was a failure
before its inception. The U.S. military
could just as easily succeed in stamping
out evil, mean people, bad fashion or
Carrot top. Just like international ter-
rorism, these things exist as long as the
cultures which support them exist.
With the conflicts in Iraq and
Afghanistan dragging the United States
economy deeper into debt by the day,
and with no foreseeable end to either
situation in sight, Bush will do his best
over the course of the next few months
to convince us that these problems are
getting better. He will try and tell us
that by being vigilant, and never giving
up, and plodding forward regardless
of the cost, both internationally and
domestically, that Iraq will soon be a
shining democratic republic amidst
a sea of tyrannical Islamic dictator-
ships. That the people of Afghanistan
will be as free as Americans and the
fundamentalist social structures of
these countries will come crashing
down, replaced instead with good, old
fashioned American freedom.
Nonsense.
If President Bush had more than
a cursory understanding of interna-
tional politics and foreign relations,
or bothered to open his eyes and for
a moment glance about the world in
which we live, he would see that as well.
And I think that his little slip up on
Matt Lauer was nothing less than the
accidental verbalization of a fact that
everyone except the President and Vice
President seem to realize.
There is no way to win the War on
Terror, at least not by hitting it with the
sledge hammer that is the U.S. military.
Perhaps now that the president has
finally verbalized the reality of the
situation we will be able to explore new
options for approaching the worldwide
struggle against anti-Americanism
and the cancer of international ter-
rorism.
In My Opinion
Political facts get fuzzier as Election Day nears
(KRT) � In last year's movie Some-
thing's Gotta Give, Jack Nicholson tries
to explain his errant behavior as a suitor
to Diane Keaton:
"I've never lied to you. I've always
told you some version of the truth he
offers, weakly.
But, she protests: "Truth doesn't
have versions
Ah, Diane, wish you were right. But
sorry, in love, as many people know,
the truth often does have versions.
And people choose to believe what
they want to believe about what a lover
is saying or doing. It's a human foible
connected to being in love.
Unfortunately, politics is a lot like
love in this regard, and people act much
the same. Best example to date: The
different versions of Democratic presi-
dential nominee John Kerry's Vietnam
War record.
Another fresh example: two ver-
sions about the ability of this country
to win the war on terrorism - both
from the mouth of President Bush, one
day apart.
It's an election year, and Americans
know what that means. Voters have
been subjected through advertising
and campaign rhetoric to the usual non
issues, side issues, misstatements and
outright distortions. Most are some ver-
sion of the truth, loosely defined.
Whom can voters trust? Who
speaks the true truth? And how can
voters ever possibly know?
Absent guarantees, it seems most
Americans are choosing what to believe
based on their personal views of the
candidates themselves. Public opinion
polls show us to be an already polar-
ized country concerning our choices
in the presidential election, and the
Republicans haven't even finished their
nominating convention yet.
Some say that Kerry asked for a
dissection of his war record by making
his veteran status part of his resume to
serve as president.
Yet, the dissection that occurred
- by a GOP-connected veterans
group - has been countered by a claim
of inaccuracy that is backed up by
official records.
The Swift Boat Veterans for Truth, a
misnamed group if ever there was one,
bought air time to present their version
of the Democratic nominee's record.
They basically claimed Kerry was a
liar and a coward and did not deserve
the medals and honors he received for
valor in combat.
The Swift Boat Veterans for Truth
discredited the stories of other veter-
ans who actually served with Kerry in
the war, including one who says Kerry
saved his life by plucking him out of
the water under enemy fire.
In fact, one of Kerry's chief detrac-
tors on the war issue received a Bronze
Star for the very same action that
he now says Kerry fabricated. The
military's official version of what hap-
pened is incorrect, he says. I'm sure
his memory hasn't faded in all these
years.
Further, many Republicans now
say, the issue of military service isn't
Important in choosing a president. That
isn't what they said when Bill Clinton
ran for president, of course.
Clinton, a Democrat, was denounced
for eight years for choosing to evade
military service during the Vietnam
years.
So now the Democrats have a can-
didate who fits the requirements of
volunteering, showing up and putting
his life on the line. And Republicans
- all of a sudden - put down that ser-
vice as unimportant. Which version of
that doublespeak do Americans choose
to believe?
Speaking of Bush, this week he
confused Americans with his com-
ments on winning the terrorism war.
First, he says we can't and then he says
we can.
One of these statements probably
was a misstatement, and I am guessing
the first one. But it might have been
the most honest one, if you look at the
war on terrorism in the big picture. We
likely will be fighting against terrorism
for many decades to come.
But I figure those who support
the president do not want him going
around saying that the war on terror-
ism can't be won. So Bush's handlers
got to him, plotted a new statement,
and on Tuesday, the president reversed
course.
The election is not until November,
and it is just September. Lots more time
for "facts" and "records" to show up.
But because most Americans seem
to have made up their minds about
whom to believe and what to believe,
it is likely that we will just continue
batting "facts" back and forth. Likely
most voters won't be dislodged from
their favorite fellow.
That leaves the minority of unde-
cideds in key states to determine which
way this election will go. And the
campaign spinmeisters are going to be
very busy trying to appeal to them in
the coming weeks.
Hold your ears, cover your eyes, and
wait for incoming. More versions of the
truth are on the way.
Pirate Rant
Editor's note: The Pirate Rant is
an anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
sent to editor@theeastcarolinian.
com. The editor reserves the right
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.
Everyone's always got some-
thing to say - why? If you don't
like the way things are, get off
your lazy a and do something
about it.
BushCheney '04: Over a bil-
lion whoppers served.
President George W. Bush is
currently trying to get himself
and his party re-elected for the
2004-2008 term. Sorry, G.W
but I don't think a Presidency
promoting lies, exaggerations
and propaganda constitutes the
quality deserving a "President of
the United States" nod again.
Explain to me why men like
the Idea of just being "friends"
(and you know what I mean), as
long as they suggest it and as long
as the woman wants more. If you
can't handle a woman dictating
to you when she wants you the
same way you do her, then don't
suggest being friends.
If STDs are cool, ECU is the
place to be.
What's up with everyone and
their huge gold umbrellas? Every
time it rains I feel like it is more
of a challenge to dodge the big
umbrellas than it is to try and
keep dry.
What is it with the men in
eastern North Carolina? Most
don't speak unless spoken to and
half of them seem easily intimi-
dated by strong-willed women.
What is it? Is every man around
here so used to the woman being
the one in control that they can't
think for themselves? Let me give
those men that fall in this cat-
egory a little advice - open your
mouth, and get a little aggressive.
Some of us appreciate a man that
knows what he wants and doesn't
mind saying it.
To the sorority on the corner
of Elm and 10th Streets, I under-
stand that watering your new
lawn is important, but when the
sprinklers are hitting the cars on
the road instead of the lawn, I
don't think they are doing much
good. If I wanted to wash my car
I would have taken my car to a
car wash.
Yay! "The Apprentice" is
back for a second season! More
chances to see Donald Trump's
wacky hair!
Am I the only one, or does
anyone else think that the
dismissal of the Kobe Bryant case
is just a little too convenient? In
my opinion, Bryant never raped
the defendant but she saw an
opportunity to say so and get
some big bucks. Athletes get in
trouble often enough but no
more than anyone else. And
let's not forget that they can be
victims too.
jC
"It ain't normal
- and it's most men's
fantasy. I ain't ever
really got a kick out
of two women being
together at the same
time
- Pop star Usher, on
having a threesome





V LLLU
9-9-04
Page A6 features@theeastcarolinlan.com 252.328.6366 ROBBIE DERR Features Editor CAROIYN S
CAftDDRA
Assistant Features Editor THURSDAY September 9, 2004
National Election
Day is Now 2,
2004:
President and Vice President for
a four year term
U.S. Senators for a six year term
U.S. Representatives for a two
year term
The Presidential
Candidates are:
George W. Bush and Richard B.
Cheney (Republican)
John Kerry and John Edwards
(Democrat)
Ralph Nader and Peter Miguel
Camejo (Independent)
Register to Vote:
Online: Declareyourself.com
Mall: County Board of Elections
Public High Schools
Public Libraries
DMV: Drivers Ucense Examination
Offices
Deadline and
Requirements:
Application must be submitted 25
days before the election
Applicant must be a U.S. Citizen
Applicant must have been a
resident of NC for 30 days before
the election
Applicant must only be registered
to vote in one county or state
Healthy Hints:
Identify "hidden sugars" In your
diet In an attempt to cut calories.
These "hidden sugars such
as mayonnaise, mustard and
ketchup add calories that often
are not enjoyed enough to justify
the calories.
You should drink plenty of water
before, during and after exercising.
If you are dehydrated, you will not
be able to exercise as effectively
and your muscles will fatigue
earlier.
Alcohol affects the sleep cycle,
resulting In impaired learning and
memory.
Two to four cigarettes in a row
Increase blood fats 200-400
percent. The average smoker (30
cigarettes per day) has four to six
times the chance of having heart
disease.
Peanut Butter
Swirl Brownies
Brownie:
.1 14 cups all-purpose flour
34 teaspoon baking powder
�12 teaspoon salt
12cupbutterormargarine(1 stick)
4 ounces unsweetened chocolate
4 ounces semisweet chocolate
�1 12 cups sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
4 large eggs, lightly beaten
Peanut Butter
Swirl:
�1 cup creamy peanut butter
�13 cup sugar
4 tablespoons butter or margarine
2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
'1 teaspoon vanilla extract
�1 large egg
Directions:
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees
F. Grease 13" by 9" metal baking
pan.
