The East Carolinian, September 2, 2004






9-1-04
Volume 80 Number 3
THURSDAY
September 2, 2004
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Biology undergraduates get hands on training
Students working in
fields identify various
forms of plant life
MATT COCKRELL
STAFF WRITER
ECU undergraduate biol-
ogy students began a long-term
ecology project this summer in
a several hundred acre field site
which inhabits a wide variety of
plant life and other ecological
aspects.
The students began the proj-
ect this summer and collected
the first of many annual data
sets to come in a long-term eco-
logical experiment. The project,
funded by a National Science
Foundation grant, is being con-
ducted at a site near ECU's West
Research Campus. This program
will allow students to do some
actual fieldwork at all levels, from
sophomores to graduates working
on their master thesis.
"The students will actually
gather data for database from
the field plots and learn about
some of the plants. In separate
labs, higher level students will be
working with the actual field data
and interpreting it said Carol
Goodwillie, a biology professor
at ECU who is involved in the
whole project.
A goal of the project is to give
students a chance to work with a
large accumulating database and
the students will learn critical
analytical skills, Goodwillie said.
Based on what the students learn
about ecology and ecological
concepts they can generate their
own hypothesis that they can test
on a data test which makes for a
more creative program.
The recently launched project
currently has 13 students. The
participants set out in the field
plots sampling from 96 quad-
rants in the plots and identify-
ing and counting every species
in the area. Within the 600-acre
site, they have already discov-
ered as many as 2S0 species.
The 600-acre site where the
fieldwork is taking place was
previously made up of 60 percent
jurisdictional wetlands.
According to Goodwillie, the
site required some work before
it was made suitable for the
project.
"The land had to be burned
and tilled, then set up into plots
Goodwillie said.
"There was some rootstock
already there and from a seed
bank we had, in a short time
there were lush fields
Within the site, there are
eight, 20 by 30 meter plots and
each plot is given its own treat-
ment. One is a control plot, a
one is being mowed about once �
a year, one is being fertilized B
and the last is being mowed
and fertilized. The purpose of �
o
see BIOLOGY page A4 Program participants examine and record various forms of plantlife within the 600-acre ecological site.
Web site to reduce smokeless tobacco
Students enrolled in ECU's first engineering program sit through a professor's lecture.
ECU'S first engineering
program begins its study
Enrollment exceeds
initial goals of program
BRANT SMITH
STAFF WRITER
ECU'S systems engineer-
ing program, currently seating
43 students, takes a different
approach to traditional engineer-
ing curriculums in an attempt to
fit the engineering demands of
eastern North Carolina.
The systems engineering con-
centration is the first of its kind
in the state of North Carolina.
"We feel like we have a very
unique opportunity starting a
brand new program, with brand
new faculty, and not tied down
by people who have done things
a certain way for many years
said Paul Kauffmann, chairman
of the department of industrial
technology.
Despite receiving approval
for the new engineering program
late in ECU's freshman admission
period, we were successful in
compiling a class Kauffman said.
The current systems engineering
class of 43 students exceeds the
initial goal of 35 students.
Ralph Rogers, dean of science
and technology, said ECU'S pro-
gram gets its students involved
in the engineering courses earlier
in their college careers, which is
different when compared to dif-
ferent more typical engineering
curriculums.
An important focus of ECU's
engineering curriculum is to get
students involved in teamwork
and also to collaborate different
areas of study within the cur-
riculum, Kauffmann said.
Concerning the aspects of the
program's initial concentration,
Kauffmann said a systems engi-
neer is an individual that identi-
fies a basic problem, puts together
a team of experts, looks at all the
issues or alternatives that could
go into solving a problem and
implements and achieves busi-
ness results.
Rogers said we are basically
trying to turn out engineers that
can move into new and emerging
areas where their job will be to
define problems and integrate
solutions.
"These are the types of quali-
ties we especially see in demand,
both for large companies as well
as small companies and organiza-
tions Rogers said.
A goal of the program is to
create more engineers in the
region of eastern North Caro-
lina, which will help benefit the
region as a whole.
"Most important in our
mind we want systems engineers
to work with the businesses
and manufacturing operations
of eastern North Carolina. We
believe the skills and talents we
are going to produce in our stu-
dents to solve technical setbacks
in the most cost effective way
are really going to contribute to
the economic development of
organizations in this region of
the state Kauffmann said.
Regarding the future of the
program, Rogers said the engi-
neering program intends to
increase the student capacity
and expand the program into
other concentrations including
engineering management, soft-
ware engineering and biomedical
systems.
Students have shown positive
reactions to ECU'S new program.
Matthew Harrell, freshman sys-
tems engineering major, said a
factor attracting him to ECU's
engineering program was the
student to professor ratio. Harrell
said' ECU's systems engineering
program is approximately 35
students to 11 professors, com-
pared to NC State's engineering
program where the ratio is much
smaller.
"When you're in close con-
tact with your professor they
can really get to know you as
oppose to being a number in the
classroom Harrell said.
Harrell said another aspect
of the program that appeals to
him is the fact this is ECU's first
engineering class.
"It's ground breaking with
the school you really have a
chance to make something of
this department
For more Information about
engineering at ECU, visit the
program's Web site at www.tecs.
ecu.edu.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Site offers confidential
solution to smokeless
tobacco users
MICHAEL HARRINGTON
STAFF WRITER
A new Web site is offering
smokeless tobacco users a 21st
century resource for a solution to
the age-old problem of nicotine
addiction.
Chewfree.com, founded by
the Oregon Research Institute
(ORI) and funded by the National
Institute of Health, is attempting
to use the Internet as a tool to
help smokeless tobacco users stop
their tobacco use.
Smokeless tobacco users look-
ing for assistance from the Web
site can submit their e-mail
address to Chewfree.com. A
member of the ORI will then
contact the person providing that
person with a password granting
them access to the site and its
resources.
"The neat thing about Chew-
free.com is that it's available 24
hours a day, seven days a week
said Herb Severson, a member of
the ORI.
Once Chewfree.com visitors
log into the Web site they can
select and print out a certain quit
plan, receive support from other
site visitors and receive addi-
tional Information on smokeless
tobacco.
Chewfree.com provides a
solution for smokeless tobacco
users who wish to maintain some
privacy and treat themselves.
"Doing it in the privacy of
your own home does help some
people said Georgia Childs,
ECU's assistant director for peer
health.
Childs said the individual
has to have a strong personal
desire to quit in order for any
program such as Chewfree.com
to be effective.
She said a lot of students may
quit for reasons such as their
girlfriends wanting them to, or
to attempt to cut costs, but it is
not that easy. This could lead to
students giving up on treatment
programs because their will to
quit is not strong enough.
Smokeless tobacco is a drug
that carries many mispercep-
tions. Childs said users may feel
because they are not inhaling
smoke into their lungs they
are not facing any health risks.
"It's not the smoke, it's the
nicotine Childs said.
"That's one of the biggest
misperceptions
The likelihood of developing
cancer is greatly increased by the
use of any tobacco products. A
person may also experience reces-
sion of the gums, tooth decay
and nausea from using smokeless
tobacco.
"About two thirds of the
people who use smokeless tobacco
will develop oral lesions and
about four percent of them will
develop cancer Severson said.
These health problems are
prevalent to people in any age
group. Whether you are a college
student or a retiree you still put
yourself at great risk by using
smokeless tobacco products,
Severson said.
"Young people often think
the health effects are a long way
off Severson said.
ECU students said they feel
the Web site is a good strategy in
solving the problem.
"It sounds like a good idea.
The Internet is where everyone
goes to find information said
senior economics major Jon
Watson.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcaroiinian. com.
ECU moves up in 'US News' rankings
Advances from fourth
to third tier
NICK HENNE
NEWS EDITOR
In the most recent rankings
measured by the U.S. News and
World Report of national doctoral
universities, ECU has moved up
from the fourth to third tier of
the 248 institutes Included in the
national doctoral category.
U.S. News and its annual rank-
ings have several categories of
institutions. ECU falls In national
universities as one of the 248
total that are considered in the
rankings. These universities are
categorized and ranked into four
tiers based on various factors.
ECU has been placed in the third
tier this year moving up from
the fourth where we were placed
last year.
Various factors Influence the
placement of these universities
including student and faculty
ratio, library resources and repu-
tation among the university lead-
ers, said John Durham.
Some factors Durham said
have improved within ECU
since last year Include higher
test scores of incoming stu-
dents and our continual effort in
providing exceptional value
toward our students. However,
despite these improvements and
moving up in rankings, Durham
said ECU has not undergone
any major changes or improve-
ments.
"The university is probably
more like it was last year than it
is different than last year said
Durham.
"We don't go out of our way
to try to affect the rankings we
don't sit there and study what we
can do to improve our rankings
Durham said while it's always
nice to be on these various lists,
U.S. News puts a lot of emphasis
on aspects such as class size,
endorsements and other things
we can't do a lot about. Durham
said the top 20 institutes on the
list this year are made up of pri-
vate schools only.
"What the magazine doesn't
do a particularly compelling job
of is trying to access the role the
university has in the success of
our students which we think is
the most important thing for us
to be measured Durham said.
Durham said he feels it is
important how well our students
succeed both in school and years
down the road when they get
involved in their professions and
not how it stacks up on these lists.
Chris Giggey, senior neu-
roscience major said he has
noticed aspects of ECU improv-
ing over the past few years.
He said he heard the Brody
School of Medicine has improved
as it is also excelling in areas of
family practice and general prac-
titioner studies. Giggey said he
feels ECU will become an institute
that appeals to a wider variety
of incoming students as a result
of the increased rankings.
"I think most people think
of ECU as a liberal arts college,
that will probably change said
Giggey.
Brian Vierria, senior chemis-
try major said he hasn't noticed
a major change in the degree of
difficulty in classes over the last
several years. One improvement
he said he has noticed though is
the increased use of automated
methods of teaching.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
INSIDE I News:A2 I Comics: B6 I Opinion: A5 I Features: A6 I Sports: Bl





PAGE B6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN-SPORTS
9-1-04
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The East Carolinian is now hiring
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No experience needed -
we will TRAIN you
Learn professional-writing skills -
necessary in any field
Boost your resume - set yourself
apart for the competition
Develop networking skills -
make strong contacts for your future
For more information, or to apply come by
our office located on the second floor of
the Student Publications Building (above
the cashiers office), or call 328-6366.
The East Carolinian is hiring
for the following positions:
Staff Writers
Copy Editors
Photographers
Layout Designers
Asst News Editor
Asst Features Editor
Asst Sports Editor
Web Editor
Wire Editor
Photo Editor
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
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9-1-04
Volume 80 Number 3
THURSDAY
September 2, 2004
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Biology undergraduates get hands on training
Students working in
fields identify various
forms of plant life
MATTCOCKRELL
STAFF WRITER
ECU undergraduate biol-
ogy students began a long-term
ecology project this summer in
a several hundred acre field site
which inhabits a wide variety of
plant life and other ecological
aspects.
The students began the proj-
ect this summer and collected
the first of many annual data
sets to come in a long-term eco-
logical experiment. The project,
funded by a National Science
Foundation grant, is being con-
ducted at a site near ECU'S West
Research Campus. This program
will allow students to do some
actual fieldwork at all levels, from
sophomores to graduates working
on their master thesis.
"The students will actually
gather data for database from
the field plots and learn about
some of the plants. In separate
labs, higher level students will be
working with the actual field data
and interpreting it said Carol
Goodwillie, a biology professor
at ECU who is involved in the
whole project.
A goal of the project is to give
students a chance to work with a
large accumulating database and
the students will learn critical
analytical skills, Goodwillie said.
Based on what the students learn
about ecology and ecological
concepts they can generate their
own hypothesis that they can test
on a data test which makes for a
more creative program.
The recently launched project
currently has 13 students. The
participants set out in the field
plots sampling from 96 quad-
rants in the plots and identify-
ing and counting every species
in the area. Within the 600-acre
site, they have already discov-
ered as many as 250 species.
The 600-acre site where the
fieldwork is taking place was
previously made up of 60 percent
jurisdictional wetlands.
According to Goodwillie, the
site required some work before
it was made suitable for the
project.
"The land had to be burned
and tilled, then set up into plots
Goodwillie said.
"There was some rootstock
already there and from a seed
bank we had, in a short time
there were lush fields
Within the site, there are
eight, 20 by 30 meter plots and
each plot is given its own treat-
ment. One is a control plot,
one is being mowed about once cl
a year, one is being fertilized j
and the last is being mowed J
and fertilized. The purpose of g
o
see BIOLOGY page A4 Program participants examine and record various forms of plantlife within the 600-acre ecological site.
Web site to reduce smokeless tobacco
'i:wijj:iaiiMi
Students enrolled in ECU'S first engineering program sit through a professor's lecture.
ECU'S first engineering
program begins its study
Enrollment exceeds
initial goals of program
BRANT SMITH
STAFF WRITER
ECU'S systems engineer-
ing program, currently seating
43 students, takes a different
approach to traditional engineer-
ing curriculums in an attempt to
fit the engineering demands of
eastern North Carolina.
The systems engineering con-
centration is the first of its kind
in the state of North Carolina.
"We feel like we have a very
unique opportunity starting a
brand new program, with brand
new faculty, and not tied down
by people who have done things
a certain way for many years
said Paul Kauffmann, chairman
of the department of industrial
technology.
Despite receiving approval
for the new engineering program
late in ECU'S freshman admission
period, we were successful in
compiling a class Kauffman said.
The current systems engineering
class of 43 students exceeds the
initial goal of 35 students.
Ralph Rogers, dean of science
and technology, said ECU's pro-
gram gets its students involved
in the engineering courses earlier
in their college careers, which is
different when compared to dif-
ferent more typical engineering
curriculums.
An important focus of ECU's
engineering curriculum is to get
students involved in teamwork
and also to collaborate different
areas of study within the cur-
riculum, Kauffmann said.
Concerning the aspects of the
program's initial concentration,
Kauffmann said a systems engi-
neer is an individual that identi-
fies a basic problem, puts together
a team of experts, looks at all the
issues or alternatives that could
go into solving a problem and
implements and achieves busi-
ness results.
Rogers said we are basically
trying to turn out engineers that
can move into new and emerging
areas where their job will be to
define problems and integrate
solutions.
"These are the types of quali-
ties we especially see in demand,
both for large companies as well
as small companies and organiza-
tions Rogers said.
A goal of the program is to
create more engineers in the
region of eastern North Caro-
lina, which will help benefit the
region as a whole.
"Most important in our
mind we want systems engineers
to work with the businesses
and manufacturing operations
of eastern North Carolina. We
believe the skills and talents we
are going to produce in our stu-
dents to solve technical setbacks
in the most cost effective way
are really going to contribute to
the economic development of
organizations in this region of
the state Kauffmann said.
Regarding the future of the
program, Rogers said the engi-
neering program intends to
increase the student capacity
and expand the program into
other concentrations including
engineering management, soft-
ware engineering and biomedical
systems.
Students have shown positive
reactions to ECU's new program.
Matthew Harrell, freshman sys-
tems engineering major, said a
factor attracting him to ECU's
engineering program was the
student to professor ratio. Harrell
said ECU's systems engineering
program is approximately 35
students to 11 professors, com-
pared to NC State's engineering
program where the ratio is much
smaller.