2. Prepare Brownie: On waxed
paper, combine flour, baking
powder, and salt. In 3-quart
saucepan, heat butter and
chocolates over low heat until
melted, stirring frequently. Remove
saucepan from heat: stir in sugar.
Add vanilla and eggs; stir until
well mixed. Stir flour mixture into
chocolate mixture until blended.
3. Prepare Peanut Butter Swirl:
In medium bowl, with mixer at
medium speed, beat peanut
butter, sugar, butter, flour, vanilla
and egg until well blended
4. Spread 2 cups chocolate batter
In pan; top with 6 large dollops
of peanut butter mixture. Spoon
remaining chocolate batter over
and between peanut butter in 6
large dollops. With tip of knife,
cut and twist through mixtures to
create swirled effect
5. Bake brownie 30 to 35 minutes
or until toothpick inserted 2 inches
from edge comes out almost
clean. Cool in pan on wire rack.
6. When cool, cut brownie
lengthwise Into 4 strips, then
cut each strip crosswise into 6
pieces.
Recipe from Good Housekeeping
at wwwmagazines ivillage.com
goodhousekeeplng
2004 Election: Important or insignificant?
President Bush addresses a group of supporters at a rally.
Presidential candidate John Kerry poses in front of fans and well wishers at a rally.
Ways for students to
get involved in this
year's election
AMANDA WINAR
STAFF WRITER
Are you going to vote in the
upcoming Presidential Election?
According to the U.S. Census
Bureau 2000 Report, 68 percent of
18 to 24 year old citizens did not
vote in the last Presidential Election.
This statistic is the reason
many students like junior Maggie
O'Neill feel the upcoming Presi-
dential Election is important.
As a Chief of Staff of the
SGA, O'Neill said that "It is very
important for people (especially
young people) to vote because all
of the issues that are important in
this election will directly effect
how students get a job, what
social security each person will
get and who is going to war
Bonnie G. Mani, Ph.D of
the political science department
agrees that students need to vote
because the government affects
almost every aspect of a student's
life. Mani said things as simple as
buying gas and cigarettes from a gas
station could be changed depend-
ing on the governmental leader.
Although students know how
much the government affects
them, Mani said the reason many
18-24 year olds do not vote or
even register is because they are
"cynical about government in
general Mani notes that young,
eligible voters are at the age where
they have a driver's license, can
buy cigarettes and vote, yet can
not do things like buy the liquor
they want to drink. Mani also
said that many students simply
have a lack of information so
don't feel they are even informed
enough to vote.
Sophomore Julierent Lewis
said "I am not against voting for
our new president. I know it is
our civic duty, but I don't even
know that much about either of
the candidates. If I voted, I would
probably vote without really
knowing who I was voting for
Getting young voters
informed is one of the biggest
obstacles political leaders, educa-
tors and others face during this
Presidential Election. Peter L.
Francia, Ph.D of the political
science department said there
are many unbiased sources that
contain excellent information
about the candidates and presi-
dential election.
Web sites like Project Vote
Smart at www.Vote-smart.org,
and The Center for Responsive
Politics at www.Opensecrets.
org are two excellent Web sites
Francia recommends for students
wanting more information.
Television sources like MTV
and CNN have also begun to
devote more time and effort to
get eligible voters registered and
informed. There are currently
many news broadcasts and spe-
cials on television that can be
very informative for those stu-
dents who are looking for more
information on the candidates
and their platforms.
ECU's SGA is also doing its
part to get students informed and
registered to vote.
"Student Government Asso-
ciation is planning on registering
2004 voters by having voter regis-
tration booths at different events
on campus O'Neill said.
The last day to register to vote
for the Nov 2, 2004 Presidential
Election is Oct. 8. If students are
intrested in finding out how
they can register to vote, they
see VOTE page A8
Choose or Lose js going strong Fan fashions
are here
to stay
MTV's 20 Million
bud campaign
CAROLYN SCANDURA
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
The United States is one of
the few countries in the world in
which every gender and race have
the right to vote. Once a person Is
legally 18 years old, registering to
vote is their right as an American.
MTV, or Music Television, has
decided that not enough people
between the ages of 18 and 30
are voting. During the last presi-
dential election, only 18 million
young adults voted. Choose or
Lose 2004: Twenty Million Loud
is MTV's campaign which is pro-
moting political awareness and
voter mobilization.
Launched in 1992, the Choose
or Lose campaign is MTV's pro-
social approach to making young
people aware of the political
process and shows them that it
is possible to have their most
urgent political concerns voiced
to thousands of people. MTV
is confident that if 20 million
young people would vote, the
nation would realize that the 18-
30 age group does care about the
democratic process. The opinion
of MTV is well stated by EVP,
News and Production at MTV,
Dave Sirulnick. "Our campaign
will actively work to dispel a
number of misconceptions about
young people in America
"Twenty Million Loud will
serve as a call to action to prove
that young people are not apa-
thetic and actually vote in large
numbers for candidates from
both parties. This is a group of
voters that can swing elections
and must be taken seriously in
2004 said Sirulnick.
President of MTV and MTV2,
Van Toffler is very passionate
about Choose or Lose 2004.
"The goal of Choose or Lose
2004 and 20 Million Loud is
to give this enormous pool of
potential voters the tools they
need to make informed choices,
get involved in the political pro-
cess and become motivated to
make the ultimate choice in our
democracy said Toffler.
Toffler understands that
young people are becoming
much more politically aware
every day because of how the
dynamics of the United States has
changed recently.
"The political and social
environment of the past three
years has created an amazingly
active and informed group of
young voters w;th issues ranging
from the war on terror and the US
involvement in Iraq to education
and the economy Toffler said.
MTV.com has many features
to offer the young adult inter-
ested in voting this election year.
Users can register to vote in their
home state, get un-biased infor-
mation about the candidates and
join discussion forums to actively
discuss issues that plague young
people. The "vote smart" tab of
the MTV Choose or Lose 2004
Web site has information about
each candidate, issues from the
public agenda and links to an
election guide. Issues that the
"vote smart" tab address are: the
Students can go on the Choose or Lose Web site and voice their
opinions about the two candidates by adding their captions to
pictures found on the Web site like the picture above.
environment, gay rights, health
care, higher education, terror-
ism and many other important
topics.
MTV's Choose or Lose 2004 is
the first ever national campaign
that will offer an Online "Pre-
Lection" where young people
can cast their votes for president
in a simulated national election.
Along with being able to simulate
an election, anyone who registers
for the "Pre-Lection" can also
gain exclusive access to music
and videos.
Those who have registered
for "Pre-Lection" can also win a
chance to be on TRL, hang out
with an MTV VJ in New York
City and win CDsMTV gear.
"Pre-Lection" voting starts on Sept.
20, which allows young people
to be heard like never before.
MTV's Choose or Lose 2004
campaign slogan "20 Million
Loud" helps to represent a coali-
tion of youth organizations.
MTV's partners in Choose or Lose
2004 include Youth Vote Coali-
tion, the Hip-Hop Team Vote,
WWE's Smackdown Your Vote
Meetup.com, Project Vote Smart,
National Council of La Raza,
Black Youth Vote, Youth Service
America, the New Voters Project,
Youth Venture, CIRCLE Research,
the NAACP and Harvard Univer-
sity Institute of Politics.
Roger Green, a junior at ECU
has seen commercials on MTV
see CHOOSE page A7
O
FYI
On the Web:
www.mtv.comchooseorlose
- Register to Vote
- Learn about the candidates
- Learn about the Issues
- Register for the "Fre-LectJon"
Are you feeling heavy burdens of stress?
Stress vs. stress
management
REID DORSETT
STAFF WRITER
A study done by the Health
Resource Network shows that 75
percent of the population feels
stress weekly. Of those people,
half have said to feel moderate
to high levels of stress.
What is stress? 1 am sure you
have felt it before, but could you
define it? The counseling center
of the University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign defines
stress as "the 'wear and tear' our
bodies experience as we adjust
to our continually changing
environment
Stress affects everyone on a
daily basis. Chances are you are
feeling some sort of stress as you
read this article, possibly from a
quiz or a project. Not all stress is
bad, though. It can motivate you
to do well in school or other daily
activities.
"I feel that I do my best work
when I am under pressure or a
little bit of stress said Danny
Stiling, junior design and draft-
ing major.
The problem Is when stress
becomes more overwhelming.
Symptoms of overwhelming
stress may be physical, such
as headaches, irritability, skin
problems, fatigue, sleeping prob-
lems, muscle tension and eating
problems. Symptoms may also
be emotional, such as lack of
motivation, inability to focus,
nervousness and uncontrollable
crying. I am sure you have felt
some of these symptoms before.
Everyone feels stress differently,
though. Some feel tired and can't
eat, while some can't sleep and
feel no motivation for school.
It is important that when you
are feeling stressed that you learn
to manage and reduce that stress.
If you don't, stress will build up
and lead to worse problems, such
as emotional breakdowns and
even heart disease and strokes
caused from raised blood pres-
sure.
"Manage your time wisely,
don't study 247. You could study
some, then socialize a while, and
a planner definitely helps said
Ty wanna Jeffries, assistant direc-
tor for wellness education.
There are many ways to
relieve stress. The same way
that everyone feels stress differ-
ently, everyone finds relief from
stress differently. This takes
time and finding what works for
you. Experiment with exercise
and programs offered around
campus.