"When you're in close con-
tact with your professor they
can really get to know you as
oppose to being a number in the
classroom Harrell said.
Harrell said another aspect
of the program that appeals to
him is the fact this is ECU's first
engineering class.
"It's ground breaking with
the school you really have a
chance to make something of
this department
For more information about
engineering at ECU, visit the
program's Web site at www.tecs.
ecu.edu.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Site offers confidential
solution to smokeless
tobacco users
MICHAEL HARRINGTON
STAFF WRITER
A new Web site is offering
smokeless tobacco users a 21st
century resource for a solution to
the age-old problem of nicotine
addiction.
Chewfree.com, founded by
the Oregon Research Institute
(ORI) and funded by the National
Institute of Health, is attempting
to use the Internet as a tool to
help smokeless tobacco users stop
their tobacco use.
Smokeless tobacco users look-
ing for assistance from the Web
site can submit their e-mail
address to Chewfree.com. A
member of the ORI will then
contact the person providing that
person with a password granting
them access to the site and its
resources.
"The neat thing about Chew-
free.com is that it's available 24
hours a day, seven days a week
said Herb Severson, a member of
the ORI.
Once Chewfree.com visitors
log into the Web site they can
select and print out a certain quit
plan, receive support from other
site visitors and receive addi-
tional information on smokeless
tobacco.
Chewfree.com provides a
solution for smokeless tobacco
users who wish to maintain some
privacy and treat themselves.
"Doing it in the privacy of
your own home does help some
people said Georgia Childs,
ECU's assistant director for peer
health.
Childs said the individual
has to have a strong personal
desire to quit in order for any
program such as Chewfree.com
to be effective.
She said a lot of students may
quit for reasons such as their
girlfriends wanting them to, or
to attempt to cut costs, but it is
not that easy. This could lead to
students giving up on treatment
programs because their will to
quit is not strong enough.
Smokeless tobacco is a drug
that carries many mispercep-
tions. Childs said users may feel
because they are not inhaling
smoke into their lungs they
are not facing any health risks.
"It's not the smoke, it's the
nicotine Childs said.
"That's one of the biggest
misperceptions
The likelihood of developing
cancer is greatly increased by the
use of any tobacco products. A
person may also experience reces-
sion of the gums, tooth decay
and nausea from using smokeless
tobacco.
"About two thirds of the
people who use smokeless tobacco
will develop oral lesions and
about four percent of them will
develop cancer Severson said.
These health problems are
prevalent to people in any age
group. Whether you are a college
student or a retiree you still put
yourself at great risk by using
smokeless tobacco products,
Severson said.
"Young people often think
the health effects are a long way
off Severson said.
ECU students said they feel
the Web site is a good strategy in
solving the problem.
"It sounds like a good idea.
The Internet is where everyone
goes to find information said
senior economics major Jon
Watson.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
ECU moves up in 'US News' rankings
Advances from fourth
to third tier
NICK HENNE
NEWS EDITOR
In the most recent rankings
measured by the U.S. News and
World Report of national doctoral
universities, ECU has moved up
from the fourth to third tier of
the 248 institutes included in the
national doctoral category.
U.S. News and its annual rank-
ings have several categories of
institutions. ECU falls in national
universities as one of the 248
total that are considered in the
rankings. These universities are
categorized and ranked into four
tiers based on various factors.
ECU has been placed in the third
tier this year moving up from
the fourth where we were placed
last year.
Various factors influence the
placement of these universities
including student and faculty
ratio, library resources and repu-
tation among the university lead-
ers, said John Durham.
Some factors Durham said
have improved within ECU
since last year include higher
test scores of incoming stu-
dents and our continual effort in
providing exceptional value
toward our students. However,
despite these improvements and
moving up in rankings, Durham
said ECU has not undergone
any major changes or improve-
ments.
"The university is probably
more like it was last year than it
is different than last year said
Durham.
"We don't go out of our way
to try to affect the rankings we
don't sit there and study what we
can do to improve our rankings
Durham said while it's always
nice to be on these various lists,
U.S. News puts a lot of emphasis
on aspects such as class size,
endorsements and other things
we can't do a lot about. Durham
said the top 20 institutes on the
list this year are made up of pri-
vate schools only.
"What the magazine doesn't
do a particularly compelling job
of is trying to access the role the
university has in the success of
our students which we think is
the most important thing for us
to be measured Durham said.
Durham said he feels it is
important how well our students
succeed both in school and years
down the road when they get
involved in their professions and
not how it stacks up on these lists.
Chris Giggey, senior neu-
roscience major said he has
noticed aspects of ECU improv-
ing over the past few years.
He said he heard the Brody
School of Medicine has improved
as it is also excelling in areas of
family practice and general prac-
titioner studies. Giggey said he
feels ECU will become an institute
that appeals to a wider variety
of incoming students as a result
of the increased rankings.
"I think most people think
of ECU as a liberal arts college,
that will probably change said
Giggey.
Brian Vierria, senior chemis-
try major said he hasn't noticed
a major change in the degree of
difficulty in classes over the last
several years. One improvement
he said he has noticed though is
the increased use of automated
methods of teaching.
This writer can be contacted at
news�theeastcarolinian. com.
INSIDE I News:A2 I Comics: B6 I Opinion: A5 I Features: A6 I Sports: Bl





Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366
NICK HENNE News Editor KATIE KOKJNDA Assistant News Editor
THURSDAY September 2, 2004
CAMPUS NEWS
Free Screening
of 'I, Robot'
E-bay Is presenting a free welcome
back screening of the movie
, Robot at the Hendrix Theater on
Sept. 2 at 7 p.m. Tickets for this
event are available at the Central
Ticket Office at no charge.
Leadership Deadline
The deadline for enrollment In the
emerging leadership program and
the advanced leadership program
for freshmen is Friday, Sept. 3.
Apply in 109 Mendenhall.
Labor Day
There will be no class on Monday,
Sept. 6 due to Labor Day holiday.
Fraternity Rush
Fraternity Rush will be Tuesday,
Sept. 7 - Friday, Sept. 10. ECU
busses will provide any person
interested In joining a fraternity
transportation to each fraternity's
rush location on Tuesday and
Wednesday. Busses will stay at all
of the 17 locations for 20 minutes.
On Thursday and Friday, students
are free to go to whatever fraternity
they like. Fraternities will provide
transport for these dates. Rush
begins at 7 p.m. each night
Graduation Deadline
The last day for students to apply
for graduation is Wednesday,
Sept. 8.
Sorority Rush
Sorority Rush is taking place
on Sept. 12 - 18. Busses will
transport anyone interested to
each sorority house. For more
information, contact Amanda
Lewis. Late registration for sorority
recruitment is Sept. 11 from 5
p.m. - 8 p.m. at the Greek office
in Mendenhall 224.
Get a Clue
Get a Clue, a student organizational
fair, will be on Wednesday, Sept.
15 from 10:30 a.m. -1 p.m. in the
Wright Place. Various student
organizations and activities are
taking place at this event enabling
students to learn more about
activities going on and become
more involved.
Chamber
Music Festival
The Brentano String Quartet will
come to campus for their second
appearance in the Four Seasons
Chamber Music Festival on Friday,
Sept. 24 in the A. J. Fletcher Recital
Hall.
Film Series
The Travel-Adventure Film &
Theme Dinner Series opens at
Hendrix Theater on the main floor
of Mendenhall Student Center,
with Bavaria and the Black Forest
by Fran Reidelberger on Sunday,
Oct 3 at 3 p.ra
'HAIR' Production
The American Tribal Live-Rock
Musical HAIR will be on the
main-stage at McGinnis Theatre
from Sept. 30 - Oct. 5. Parental
guidance suggested due to
profanity, drug references and
the potential for on-stage nudity.
For ticket prices, call the box office
at 328-6829.
Family Weekend
ECU Family weekend is from Sepl
10 -12,2004.
Campus Safety Week
Sept. 13 - 17 Is Campus Safety
Week sponsored by your
ECU Student Government
Association.
World Peace Week '04
ECU World Peace Week 2004 will
run from Sept 19-24.
News Briefs
Local
West Nile virus
confirmed In Surry County man
RALEIGH, NC - A Surry County man
is recovering after being infected with
the West Nile virus in North Carolina's
first case of the Illness this year, state
health officials said Wednesday.
The man, In his 50s, is recovering
at home, said Dr. Leah Devlin, state
health director. State labs confirmed
the case In lab tests Aug. 31.
The virus is carried by wild birds,
which are bitten by mosquitoes, which
can transmit the virus to humans. The
disease is not contagious.
Symptoms of West Nile include
headache, high fever, neck
stiffness, decrease In the level of
consciousness, tremors, convulsions,
muscle weakness and paralysis.
People older than 50 years of age
have the highest risk of severe
disease. People whose immune
systems are weakened are also
more likely to experience severe
infections.
Last year two North Carolinians died
as a result of WNV infection. Both
of them had weakened Immune
systems, one as a result of cancer
treatment, the other as a result of an
organ transplant.
UNC-Wllmlngton swim team
removed from probation for now
WILMINGTON,NC(AP) -Thewomen's
swimming team at the University of
North Carolina at Wilmington will be
removed from probation while school
officials reconsider allegations of
hazing by upperclassmen.
Chancellor Rosemary DePaolo has
decided to reconsider the punishment
following a meeting with parents of
swimmers last week, according to the
parents and school officials.
When the allegations and punishment
announced last month, DePaolo was
adamant in her defense of Dean
of Students Terrence Curran, who
conducted the initial investigation.
The new investigation is being
performed by Paul Hosier, the provost
and vice chancellor of academic
affairs, and will Include statements
from the entire team. The results will
be turned over to DePaolo, who will
decide what - if any - punishment
is needed.
The investigation stems from
allegations that in early April
upperclassmen made regular trips
to a university dormitory to select
unusual clothes for the freshmen to
wear to class.
The freshmen later had their faces
painted and participated In various
activities, including a scavenger hunt
In downtown Wilmington and running
through an automatic car wash
near campus. Team members then
allegedly went to an upperclassman's
off-campus residence and drank
alcohol.
Following the first Investigation,
DePaolo placed the program on
probation forthe 2004-2005 academic
year. Upperclassmen would not be
allowed to participate in road meets
during the first semester.
"My job is to protect our students
and our campus and ensure safety
as much as possible DePaolo said
in July.
"And this was hazing. Our policy
is against hazing; we have zero
tolerance for it This was a case of
it
Paralysis not keeping
teen from living well
RUTHERFORDTON, NC (AP) - If
Joseph Malmone had it to do al!
over again, he wouldn't have gone
skiing with a group of his friends
from North Carolina State University
in February. That was the day the
college sophomore skied into a tree at
Snow Shoe Mountain, W.Va suffering
injuries that left him paralyzed.
He remembers the moments before
the crash, losing control on a curve
and he recalls how close he came to
hitting another tree, before actually
slamming into one.
"I remember telling myself I'd better be
careful when I got up because I knew
I had to finish that slope to get to the
bottom. The next thing I knew, I'm in
the helicopter Maimone recalled.
In retrospect he knows the slope was
too difficult for him.
Six months after the accident,
Maimone, 19, is doing everything in
his power to continue the adjustment
to being paralyzed and being In a
wheelchair. But he believes therapy
will lead him "eventually" to the time
when he'll be put of the wheelchair
and walking and moving again.
Maimone, the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joe
Maimone of Green Hill, remained at
a West Virginia hospital for a month
after the accident and was a patient
at the Shepherd Center in Atlanta,
Ga for two months before returning
home.
National
In reversal, Justice
Department agrees to throw
out major terror conviction
WASHINGTON (AP) - In a dramatic
reversal on the eve of President
Bush's nomination acceptance, the
Justice Department acknowledged
its original prosecution of a suspected
terror cell in Detroit filled with a
"pattern of mistakes and oversights"
that warrant the dismissal of the
convictions.
in a 60-page memo that harshly
criticizes Its own prosecutors' work,
the department told U.S. District
Judge Gerald Rosen on Tuesday night
it supports the Detroit defendants'
request for a new trial and would
no longer pursue terrorism charges
against them. The defendants at
most would only face fraud charges
st a new trial.
The Justice Department is "concurring
in the defendants' motions for a new
trial" and asks the court to dismiss the
first count of the original indictment
charging the defendants with material
support of terrorism, the government's
filing said.
The department's decision came after
a months long Internal Investigation
uncovered several pieces of evidence
that prosecutors failed to turn over
to defense lawyers before the trial
last year. The probe exposed deep
differences within the government
over the course of the case and
the quality of the prosecution's
evidence.
The internal investigation of
prosecutorial misconduct found
enough problems that there is "no
reasonable prospect of winning the
government conceded, drawing back
from a case once hailed by the Bush
administration as a major victory in
the war on terror.
World
U.N. report calls for quick
Increase In International
force In Sudan's Darfur region
UNITED NATIONS (AP) - A U.N. report
called Wednesday for a quick increase
in the international monitoring force
in Sudan, saying the government has
not stopped attacks against civilians
or disarmed marauding militias.
On July 30, the council gave the
government 30 days to demonstrate it
was taking action to curb Arab militias
accused of attacking, raping and
killing villagers in Darfur and improve
security and humanitarian access. It
threatened punitive economic and
diplomatic measures if Khartoum
didn't move quickly.
The report to the U.N. Security Council
did not mention or recommend
sanctions but said the government of
Sudan has not been able to resolve
the crisis in Darfur and has not met
some of the core commitments it
has made
The Sudanese government Is under
intense international pressure to
restore calm across the western
desert region where an 18-month
insurgency has killed more than
30,000 people and driven more than
1 million from their homes.
The U.N. report cited "some
progress" by the government In
Improving security In several
areas where Sudanese have
taken refuge, deploying additional
police and the beginning of
disarmament and the lifting of
restrictions to humanitarian relief. It
also said the government has made
a commitment not to force those
who have fled to return and has
established human rights monitors
and investigations of the conflict
Hurricane Frances
approaches U.S.
LUQUILLO, Puerto Rico (AP)-
Hurricane Frances roared toward
the Bahamas and the southeastern
United States on Wednesday after
churning past Puerto Rico, bringing
heavy surf and blustery winds to the
U.S. territory.
Frances strengthened to a dangerous
Category 4 hurricane with sustained
winds of 140 mph. Forecasters said
it could get even stronger - to a
Category 5 storm with 156 mph wind.
Still, Puerto Rico saw only moderate
rain and winds, and lightning that
knocked out electricity to about
17,000 people. No injuries were
reported.
The storm was forecast to be
passing near or over the Turks and
Caicos Islands and the southeastern
Bahamas on Wednesday afternoon.
Some residents in Turks and Caicos
put up plywood on their windows.
Others in the British territory hurried to
buy emergency supplies, stocking up
on bottled water and canned food.
By Wednesday morning, the
government had not issued any
evacuation orders.
The Bahamian government was
urging people in the southeastern
cays to move to larger islands, said
Carl Smith, the national disaster
coordinator. One of the most
vulnerable Islands was Great Inagua,
with a population of about 600.
"We're reminding people to get water,
food supplies and batteries, and to
know what shelter Is close to their
residenceSmith said.
The Bahamian trade minister, Leslie
Miller, threatened to revoke the
licenses of any businesses that
engage in price gouging. He said his
agency has been inundated with calls
from people complaining businesses
were hiking prices for plywood, light
bulbs, batteries and water.
"We will shut you down Miller said.
Russian flights receive security directive
WASHINGTON (AP) � Two
airlines that fly from Moscow
to the United States must check
passengers and their carryon
bags for bombs, according to
a government order Wednes-
day, one week after suspected
terrorists crashed two Russian
planes.
"The U.S. has determined it's
prudent to take additional secu-
rity measures to increase the
protection of flights between
the U.S. and Russia until we
have more information to assess
the situation said Amy von
Walter, a spokeswoman for the
Transportation Security Admin-
istration.
The airlines affected are
Delta Air Lines and Aeroflot
Russian Airlines, which fly to
the United States four times a
day from Sheremetyevo Inter-
national Airport, a Homeland
Security Department official
said.
The two planes that crashed
on Aug. 25 after near-simulta-
neous explosions, killing all
90 people on board, had left
Moscow's Domodedovo Airport
on domestic flights. The planes
belonged to the Russian airline
Sibir and a small regional air-
line, Volga-Avlaexpress.
Delta and Aeroflot were
ordered to conduct tests of all
passengers and their bags for
explosives using various tech-
nologies, von Walter said. The
airlines also must conduct more
thorough screening of all cargo
put aboard passenger planes,
she said.
Airlines must take addi-
tional security precautions
around the aircraft when they
are at the Moscow airport, and
they must inspect the aircraft
before passengers board, said a
Homeland Security Department
official who spoke on condition
of anonymity.
Russian authorities are look-
ing into the possibility that
suicide bombers brought the
planes down, and are seeking
information about two Chechen
women believed to have been
aboard - one on each plane.
Rafi Ron, former head of
security at Israel's Ben Gurion
Airport and now a security
consultant in Washington, said
the U.S. government should
not limit the stricter security
for U.Sbound planes from
Moscow.
Like the commission that
investigated the Sept. 11 attacks,
Ron advocates better technology
at airport checkpoints so more
passengers can be inspected
for explosives. Currently, metal
detectors - both hand-held
and walk-through - do not
sense nonmetal bombs, and
only those passengers selected
for extra screening are
checked for bombs in U.S. air-
ports.
Police officers check ID papers in Moscow's Domodedovo airport on Wednesday.
Kerry challenges Bush on war on terror
NASHVILLE, Tenn.(AP) �In
a sharply worded challenge to
President Bush, Democratic Sen.
John Kerry said Wednesday
"extremism has gained momen-
tum" as a result of administration
missteps in Iraq, but said the war
on terror is a winnable one with
the right policies.
"When it comes to Iraq, it's
not that I would have done one
thing differently, I would have
done almost everything differ-
ently" than the president, the
presidential candidate said in a
speech to the national conven-
tion of the American Legion.
Kerry spoke dismissively of
a statement Bush made Monday
- then rescinded on Tuesday
- that the war on terror might
not be winnable.
"I absolutely disagree he
said. "With the right policies,
this is a war we can win, this is
a war we must win, and this is
a war we will win Kerry said.
In the end, the terrorists will
lose and we will win because the
future does not belong to fear, it
belongs to freedom
Kerry, a veteran who won five
medals for service in the Vietnam
War, saluted others on the stage
as he stepped to the same podium
where Bush spoke on Tuesday. He
saluted again as he wrapped up
his speech.
Kerry accused the
administration of failing to keep
faith with the nation's 36 million
veterans by underfunding VA
programs that leave thousands
of former servicemen and women
without adequate, timely health
care and reduced retirement and
disability payments.
"The job will be done when
the government stops asking
veterans for increased co-pay-
ments, enrollment fees and other
charges to shift the burden of
care to more veterans and drive
more than a million veterans out
of the system he said.
But the heart of the speech
was a strong attack on Bush's
policies in Iraq, delivered at a
time when Republicans were
midway through a national con-
vention designed largely to stress
the president's credentials as an
effective commander In chief in
the war on terror.
Kerry catalogued what he said
was a long list of administration
shortcomings on Iraq - failing to
heed the advice of senior generals
on the number of troops needed
for postwar operations, failing to
secure the country's borders, fall-
ing to share responsibility with
NATO or the United Nations,
shortchanging the training and
equipping of the Iraqi police
and more.
As a result, he said, "today's
terrorists have secured havens in
Iraq that were not there before.
And we have been forced to
reach accommodation with those
who have repeatedly attacked
our troops.
"Violence has spread in Iraq.
Iran has expanded its influ-
ence, and extremism has gained
momentum Kerry said.
The conservative-leaning
crowd was mostly silent during
Kerry's criticisms of the com-
mander in chief.
Lloyd Woods, a Vietnam war
veteran from Caribou, Maine,
was skeptical. "If you can believe
It, it's a good speech he said.
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9-2-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
U.S. soldiers involved
in prisoner abuse
face charges soon
Suicide bombers seize Russian school
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
Army is expected to begin filing
charges soon against 26 soldiers
following a probe into the late
2002 deaths of two detainees in
Afghanistan.
Army investigators have
recommended bringing
abuse-related charges rang-
ing from negligent homicide
to dereliction of duty and
failure to report an offense,
The Washington Post said
in a report for its Wednesday
editions, quoting two Army
officers familiar with the
investigation.
A Pentagon spokesman said
he had no information about
the report.
In Afghanistan, a spokes-
woman for the military said it
"welcomes investigation into
alleged criminal acts with the
goal of determining justice
"Of course, the accused are
innocent until proven guilty
said Lt. Col Susan Meisner in
an e-mail.
The military has spent more
than a year investigating the
deaths of the two prisoners
at the U.S. base in Bagram,
Afghanistan, in December
2002. One died of a pulmonary
embolism due to blunt-force
injuries to the legs, the other
from blunt-force injuries to his
lower extremities complicating
coronary artery disease.
The Post said that most of the
soldiers facing charges are from
the Fort Bragg, NC-based 519th
Military Intelligence Battalion
and the 377th Military Police
Company, an Army Reserve unit
based in Cincinnati.
Some members of the 519th
intelligence unit were later
deployed to Iraq and have also
been implicated in the abuse
of prisoners at the Abu Ghraib
prison that occurred in late
2003.
Amanda Geiger never saw the drunk driver.
Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk.
U B Department of Trtneponabon
cSinal
MOSCOW (AP) � Attack-
ers wearing suicide-bomb belts
seized a school in a Russian
region bordering Chechnya on
Wednesday and were holding
hundreds of hostages, including
200 children. The assault came a
day after a suicide bomber killed
10 people in Moscow.
The seizure began after a
ceremony marking the first
day of the Russian school year,
reports said, when it was likely
that many parents had accom-
panied their children to class.
The attackers warned they would
blow up the school if police tried
to storm it and forced children to
stand at the windows, said Alexei
Polyansky, a police spokesman
for southern Russia.
Both the school attack and
the Moscow bombing appeared
to be the work of Chechen
rebels or their sympathizers,
but there was no evidence of
any direct link. The two strikes
came just a week after two Rus-
sian planes carrying 90 people
crashed almost simultaneously
in what officials also say were
terrorist bombings.
"In essence, war has been
declared on us, where the enemy
is unseen and there is no front
said Russian Defense Minister
Sergei lvanov, according to the
Interfax-Military News Agency.
He spoke before the seizure.
The latest violence also
appears to be timed around
Sunday's presidential elections
in Chechnya, a Kremlin-backed
move aimed at undermining sup-
port for the insurgents by estab-
lishing a modicum of civil order
in the war-shattered republic.
The previous Chechen president,
Akhmad Kadyrov, was killed
along with more than 20 others
in a bombing on May 9.
Gunfire broke out after the
raid and at least three teachers
and two police officers were
wounded, Polyansky said. More
gunfire and several explosions
were heard about three hours
later, the Interfax news agency
reported.
He said most of the attack-
ers were wearing suicide bomb
belts.
The attackers demanded
talks with regional officials
and a well-known pediatrician,
Leonid Roshal, who had aided
hostages during the seizure of
a Moscow theater in 2002, said
news reports.
The hostage-takers demanded
the release of fighters detained
over a series of attacks on police
facilities in neighboring Ingush-
etia in June, the ITAR-Tass news
agency reported, citing regional
officials. The well-coordinated
raids killed more than 90
people.
ITAR-Tass, citing regional
emergency officials, said about
400 people including some 200
children were being held cap-
tive. A regional police official,
speaking on condition of ano-
nymity, said the hostages had
been herded into the school
gymnasium.
There were 17 attackers, both
male and female, Interfax said,
citing Ismel Shaov, a regional
spokesman for the Federal Secu-
rity Service.
In television footage from
outside the school in Beslan, a
town about 10 miles north of
the regional capital of Vladika-
vkaz, men in camouflage with
heavy-caliber machine guns took
up positions on the perimeter
and other men in civilian dress
with light automatic rifles paced
nervously.
At one point, a girl of about
age seve,n in a floral print dress
and a red bow in her hair streaked
around a corner apparently after
fleeing from the school, followed
by an older woman. Russian
news reports said about 50 stu-
dents managed to escape, some
after hiding in the school's boiler
room during the raid.
The attack was the latest
in a string of violence that has
tormented Russians and plagued
the government of President
Vladimir Putin, who came to
power in 2000 vowing to crush
the Chechen rebels but has been
largely unable to do so.
Terrorism fears in Russia had
risen markedly following the
plane crashes and the suicide
bombing outside a Moscow
subway station on Tuesday night,
killing 10 people and wounding
more than 50.
A militant Muslim Web site
published a statement claiming
responsibility for the bombing
on behalf of the "Islambouli Bri-
gades a group that also claimed
responsibility for the airliner
crashes. The veracity of the state-
ments could not immediately be
confirmed.
The statement said Tuesday's
bombing was a blow against
Putin, "who slaughtered Mus-
lims time and again Putin
has refused to negotiate with
rebels in predominantly Muslim
Chechnya who have fought Rus-
sian forces for most of the past
decade, saying they must be
wiped out.
Putin interrupted his working
holiday in the Black Sea resort
of Sochi on Wednesday and
returned to Moscow, after doing
the same last week because of the
plane crashes. Upon arrival at
the Moscow airport, Putin held
an immediate meeting with the
heads of Russia's Interior Minis-
try and Federal Security Service,
the Interfax news agency said.
Moscow Mayor Yuri Luzhkov
told reporters near the Rizhs-
kaya subway stop in northern
Moscow that the female bomber
was walking toward the station
but saw two police officers sta-
tioned there, turned around "and
decided to destroy herself in a
crowd of people
The blast tore through a
heavily trafficked area between
the subway station and a nearby
department store. Doctors
worked through the night to
save the lives of others who
were severely wounded by the
bomb that officials said was
packed with bolts to maximize
casualties.
Several female suicide bomb-
ers allegedly connected with
the rebels have caused carnage
in Moscow and other Russian
cities in a series of attacks in
recent years.
Many of the women bomb-
ers are believed to be so-called
"black widows who have lost
husbands or male relatives in the
fighting that has gripped Chech-
nya for most of the past decade.
Investigators of the plane crashes
are seeking information about
two Chechen women believed
to have been aboard - one on
each plane.
Police spokesman Valery Gri-
bakin said hours after the blast
that police patrols were being
increased and document checks
stepped up, and that security at
subway and train stations and
airports was being boosted. How-
ever, no increase of uniformed
officers was immediately appar-
ent at subway stations during the
morning rush on Wednesday.
Fears that the Chechen rebels
aimed to export their fight out-
side the small republic's borders
rose in June after insurgents
launched a coordinated series
of attacks on police facilities
in neighboring Ingushetia, In
which more than 90 people were
killed.
In a videotape released sev-
eral days after the attack, a man
appearing to be warlord Shamil
Basayev claimed responsibility
for the assaults and said his fight-
ers had seized huge quantities of
arms from police arsenals.
In 1995, Chechen rebels led
by Basayev seized a hospital
in the southern Russian city
of Budyonnovsk, taking some
2,000 people hostage. The six-
day standoff ended with a fierce
Russian police assault. Some 100
people died in the incident.
ler Competition on the fin idenhall Brickyard,
Lawn Decoration Competition, fk
I Residence Hail Decoratio Competition
1 L1 Monday, OcfoSir 4
Skit Competition in Hendrix Theater
Wednesday, October 6
Pirate Picnic at Todd Dinning Hall
Midnight Movie: Psycho Beach Party in Hendrix Theater
Thursday, October 7
Pirate Fest Beacti Party, Mendenhall Brickyard
Midnight Movie: Psycho Beach Party
iday, October 8
Homecoming Parade down 5th Street
Family Fare Tales from Around the World at Wright
BEAT TULANE (2 pm)
" Saturday, October 9
Wr information, call the Student Government Office at 328-4726
Sponsored by the Student Government Association





PAGE A4
THE EAST CAROLINA � NEWS
9-2-04
Biology
from page A1
NC emergency officials brace
for possible visit from Frances
Biology students in the program set out for a day of fieldwork.
Hurricane Frances
September 1,2004
5 PM EDT Wednesday
NWS TPCNational Hurricane Center
Advisory 32
Current Center Location 22.0 N 71.0 W
Max Sustained Wind 140 mph
Current Movement WNW at 15 mph
(S) Current Center Location
� Forecast Center Positions
H Sustained wind 73 mph
C Potential Day 1-3 Track Area
, Hurricane Warning
mowing the fields is to simulate
natural disturbance, Goodwillie
said.
The students will moni-
tor how the plant community
changes over time. Eventually
they will be able to maintain
the highest diversity within that
specific community.
"A) fun aspect of this proj-
ect is that the data set is always
accumulating, eventually when
we get severe weather we can
see how the community survives,
the damage caused to it and
how the community recovers,
since it is such a large scale,
long term project
Goodwillie said.
This writer can be contacted at
news&theeastcarolinian. com.
Edwards meets with
laid off workers
HUGHESTOWN, Pa. (API
� Democratic vice presidential
candidate John Edwards on
Wednesday accused the Bush
administration of leading the
nation from "the edge of great-
ness to the edge of the cliff
Joining men who lost their
jobs because of a recent factory
closing, the North Carolina
senator said the United States
needs a president who "fights for
your job as hard as he fights for
his own job
Responding to cheers from
several hundred people who
attended a rally in a public
park in this Pennsylvania
town, Edwards promised that
he and presidential candidate
John Kerry would spread the
nation's wealth among more of
its citizens.
"We want people to do well
in this country - everybody
Edwards said.
The senator (olned three
fin mt-r employees of the
Techneglas factory on a back-
yard deck in a swing region of
Pennsylvania, the nation's
fifth largest electoral prize.
The area of northeastern
Pennsylvania, anchored by
Scranton and Wilkes-Barre, is
socially conservative but often
votes Democratic.
The three were among 670
employees laid off after the
TV-glass manufacturer
announced a month ago
that it was closing its plant
in nearby Pittston and two
in Ohio because of overseas
competition and declining
customer demand.
"We're all living the
American dream and one
morning the phone rings and
it's the company saying they're
going to cease operations
said Stephen Duda, the local
union president and a 14-year
Techneglas employee.
As the men summarized their
experiences, Edwards used them
as examples why new leadership
is needed in Washington.