"Knowing your own body
and knowing what your signs
of stress are can help you know
the things you need to do to
relax said Valerie Kisler-Van
Reede, licensed psychologist for
see STRESS page A7
Styles students can
wear to school
or downtown
MARTHA HILL
STAFF WRITER
Unlike our friends to the
north, who have had nighttime
temperatures drop into the sixties,
we still have a few more weeks of
warm temperatures. Even so, it is
time to think about fall fashions,
as they are already in most stores.
So what are the "must haves" of
fall? Apparently the fashion gurus
state it is the Manolo Blahnik
pumps for the reasonable price of
$485. Now I am sure many of you
are asking yourselves, "what is a
Manolo Blahnik pump?" Perhaps
some of you that watched "Sex
and the City" on HBO would
know that Manolo's are shoes.
But what college student could
afford $485 for one pair of shoes?
I can only think of two, the Olsen
twins, who will be attending
NYU this fall. So, what can ECU
students wear, while on a budget,
and still look fashionable?
On the runways, many
women will see embellishments
on everything. Sweaters, belts,
shoes and purses will sparkle
with sequins and other orna-
mental elements. Broaches are
another glittering accent. You
can buy them new, but you may
want to ask your grandmother
or mother if they have any you
can use. The Salvation Army
and thrift stores are a wonderful
place to find these things for a
discounted price.
The main colors this season
are hues of purple or green.
Women will also see animal
prints and, believe it or not, pais-
ley is making a comeback.
Many new styles of skirts are
found in tweed and plaid fabrics.
The cut is penciled or flared
These are worn with fitted knit
tops. Pant styles haven't changed
much. They can be found in
tweeds, plaids and monochro-
matic colors.
To keep warm, fashion design-
ers have made many styles of
Shearling vests and coats. Pon-
chos and pullovers have already
been seen on campus. Belted
coats are another consideration
If you can't afford to buy a new
coat, many fashion designers
suggest updating fitted coats you
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9-9-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE A7
Your family has suddenly
grown by 23,724!
Timing your medical checkups Qtrpcc
These are the medical checkups and tests recommended
for healthy adults under age 50.
from page A6
j Women J Men
j J Complete physical 1 -3 years
f
J l Blood pressure
J -I
Tetanus, diphtheria
booster
Pelvic exam
1 -3 years
Every 10 years
Annu.illy
Pap smear
Annually
Breast exam
Annually
f,
j Total cholesterol
1 -5 years
n
J J Vision test, glaucoma Every 3 years
j J Digital rectal"
Annually
J l Hearing test
V Mammogram
j j Resting
Every 3 years
Annually
II
electrocardiogram
(EKG stress test tor adults
with hear I disoase risk lactors)
Once
Celebrate family Weekend with your
East Carolina family
and make Mom & Dad a part of it too!
Student Football
Ticket Pick-Up
Student tickets are available at ECU-
Dowdy Student Store, 9 am - 7 pm,
throush Thursday. ECU 1 Card
required.
Student tickets are also available at the
Mendenhall Student Center Ticket Office
and the Athletic Ticket Office. Hours at
those locations vary.
Store Hours:
Mon. - Thurs 7:30 am - 7 pm
Fri 7:30 am - 5 pm
Sat 11 am-3 pm
visit us at the Souvenir Shops at Dowdy-Flcklen
Stadium on home game days!
Som� medical organization!
recommend testing to
begin at age 50
"fcKammaiion ot rectum
and. m men rhaprorttaM
Souice US Preventive
Seivlces Task Force
American Collage nl
Obnteuioans and
Gynecologists
CM02KRT
Graphic Paul Trap
More tests or fewer?
These may warrant additional screening
and more or less frequent testing
� Lifestyle (drinking, smoking,
diet, unsafe behavior, etc )
� Occupation
� Family s medical history
� Advice of doctor
Choose
from page A6
about Choose or Lose 2004.
"The commercials make
you think but did not really
influence me because I was going
to vote regardless. Hopefully the
commercials and the campaign
will make people who never
thought about registering to
vote just go out and do it said
Green.
MTV reaches more than 8S
million homes across the U.S.
and was rated the number one
network for young adults, ages
18-34 last year. MTV Networks
also own and operate many other
popular cable stations such as
NickelodeonNick at Night, TV
Land, VH1, CMT and Spike TV.
Visit www.mtv.com
chooseorlose for more about
registering to vote, the
"Pre-Lection" or for
information about the
candidates. Americans who
are not part of the 18-30
crowd do not expect young
people to vote. Prove them
wrong by being informed about
the candidates and taking
advantage of your right to vote.
Register to vote on Nov. 2, Choose
or Lose.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
the Center for Counseling and
Student Development.
Activities that are recom-
mended by both the Counseling
Center and the Wellness Educa-
tion Center are things like medi-
tation, exercise and spending
time relaxing. It is important to
eat right and have good sleeping
habits. Eating and sleeping well
helps your body physically and
emotionally adjust to stress.
What are your stressors? Find
out what causes you to feel stress.
Don't ignore it. Confront it and
find out ways to manage through.
Slow breathing is an effective
way to bring your heart rate
down and help focus. It can also
help in reducing muscle tension
around the neck and shoulders.
Journaling may also help by
giving you an outlet to express
feelings. Find a way to laugh.
Watch a funny movie or spend
time with friends. Studies show
that laughter is one of the most
effective ways to reduce stress.
It is also important for you
not to turn to nicotine and
other stimulants, alcohol or
sex to relieve stress. You may
feel that they reduce stress,
but they lead to other stresses
that may make things worse
in the future. Stresses such as
addiction, binge drinking
and sexually transmitted
diseases can raise stress levels
even higher.
If you are feeling stressed
to where you can't handle it
or feel you don't know how to
deal with stress in general, please
feel free to contact the Center
for Counseling at 328-6661
or Wellness Education at
328-6794. They offer bro-
chures on stress management
and counseling. Don't let stress
get you down. Lead a healthy,
safe lifestyle.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Family Weekend Sale!
Get Mom, Dad, Grandma & Grandpa
into the Pirate Spirit. Take 25 OFF all
regular price family apparel, Thursday,
Sept. 9 - Saturday, Sept. 11.
No other discounts apply. Prior purchases excluded.
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Pirate Club Members: Check out our NEW
ARRIVALS! Take 25 OFF all resular price Pirate Club
apparel Thursday through Saturday!
Where to go (or help: Center
for Counseling and Student
Development 316 Wright
Building, 328-6661
Wellness Education, Student
Health Service, 328-6794
Wright Building (252) 328-6731 � www.studentstores.ecu.edu
tasK
ffitton-Chi Nu
� i
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m
��
�qst Coast Natives
American Fraternity In the Nation
since 1996 .
idbe apart of a brotherhood that strives in
and preserving the Native American way of
life.
September 9, 2004
Bate 1013 6pm-8pm
5hNative Culture
ig 4bf Al& the powwows held here at ECM
iffcbrohe6wf �t are
rhy, dqpefib aWwitt always be there to
help you do the right thing,
ste in many trtiandi Native American
events,
art of $&mmM0Y of leaders were failure is
at an option and successes the only way to go.

s.
.
X
Pledge Today
0WrWOW TIME
ntact: Brad Caudill
President of EXN
252-756-4706 (home)
� 252-903-8265 (cell)
kri220@mail.ecu.edu
s$)terrber14th
7PM
im�miim 1
msc brickyard
free salsa lessons, free food, live band





PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
9-9-04
Fashion
from page A6
I !
Ill
47
5 f
Page
already own with a sparkly belt.
For the fashion conscious men
on campus, the colors for shirts
are a combination of browns and
blues. These come in diamond
prints, stripes and checks. Many
men will be wearing narrow ties
with stripes or patterns. Very
ornate ties will be seen in stores
and can second as a conversation
piece at your next formal. Cargo
pants and khakis are always
popular, but it is suggested to
not use the side pockets in those
cargo pants. They are more for
decoration and don't hang well
when bulging with "cargo
Lastly, for the guys, many of
you will use denim jackets and
cardigans to stay warm. Fashion
designers stress it is a cardinal
sin to wear a denim jacket with
jeans. So gentlemen, don't be
a fashion victim.
Have ECU students really
given much thought to buying
clothes for this fall?
"No, not really said Derek
Hurdle, senior in finance.
"I like the polo's at Amber-
crombie and Fitch and J.Crew
Interestingly enough, he
commented that he does like
to shop but usually will go to
the bigger cities like Raleigh or
Norfolk, Va.
Courtney Johnson, a senior
in child life studies agreed. She
will often go to Raleigh.
"They have a bigger selec-
tion said Johnson.
Where can one shop in
Greenville? The Gap at Colonial
Mall is a good start. The Gap is
promoting individual styles and
how you wear it. Much of what is
found at the Gap is contemporary
basic styles that one can wear
with their own personal flare by
accessorizing or layering. Sarah
Jessica Parker, their new spokes
model, can be seen donning sev-
eral styles of jeans that she had
altered to fit her personal style;
from racing stripes down the side
of one pair of jeans to bows on
another. So, anything goes.
Women can find layering
tees, which were popular this
summer and smart blazers with a
form fitting cut. These blazers are
extremely versatile because they
can be dressed up with a pair of
pants or dressed down with a pair
of jeans. The two biggest sellers in
women's jeans are the Long and
Lean and the Ultra Low Rider.