"Most people don't realize
how much more a job Is than a
paycheck Edwards said. "It's
about your self-respect
CHARLOTTE, NC (AP) �
While forecasters tried to pin
down exactly where powerful
Hurricane Frances might come
ashore, emergency officials in
central and western North Caro-
lina braced Wednesday for the
possibility of strong winds and
torrential rain.
Packing 140 mph winds
and a path that has emergency
officials in several Southeastern
states jittery, the Category 4
storm was expected to fluctuate
in intensity as it headed for the
U.S. mainland.
Frances could become a
Category S storm with top
sustained winds of 156 mph or
higher, according to the National
Hurricane Center in Miami. The
storm could hit anywhere from
South Florida to South Caro-
lina as early as late Friday, the
NWS said, though it appeared
central Florida was the likeliest
target.
While the forecast could
change, the NWS said strong
winds and heavy rainfall are
expected across the western
Carolinas late in the weekend.
If current expectations about
the storm's track hold true,
the worst conditions would
be in the western Piedmont
and the mountains.
On Wednesday, emergency
officials in the region were get-
ting ready in case Frances moves
through after making landfall to
the southeast.
"We have a swift water
(rescue) team and today we went
through the equipment to make
sure we're ready said Randy
McKlnney, assistant director
or the Burke County Office of
Emergency Services.
"This is a pretty good size
storm and we hate for it to
hit anyone he said. "We still
have a lot of nightmares from
(Hurricane) Hugo. While that
wasn't a big flood event for us,
we had a lot of infrastructure
damage. So we are in a state of
high concern
In 1989, Hugo came ashore
at Charleston, SC, then held
together as it ripped through
South Carolina and Charlotte,
which Is 200 miles inland and
doesn't normally see hurricane
damage. The city suffered wide-
spread devastation.
Paige Sheehan, a
spokeswoman's for Mecklenburg
County's MEDIC emergency
services agency, said staffers
are prepared to be called in
at a moment's notice.
"With these storms, you just
don't know until you know
she said on Wednesday. "We
can expand our staffing levels
very rapidly and our folks will
show up without even having to
call them.
"The bottom line is, we want
the community to always be
prepared for any potential
disaster at any time. It could
be a freak thunderstorm, it
doesn't necessarily have to
be a hurricane
The North Carolina National
Guard alerted some 5,000
soldiers and airmen for possible
state active duty Wednesday.
The National Guard has
12 helicopters available In
Salisbury and Raleigh for use in
aerial damage assessment, aerial
rescue and aerial re-supply mis-
sions.
THIS WEEK AT THE MOVIES
Eternal Sunshine of the
Spotless Mind
WED. 7 PM
THURS. 9:30 PM
FRI. 7 PM & MIDNIGHT
SAT. 9:30 PM
SUN. 7 PM
Shrek 2
WED. 9:30 PM
THURS. 7 PM
FRI. 9:30 PM
SAT. 7 PM & MIDNIGHT
SUN. 3 PM
SPECIAL SHOWING OF "I, ROBOT"
SEPT. 2nd @7PM ONLY!
Aug. 23-Sept. 24: "Angels & Demons" by Muslim Arab artist Khalil Bendib - OPENING RECEPTION ON SEPTEMBER 10
@ 4PM in Mendenhall Gallery
Sept. 9th: BINGO - Mendenhall Dining Hall @ 9:30PM
Sept. 11th: Avett Brothers - 4:30 - 6:30PM @ Tailgate Field
Wlr
www.ecu.edustudentunion For more info call 328-4715





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Page A5
editor@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366
AMANDA Q. UNGERFELT Editor in Chief
THURSDAY September 2, 2004
Our View
This week at the Republican National
Convention, protestors have made countless
national headlines for their actions in New
York City.
The protesting has become so severe, that
arrests related to the event were record-break-
ing. A New York criminal court spokesman told
the Associated Press that Tuesday's arrests
in Manhattan totaled to 1,191 - the most
convention-related arrests in one borough for
one day.
All around the Madison Square Garden
convention site, an unusually large amount
of police lined the streets with automatic
weapons. TEC can't help but wonder what
kind of scene may develop from the already
existing tensions between the protestors and
the armed policemen.
Are the armed officers really necessary?
Can't they remain somewhere close to the
convention site, but out of view from
pedestrians?
Since the beginning of the RNC, there has
only been one record of violence related
to the convention - an officer was beaten
unconscious.
However, no suspects were obtained in the
beating, and the incident did occur blocks
from Madison Square Garden.
The protestors in attendance oustide of the
convention are peaceful and unarmed. Sure,
there may be an occasional rock or bottle
thrower, but is a sea of armed men really
needed to tame such troublemakers?
The NYPD should take a quick history
lesson - many times police have used their
guns for crowd control in the past they have
committed violent excesses. The tragedy
at Kent State is more than enough of an
example of such.
Although the past week's action has been
tame, tonight will be the true test as President
Bush enters the convention to speak. We only
hope that both Bush's and the protestors'
voices will be heard in a safe and non-vio-
lent atmosphere, protecting everyone's First
Amendment rights.
Our Staff
Nick Henne
News Editor
Robbie Derr
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Nina Coefleld
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Katie Koklnda
Asst. News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Asst. Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst. Sports Editor
Rachel Landen
Special Sections Editor
Herb Sneed
Asst. Photo Editor
Alexander Marciniak Jenny Hobbs
Web Editor Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
252.328.6366
252.328.6558
252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or reject
letters and all letters must be signed and include a
telephone number. Letters may be sent via e-mail to
editor@theeastcarolinian.com or to Tirre East Caro-
linian, Student Publications Building, Greenville, NC
27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more information.
One copy of The East Carolinian is free, each addi-
tional copy is $1.
I DON'T SUPPORT A
MARRIAGE AMENDMENT. MY
DAUGHTER IS GAY, SO I KNOW
SOMETHING ABOUT THAT.
MAYBE IF YOUR DAUGHTER WAS
UNEMPLOYED, OR UNINSURED, OR
ON A FIXED INCOME AND NEEDING
PRESCRIPTION DRUGS, YOU'D
"KNOW SOMETHING" ABOUT
THOSE PROBLEMS, TOO.
IS THAT HOW IT WORKS?
YOU'RE INDIFFERENT TO
PEOPLE'S HARDSHIPS UNTIL
THEY AFFECT YOUR OWN FAMILY?

WE DID BURDEN HER
GENERATION WITH
CRUSHING DEBT!
DOES THAT COUNT?
Opinion Colunmist
Republican National Convention draws crowds
Largest political protests in
decades planned
PETER KALAJIAN
STAFF WRITER
Warmest salutations to all my
fellow ECU students, and to those
new arrivals joining us from the world
outside of Greenville for the first time,
welcome. I understand that the first
week of classes after long summers
spent lounging on the beach, or slaving
away in the back of a steaming restau-
rant, can distract our attention from
important events occurring outside
of the insulated cocoon of Greenville,
NC, so please allow me to remind
everyone of the upcoming Republican
National Convention in New York this
week.
While the idea of a stadium filled
to the brim with sweaty, middle aged
white men arguing over which country
to invade next would not normally
appeal to me on an intellectual, nor
any other, level, I find this year's RNC
to be of special note.
Massive street protests, the largest
since the 1968 Democratic National
Convention in Chicago, are being
planned for the entire week. As tens
of thousands of protestors and Repub-
lican supporters descend on Madison
Square Garden, an Army of security,
both N.Y.P.D. and National Guard,
along with dozens of other law enforce-
ment organizations, prepare for the
onslaught. The question remains:
Will the protestors, the vast majority
of whom want nothing more than
to shout their slogans and wave their
banners, be met with tolerance and
cooperation (two privileges which they
are in fact granted by the United States
Constitution) or with pepper spray and
attack dogs?
In 1968, Mayor Richard Daly
declared war on Vietnam protestors,
many of who were American veterans,
and forever illustrated to the world the
way NOT to conduct business with
political protestors. Either way, Karl
Rove and the rest of the Bush political
assault team have taken steps to ensure
that whichever scenario comes to pass,
the president will have his back cov-
ered so as not to be bothered with the
unpleasantness of political reality.
In a publicized move last week,
top Bush administration officials set
out on a public relations campaign to
depict any protestors at the RNC as
unpatriotic and unsupportive of a sit-
ting president. The N.Y.P.D. has already
made hundreds of arrests, most often
for unlicensed public demonstrations
and overt political dissension, often
sighting "security concerns" or "public
safety issues Lucky for them, the
Patriot Act makes the suspension of
constitutional rights in the interests
of national security the order of the
day.
With national support for the war
in Iraq decreasing by the week, and the
illusion of Iraqi sovereignty losing cred-
ibility with every passing month, Bush
needs a miracle. No doubt, he and his
crack squad of propaganda artists will
do a very convincing job trying to sell
his failed policies in Iraq, Afghanistan
and at home, but in the end, I have an
unflinching faith in the American abil-
ity to detect BS coming from national
leaders.
Bill Clinton was hung from a yard-
arm for his little indiscretion, and all he
did was lie about an extramarital affair.
To my knowledge, not one American
solider was killed in the wake of the
Monica Lewinsky scandal. Bush has
lied to us about a war, and as a result,
more than 1,000 Americans and count-
less Iraqi civilians have lost their lives.
Maybe it is time we opened our eyes.
Online Reader Responses
Responses to column,
'In wake of recent events,
where are the liberals?'
When I read articles posted by this
individual (Tony McKeej, he usually
leaves out information and facts that
would weaken his argument. The
information on the swift boat captains
is only a week or so old, so I can't see
how that could slip his mind. He did
fail to mention that it took several
weeks for Bush to call an end to the
ads. I am sure Limbaugh and O'Reilly
are proud to know that a loyal right-
winger like Tony is following in their
footsteps of providing misinforma-
tion.
� William Nelson
I am very proud to say I am a
Liberal and I am here to answer your
questions.
People in this country have the
right to disagree with political figures,
especially those from opposing par-
ties. Democrats do not have to sing the
praises of President Bush, that's what
the RNC is for.
It is true; we liberated the people
of Afghanistan and Iraq, but let's not
pretend the current administration did
so for the good of the people. The US
rarely goes into coun tries for humani-
tarian reasons. Iraq has a vast amount
of oil, which is of great interest to very
wealthy Americans. Afghanistan was
of interest to Bush because if it could
be occupied, it would be an easy route
to get into Iraq.
If we were really interested in remov-
ing dictators and liberating oppressed
people, why are we not concentrating
on other nations? Why, after 40 some
years, have we not yet overthrown
Fidel Castro, so Cubans can benefit
from trade with the United States? You
know we have the capability. Why are
we not taking action against North
Korea or Iran, both of which have
openly said they have capabilities for
weapons of mass destruction, both
oppress their own people and both
have tyrannical figures running the
government?
Why doesn't the United States try
to help Haiti? We don't even consider
Haitian refugees when they make it to
our shores. Haiti's government is in
chaos, AIDS is in epidemic proportions
and there are no real viable products
being exported from Haiti. This is
greatly suppressing the economy of
the country.
The answer to all of my questions is
that none of these nations has anything
of importance to the United States. We
don't care about the people of these
countries because we can't gain any-
thing from them. I know my conserva-
tive counterparts will say we can't save
the world, but maybe we should stop
trying to police the world also.
I am so happy you brought up Bill
Clinton. You're right, President Clinton
sent many troops to other nations for
humanitarian efforts. If 1 remember
correctly, Republicans did not praise his
efforts. They tried, relentlessly, to attack
his personal character. Conservatives
do not remember what an excellent job
he did as President, only that he had an
extra-marital affair. Why should liber-
als have to celebrate Bush if conserva-
tives did not have to do the same for
Clinton? You mentioned hypocrisy in
a certain political party sounds to me
like the only party being hypocritical
is the Republican Party.
You also brought up the Swift Boat
Veterans for Truth. You and I both
know these vets are a group that stem
from the Republican Party and despite
their name, are very untruthful. These
men said they "served alongside Kerry
Actually, they were in Vietnam at the
same time as Kerry, but not slde-by-
side with him. Now, I go to ECU with
you, Mr. McKee, but know nothing
about you. Just because one is in the
same area in the same year as another
does not mean they know enough to
contest one's character. It is very slan-
derous. Slander is not covered by the
First Amendment, Mr. McKee. These
same men came out against Senator
John McCain in 2000 and Senator
Max Cleland in 2002. Isn't it some-
what suspicious these same men were
in all of these places at the same time?
They could not have enough first-hand
experience with all of these men to
comment on their personal lives before
they became politicians.
You said there was a lot of hypocrisy
in the Democratic Party, but maybe
before you point fingers, you should
remember the childhood quote, "When
you point the finger at someone, you
have three fingers pointing back at
you
� Samantha Riley
Tony, you couldn't have worded
it any better. I am in total agreement
with you. Every thing you said in your
article is true. Where are the liberals?
Who knows. All I know is that Kerry
is a constant liar and he can't seem to
make up his mind. He votes for one
thing and then votes against it. I don't
want that man to be my president. Also,
when the primaries were taking place,
Democrats were voting for him because
they believed that he could beat Bush.
They didn't vote for him for what he
stood for or what he could do for our
country, just because they believed
that he could beat Bush. The students
at ECU and the nation need to really
think about that. Kerry isn't going to
do anything for this country but sit on
his butt and pretend to do something.
I'm voting for Bush hands down. Bush
has done well for this country and he
will continue to do so.
� Shanda Schroeder
Pirate Rant
Editor's note: The Pirate Rant is
an anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
sent to editor&theeastcarolinian.
com. The editor reserves the right
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.
With the elevators in White
Hall being out of commission on
a daily basis, who needs the SRC
to exercise in? I've got 10 flights
of stairs to walk up and down,
three or four times a day.
Why is it the fire alarms only
go off when I desperately need
sleep?
We have thousand-dollar,
flat-screen TV's throughout
the Science and Technology
Building that run nothing but
announcements, and yet ECU
can't afford to get the dishwasher
in Mendenhall Dining Hall fixed.
I'm sure those plastic forks and
Styrofoam trays are great for the
environment.
Every time a guy tries to pick
me up he gives me some corny
line. Do you really think that's
gonna make me want to jump in
bed with you?
The elevators in White Hall
have been broken on and off
since move in and yesterday they
informed us they will either shut
down the elevators completely
for two months, or just leave it
up to chance. You know what
my reward for this huge incon-
venience is? A free smoothie
coupon at the SRC. Gee, thanks,
Campus Living.
Why does the staff get the
majority of the best parking spots
when they make up a minority of
the campus population?
Here's a hint - if I see you
passing out flyers for something
in the Wright Place and I pur-
posely walk away from you, don't
chase me down and ask me if I
want one.
I thought it was interesting
that certain Republican stu-
dents chose to hold up signs at
the Kerry rally saying "Bush's
daughter's are hotter Is that
the only valid arguement for the
Republican party against John
Kerry?
Do the bus drivers not see me
when I'm running alongside the
bus, flailing my arms, begging
them to stop and pick me up?
Why does ECU say they are so
poor, and yet they keep building
buildings?
We need to exterminate some
of the ugly girls on campus and
get some more fine ones. Rant
Editor's note: Sounds more like we
need to exterminate the a"holes
from the campus.
Why does the food in the
dining halls have so much fiber?
For real man, I'm always running
to the John immediately after
eating that stuff!