"Don't let the name Long and
Lean fool you. This pair of jeans
is named so because of the look it
gives you, not necessarily how it
fits said Eric Batemen, assistant
manager of the Gap.
Women can also expect to see
denim or cord skirts and pants
with a flare, boot or modern
cut. The jeans and pants have
variations on the washes or
pinstripes.
There are also many acces-
sories to choose from at the Gap.
Scarf belts can be worn around
the waist or the neck. Flower
pins and broaches can be used as
embellishments.
For the guys, the Gap is pro-
moting "stress free" items for
men. What does this mean? Two
wonderful words: spill resistant.
The relaxed and classic fit pants
and many styles of button down
shirts and polo's are pretreated
fi Fashion Tips
Ideas for women:
Glittering accents - vintage
broaches, spaikly belts,
sequlned sweaters
Swap a belt for a bow
Green Is the new shoe hue
Women's blazers with a form
fitting cut are extremely versatile
Ideas for men:
Spill resistant clothes
Jean Jackets and cardigans
Narrow ties
to help resist stains. These items
come in many different colors
and styles.
The Gap is running a great
promotion: buy five regular
priced items and receive a 20
percent discount. This offer will
run until Sept. 22.
American Eagle Outfitters,
also found at Colonial Mall, is
promoting many of the same
styles. Denim skirts, blazers,
and ponchos for the gals. Polo's,
button down shirts, jeans and
cargo pants for the guys. Geared
toward college kids, price ranges
from $29.50 and up.
If you are on a really tight
budget you can always check out
the discount stores like the Cata-
log Connection, TJMaxx or Ross.
You have to look but you can find
some incredible stuff.
Happy shopping.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
CHINESE RESTAURANT
The Best Chinese Food in Town!
On the corner of 10th and Evans, Near ECU. Phone 757-1818. Fax 757-8708
GREAT Lunch Buffet ($4.95) and Dinner Buffet ($6.95)
$1 off with ECU Student ID (Dinner Only)
DRINK SPECIALS!
$1 Domestic $2.50 Mixed Drinks Tuesday 8c Thursday nights only
We have a banquet room in the back that
can accommodate 100 people!
We also have a regular menu and a vegetarian menu
Hours: Monday - Thursday 11:30 - 9:30, Friday 11:30 - 10:30
Saturday 5 - 10:30, Sunday 12:00 - 9:30
�'�
Nil
-I
Vote
from page A6
may want to go to the Federal
Election Commission Web site,
www.Fec.gov, or the North
Carolina Board of Elections at
www.Sboe.state.nc.us. Students
may also go directly to the Pitt
County Government Board of
Elections Office at 201 E 2nd St.
If a student is registered in
another state, they can obtain
what is called an absentee ballot.
An absentee ballot is a ballot
that is mailed to the out-of-state
person from the state they regis-
tered In. Absentee ballots must be
returned by Nov 1 at 5 p.m and
can be obtained starting Sept. 13.
By going to www.electionimpact.
votenet.com students can find
out how to obtain and fill out an
absentee ballot.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
A
A
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CA
A
Office Hours:
Monday-Friday 9dm-5pn
Siitmdav 9am-2i)in
Aportments & Rental Houses
P0 Box 873 � 108 Brownlea Drive SuiteA �!
Greenville, NC 27835-0873 s" ' " '
phone (252) 758-1921 Ext. 60 � fax (252) 757-7722
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9-9-04
'y
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2) 757-7722
Page A9
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What do you see? Every day, The New York Times helps you see the world around
you in whole new ways. Pick up your copy of The Times today. And to subscribe at
a very special student rate of more than 50 off, call 1-888-NYT-COLL and
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By 6th grade, an alarming number
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For Rent
1 BR1BA Apt. to sublease in a
Pirate's Place 3BR suite. $295mo.
plus 13 utilitiescable. Please call
Michael Grant at (252)587-9021.
Walk to ECU. 4 BR, 2 Bath, two
story with deck, central heatair,
newly carpeted and painted. Nine
to twelve month lease. Call 259-
0424 or 756-3947.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments,
walking distance to campus, WD
conn pets OK no weight limit,
free water and sewer. Call today for
security deposit special- 758-1921.
Tired of apartment living? Three
bedroom duplex, washer dryer
hook-up, vaulted ceilings, privacy
fence, bonus storage room, 1200
square ft $700 month. Call 561-
8732.
Three bedroom duplex for rent
near ECU. Available immediately.
Rent $561-Call 752-6276.
12 Block off 5th, 1 bdrm-
washer 6 dryer included- call
321-4712.
Walk to campus, 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath,
116B N. Meade St. Hardwood
floors, ceiling fans, all kitchen
appl. included, washerdryer, attic
space and shed. Nice size front
back yard. $675.00month. First
month free rent. Call 341-4608.
2 units for rent 4 BR 2 BA upstairs
and 3 BR 2 BA downstairs both
include fridge, stove, WD. Water
and sewer included in the rent.
113 Rotary Ave. 336-210-6702.
Chocowinity Veterinary Hospital is
looking for a responsible student
to live RENT FREE in an efficiency
apartment. We prefer interest in
animal science or health field.
Great opportunity for Pre-Vetl Call
for details (252)946-9000.
Walk to Campus- 4 BR 2.5 BA
townhome available close to ECU.
WS cable included Call 4 appt 752-
4225 EHO. Managed by AIMCO.
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015- 1 & 2
BR apts, dishwasher, GD, central
air & heat, pool, ECU bus line, high
speed internet available, 9 or 12
month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, & cable.
Twin Oaks townhouse, 2 BR, 1 12
bath, end unit on ECU campus bus
route. Patio, pool, WD hook-up.
$575 per month. Call 864-346-
5750 or 864-228-3667.
Close to campus available now!
136 North Library- 3 bedrooms, 2
bath, $875. 122 North Eastern- 3
bedrooms, 1 bath, $850. Duplexes
on Stancil- 3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
$585, first month free. 252-758-9009.
$900. Please call 252-258-2287.
Services
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Part time PHP programming
help needed immediately. Please
send Resume with references and
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Bedrooms & Sofas Plus is looking
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in Person at 425-A S.E. Greenville
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positions 100 200week. Perfect
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Reliable transportation a must.
Call 756-5527 between 2-5 only.
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Gymnastic teachers neededl
Experienced males & females
who enjoy working with children,
23,000 sq. ft. modern gym,
2 miles from campus, contact
Darlene Rose at 321-7264.
Pitt County Community Schools
and Recreation is currently looking
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volleyball, and basketball) and
volunteer youth sport coaches.
Days, times, and pay vary
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Personals
Roommate Wanted
Share two bedroom $230mo.
12 utilities in Wesley Commons
South. (252)578-6727.
Roommate wanted for 2 bedroom
apt. Great location on Fifth Street
next to campus and downtown.
$270mo. plus 12 utilities.
Contact Josh at jls0403@mail.
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find a better price! Lowest prices,
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Announcements
tro and Vintage Cloth
Handmade Silver
Jewelry & More,
Come check
us out!
X01 Dickinson Ave.
752-1750
Come Join us for the September
11 contra dance! live, old-time
and Celtic music by a string
band. Potluck dinner: 6:00 p.m
concert: 7:00; lesson: 7:30;
dance:8:00-10:30. Band: Bill
and Libby Hicks; Caller: Chris
Mohr. No experience needed;
we'll teach you as we go along!
Come alone or bring a friend! $3
(students) $5 (FASG members) $8
(general). Co-sponsors: ECU Folk
and Country Dancers (752-7350)
and Folk Arts Society of Greenville
(795-4980). An alcohol- and
smoke-free event, www.geocities.
comecufolkand countrydancers
Location: Willis Bldg 1st and
Reade Sts downtown.





PAGEA10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
9-9-04
ftllCHf
CAMPUS EVENTS CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 2004
Special Events on September 10
ECU JAZZ ENSEMBLE CONCERT
Hendrix Theatre, 7pm $5.oo for ECU Students
$ 10.00 for ECU FacultyStaff (in advance)
Get ready to groove to the smooth tunes of our ECU Jazz
Ensemble under the artful direction of Caroll Dashiell!
Family weekend calendar
ECU PIRATE PEP RALLY
MENDENHALL BRICKYARD, 6PM
join us in cheering our ecu pirates to another victory along
with the ECU marching Band, coach John Thompson, ECU
Cheerleaders and Dance team!
World Peace Week Sept 19-24
World Peace Vigil
Tuesday, September 21 "
Steps of Joyner Library, 7pm
Join us i'� i special evening ol reflections .mil musical performances focusing on world peace
featuring thi Gospel hoir, Native American DrummerSingers (Graj Woll r.), studeni and1
more!
Sponsorskf ih ECU'ShhL-ni Invehtnumt't UionmU 289&
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
4PM-6PM SU ART EXHIBIT OPENINGRECEPTION (NEW) MENDENHALL
Student center (MSC)
artistsculptor Kahil Bendib from Berkeley, CA will be on campus to meet
WITH STUDENTS AND FAMILIES AT HIS EXHIBIT OPENING IN MENDENHALL STUDENT
CENTER. BENDIB CREW UP IN MORROCO AND ALCERIA AND CAME TO CALIFORNIA
TO PURSUE HIS MASTER'S DEGREE AT THE UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA IN
1 980. HE BEGAN HIS CAREER FIRST AS A POLITICAL CARTOONIST AND LATER AS A
PROFESSIONAL SCUPTOR. HIS WORK HAS BEEN COLLECTED AND EXHIBITED BOTH IN
THE US AND ABROAD. SPONSORED BY SU VISUAL ARTS COMMITTEE.