"Trust me, people
act differently when
you've got jewelry on
your head
Paris Hilton, in her memoir,
Confessions of an Heiress:
A Tongue-in-Chic Peek
Behind the Pose.





U LLe
Page A6 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 ROBBIE DERR Features Editor CAROLYN SCANDURA Assistant Features Editor THURSDAY September 2, 2004
Announcements
Mendenhall Billiards:
Pool Tables and Ping-Pong - ECU
OneCard Required
Hours: Mon. - Thurs. and Sat.
12 p.m. -1 am.
fit 1 p.m. -1 a.m.
Sun. 1 p.m. -12 a.m.
$3hour for pool. $1.50hour for
ping-pong (White Ball ,50Yellow
Ball 75)
Parties can make a reservation for
tables by calling 328-4738
Mendenhall Bowling: Outer
Umltz Bowling Center:
ABC-Sanctioned - ECU OneCard
Required
Hours: Sun. 1 p.m. -12 a.m.
Mon. - Tues. 9 a.m. -10 p.m.
Wed. - Thurs. 9 a.m. -12 am
Fri. - Sat. 1 p.m. -1 a.m.
$2game
Specials: Mon Wed. and Fri.
1 p.m. - 6 p.m. $1
Sun. 1 p.m. - 6 p.m. .50 (Shoe
Rental .50)
Healthy Hints
Surround yourself with a
great support system - family,
friends:
Keep yourself surrounded from
every side with positive-minded,
healthy people who are on YOUR
team - people who will care
for, support, love, respect and
appreciate you.
Laugh often:
Recent studies are showing the
significance of how laughter,
fun and mirth help keep people
healthy, as well as heal sick
bodies. Everyone is really a
unique, hilarious person. Look for
the hilarity in every situation and
keep laughing.
Keep your thoughts positive:
What you put out does come
back. So if you want to feel and
look great, monitor your thoughts
closely to ensure that you are
thinking only positive, forwarding
thoughts. If you catch yourself
thinking a negative thought, simply
turn it around into a positive
thought.
Healthy Eats
Tortilla- Black Bean Casserole
Ingredients:
2 cups chopped onion
� 1-12 cups chopped green
sweet pepper
� 1 14-12-ounce can tomatoes
34 cup picante sauce
2 cloves garlic, minced
2 teaspoons ground cumin
2 15-ounce cans black beans
Nonstick spray coating
10 7-inch com tortillas
2 cups shredded reduced-fat
Monterey Jack cheese (8 oz)
Shredded lettuce (optional)
Sliced small fresh red chili
peppers (optional)
Directions:
-In a large skillet combine
onion, green pepper, undrained
tomatoes, picante sauce, garlic
and cumin. Bring to boiling;
reduce heat. Simmer, uncovered,
for 10 minutes. Stir in beans.
-Spray a 2-quart rectangular
baking dish with nonstick coating.
Spread one-third of the bean
mixture over bottom of the dish.
Top with half of the tortillas,
overlapping as necessary, and
half of the cheese. Add another
one-third of the bean mixture,
then remaining tortillas and bean
mixture. Cover and bake in a
350 degree F oven for 35 to 40
minutes or until heated through.
Sprinkle with remaining cheese.
Let stand for 10 minutes.
-If desired, place some shredded
lettuce on each serving plate.
To serve, cut casserole into
squares and place atop lettuce.
Garnish with chili peppers, If
desired. Makes 6 to 8 main-dish
servings.
Nutritional Information:
Nutritional facts per serving
calories: 248, total fat: 4g, saturated
fat: 1g, cholesterol: Omg, sodium:
631 mg, carbohydrate: 40g. fiber:
5g, protein: 15g
Recipe from Better Homes and
Gardens: Bhg.com
New Starbucks now open
Employees at the new Starbucks are ready and eager to help their new customers. The store is conveniently located near Pitt County Community Hospital.
Hospital area now has
new place for coffee
CAROLYN SCANDURA
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
Greenville is growing more
and more each day. There
are many new restaurants in
town but not many of those
restaurants have as much to
offer as a brand-new Starbucks.
Their grand-opening was
Saturday, Aug. 28. This unique
coffee experience has much more
to offer than great coffee drinks.
Starbucks is a great place for
students and Greenville residents
to enjoy coffee and grab a wide
variety of pastry treats.
Meredith Clinard, the
manager of the new Starbucks
located at the corner of Arling-
ton and Stantonberg Roads, is
very excited to be opening this
new store. Meredith is a young,
up-beat Starbucks coffee master
who began training to be a
manager in June of 2004. Her
training was done under the
tutelage of Brian Harrison,
the manager of the Greenville
Boulevard Starbucks. When asked
how she would describe working
at Starbucks, Clinard said, "I love
it. It's a lot of fun. There are many
Personal Trainer
challenges but we have fun at
what we do
There are new Starbucks
popping up all over the country
because of the way this amazing
company does business. Walk-
ing into a Starbucks alone, it's
obvious that all of the employees
are having fun with what they
do but further investigation
tells why. Starbucks has two
different kinds of mission
statements, which address
aspects of the company outlook
that many companies do not
really think about. One of these
missions deals with how to
maintain the financial
livelihood of the company
and apply the highest stan-
dards to serving employees and
customers. The other, is to work
towards a role of environmental
leadership, which encourages
employees and customers to
preserve the environment.
The Arlington Boulevard
Starbucks has 20 employees who
are an even mix of ECU students
and Greenville residents. Each
employee is trained for two
weeks. They all learn how to do
everything from setting up the
drip coffee machines to foam-
ing milk to making a caramel
macchiato and pouring the milk
at just the right rate that it does
not spill all over the floor.
Coffee making standards
that are set by the Starbucks
Corporation are very stringent
and learning these techniques
is important; but after basic
techniques are learned is when
the fun part starts. Employ-
ees at Starbucks strive to make
the coffee experience the best
for each customer, every time
they are in the store. Whether
the customer comes up to the
counter or uses the drive-thru,
coffee personalization is always
welcome. Some coffee veterans
have different requests such as,
58 of an Equal packet or nine
counterclockwise stirs. Everyqne
has different tastes. Manager
of the Greenville Boulevard
Starbucks suggests customers
experiment with their coffee. If
customers do not like the way the
coffee turned out, the store will
take it back and make a new one
until the customer is right.
All of the employees at
the Arlington Boulevard store
are very up-beat just like their
manager Meredith Clinard.
"The Matt aka Matt
Lewis, a junior construction
management major, explained
how he started working at this
Starbucks location: "Meredith
asked me to come and work for
her. It is a great environment
and Ij hope to be here till gradu-
ation
"Starbucks gives you so much.
It is a fun environment that
moves very fast. The employee
benefits are great and everyone
Is really fun said a Starbucks
employee.
With such great testimonials
from employees, it is no wonder
that Starbucks was on The For-
tune 100 Best Companies to
Work for 2004 list. Not only does
Starbucks provide a happy and
safe place for employees to work,
they are also very involved in the
community. The Starbucks Foun-
dation, in place since 1997, is
"dedicated to enriching the lives
of youth in underserved com-
munities For more information
about Starbucks the Corporation,
the Starbucks Foundation or pos-
sible job opportunities, visit their
Web site at www.starbucks.com.
Starbucks is a great place to
pick up a quick coffee and pastry
or to sit and study. Some students
have been known to study at vari-
ous Starbucks locations for up to
six hours at a time, which is fine
with all of the employees.
"Starbucks is meant to be
relaxing and no one will ever be
asked to leave for sitting at a table
too long said the manager from
(") Starbucks
Things to remember
Location: 2205 W.
Arlington Blvd.
Hours:
Monday: 6 a.m. -11 p.m.
Tuesday: 6 am -11 p.m.
Wednesday: 6 am. -11 p.m.
Thursday: 6 a.m. - n p,m.
Friday: 6 a.m. -11 p.m.
Saturday: 6 am -11 p.m.
Sunday: 6 am -11 p.m.
Most Popular Coffee Flavor:
Cafe Verona
Full Service Drive-Thru
the Greenville Boulevard loca-
tion, Brian Harrison. The new
Starbucks, which is very close
to the hospital, is a great place
for students to study, hangout
together or just sit and people
watch. Visit this upbeat staff soon
and you will be glad you did!
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Heavy clothes and heatstroke
Exercising in hot weather while wearing long pants and a long-sleeve
top greatly Increases your risk of dangerous overheating.
Coverage adds up
Each area represents
nsolbody s
surface
Arm
Tillotson, author and ECU
alumnus, publishes memior
Head
Front
of torso
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Layers
matter
Two thin layers
can insulate -
and overheat -
even more
than one
heavy one
Front
of leg
Source
Runrxr World
if
Gfiphtc
Paul Trap
Fabric matters
Loosely
woven,
lightweight,
lets aw
through
Medium-
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"wicks"sweatshirt.
sweatholds
iway frommoisture
body
Denim,
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fabric, lets
through little
or no air
A
Jery Tillotson adds
'Nights of Fury to list
of published works
LISA TUMBARELLO
SENIOR WRITER
Author, Jery Tillotson, a 196S
graduate of ECU, has recently
released a memoir collection,
Nights of Fury, revealing his
struggles of growing up as an
openly gay person from post
World War II to Sept. 11.
Tillotson is a native of
Thomasville, NC, and has
written
nu merous
novels of sus-
pense, horror
and gay
erotica. He
is widely rec-
ognized and
praised for
his writing,
especially in
the gay community.
Tillotson has a strong fan
base from the North Carolina
area since many of the settings
and experiences, which he writes
about, are adapted from the time
he spent growing up here. He
most often uses the Piedmont
and coastal areas in his novels,
and also has incorporated some
of his experiences at ECU into
his stories.
Tillotson assumes several
pen names for his stories, each
with a different personal-
ity and story style. Although
there are many, his most
recognizable alter egos are Jason
Fury, Andrea D'Allasandra
and he will soon be introducing
yet another as Kandy Kristmas.
Jason Fury is most
appropriately the author of
Nights of Fury. Nights of Fury is a
collection of experiences adapted
from his personal journals from
the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s.
Fury devotes an entire chapter
in this memoir collection to his
experience at ECU when he stud-
ied here from 1963 - 1965.
Tillotson describes his two
years at ECU as a turning point
in his life. ECU had not yet
encountered an "out-of-the-
closet queer boy before this
brought out the worst and the
best in people said Tillotson.
He touches on many da mag i ng
times at ECU as a result of being
so unashamed of who he was.
"If you were even suspected
of being a queer at ECU - and
most other colleges in the early
1960s - your life could be made
hell Tillotson said.
"Mine was, many times over
As a gay student at ECU in the
1960s, Tillotson found support
in the least likely of places. He
tells of the jocks who accepted
him and the gays who wanted
nothing to do with him.
"The gays at ECU were totally
in the closet Tillotson said.
"They considered me too
obvious
Nights of Fury tells of the
Mmply unforgettable men" of
the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s.
In the Disco days of big hair
and high fashion, sex was
everywhere and being a
sexually free male was much
different thart it is today.
Tillotson's account of this
extraordinary era will be
an interesting read not
f
t '
see FURY page A7





9-2-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE A7
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The East Carolinian is hiring
for the following positions:
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Photographers
Layout Designers
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
only for gays but also for
those who want a better
understanding of what it was like
to be gay.
"I hope readers will be
intrigued with how queer people
lived, startingafter World War lion
up to the present Tillotson said.
"Since I witnessed the Sept.
11 massacre at the World Trade
Center, this should give the book
an added jolt of shock
Tillotson worked for IS years
in the journalism field after
he graduated from ECU. He
worked at the Wilmington Star-
News after he graduated and
eventually moved around to
several notable journalism
publications before moving to
New York City in 1978.
Tillotson now works for New
York Life and continues to write in
his spare time. He is soon releas-
ing a more youth-targeted novel,
Doofus, The Little Christmas Boy,
under the pen name Kandy
Kristmas.
"1 like writing as Kandy Krist-
mas. She's very down-to-earth,
maternal, warm and nurturing
Tillotson said.
The 231 page story is aimed
at the Harry Potter crowd and
is described by Tillotson as "a
fast-paced fantasy novel that
should keep everyone on the edge
of their seats
Tillotson will be adding
this novel to his already
acclaimed list of more than IS
stories including Eric's Body and
The Rope Above, The Bed Below,
which have become staples in
the gay community. Tillotson is
constantly churning out new
works and will surely keep
his fan base satisfied for years
to come.
To check out more
about Jery Tillotson visit
www.jerytillotson.com. To pur-
chase any of Tillotson's novels visit
www.barnesandnoble.com.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Mind games: Play them now,
build brainpower for later
(KRT) � OK, we're getting
our bodies in shape.
Now, it's time to do a boot
camp for your brain.
A growing body of research
has concluded that by keeping
your mind active, you may stave
off the memory loss and dimin-
ished brain functions associated
with aging. Physical exercise
and a healthy diet can boost the
brain, too.
"If you start in your 30s
or 40s, you have four or five
decades to control these factors
that come into operation that
can have a very dramatic effect
says Dr. Ranjan Duara, medical
director of the Wien Center for
Alzheimer's Disease and Memory
Disorders at Mount Sinai Medical
Center in Miami Beach.
So, bravo to the crossword-
puzzle-a-day crew, the amateur
CPAs doing their own taxes, the
polyglots who add one more lan-
guage to their repertoire. Any and
all of these activities done in ear-
lier life can help bolster the mind
in old age, a concept experts call
"the cognitive reserve" theory.
Jeanette Tristman of Miami
Beach has lived her life by that
creed. At 86, she spends hours
on the computer, does crossword
puzzles and reads voraciously.
"This is the only way to do
it she says. "If you don't use it,
you lose it
Some experts, however, doubt
these exercises have an inside
track of lowering the risk of
cognitive decline. Without hard
data to support such claims, it's
just too early to know, says David
Loewenstein, director of research
at the Wien Center.
WATCH EXTREMES
"It can't hurt to stay mentally
active, but anything that's good
can also be taken to an extreme
says Loewenstein, a professor of
psychiatry and behavioral sci-
ences at the University of Miami.
'I have people ask me, My God,
do I have to play Scrabble six
hours a day?
In the past, conventional
wisdom held that brains did not
grow cells after a certain point.
But research has shown that lab
animals that navigated mazes
in captivity buffed up their hip-
pocampus, a part of the brain
involved with storing memories.
It's not known whether mental
activity has a similar effect on
human brains, but research holds
that what one does now can pay
off later.
"What you put in earlier in
adulthood and middle age can
help you guard against some of
the other aspects of cognitive
decline in later life said Uni-
versity of Florida psychologist
Michael Marsiske.
To help people stockpile
that mental capacity, "brain
gyms" have proliferated on the
web, with names ranging from
MyBrainTrainer.com to Happy-
Neuron.com, each one promising
a collection of mental calisthen-
ics.
At Memory Concepts, sub-
scribers pay an annual fee of
$99 to pump mental iron with
exercises that tax five aspects
of memory - language, execu-
tive function (problem-solving),
visual-spatial skills and long- and
short-term memory.
Watching two family mem-
bers suffer from Alzheimer's
disease inspired founder Janet B.
Walsh to create her own mental
exercises, like taking art classes
and brushing her teeth with her
nondominant hand. Eventually
she paired with a neuropsy-
chologist to develop a program,
which she likens to training at
the gym.
"You really need someone
to show you how to lift weights
properly or run on that treadmill
properly says Walsh, 48, of Long
Island. "We're actually saying
the mind has the same capacity
and we're just going to help you
along
But others say the toughest
mind games may do little to
enhance people's ability to func-
tion in the real world as they age.
One of the largest studies to date
ofolder adults' cognitive abilities,
the National Institute of Aging's
ACTIVE trial (for Advanced Cog-
nitive Training for Independent
and Vital Elderly), demonstrated
that while the subjects aced
memory and problem solving
tests on paper, they registered no
improvement in daily living. This
result suggests that structured
classes or even exercises found on
the Web may be misguided, says
University of Florida psychologist
Marsiske, one of the principal
investigators.
"It's acontextual. It's not
related to real life he says.
Rather than taking classes
on how to improve one's
memory, he said, people should
engage in real-life activities
such as going to the library
or taking courses that spark one's
mind.
DIET AND FITNESS
Intellectual activity alone
does not necessarily suffice.
Physical fitness and a healthy
diet, important for maintaining
sound bodies, helps maintain
sound minds.
One recent National Institute
of Aging study found that after
six months of regular aerobic
exercise, seniors improved their
recall ability by 25 percent,
according to cognitive function
tests performed at the beginning
and end of the period. Those who
engaged in nonaerobic exercise
for that same period saw no
benefit.
Earlier this month at the
Alzheimer's Association meet-
ing in Philadelphia, a Harvard
doctor reported that middle-
aged women who ate vegetables,
particularly leafy greens, stayed
sharper than their counterparts
who turned their noses up at this
food group.
"These are all good things
when it comes to brain health
says Dr. Gary Small, director of
the UCLA Center on Aging and
co-author of The Memory Prescrip-
tion (Hyperion, 2004). "What's
good for your brain is also good
for your heart
In his book, Small describes
a four-pronged plan to improve
the memory in just two weeks,
calling it "a boot camp for the
brain The plan melds memory
exercises, physical activity, a
diet high in antioxidants and
omega-3 fatty acids, and stress
reduction.
Neuro-imaging scans showed
that in just two weeks, a group
of volunteers, age 30 on up, saw
a S percent improvement in the
efficiency of their brain function,
Small says. Their stress levels and
blood pressure dipped.
Now, he hopes to. follow
people over the long term to see
if the results will continue to
accrue.
"If we can get such dramatic
results in two weeks, imagine if
people did this for two months
or two years. I would predict
that it would lower the rate of
Alzheimer's he says. "This may
not cure it, but if we can stave
it off for six months or a year,
it would have a huge impact on
public health
For some, memory prob-
lems are not a symptom of
old age but a way of life. All
his life, Ira Abrams, 71, has
had trouble recalling people's
names. At social gatherings, the
Aventura man would station
his wife by his side and whisper
a constant stream of "what's
his name, what's her name" to
her.
Years ago, he joined the brain
gym of his generation, taking a
class to hone his ability to recall
names. "That memory course
he says, "from, oh what's his
name
A beat passes. He hems ner-
vously and then blurts out, "Dale
Carnegie as the answer bubbles
up from the inner recesses of his
memory.
Never, never, never give up.
COMMITMENT
Pass It On.
THE FOUNDATION for a BETTER LIFE
www.forbcttcrlife.org





1
PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
9-2-04
New art exhibit starts
the season off fresh
rtEvent Info
Greenville Museum
of Art presents artist
James Daniel, III
JESSICA CRESON
SENIOR WRITER
On Sept. 9 an exhibition
at the Greenville Museum of
Art opens with James Daniel's
artwork and will go through
Oct. 31.
Daniel is from Asheville, NC
and for seven years he worked
with Ben Long, a popular fresco
artist, as his assistant as well as
his apprentice. In 2002, Daniel
had his own show for the first
time at the St. Eugene's Catholic
Church in Asheville.
Fresco is mostly known for its
boom in Italy during the 13th and
14th centuries. Michelangelo's
"Sistine Chapel" and Leonardo
DaVinci's "The Last Supper" are
some of the most famous works
done during this time.
Then, the Catholic religion
was a major influence on most
paintings. Now, there is a larger
range of subjects.
"You shouldn't try to clas-
sify yourself as just one thing or
another. In Italy, no matter what
style you practice, theycallyoua
painter, until you reach a certain
level of artistic achievement.
Then they call you an artist said
James Daniel, III on the Gallery
C Web site.
Fresco involves painting
water-based colors into wet plas-
ter. If the plaster dries before
the artist is done painting, then
they must start over again. This
does not allow much room to
experiment and make changes.
Therefore, this style of painting
requires a detailed plan before
starting.
Daniel's exhibition will
cover how fresco is made from
beginning to end. He has made
mini frescoes, cartoons and
studies made on other fres-
coes to give customersvisitors
more information on the art of
fresco.
Opening night, Sept. 9,
Daniel plans to be there at 6
p.m. to speak about his work at a
gallery talk.
The Greenville Museum of
Art started off as a storefront in
downtown Greenville and has
grown to now be a 10,000 square
foot gallery.
The gallery rias many things
Who: James Daniel, III
Where: Greenville Museum ol Art
When: Sept 9 - Oct 31
Visit Galleryc.net tor more Into en
Gallery C In Raleigh and Gmoa.
org for more Into on Greenville
Museum ol Art.
to offer its visitors, such as: gal-
lery talks, openings, tours, lun-
cheons and performances.
It caters to the young and
old with the various programs
offered. Anyone can sign up for
class and workshops at the gal-
lery as well.
It is located at 802 South
Evans St. in Greenville. The gal-
lery can be reached at 758-1946.
Admission is free.
Gallery C, located in Raleigh
and founded in 1985, represents
Daniel and is known to be one of
the oldest and finest art galleries
in the state. They have a wide
variety of artists and styles.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Get caught
reading.
4
HE EAST CAROLINIAN
GET YOUR BOWL ON
Bowling League Informational
9204 6:30pm in Outer Limitz Bowling
Mendenhall Student Center
Leagues Play Begins
9804 for Wed Night League (No tap bowling)
9904 for Thur Night League (Regular bowling)
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Registration forms available in Outer Limitz Bowling
Talk is cheap!
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Get Your Student Football Tickets
at Dowdy Student Store.
$ . Jty

Student Tickets
Watch your email or visit our
website for details about our
ECU Pirate Football
promotions, includins the
"Take it AWAY Points Sales"
held after every AWAY game
won by the Pirates!
Student tickets for home games are available at ECU-
Dowdy Student Store, 9 am - 7 pmTuesday through
Thursday prior to each home game. Your ECU 1 Card
is required. You may not pick up tickets for other
students at the student store.
I Student tickets are also available at the Mendenhall Student
Center Ticket Office and the Athletic Ticket Office. Hours at
: locations vary.
those I
The greatest selection of Fan Wear
is at ECU-Dowdy Student Store!
ECU PIRATE GAME SCHEDULE:
Saturday, September 4 � W. Virginia
Saturday, September 11 Wake Forest
Saturday, September 25 � Cincinnati
Saturday, October 2 � Louisville
Saturday, October 9 � Tulanc
Saturday, October 23 � So. Miss
Saturday, October 30 � Army
Saturday, November 6 � Houston
Saturday, Nov. 13 � So. Florida
Saturday, November 20 � Memphis
Saturday, Nov. 27 � NC State
In Charlotte
Games In BOLD are played at ECU s
Dowdy-Fickkn Stadium
Jr
Clip this schedule & ticket pick-up info
tor
Student Stores

Ronald E. Dowdy
$& � (252) 328-6731 � www.studentstores.ecu.edu
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9-2-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE A9
In 31 states, freshmen must be vaccinated against meningitis
Schools across the nation are helping students stay healthy this school year by requiring
students to receive meningitis shots before coming to school this fall.
(KRT) � For the price of a
pair of sneakers, John Kach prob-
ably could have saved his fingers
and legs.
Kach, a college student in
Rhode Island, believes vaccina-
tion against meningitis would
have kept him from contracting
the bacterial illness - most likely
in his dormitory - that led to the
loss of his limbs four years ago.
If only he had gotten that shot,
which costs about $85.
"I went to the doctor's office
for a physical. They recom-
mended getting vaccinated, but
they didn't have vaccine at the
office Kach said during a recent
teleconference sponsored by the
federal Centers for Disease Con-
trol and the National Meningitis
Association.
"I figured, meningitis, what-
E ever I went to school and didn't
get (immunized) there he said.
"I played basketball, had a good
time. I didn't get to it. I regret it
Every year, about 125 col-
lege students like Kach contract
meningitis, and five to 15 of
them die. The risk of dying is six
times higher for students in dor-
mitories, particularly freshmen,
according to the American Col-
lege Health Association. Up to
80 percent of those college cases
are preventable with vaccine, the
organization said.
In general, the vaccine is 85
percent to 100 percent effective
in preventing meningitis in older
children and adults.
This year, New Jersey joins 30
other states that require all fresh-
men and transfer students who
plan to live in college campus
housing either to be immunized
against meningitis - which New
Jersey's law does - or to be edu-
cated about the disease, before
they start school.
New Jersey and Connecticut
have the toughest college men-
ingitis immunization state laws
in the country, according to the
National Meningitis Association.
Rep. Robert E. Andrews, D-N.J
has sponsored a similar federal
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New Jersey's law will affect
about 37,000 students living in
dormitories at four-year colleges,
said Marilyn Riley, spokeswoman
for the state Department of
Health and Senior Services. Last
year, there were 29 cases of men-
ingitis in New Jersey, including
seven victims between the ages
of 18 and 25 years old, Riley said.
Four of the 29 patients - all men,
and ranging in age from 23 to 72
years old - died.
There have been 20 cases of
meningitis in New Jersey so far
this year. Six people have died,
including a 5-year-old girl who
died in July at a day camp. Fellow
campers and workers were given
antibiotics as a precaution, and
there were no other cases.
Meningitis is a form of
meningococcal disease that
inflames the membranes of the
brain and spinal cord. Another
form, meningococcemia, infects
the blood. Meningococcal dis-
ease strikes about 2,500 Ameri-
cans every year, causing death in
up to 15 percent of cases.
The deadly, contagious bac-
terial bug is carried in small
droplets. It can be spread by a
kiss, a cough, a drink, a smoke,
a sneeze - especially in close
quarters, such as a college dorm.
Bacterial meningitis can cause
brain damage, hearing loss and
learning disability.
There is also a viral form of
the disease, which is less severe
and usually resolves without
specific treatment.
College students are particu-
larly vulnerable to the disease
because "they don't eat right or
sleep right and they share close
quarters. That's always been a
concern said Shirley Smith,
director of health services at the
Madison, N.J campus of Fair-
leigh Dickinson University.
This summer, letters like this
one from Gail Pakalns, direc-
tor of Seton Hall health and
counseling services, were part of
freshmen orientation packages at
colleges in New Jersey:
"Dear Incoming Seton Hall
University Student: 1 am writing
to inform you about the new law
that requires meningitis immu-
nization for all incoming stu-
dents (undergraduate and gradu-
ate) who will be living in campus
housing. The New Jersey law goes
into effect September, 2004
Seton Hall expects that 850
of its 1,225 freshmen will live
on the campus this year and
therefore need to be immunized
against meningitis, according to
Joan Osthues, associate director
of health services. The students
were told they could be vacci-
nated by their own doctor or at
a campus clinic for $85, Osthues
said.
Seton Hall had a confirmed
case of the disease in 1994, when
a student found a friend feeling
weak and feverish in his room.
The ill student was taken to a
hospital, where he was diagnosed
with bacterial meningitis. Pre-
ventive medication was given to
all who might have had contact
with him, and the campus was
alerted about the case. The stu-
dent recovered completely, and
no one else became ill, according
to campus health services.
John Kach, the Rhode Island
college student who survived
meningitis, had a far more severe
case. One day in 2000, Kach was
in his dorm when he developed
flu-like symptoms that included
vomiting and a 104-degree tem-
perature. When he was no better
the next morning, his girlfriend
took him to a hospital.
He developed red and purple
blotches on his arms and back.
A blood test showed he had 10
times the normal number of
white cells, which fight infec-
tion. His lungs and kidneys were
shutting down.
"My blood was curdling, like
milk recalled Kach, who devel-
oped gangrene in his hands and
legs. Eventually, doctors had to
amputate most of his fingers and
both his legs below the knee.
"It's such a rare disease, but
to me it's not so rare. I've seen
people suffer and die from it. A
lot of people are not as lucky as I
am said Kach, who is attending
college again. He now advises
high school seniors to get vac-
cinated before they go off to
school.
"The possibility of meningitis
is reduced. It's one less thing to
worry about he said. "It's only
$80. It's a pair of sneakers
Meningitis vaccine is not
routinely recommended for
adults, just those such as college
students or military personnel
housed in close quarters, said
Dr. Julie Gerberding, director of
the CDC.
"Even though it's a very dev-
astating disease, it's very rare,
and people are reluctant to get
vaccinated Gerberding said.
"Fortunately, we don't have a lot
of cases. But the ones we have
are serious
V1





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9-2-04
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9-2-04
r
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ir
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I
Page B1 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY Z0PP0 Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
THURSDAY September 2, 2004
Dream Team
will return
in 2008
Unfair criticism
directed toward USA
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Quick - name a team or an
athlete that made the medal
stand this year at the Olympic
Games rolling on about two
months of practice. Not four
years, not three. Two months.
Have you
thought of
one yet?
OPINION
A h ,
there you
go - The
USA basket-
ball team,
right?
Now name
another.
Didn't
think so.
Why are we making such
a big deal about this year's
"Dream Team" not stand-
ing atop the podium? Team
USA basketball did some-
thing a lot of countries
combined were not able to do
the entire two weeks of com-
petition: medal. A bronze
medal, but nevertheless, a
medal.
I know, I know. We are
Team USA, the team who is
expected to always win the
gold in basketball. This was
definitely a disappointment
considering that we have won
gold every Olympics since
1992, the year we introduced
the "Dream Team or profes-
sional athletes, to compete in
the games.
So what went wrong with
the 2004 squad? Nothing.
We threw together a bunch
of all-star athletes that were
WILLING to travel overseas
and represent our beloved
country. Those athletes had
a few months of preparation
to get used to each other and
the international style of play
and rules.
Speaking of international
style of play, maybe they
should just refer to it as "inter-
national barrage of three
point field goals with an
asterisk beside it. Asterisk
being that the three-point
line was several feet shorter
than what our NBA players
are used to in the associa-
tion.
If our players had the
same amount of time to pre-
pare for the games (year-
round) as all the International
teams did, we would have
put up triple digits in each
contest. Let the world's great-
est athletes (NBA) shoot-
21 foot jumpers for a year
straight and then see what
kind of numbers they put
up then.
There are several articles
out now stating the rest of
the world has caught up with
the Americans in the sport
of basketball and may nave
even passed them in skill
level. Those statements and
articles require one simple
answer: bull.
Kobe Bryant, Shaq, Kevin
Garnett, Ben Wallace, Jason
Kidd, Steve Francis, Vlnce
Carter. You tell me when
to stop and I will. Tracy
McGrady, Paul Pierce, Baron
Davis, Reggie Miller. OK, so
you get the point and other
writers should too.