6pm ECU Pirate pep rally msc brickyard
(IF IT RAINS, THIS EVENT WILL BE CANCELLED)
JOIN US AND THE ECU MARCHING BAND, CHEERLEADERS AND COACH THOMPSON AS WE
CHEER OUR ECU PIRATES ON FOR A VICTORY OVER THE WAKE FOREST DEMON DEACONS!
6PM-11 pm Adventure Extravaganza (NEW)
Student recreation
CENTER
CHECK THIS OUT ATTHE SRC POOL, ADVENTURE CENTER AND CLIMBING WALL FOR AN
ADVENTURE YOU'LL REMEMBER!
6:00
7:00
8:00
9:00
10:00
belay workshop location: climbing wall
basic kayak paddling technique location: outdoor pool
Basic Canoe paddling Technique location: south Lap
Kayak rolling technique location: outdoor pooiso.lap
west Trip multi- Media preview location: SRC Classroom
Climbing technique seminar location: climbing wall (Staff)
ecu Jazz Ensemble concert (Ticketed)
MSC HENDRIX
7 PM
theatre
don't miss this opportunity to hear our premiere ecu jazz ensemble in an
upbeat and cool evening of all that jazz! tickets are still available.
9pm-0n ecu family fun night (new) msc
Enjoy a relaxing evening in Mendenhall at our "open mic" night (sign up
and perform your favorites) in the pirate underground sponsored by su
popular Entertainment, free bowling and billiards (8pm-iopm) in the outer
llmitz, su late night films (shrek 2 and eternal sunshine of a spotless mind)
and su presents an outdoor videofoam dance party (9pm-1 2am).
Book Sale
the friends of joyner library will hold their annual book sale on friday,
910 thru sunday 912 in mendenhall. hours for the book sale will be
friday (910) from 12 to 5pm, saturday (911) from 9am-5pm and sunday
(91 2) from 1pm-5pm.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 11
9:30am student recreation center (next to mendenhall): new
Bring your Fitness pass with you!
pirate power Walk (9:30am) - come join us at the student recreation
center rotunda for a one-mile power walk featuring a fantastic view of
the ecu central campus!
100 step (1o:o0am) - get a great workout in a 50 minute session that
has a fun mix of athletic and rhythmic style step patterns! this class is
devoted exclusively to step aerobic training with a complete warm-up and
cool-down period included.
aqua fitness (10am) - let the dynamics of the water combine cardio and
strength training into one 50 minute workout! no swimming skills are
required. this is an incredible workout that promises to deliver full-body
training through low stress and fat burning exercises! water bottles and
aquatic footweaiare recommended.
10am-12n00n open houses (ecu transitshuttle service on campus)
� student professional development center (5th & jarvis)
�joyner library (11am: llbrarytour)
� science & technology
� student recreation center
4:OOPM-6:30PM ECU PIRATE BUFFET (TICKETED) WILLIAMS ARENA (MINCES)
MEET OUR FACULTY AND VI P'S WHO WILL BE MEETING AND GREETING PARENTS AS OUR
HOSTS DURING THE BUFFET FROM ARTS & SCIENCES, EDUCATION, HEALTH 6. HUMAN
PERFORMANCE, MUSIC, BUSINESS, HUMAN ECOLOGY. TICKETS ARE STILL AVAILABLE!
7:OOPM ECU PIRATES VS WAKE FOREST UNIVERSITY DEAMON DEACONS
(TICKETED EVENT)
Sunday, September 19 - Dances for Universal Peace, 4-6pm, Mendenhall 244. FREE Spon-
sored by the ECU Student Involvement Team.
Tuesday, September 21 ECU Wo rid Peace VigilUnited Nations International Day of Peace, Joyner
Library (steps facing the mall), 7pm. FREE Sponsored by the ECU Student Involvement Team
Wednesday, September 22 - Social Justice Institute: Speaker (Topic: "What Have We Come
To? Wars Between the Generations 7:30pm, Murphy Center. FREE Sponsored by the Ledonia
Wright Cultural CenterOffice of Intercultural Affairs.
Thursday, September 23 - Trie Ruml concert A Turning Night of Stars with Coleman Barks
(internationally renown poet and translator of Ruml), David Darting (cello), Glen Velez (percussion),
Zulelka (dance), 8:00pm, Wright Auditorium Free for ECU students wOne Cara7$5.00 for ECU fac-
ultystaffS10.00 public.
�Friday, September 24 - Arts for Peace: PoetryMusicDance Workshop with Coleman Barks,
David Darling, Glen Velez, Zulelka, 10am-12:30pm, Wright Auditorium. FREE
FREE Student Tickets: RUMI CONCERT
�Sponsors of Coleman Barks two-day residency at ECU include: ECU Student Involvement Team,
Student Union, Ledonia Wright Cultural CenterOffice of Intercultural Student Affairs, Center for
Off-Campus UvlngOffice of Adult & Commuter Student Services, Division of Student Life, Carol
Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professorship Endowment, College of Fine Arts and Communication
(School of MusicSchool of Art & Design), Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences, and the
English Writers Reading Series.
FOR MORE INFORMATION ON FAMILY WEEKEND '04 CONTACT OUR OFFICE OF STUDENT
INVOLVEMENTATX.4790. AND FOR TICKETED EVENTS CALL OUR CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
AT 328-4788.
GENERAL STUDENT FOOTBALLTICKET-PICK UPS FOR FOOTBALL GAME WILL BE ON SEPTEMBER
10TH (FRIDAY) FROM 9AM-5PMATTHE ECU TICKET OFFICE; GUEST TICKETS ARE AVAILABLE
AT FULL PRICE OF $2 5. STUDENTS MUST HAVE VALID ECU ONE CARD TO PICK UP TICKETS
Special Event on September 19
DANCES FOR UNIVERSAL PEACE (MENDENHALL
244, 4PM-6PM). FREE. THE DANCES OF UNIVERSAL
PEACE ARE SIMPLE CIRCLE DANCES SET TO LIVE
MUSIC AND SACRED PHRASES FROM SPIRITUAL
TRADITIONS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD. NO
PREVIOUS DANCE EXPERIENC EIS NECESSARY. THE
MOVEMENTS AND SONGS ARE DRAWN FROM OVER
400 DANCES INCLUDE THEMES OF PEACE, HEALING
AND THE CELEBRATION OF LIFE. DRESS IS CASUAL
(COME AS YOU ARE)! SPONSORED BY THE ECU
STUDENT INVOLVEMENT TEAM.
Vnivt





9-9-04

Q
n
Page B1 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY ZOPPO Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
THURSDAY September 9, 2004
NCAA
defends
decision
Howard discusses
recent controversy
NCAA
OPINION
TONY ZOPPO
SPORTS EDITOR
I expected there would be
both positive and negative
feedback for the piece 1 wrote
last week entitled "Hypocrisy
now spelled N-C-A-A I imag-
ined that any and all com-
ments on the article would
come from ECU students and
staff. What I did not expect
was a call from the NCAA.
Jeff Howard, director of PR
and media relations for the
NCAA, called me on Thurs-
day of last week at noon.
After we introduced our-
selves, Howard jumped into
the deep end of the Mike
Williams and Jeremy Bloom
pool with me. Due to the fact
that this call was completely
unexpected, I was not able to
record Howard's comments.
However, 1 will do my best to
paraphrase our conversation.
The first thing Howard
and I argued on was Mike
Williams and his academic
eligibility. Howard stated that
Williams, in fact, did not suf-
ficiently fulfill his academic
requirements to become eligi-
ble for football again. Howard
did not specify why, as infor-
mation on grades and such is
strictly private. However, he
also stated that completing
classes in summer sessions
does not count toward athletic
eligibility. Williams would
have had to acquire six hours
of class credit during the
spring of 2004, the semester
in which he dropped out of
school to enter the NFL Draft.
Howard also continued
to say that Williams had
not paid back any monies
and benefits received from
agent Mike Azarelli. Howard
stated that the USC receiver
had severed ties with Azarelli
but was waiting to pay the
money back if he was rein-
stated. Since the NCAA had
denied Williams, he decided
to keep whatever benefits he
had received during his short
relationship with Azarelli.
My argument for Williams
remained where it has been
for the last several weeks. I
concede that Williams did
not complete the academic
requirements for reinstate-
ment if the rule states that
he has to complete his credits
in the spring rather than
the summer. However, why
should the summer not count
toward his academic eligibil-
ity? I would be six credits
closer to graduation if I took
six course hours during the
summer here at ECU. What
makes me different from
Mike Williams? Athletically
speaking - about five inches,
SO pounds and several million
dollars staring me in the face a
year from now. Academically?
There isn't a single difference.
1 also defended Williams'
stipulation that he would
make the decision to pay back
any benefits he gained from
Azarelli by comparing his case
to Tim Dwight's in 1998. As
explained in my last piece,
Dwight finished his football
eligibility in 1998 and signed
a contract with the Atlanta
Falcons that carried a fat $1.4
million signing bonus. How-
ever, he was allowed to run
track at Iowa because it was
a different sport. But what I
didn't know last week, was
that Dwight had to pay back
money that he had received
before he signed the contract
if he wanted to run track for
the Hawkeyes.