I do respect other
nations in that they do
send their absolute best to
the games because their
players feel it as a honor and
duty to play and represent
their country in the Olym-
pics. "Team" USA should
take notice to the rest of
the world and see how
much it means to them
to win the gold medal.
These excuses that were
thrown in at the last
second by some of our star
athletes would just be unac-
ceptable in other countries.
Hats off to those that went
and performed the )ob they
were supposed to do.
I know what you are still
thinking, "But we got the
1 bronze medal, so what?"
I hate that. I remember
watching the 1992 team
�cruise through the entire
tames, never challenged. In
net, Head Coach Chuck Daly
never used a single time-out
in the entire tournament.
see TEAM page B2
ECU opens season against No. 10 WVU
The Pirate defense will have to contain West Virginia standout quarterback Rasheed Marshall, who scored four touchdowns on ECU last season.
Pirates want first win
in Morgantown
ERIC GILMORE
STAFF WRITER
That time of year has finally
arrived. The ECU football season
is upon us. With the turn of the
calendar to September, ECU stu-
dents and fans should now be
able to sense football in the air.
The Pirates will begin its
season with a new state when,
they travel to play No. Id West
Virginia on Sept. 4 at 6 p.m.
A sellout crowd of 60,000 is
expected at Milan Puskar Sta-
dium for both team's season
openers.
"From the moment that we
walked off the field against
Southern Miss, our football team
has turned their attention to this
season said Head Coach John
Thompson at his weekly press
conference.
"We've had a bad taste in our
mouths since last season and we
.wnttqspttJt,ouV' , .
' 'T think you will see a differ-
ent edge to this football team.
There is a commitment to getting
this program back to where it
used to be. Nobody likes where
we are, but everybody knows
where we are going to get to.
We are on the right path and
the right direction Thompson
said.
The first test of the 2004
season should shape up to be
the hardest. The heavily favored
Mountaineers are now the fea-
ture team in a weak Big East and
have their eyes on a BCS bowl. In
a hostile environment, it will be
important that the Pirates have
the right attitudes.
Offense
The Pirates will debut a ver-
sion of the Fun-N-Gun offense
under new offensive coordinator
Noah Brindise. The Steve Spur-
rier protege hired away from the
Washington Redskins has shown
in the off-season he wants to
spread the ball all over the field.
"Noah Brindise has put
together a very good plan that
will take advantage of our per-
sonnel Thompson said. .
Those strong personnel will
include 1,000 yard rushers in
Art Brown and Marvin Townes.
ECU is only one of three teams in
the nation to have two returning
1,000 yard rushers. Brown, red-
shlrted the 2003 season because
of a nagging knee inury, wants
to hit the field with a vengeance.
Joining Brown and Townes in
the backfield will be big-bodied
fullback Jermarcus Veal.
Handing off to both run-
ning backs will be sophomore
quarterback James Pinkney.
see PREVIEW page B3
ECU to host tournament
ECU Volleyball will compete against High Point, Furman,
Mercer and Lamar this Friday and Saturday as the Lady
pirates play host to the City Hotel and Bistro Invitational. All
ECU matches are scheduled at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. on both days.
A new world record
Defrocked Irish priest Cornelius Horan attacked marathon leader Vanderlei De Lima.
Another Olympics,
another sideshow
Overtime heartbreaker
ECU men's soccer
talltoUNC-W.2-1
KYLE ROGERSON
STAFF WRITER
UNC-Wilmington has proved
to be a respectable opponent
over the past few years and a loss
in overtime is not the way the
Pirates had hoped to start their
season against their archrival.
However, that was the story at
Bunting Field yesterday after-
noon as the Seahawks defeated
the Pirates 2-1.
The Seahawks controlled the
first half with ball possession
and well-made passes. Russell
Bienias, a sophomore defender,
scored the only first-half goal
for the Seahawks at about the
20th minute of the gameBienias
stood just inside the box as he
drilled a shot off a half volley past
the Pirate keeper, Brian Pope.
In the second half the Pirates
answered with a goal from Terron
Amos in the 74th minute of the
match. Terron had threatened to
score earlier in the game and he
finally was able to capitalize on a
great offensive opportunity.
The ball was crossed into
the box by Matt Kowaleski and
made its journey to the foot of
Amos standing approximately
five yards from the goalkeeper.
He easily placed the ball in the
back of the net and tied the
game at one.
Later, Amos brought the fans
to the edge of their seats during
see SOCCER page B2
BRENT WYNNE
SENIOR WRITER
After the summer 2004
Athens games, Generation X will
have plenty of stories to tell their
grandchildren. However, it won't
be about Michael Phelps' incred-
ible run to eight medals or the
USA men's basketball team bring-
ing home a disappointing bronze
medal. Phelps' record will likely
be outdone in the years to come,
and the United States basketball
team will return to dominance
on the international level.
What will be remembered
about this year's Summer Olym-
pics however, is the staggering
number of drug cases and how
those cases effectively tarnished
an already sub-par Olympic expe-
rience for the viewer.
As of Aug. 28, the day before
the Olympics concluded, a record
21 different drug cases were
reported in a story ran by the
Associated Press. Keep in mind
Paul Hamm speaks to reporters about his gold medal.
that each case doesn't necessarily
involve one athlete. A number
of cases had two or more cul-
prits, such as the one involving
Greek sprinters Kostas Kenteris
and Katerina Thanou, who were
effectively pulled out of the games
while the IOC was investigating
their missed doping tests.
At least Kenteris and Thanou
didn't have to suffer the embar-
rassment of competing and win-
ning, then getting caught red-
handed like Hungary's Robert
Fazekas, who lost his gold medal
in discus after he allegedly tam-
pered with a doping test.
The fact that the Athens games
were clouded by failed drug tests
and cheating athletes didn't come
as a surprise to me. Although the
number of cases is extremely high,
the Olympics have rarely been
without incident.
see OLYMPIC page B2





PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
9-2-04
Team
from page B1
That truly was the "Dream Team
Jordan, Bird, Magic, Drexler
and so on. It was a team that
molded itself into one single
unit with one united purpose:
to destroy any competition in
its path.
That's what is coming again
in four years. The United States
will restore its original basketball
swagger and show the rest of the
world how great a team can be
and how crushingly painful it
will be to face them in the Olym-
pic Games.
The whole NBA gets to
read all these articles on how
everyone has finally caught up
to us and how everyone is on a
level playing field. 1 will person-
ally say thanks to those writers
who will have awakened a sleep-
ing giant. A giant that will step on
anything that comes between it
and its goal. A giant that is Team
USA. A giant that will once again
become "The Dream Team
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeas tcarolinian. com.
The USA men failed to win a gold medal in Athens this year.
Soccer
from page B1
the final minute of the game.
He received a lofted pass from
near midfield as he was enter-
ing the box running forward
toward the goal. He managed
to maneuver around the final
defender between he and
the goalkeeper and as the
fans gasped, he gave the ball
one last touch before shooting.
However, he nudged the ball too
far out in front of him and the
UNC-Wllmington keeper
pounced on it.
WithTerron's misfortune, the
Pirates headed into overtime.
It was obvious that ECU had
the momentum during the first
part of OT and they created many
offensive opportunities early in
the period.
However, the Seahawks
regained control of the game.
One of their strikers ripped
a shot with his left foot from
twenty yards out that soared
past an outstretched Brian Pope
and hit the left post of the goal
frame.
Moments later, a Seahawks
player crossed the ball into the
box from the left flank. UNC-
Wilmington forward Keith
Shevlin was in perfect position to
head the ball past Pope into the
back of the net.
This somewhat new rivalry
does not amplify the game for
the players exclusively. It was
an equally tough game for the
referees. The center referee was
Captain Reed Avren played well against Wilmington but ended
the game scoreless. The Pirates will take on Longwood next.
forced to stop the game several
times as the tempers of a few
players flared up.
While both teams played
very aggressively, the players did
not become overwhelmed with
emotion at any one point during
the game. Many fouls were called
and a number of free kicks were
given, along with two yellow
cards.
One of the two
cards was given in
regulation and the other was
awarded late in the overtime
period to Pirate midfielder Chris
Mobley.
Likewise, Head Coach Michael
Benn did not become heated as a
result of the game.
"Losing is losing said Benn,
responding to whether a loss in
this particular rivalry stung any-
more than a regular game.
"You hate to lose a game like
that, with how hard we fought
but overall, a loss is a loss
The Pirates will take to the
field again this Sunday when
they play Longwood at home on
Bunting Field at 1 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
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9-2-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B3
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But how do you choose?
First ask yourself what appeals to you.
What are you good at? What do you like to do?
The ALLIED HEALTH CAREER EXPLORER can help you
narrow down your search. Go to www.ecu.eduah and
click on the CD. You'll get the scoop on dozens of careers
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Now's the time to get started on your futurel
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Carol Belk Building
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t'iwvwwmr www.ecu.eduah
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
School of Music Concert Series
World-class virtuosity for a song.
Subscribe
today.
Clarino Consort
Sunday, September 12 v
Baroque trumpet ensemble
Meridian Arts Ensemble (above)
Saturday, September 25
Blazing their own trail, the MAE truly
offers something tor everyone.
Klasinc Loncar Guitar Duo
Monday, September 11
Croatian-born classical guitarists
Jon Nelson, trumpet
Thursday, November 4
MAIi trumpeter and composer
The Oberlin Trio
Saturday, November 6
Virtuosos with 1,000 globe-girdling
performances among them.
Nathan Fischer, classical guitar
Wednesday, November 17
"master of several hundred years of music"
Ray Stewart, tuba
Friday, December 3
MAE co-founder whose work is heard on
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John Ferrari, percussion
Friday, January 28
MAE member, frequent Lincoln Center
performer
Brian McWhorter, trumpet
Wednesday, February 9
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Friday, February 18
With the ECU String Chamber Orchestra
Meridian Arts Ensemble
Saturday, March 5
Zappa, Bach, or both? Find out.
Dan Grabois, horn
Sunday, March 6
MAE member, also performs with the
New York Chamber Ensemble
Ara Gregorian, violin and
Nadejda Vlaeva, piano
Friday, Apnl 15
Celebrated prof and pnzewinning pianist
Benjamin Herrington, trombone
Saturday, April 16
One of New York's leading trombonists
VMM
A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall at ECU All
concerts at 8KX) p.m. except Clanno
Consort, which begins at 7:00 p.m.
Tickets
Purchase individual tickets at $10 aduJts
$5 students, or buy the I4-concert series
at $98 adu!ts$42 students. Call
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Pinkney separated himself from
the other quarterbacks in the
off-season and quelled any pos-
sible controversy. He grasped
the detailed offense quickly and
never relinquished his spot on
the depth chart.
Pinkney will have several
options to throw to. The wide
receiver position is largely
unproven, but there is no short-
age of bodies so no receiver
should be winded.
The Pirates have seven play-
ers that could see time at the
receiver position. Leading the
corps will be the speedy Dam-
arcus Fox. Arguably the fastest
player on the team, Fox is the
leading returning receiver and
last season scored one touch-
down to go along with 131
receiving yards.
Starting at the other receiver
position is Brian Howard, who was
superb in the last two scrimmages.
"Our wide receivers have
stepped up. We've been able to
do some things with so many
young guys. Having Robert Till-
man step in to the wide receiver
position will help our football
team Thompson said.
Also contributing to the
receiving corps will be senior
Edwin Rios, junior Bryson Bowl-
ing and sophomores Bobby Good,
Will Bland and Kevin Roach.
The offensive line remains a
question mark. With only one
starter returning, Thompson is
looking to some younger, inex-
perienced guys to step up in big
ways. Gary Freeman, who gained
10 pounds and lost eight waist
sizes this off-season, will anchor
the O-Line.
The offensive line will need
to play well in order to create
holes for the talented running
backs and for Pinkney to have
sufficient time to throw.
Two junior college tight ends
will provide immediate help at a
position that was a severe weak-
ness last year. Shawn Levesque
will start, but Shawn Harmon
and Josh Coffman will give Brin-
dise enough leeway to run the
ball in short yardage situations.
Cornerback Adam Jones will
lead the West Virginia defense.
Jones is a physical corner who
was named to the Preseason
All-Big East first team and led
the team with four interceptions
last year.
Joining Jones as leaders on
the defense will be linebacker
Adam Lehnortt and defensive
tackle Ben Lynch, who received
high praise among the preseason
publications.
Defense
"Defensively, we wanted to
play faster and we are playing
faster. There is an understanding
and a comprehension of how we
should play Thompson said.
ECU'S defensive line is the
biggest weakness of the team.
Guy Whimper and Dontre Brown
will have to anchor the razor
thin D-Line. Richard Koonce will
provide some speed at the end
position, but will give up nearly
60 pounds against the mammoth
line of West Virginia.
Chris Moore, the nation's
returning tackier and Butkus
Award candidate will be the most
vocal player on the defensive side
of the ball.
"Chris is a leader on this foot-
ball team. When things go well,
Chris will be right in the middle
of it, but when you go against
us, you will see Chris getting it
straight Thompson said.
Some new faces will be at
the outside linebacker position.
JUCO transfer Jamar Flournoy
and converted fullback Dashaun
Stephens will start to give ECU
speed off the edge.
The secondary will be the
strength of the Pirate defense.
With so many young guys get-
ting experience last year, the
ECU pass defense should be tail
down on the nearly 200 yards per
game they gave up last year.
Erode Jean, a Conference
USA All-Freshman team a year
ago will be featured against the
team's best receivers. Donald
Whitehead will bring experi-
ence at the other corner position
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in being the only senior. JUCO
transfer Zach Baker and Kyle
Chase will start at the safety
position.
The ECU defense will have
their hands full in stopping the
WVU offense. The Mountaineer
offense starts with two-year
starter Rasheed Marshall. Mar-
shall burned ECU last year for
four touchdowns. He has the
ability to run the option or drop
back in the pocket and look at his
large receiving targets.
"If Marshall has a good game
throwing or running, it's going
to be tough for us. We've got to
not let him have a good game
Thompson said.
The Pirates are going to have
to stop a dual threat in the back-
field, courtesy Kay-Jay Harris and
Jason Colson. Both Mountaineer
running backs will share time
and carries on Saturday. The No.
10 team has averaged 448 yards
rushing over the last two meet-
ings against ECU and WVU has
only gotten better.
The Mountaineer offensive
line can be credited with a major-
ity of the rushing statistics. The
line averages 297 pounds, which
would be good for any profes-
sional team. Guards Jeff Berk and
Dan Mozes are both All-Big East
selections.
The best player on West
Virginia's team is the returning
Big East newcomer of the year
in 6-foot, S-inch wide receiver
Chris Henry. Henry burned
ECU for two scores on his way
to 1,006 yard receiving season.
The sophomore receiver has an
8-inch advantage over 5-foot, 9-
inch cornerback Erode Jean.
Special Teams
The special teams should
again be a strong suit for the
Pirates. Ryan Dougherty, one of
the nation's best punters, will
lead the kicking game. Place
kicker Cameron Broadwell nailed
virtually every field goal in each
of the Pirates' scrimmages. Bran-
don Howard has received praise
from Thompson and will be the
long snapper.