The NCAA made a condi-
i tional deal with him stating
that if he paid the money
1 back, he would be allowed to
Jrun track. In Williams' case,
he stated he would pay the
see OPINION page 86
Pirates to host Wake Forest
The Pirates will have their hands full this Saturday as they will have to contain a Wake Forest offense that put up 30 points against Clemson last weekend.
ECU looks to rebound
from blowout loss
BRANDON HUGHES
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
The Pirates will head into Sat-
urday's home opener against the
Demon Deacons in an attempt to
rid the foul taste West Virginia
left in their mouth guards follow-
ing a 56-23 drubbing last week.
The Deacs roll into Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium in the wake
of a disappointing 37-30 double
overtime loss to Clemson.
Wake Forest vs. Clemson
Recap
Wake Forest was on the verge
of pulling off an ACC upset over
the No. 16 ranked Tigers before
Clemson forced overtime with
a touchdown and two-point
conversion with less than
two minutes remaining
in regulation
Clemson quarterback Charlie
Whitehurst found Kyle Brown-
ing for an 11-yard scoring strike
in the second extra period and
the Tiger defense preserved the
37-30 victory.
Wake's standout tailback
Chris Barclay racked up 179
yards on 29 carries, but White-
hurst came through in the clutch
and finished the game 20-of-41
passing for 288 yards.
Last Meeting
Five turnovers doomed the
Pirates' chances at pulling out
their first win of the 2003 season
Sept. 20, 2003 at Wake Forest.
Wake held a 17-3 lead at
halftime before cruising to a
34-16 victory. ECU out-gained
the Demon Deacons in
total yardage 391-324, but
Desmond Robinson tossed three
interceptions and the
Pirate offense fumbled six
times, losing two.
ECU running back Marvin
Townes was held to 49 yards
rushing on 22 carries as Chris
Barclay, D'Angelo Bryant
and Willie Idlette all scored
touchdowns for the Deacons.
Players to Watch
OFFENSE: Chris Barclay
may be the most eager running
back in the country this week.
After witnessing West Virginia's
Kay-Jay Harris record-setting
performance, the junior is primed
for a big game.
Harris racked up 337 yards
on the ground with four
touchdowns and Barclay, who led
the ACC in rushing last season,
will be the focus of the Pirates'
defensive schemes.
Junior quarterback Cory
Randolph is slated to start under
center following a poor opener
against the Tigers. Randolph
completed just 7-of-21 passes
last week for 55 yards, but expect
a better showing from the mobile
signal-caller. Randolph was a
dual threat in 2003, throwing
for 1,773 yards and rushing
see FOOTBALL page B5
Baker brings extra
intensity to Pirates
Pirates' safety Zach Baker.
Hard-hitting defender
looks to make impact
ERIC GILMORE
STAFF WRITER
If you have no food in your
pantry, then it's obvious that you
need some food. Head football
coach John Thompson knew that
he inherited a bare cupboard in
terms of talent when he took the
reigns. Thompson needed imme-
diate help in order to upgrade the
talent and restock his shelves.
Enter Zach Baker.
Thompson has spent the last
two seasons scouring the country
In order to find players that will
provide that Immediate help.
That includes Pima College in
Tucson, Ariz.
Baker received many acco-
lades at the small two-year school.
He was an honorable mention
junior college All-American with
62 tackles and six interceptions
last season.
Baker's story is one often told
by junior college transfers.
"Playing at Pima College
was a good experience. I got to
stay at home for two years and
got to play where my family and
friends got to see me said Baker.
"I needed to grow physically
and mature more so 1 would be
better fit to play Division I-A
football
The 6-foot, 1-inch, 215-pound
junior college transfer has pro-
vided some size and speed at the
free safety position.
"Everybody has to leave home
some time Baker said.
"I felt like it was time for me
to leave and do some different
things. I decided that this was the
best situation to come into
The hard-hitting safety
enrolled in the spring so that
he could adjust to a new scheme
while also learning the coaches
and teammates.
"Spring was real helpful
Baker said.
"I came in a semester early
so I could establish a bond with
teammates and learn the system.
I feel like I got a step up
Another reason why Baker
traveled across the country to
play for the Pirates is defensive
coordinator and safety coach
Jerry Odom.
"As far as football goes, coach
Odom has taught me the most
Baker said.
"He taught me how to do a lot
of different things that I didn't
know before
In Morgantown, Baker was
one of four players who started
for the first time. He was also
one of the 14 new players that
donned an ECU uniform for the
first time. The biggest thing Baker
could tell was the difference in
the speed of the game.
"The pace and speed of the
game is a lot faster so I have to get
used to that Baker said.
"It was quite an experience
up there to see how fast the game
was going
The starting free safety
recorded six tackles in his first
game, all of which were assisted.
Baker and the secondary were
forced to tackle the larger Kay-Jay
Harris numerous times.
"You can't arm tackle a guy
that big unless you wrap him up
and drag your feet Baker said.
"He didn't go down very easily.
It was extremely disappointing
The Pirates will have their
home opener against Wake Forest
this Saturday at 7 pm. Baker and
his defense are ready to prove last
week was a fluke.
see BAKER page B4
ECU Women's track excels
both on field, in classroom
Lady Pirates display
brains, brawn
BRENT WYNNE
SENIOR WRITER
For their outstanding per-
formance in the classroom, the
United States Track Coaches
Association has recognized the
ECU Women's Track and Field
team as an All-Academic team.
The team compiled a cumulative
GPA of 3.08 for the spring season
of 2004.
A team record has shown
nine of the 40 women on the
roster made the Chancellor's
List, which requires a minimum
GPA of 4.0.
Adding to the list of accom-
plishments, three women were
named to the All-Academic team
for their top notch academic and
athletic achievement. Colleen
McGinn, who has since gradu-
ated from ECU, led the trio with a
GPA of 3.55. McGinn was Confer-
ence USA's high jump champion
as well as the runner-up at the
indoor ECAC Championships.
Throughout the course of her
career, she was undefeated in out-
door conference championships,
winning the CAA title in 2000, as
well as C-USA titles in 2002 and
2004. She also left the Pirates as
the school record holder in the
high jump with a personal best
jump of 5 feet, 8 34-inches.
With a GPA of 3.50, junior
Tammie Mentzel also earned
All-Academic honors. Mentzel
won bronze at the C-USA outdoor
championships for her efforts in
the pole vault, as well as earning
All-East honors for her fourth
place finish at the ECAC Indoor
Championships. Like McGinn,
Mentzel holds both outdoor and
indoor school records in the pole
vault, setting her personal best
by clearing 12-feet, 3-lnches in
2004.
Excelling in the classroom
is something that Mentzel has
always done. Although she admit-
tedly "slacked off" in high school,
school still came as second nature
to the track and field star.
Now, as a student athlete at
the collegiate level, she disregards
Colleen McGinn (topTwas an outstanding high jumper during
her career at ECU while Tara DeBrielle (bottom left) and Tammie
Mentzel (right) will enjoy a year or two more with the Pirates.
the cliche that one must balance
school and sport.
"It's not really that I have to
balance academics and athletics
said Mentzel.
"They kind of just run into a
daily schedule
A day in the life of Mentzel
unfolds like this; class during the
day, which is followed by practice
in the afternoon, then a little free
time for dinner and finally back
to the books for homework. And
what if she finishes early?
"I usually hang around the
house with my roommates and
friends Mentzel said.
One of those friends is likely
teammate Tara DeBrielle, who
joined Mentzel on the All-Aca-
demic squad with a GPA of 3.34.
DeBrielle, who will return for a
fifth season of eligibility in 2005,
captured the C-USA 800 meters
outdoor title with a time of
2:12.84. Her school record indoor
time of 2:10.51 earned her All-
East honors at the ECAC Indoor
Championships. DeBrielle also
ranks second on the ECU all-time
outdoor performer list with her
season best of 2:10.61.
Alike in athletic accomplish-
ments, the comparisons off the
track between Mentzel and DeBri-
elle are few and far between.
While Mentzel does a lot
of last minute studying that
includes reading over chapters
and highlighting key informa-
tion, DeBrielle takes a more tradi-
tional approach to her studies.
"I am constantly in my room
studying away from my room-
mates and other distractions
said DeBrielle.
"I work really hard for the
grades that I make.
see TRACK page B7





"PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
9-9-04
ESPN The Truck to visit Greenville
Public invited to
interactive sports tour
TONYZOPPO
SPORTS EDITOR
Cox Communications will
host ESPN The Truck at Wachovia
Freeboot Friday on Sept. 10 from
S p.m. - 8 p.m. at the Sixth Street
Parking Lot.
Contained within a 53-foot
trailer and adjacent home theater
tent, ESPN The Truck's interac-
tive exhibits give sports fans the
opportunity to experience ESPN
Ill3, take home their photo on
the cover of ESPN The Magazine,
play the latest motor sports video
games, download ESPN interac-
tive programs and much more.
The Truck is also free of charge
and wheel chair accessible.
"As a corporate partner with
our communities in eastern
North Carolina, we are proud
to be involved in this Uptown
Greenville event said Phil
Ahlschlager, vice president and
9-9-04
general manager of Cox Commu-
nications North Carolina.
"Thanks to our relationships
with programmers like ESPN, we
are able to give back to the com-
munities we serve in a variety of
different ways
"This Alive-at-Five style con-
cert series has become a signature
event for Uptown Greenville with
Freeboot Friday now beginning
in its fifth annual event series
said Debbie Vargas, chairperson
for the uptown promotions orga-
nization committee of the event.
"We are thrilled to team with
Cox Communications to bring
ESPN The Truck to Greenville
for Freeboot Friday, a great com-
munity event said James Brown,
senior vice president, field sales
and marketing for ESPN.
"ESPN The Truck is a dem-
onstration of the cutting edge
products and services that ESPN
is constantly developing to better
serve the sports fan, our affili-
ates and advertisers. It is truly
a hands-on experience that no
sports fan should miss
ECU Pirate fans will also be
able to visit the sports attraction
on Saturday Sept. 11, prior to
kick-off of the ECU Home Foot-
ball season. ESPN The Truck will
remain at the Sixth Street Parking
Lot and will be open to the public
from 12 p.m. - 6 p.m.
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9-9-04
9-9-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B3
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PAGE B4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
9-9-04
9-9-04
Tragedy strikes at NC State football game Baker
Two men shot to
death at Carter-Finley
BRENT WYNNE
SENIOR WRITER
Authorities have arrested two
brothers following an altercation
in which shots were fired, leading
to the death of two young men
at a tailgate party before the NC
State football game on Saturday.
The victims, who were iden-
tified as Kevin M. McCann, 23,
of Chicago, and Marine 2nd
Lt. Brett Johnson Harinan, 23,
of Park Ridge, 111 were tailgat-
ing before the game. Neither
McCann or Johnson were stu-
dents at the university.
Brian Smith, another tailgater
who was in the area of the two
Chicago natives, said the victims
were tossing a football around
when a car drove recklessly in a
parking lot full of other football
fans tailgating as well. According
to Smith, the men pulled the
blond-haired driver from his car,
and beat him badly, pushing his
head info the dirt.
Shouting obscenities and
threatening revenge, the blond
man left his car said Smith. He
returned some time later and asked
Smith if he knew where the men
who beat him were, saying he had
"a. 38 Smith and Wesson for them
Smith, without thinking,
pointed him in the direction of
the victims and heard the gun-
shots a short while later.
"My reaction is that I got two
guys killed said Smith in an inter-
view with the Associated Press.
After running to the shoot-
ing scene to find one victim
wounded in the face and the
other in the upper torso, Smith
said the second suspect arrived
to carry the gunman away from
the scene of the incident.
Tony Harrell Johnson, 20, of
Raleigh, and his brother, Timothy
Wayne Johnson, 22, an NCSU
student were arrested a short
time later and charged with two
counts of first-degree murder,
said sheriff's department spokes-
woman Phyllis Stephens.
A second witness to the crime,
32-year-old Jason Seaton, said he
was less than 30 feet away from
the victims' tailgate area when he
from page B1
We are going to focus all
our emotion on getting better
Baker said.
"We have to start coming up
with victories. It's going to be real
exciting playing my first game
here at Dowdy-Ficklen. 1 think
it's going to be a huge advantage
playing at home
This writer can be contacted at
sports�eastcarolinian. com.
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Fans gather around the crime
saw the two young men get out
of their car and approach a small
group of tailgaters.
Seaton then saw a puff of
smoke and heard a series of what
he called a "bottle-rocket" sound.
"I saw the two guys, and they
weren't sprinting out of there
said Seaton.
"They were all nonchalant
jogging out of there
Seaton found the victims on
the ground and tried to use two
of his shirts to stop the bleeding.
Although it helped for one, it was
too late for the other.
bcsne in Raleigh on Saturday.
"I saw him gasp three times,
and he was dead Seaton said.
"When I get out here, when
nobody's looking, I'm gonna cry
about this
The second victim died later
at a hospital.
The first court appearance
for Timothy Johnson was sched-
uled for Tuesday, Stephens said.
Information about his brother's
first hearing was not immediately
made available.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com
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9-9-04
9-9-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B5
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Men's Soccer falls to High Point, 5-3
ECU put out another disappointing performance Wednesday against High Point
Pirates lose composure
early, fail to recover
KYLE ROGERSON
STAFF WRITER
The High Point Panthers
stunned the ECU Pirates with
three goals in the first twenty
minutes of play on Wednesday
afternoon at Bunting Field. The
relentless attacks made by the
Panthers early in the contest
pinned ECU to the ground and
the pirates could not get up for
the remainder of the game.
"We cannot afford to put our-
selves in holes like we did said
Head Coach Michael Benn.
"This is the second Wednes-
day in a row that we have come
out flat. I'm embarrassed; it was
a bad showing
The onslaught began within
eight minutes of the starting
whistle when Panther defender
Blake Roth took a throw on
High Point's side of midfield.
The throw flew over twenty-five
yards into the Panthers' offensive
third of the field. After a Pirate
miscue, the ball glanced out of
bounds across the end line and
the Panthers received a corner
kick.
Luke Lemanski charged down
the right side of the field await-
ing the delivery from his team-
mate, Patrick Althoff. Lemanski
used his height to rise above a
fighting defender and steer the
ball into the corner of the goal
with his forehead.
The initial blow was bearable,
and the Pirates did not lose their
hope, nor were they willing to lay
down at this point in the game.
However, the next two strikes
proved to be too much for ECU.
A shot that was deflected
by a Pirate defender got a lucky
bounce and found its way into
the goal after being crossed
on a corner kick opportunity.
The next goal came only three
minutes later courtesy of Patrick
Althoff, who earned the assist on
Lemaanski's goal earlier in the
game. The Pirates were under
tremendous pressure at such a
deficit.
Amos may have felt the pres-
sure but he did what leaders do -
find ways to keep their team alive.
Danny Lundquist battled
with an opposing midfielder
to keep the ball in play on the
Pirate's half of the field. Eventu-
ally the ball skipped on the wet
playing surface through two
High Point defenders and Amos
found himself face to face with
the keeper. He collected himself
and smashed tlfe ball passed
a stumbling keeper who was
unable to keep his balance during
the point blank encounter.
Amos spoke modestly of his
performance and gave credit to
the players around him.
"They have created a lot of
chances for me said Amos.
One teammate who has con-
nected with Amos as a striker is
J.W. Gallagher. They continued
their tag team antics in the
second half with the help of
Matt Kowalski, a strong ECU
mid-fielder. Kowalski played a
through ball to Gallagher who
dribbled swiftly toward the end
line. Gallagher looked to the
center of the box for his favorite
target, and he found him. Amos
received the pass and finessed a
shot around the goalkeeper into
the far side netting.
Two goals were scored late
in the match, but they had little
effect on the outcome of the
game. Fatigue and carelessness
seemed to be the cause of the late
letdown by each defense.
For the Pirates it was the early
letdown that was the reason for
the inability of the team to reach
their goal on Wednesday.
"At this level, you cannot
expect to win games if in the
first fifteen minutes you are not
mentally prepared Amos said.
The Pirates will take to the
field next against Georgia South-
ern at 1 p.m. Saturday in States-
boro, Ga. ECU will return home
to Bunting field to square off
with Elon next Wednesday after-
noon at 3:30 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
Football
from page B1
for 496.
Senior Jason Anderson will
be Randolph's primary receiver.
Anderson led the Deacs with
44 receptions, 751 yards
receiving and six touchdowns
last season. The 6-foot-3 receiver
hauled in seven receptions
for 139 yards and a score last
week.
DEFENSE: Wake Forest
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returns eight starters on
defense from 2003 and will
implement a four-man
front in addition to the
3-3-5 nickel package
the Deacs have used for the past
three seasons.
Senior cornerback Eric
King anchors the secondary.
King was a first-team AU-ACC
performer and team MVP a season
ago and' is joined by fellow
seniors Marcus McGruder and
Warren Braxton.
Linebackers Caron Bracy
and Brad White return for their
senior campaigns and finished
first and third on the team in
tackles as juniors.
This writer can be contacted at
sports&theeastcarolinian. com.
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PAGE B6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
9-9-04
9-9-04
Opinion
from page B4
money back upon the NCAA's
actions.
The guys in Indianapolis
must have not taken that one too
well. I have a funny feeling they
don't like to be the "demand-ee"
and an athlete the demander.
Moving onto Jeremy Bloom.
Howard had three main points
about the decision the NCAA
made to deny Bloom's request to
accept endorsements.
Number one: Bloom could
ask the department that governs
world skiing for assistance in
funding his training for the 2006
Winter Games. However, the
amount of money they can give
him and whether it is sufficient
to help him train is not of the
NCAA's concern, which means if
that is the only money he can get,
he still can't train for Turino.
Number two: He went against
court and NCAA advice by fol-
lowing through with accepting
endorsements.
Number three: contrary to
popular belief, Bloom is allowed
to accept prize money during
Olympic competition.
I made a mistake last week
by grouping together endorse-
ments and prize money. I stated
that Bloom could accept neither
when in fact he can accept the
latter. I tip my hat to the NCAA
for that. However, I have just one
(rhetorical) question for all three
of the previously mentioned
points. If Bloom cannot properly
fund his training fortheTurino
Olympics, how can he therefore
compete, win and accept prize
money?
The last thing that Howard
said to me, rather passionately,
was that there was one thing lost
in all of this controversy - the
most important thing. That most
important thing is the fact that
Williams and Bloom are student
athletes, not just athletes.
I agree. However, I don't
believe that Williams and Bloom
being student-athletes has much
to do with this at all.
This is about amateurism, pro-
fessionalism and the NCAA sup-
posedly making decisions on what
they say is a "case to case" basis.
Though Williams went
against NFL and USC warnings
about the ruling that allowed
him to enter the draft could be
overturned, he did have every
intention to regain amateur
status. The fact that summer
courses wouldn't count toward
eligibility for an athlete like
Williams but do for graduation
for a guy like me is ludicrous.
The NCAA could use a refresher
course in compromise, as Wil-
liams' case is not very different at
all from Tim Dwight's. With all
the money the USC wide receiver
could make for the NCAA, one
would think they'd welcome him
back with open arms.
As for Jeremy Bloom, there's
not much more I can say. He isn't
Chris Wienke, who had a $1 mil-
lion minor league baseball con-
tract while he was quarterback-
ing FSU. Bloom isn't Tim Dwight.
But he does have something in
common with them - he wants
money from playing a different
sport than he is eligible for, or
rather was eligible for, with the
University of Colorado.
Bloom is not only an extraor-
dinary case, but he has several
similar precedents dealing with
accepting money outside of his
NCAA Division I sport. The only
difference is that the money is in
endorsements rather than con-
tracts. 1 think they could cut the
kid a break, considering the fact
that he's looking to represent his
country on the highest athletic
level in the world.
That's just one man's opinion
though. For all of you readers out
there, as Huggy said in Starsky
and Hutch, " 1 just lay it out for
ya'll to play it out
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Headaches?
Holland introduced as new AD Wednesday
Former Virginia AD
addresses media
BRANDON HUGHES
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Donning a white Pirates cap,
new athletic director Terry Hol-
land was introduced during a press
conference held at the Murphy
Center Wednesday morning.
Chancellor Steve Ballard was
among the speakers amid the
flurry of reporters and television
crews that witnessed the dawning
of a new age in Pirate athletics.
"It is a great day for ECU as
I think everybody recognizes
said Ballard.
"People make all the differ-
ence and we're committed at ECU
to hiring great people
Holland was selected after
an extensive search culminated,
which included a search commit-
tee involving Ballard and football
Head Coach John Thompson.
Interim AD Nick Floyd was also
on hand and received an ovation
for his commitment and service
to the university. Floyd stepped in
for Mike Hamrick, who departed
in August of last year to take over
as the AD at UNLV.
"We would not be here today
without the strong leadership
of Nick Floyd said Ballard.
"We have five-year con-
tracts for both Mr. Holland
and Mr. Floyd. I believe we
have as strong a leadership in
the athletic department as any
public or private university
Shortly after, Holland took
the podium for the first time.
"Let me say the pleasure is all
mine because what you folks have
done here in the Greenville com-
munity and at ECU is something
very special and you should be
proud of it said Holland.
"I'm embarrassed that I've
been up and down 1-95 probably
200 times the last five years and I
didn't know what was happening
here. I should have been able to
hear the humming noise as hard
as you folks have been working.
This is a great university that is
probably one of the best kept
secrets on the East Coast
The former athletic director
at the University of Virginia will
begin his duties Oct. 1. Holland
served as AD at Virginia from
1995-2001 before becoming a
special assistant to the president
at Virginia. Holland coached
men's basketball in 1974, quickly
becoming the most successful
coach in Cavalier history, compil-
ing a 326-173 career record.
"The main attraction of ECU
is the spirit, pride and determi-
nation of its students, faculty,
alumni and fans. Even though
the latest conference realign-
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ECU sports programs, everyone
seems determined to rise above
these setbacks Holland said.
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9-9-04
9-9-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B7
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Track
from page B1
Media
from page B6
"I gave up a lot of things to
make sure that I stayed on track
with school
DeBrielle said that she has
basically given up a social life
because school and track are
so Important to her and that
"there's just not enough time to
do everything and still get the
results I want on the track and
in the classroom
A normal day for DeBrielle
starts off with class all day fol-
lowed by practice in the after-
noon.
"When 1 finally get a chance
to go home, 1 have a few hours
to eat and study before I'm com-
pletely exhausted DeBrielle
said.
Mentzel and DeBrielle are
closest to the people they spend
most of their time with - their
teammates. While time doesn't
allow them to hang out and relax
every night, both will admit that
having friends that understand
the stresses of college athletics
really helps them.
"It's nice having friends on the
team because they have the same
agenda as you Mentzel said.
"They feel your pain, joys
and understand your hard work,
and don't question you when
you say 'I have to be in bed early
this week because we have a big
meet coming up
"Since we are typically 'in-
season' all year round, my team-
mates have become my best
friends and family here DeBri-
elle said.
"We try to get together out-
side of practice so we can feel like
we have a small social life
This lifestyle isn't for every-
one and can be very hard to
adjust to, especially for incom-
ing freshmen, to whom Mentzel
offers some very priceless advice.
"Take it as it comes. Let ath-
letics and academics fall into that
daily routine and your life will
balance itself out. If you get all
worked up about being on such
a tight schedule, you will just get
yourself more overwhelmed and
stressed out Mentzel said.
"Just relax, breathe and take
things one at a time
DeBrielle explains that it
is really easy to get lost in the
"college life but that if you can
start good study habits from day
one, you will exceed more times
than not.
Although being an efficient
student athlete may seem easy
coming from Mentzel and DeBri-
elle, let's not take anything
away from them. These girls
absolutely dedicate themselves
to the university, not just for the
sake of academics, but also for
the good of the team. The fact
that these girls took time out of
their insanely busy schedules to
cooperate in this story only adds
to their personas.
Tammie Mentzel and Tara
DeBrielle epitomize the word
"student athlete" and ECU is
' fortunate to have women such
as these two representing them
not only in the classroom, but on
the field of play as well.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
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A native of Clinton, NC, Hol-
land is also a member of the North
Carolina Sports Hall of Fame.
"The problems that ECU
must overcome to restore this
tradition exist to some degree
in every athletic program in
the country Holland said.
"Our immediate goal will
be to join with the university
to provide a first clais academic
and athletic environment so that
every student and every athlete
from eastern North Carolina will
find that they do not have to
leave the area in order to succeed
at the highest levels academically
and athletically
To achieve that goal, Holland
said the university must set per-
formance benchmarks for every-
thing that affects ECU's ability �
to field competitive teams. He
also stressed that coaches need
to minimize missed class time
and allow athletes to participate
in campus activities.
"The goals are achievable,
the spirit and pride are in.
place, and the future is ours
to determine Holland said.
This writer can be contacted at
sports�theeastcarolinian. com.
Davenport
makes
quick work
of Asagoe
NEW YORK - Lindsay Dav-
enport is two victories from a
second U.S. Open title and the
No. 1 ranking.
After waiting out a day of
rain, Davenport beat Shinobu
Asagoe of Japan 6-1, 6-1 in just
46 minutes Wednesday night
to reach the Open's semifinals
in a match that began with
about 100 people in the seats at
9,645-capacity Louis Armstrong
Stadium.
They were supposed to start
at 11 a.m. in Arthur Ashe Sta-
dium, but steady showers delayed
the beginning until 7:29 p.m.
That forced organizers to shift
the schedule, with four quar-
terfinals - two men's and two
women's - in action simulta-
neously around the National
Tennis Center.
"It's not a total shock to
tennis players that we have to go
through this Davenport said.
"At this point, I just didn't care if
there were 100 people there or 10
people, I just wanted to play
Davenport's semifinal oppo-
nent will be No. 9 Svetlana
Kuznetsova, who defeated No.
14 Nadia Petrova 7-6 (4), 6-3. It
means both women's semifinals
will be United States vs. Russia:
No. 8 Jennifer Capriati meets
No. 6 Elena Dementieva in the
other.
"I don't have much publicity,
I am not Sharapova Kuznetsova
said, referring to Wimbledon
champion Maria. "People do not
know me as much. They look in
the paper and see Kuznetsova
and say, 'She's seeded, she must
be good
The biggest showdown of the
day, between two-time champion
Andre Agassi and No. 1 Roger
Federer, began with only about
a third of the 23,239 seats filled
by fans with parkas, hats and
umbrellas. Federer was leading
6-3, 2-6, 7-5 when rain returned
and halted play as Agassi served
at deuce in the first game of the
fourth set.
No. S Tim Henman led No.
22 Dominik Hrbaty 6-1, 7-5, 4-5
and was serving at love-15 when
their match was interrupted.
Only two dozen fans made
the trek across the grounds to
Court 11 for the start of the
quarterfinal between Kuznetsova
and Petrova. It was so empty that
when Petrova slapped the strings
of her racket after a missed shot,
it sounded like a violin - it was
that easy to hear.
Stan Kasten, the former presi-
dent of the Atlanta Braves, Hawks
and Thrashers, was among those
watching the two Russian women
play.
"It's like when you go scout
a kid at a high school game or in
the summer leagues, there aren't
a whole lot of people there he
said. "It's an interesting environ-
ment to see a match that means
so much
Davenport got to the grounds
around 9 a.m. She spent the day
trying to sleep, doing crossword
puzzles, visiting with family and
eating.
And when it was time to play,
she was ready.
Davenport won the first four
games of the match, then went
ahead 3-0 in the second set.
She finished with a 16-3 edge
in winners and never faced a
break point while extend-
ing her winning streak to 22
matches.





PAGE B8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
9-9-04
SaveAnd Enjoy A Yard At The
Same Time
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You probably already own a computer
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EC
ECU'S Pira
off to prep
IRS
Career of.
available t
NICK HENNE
NEWSEDITOF
Carl Ienn)
of the Interna
visited ECU'S
informing stud
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Several IR!
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NICK HENNE
NEWS EDITOR
A recent i
passed by the
Council at th
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IN!


Title
The East Carolinian, September 9, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 09, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1747
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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