Returning kicks will be super-
star freshman Chris Johnson and
senior Marvin Townes. JUCO
transfer Demetrius Hodges will
return punts.
Adam Jones will lead West
Virginia's special teams. He
averaged 26.3 yards on kickoff
returns and 6.1 yards on punt
returns this past season.
The Mountaineer kicking
game will feature place kicker
Brad Cooper who contributed 79
points last season with a career
long field goal of 43 yards.
Intangibles
Mountaineer Field is no easy
place to play and Thompson
believes that his team knows that.
"You look forward to being
in a hostile atmosphere because
you feed off that energy. If they
come out and are booing us and
throwing stuff at us, we will use
that to our advantage Thomp-
son said.
ECU'S football team and fans
will talk about how the Pirates
were snubbed by not receiving
a Big East Conference invite last
year. This will be the Pirates' first
time to prove to the nation that
they made a mistake.
"Everybody at ECU talks
about having a chip on their
shoulder Thompson said.
"I think you're going to see
that because everybody has that
chip and that little edge
The Mountaineers lead
the all-time series 13-2 and
the Pirates have never beaten
WVU in Morgantown. They came
close in 1996 when former Head
Coach Steve Logan decided to go
for a late two-point conversion
and subsequently failed, losing
the game by a mere one point.
In those 280 days since the
Pirates have last played, the
coaching staff and football team
have changed their attitudes.
This ECU football team knows
what it has to do. All they have
to do is prove everything on the
field. It's that time of year.

This writer can be contacted at
sports�eas tcarolinian. com.
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PAGE B4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
9-2-04
Olympic
from page B1
In the 1972 Munich games, 11
Israeli athletes were killed after
being kidnapped by Palestinian
terrorists. Five terrorists and a
policeman were also killed in a
blood bath that came as a result
of a rescue attempt.
In 1980, the United States,
along with West Germany and
japan, decided to boycott the
Moscow games in protest of the
Soviets' invasion of Afghanistan.
Four years later, the Soviets retali-
ated by boycotting the LA games.
As if that wasn't enough
drama for the history books,
the 1996 Atlanta games will
be remembered for an extrem-
ist who bombed Centennial
Park, killing one and injuring 111.
Maybe the International
Olympic Committee should
add a new event to the games
that includes all the convicted
terrorists, the boycotting coun-
tries, and the athletes who failed
their drug tests. They could call it
storytelling and the best story will
be the one that ruins the experi-
ence for the most athletes and
fans. That particular story would
win the gold. I mean, pardon my
sarcasm, but aren't the Olym-
pics starting to become a world
circus for clowns, who could be
countries, terrorists or athletes?
This particular year it just
happened to be the corrupt
athletes who took center stage.
However, despite the fact that
the summer games in Athens
set the record for the number of
drug cases, there can be some-
thing positive taken from that.
The IOC is apparently more
efficient in their drug testing,
which was first introduced in
Tokyo in 1964 and has been
steadily improved over the years
to keep pace with the athletes
who will inevitably try to cheat
the system.
Even though the committee
has made significant progress
with catching cheaters, the drug
problem is like a sinking boat
that has six holes in it; the IOC
has five fingers to plug these
holes, but one is always left open,
leaving one problem or another
continually exposed.
As with criminals, the cheat-
ing athletes will always be one
step ahead of the authorities,
so maybe it's time for the IOC
to' make another committee to
specialize in drug testing. Not
random testing, but testing in
full for every athlete who has
anything to do with the games.
That way, perhaps we can put an
end to the epidemic of drug use
in the Olympics.
This writer can be contacted at
sports&theeastcarolinian. com.
Patriots look to repeat as champs
A preview of 2004-
2005 NFL season
BRANDON HUGHES
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
America's favorite pastime
will be upon us soon. The giants
among men will don their pads
and helmets and begin to earn
their $1 million paychecks. The
preseason is drawing to a close
with plenty of fresh faces on
each team. Rookies are hoping to
make an impact, while seasoned
veterans gear up for another
championship run.
Several
new rules will
play an impor-
tant factor in
the upcoming
season, includ-
ing the new
injury rule.
Teams, must
report injuries of any player and
cannot falsify any reports.
The emphasis on another
rule could have a big impact
during the season. Officials have
been encouraged to enforce the
chucking by the defensive backs
off the line of scrimmage. Defen-
sive backs can't make contact
with receivers running a route
after five yards from the line of
scrimmage. This will undoubt-
edly light up the scoreboards and
some star receivers should have
career numbers.
NFC East
Philadelphia won this cup-
cake division last season, but
the Eagles will be in for a much
tougher schedule with a col-
laboration of some of the greatest
coaches in the NFL. Dallas sur-
prised everyone in 2003 with the
addition of coach Bill Parcells.
Look for the same improvement
from the Washington Redskins
after Joe Gibbs returned to D.C.
on a white horse. The Giants will
dwell in the cellar.
Philly will take this division
again, but it won't be easy. The
Eagles barely outlast the Red-
skins, who make a run with one
of the most dynamic offenses in
the league. The combination of
Mark Brunell, Clinton Portis and
Laveranues Coles will be fun to
watch, but the lack of a defensive
line will be their undoing. The
Cowboys could have run away
with the NFC East, but a poor off-
season will haunt them down the
road. They desperately needed
a running back and addressed
the issue by drafting Julius Jones
and signing Eddie George. It
will be the ageless Vinny Tes-
taverde handing the ball off to
the declining George after replac-
ing Quincy Carter, who was cut
after failing a drug test. The
Giants added new Head Coach
Tom Coughlin, but gave up way
too much for Eli Manning.
NFC North
Green Bay and Minnesota
will battle for the North division
title. Brett Favre is one of the
greatest quarterbacks of all-time,
but his age will catch up with him
eventually. If Minnesota quar-
terback Daunte Culpepper can
cut down on his turnovers and
Randy Moss stays out of trouble,
the Vikings have a shot. Chicago
should have a dismal season, but
Detroit has a huge upside with
loads of young talent. Hopefully,
Joey Harrington will blossom
into the player everyone expects
him to be.
NFC South
The Carolina Panthers came
out of nowhere last season to
represent the NFC in the Super
Bowl. Unfortunately, they didn't
make the most of perhaps their
only opportunity. The Pan-
ther defense is for real, but Jake
Delhomme was an aberration.
Stephen Davis needs to stay
healthy for them to repeat in the
competitive South, but won't put
up spectacular numbers thanks
to a depleted offensive line.
New Orleans is always a
sketchy team to predict. The
Saints are very streaky, but the
defense needs to improve for a
playoff appearance. Tampa Bay
had an off year in 2003, but
they will be back strong in 2004.
Look for them to compete with
Carolina, but eventually come up
short. Atlanta still needs a better
supportive cast for Michael Vick.
NFC West
San Francisco and Arizona
will be the two worst teams in
the NFC, which leaves St. Louis
and Seattle. The Rams still have
the slight edge, but the Seahawks
have the better quarterback.
Matt Hasselback is the most
underrated signal caller while
the Rams' Marc Bulger earns the
most overrated.
St. Louis still has Isaac Bruce,
Torry Holt and Marshal! Faulk
and added rookie running back
Stephen Jackson. That should be
enough to outlast Hasselback,
who is being talked about as a
possible MVP candidate.
AFC East
New England easily won this
division on their way to the Super
Bowl and it looks like another
easy path this season, especially
with Corey Dillon added to the
mix. Buffalo has the best shot
with a healthy Drew Bledsoe
and some receivers to throw to.
Miami has no legitimate quarter-
back to take the pressure off the
Ricky Williams-less backfield and
the New York Jets are destined for
another mediocre season.
AFC North
The North had arguably the
weakest division in the AFC as
Baltimore escaped with just a 10-
6 record. The Ravens will improve
on that mark with their suffocat-
ing defense led by Ray Lewis.
By 6th grade, an alarming number
of girls lose interest in math,
science & technology. Hhich means
they non't qualify for most future
jobs. That's �iy parents have to
keep their interest alive,
in every my we can.
It's her future.Do the malh.
wwN.girlsgotecli.org
�ft GM Smuts.
Their fate hinges on whether or
not running back Jamal Lewis
will stay out of jail.
Cincinnati has to eventually
start Carson Palmer, the No. 1
pick last season, but it's unfor-
tunate because Jon Kitna finally
had a breakout year. Dillon is
gone to Buffalo and the Bengals
will be under .500 once again.
Pittsburgh picked up Ben Roeth-
lisberger in the draft to eventu-
ally replace Tommy Maddox at
quarterback. That might take
place sooner than later, but the
Steelers, along with Cleveland,
will have a losing record. Jeff
Garcia is the new Browns offen-
sive leader, but he will need more
weapons in order to contend.
AFC Sooth
Indianapolis and Tennessee
had identical records in 2003, but
the Colts just keep getting better.
The Titans have issues at running
back after losing George.
Jacksonville and Houston
are doomed for another anemic
season. The Texans are on the
way up, but still a few years away
from being a contender.
AFC West
Kansas City had a spectacu-
lar offense last year and Denver
couldn't quite compete. The
Broncos traded star running back
Clinton Portis to the Redskins
and acquired Champ Bailey.
Seems like Washington got the
better end of that deal. Still,
Denver will hang in there, but
the Chiefs will emerge again.
Oakland and San Diego
should both rebound nicely from
horrible campaigns in 2003. The
Raiders have two capable quarter-
backs in Rich Gannon and Kerry
Collins. And the Chargers got
the best quarterback in the draft
in Phillip Rivers, plus everything
the Giants gave up to get him.
This writer can be contacted at
sports�theeastcarolinian. com.
GET GOOD SERVICE
FROM YOUR GOOD
NEIGHBOR.
l LIVE wHEBi Ol LIVE.
Don't trust just anyone to
insure your car, see me.
Bill McDonald, Agent
2710 E 10th Street
Greenville, NC
252-752-6680
LIKE A GOOD NEIGHBOR,
STATE FARM IS THERE.
MUfum urn'
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MM h M)
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hoid:
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ISTUOesrrCTJNODMNIJMS
�Located on the campus of ECU beside the
Student Rec Center.
�Six Floor Plans to choose from, and within
walking distance to downtown Greenville.
�All Units are Fully Furnished.
Phone:(252)752-2865 635 Cotanche Street No. 900
Fax (252)752-1021 Geenville, NC 27858
Mark A. Ward
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Board Certified Specialist In State Criminal Law
15 Years Experience In Criminal Defense
� Iraffic Offenses
� ABC Violations
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� DMV Hearings
� State & Federal Courts
252.752.7529' www.mark-ward.com � mward@mark-ward.com
)� Gordon's �m 6olf & Ski r5jjB www.Gordonsgolfandski.com ta� Open M-Sat 9-7 For fine Golf, Ski & Snowboard Accessories, Equipment & Apparel
1 WiMOUNTAIN
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Wednesday - M Mug Pud It 4 Pitchers
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M-Sat 9-7
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vboard
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Page B5
THURSDAY September 2,2004
For Rent
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015- 1 St 2
BR apts, dishwasher, GD, central
air St heat, pool, ECU bus line,
high speed internet available, 9
or 12 month leases. Pets allowed.
Rent includes water, sewer, St
cable.
Twin Oaks townhouse, 2 BR, 1 12
bath, end unit on ECU campus bus
route. Patio, pool, WD hook-up.
$575 per month. Call 864-346-
5750 or 864-228-3667.
Chocowinity Veterinary Hospital is
looking for a responsible student
to live RENT FREE in an efficiency
apartment. We prefer interest in
animal science or health field.
Great opportunity for Pre-Vet! Call
for details (252)946-9000.
1713 Treemont Drive-1950's brick
ranch, walk to ECU, 4 BR, 2 baths,
detached garage, screened-in
porch, near Elmhurst School,
Ficklen-Dowdy. $950month. Call
355-5150
Walk to ECU. 4 BR, 2 Bath, two
story with deck, central heatair,
newly carpeted and painted. Nine
to twelve month lease. Call 259-
0424 or 756-3947.
Walk to campus, 3 bdrm, 1.5 bath,
116B N. Meade St. Hardwood
floors, ceiling fans, all kitchen
appl. included, washerdryer, attic
space and shed. Nice size front
back yard. $675.00month. First
month free rent. Call 341-4608.
Walk to Campus- 4 BR 2.5 BA
townhome available close to
ECU. WS cable included Call 4
appt 752-4225 EHO. Managed
by AIMCO.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments,
walking distance to campus, WD
conn pets OK no weight limit,
free water and sewer. Call today
for security deposit special- 758-
1921.
Roommate Wanted
I am looking for a female roommate
to share a double apartment at
Stratford arms (next to school
of Allied Health on Charles Blvd)
Rent: $235 with half utilities (cable
included) email me or call me at
252-439-1061328-9856 regards
Chayadevie.
Roommate wanted for 2 bedroom
apt. Great location on 5th St. next
to campus and downtown. $270
month plus 12 utilities. Contact
osh at jls0403@mail.ecu.edu or
(919)623-7393.
For Sale
Welcome Back! 20 off purchases
and 50 off snakes at Pets
during September with a student
ID. Memorial Drive near Lowes
and Food Lion. 252-439-1026
Stereo equipment for sale. CD
Never, never, never give up.
COMMITMENT
Pass It On.
THE FOUNDATION �� A IITTII LIFE
www.forbencrlife.org
ART.
ASK FOR
MORE.
CT-
For more information about the
importance of arts education, please contact
www.AmericansForTheArts.org.
AMERICANS
ARTS
Dapper
Dan's
aue Cloilii
Jewelry & More.
Come check
us out!
801 Dickinson Ave.
Uptown Greenville
752-1750
FREE
� of poor maintenance response
� of unrctumed phone calls
� of noisy neighbors
� of crawly critters
�of high utility bills
� of ECU parking hassles
� of ungrateful landlords
� of unanswered questions
� of high rents
� of grumpy personnel
� of unfulfilled promises
� of units thai were not cleaned
� of walls that were never painted
� of appliances that don't woi k
Wyndham Court &
hast gate Village Apts.
.1200 F Moseley I)r.
561-RENT or 561-9011
www.pinnacleproperty
management.com
player, DVD player, receiver,
surround preamp. Most $100 or
less. Call ohn 752-6597.
Furniture Sale- all furniture is in
excellent condition. 2 end tables
$50.00 each, 7' off white sofa
$400.00, coffee table $100.00,
ceiling fan $25.00, 6' sleeper sofa
$150.00, white refrigerator $200,
2 bar chairs $50.00 each, large
dresser wmirror $150.00. Please
call 252-756-7862.
Gateway Computer for sale.
Pentium 4 processor, 1.8Chz,
128 MB RAM, 40 CB hard drive,
CD-ROMCD-RW, Microsoft
Windows, XP Home Edition. Price
$900. Please call 252-258-2287.
Help Wanted
Gymnastic teachers needed!
Experienced males St females
who enjoy working with children,
23,000 sq. ft. modern gym,
2 miles from campus, contact
Darlene Rose at 321-7264.
Active Handicapped Male needs
personal attendant. 7-10am M-F
and every other weekend. Call
756-9141.
Part time PHP programming
help needed immediately. Please
send Resume with references and
availability to programmer@wave
lengthmail.com.
Bedrooms St Sofas Plus is looking
for clean cut and responsible
individuals. Full and Part time
Delivery Positions Available. Apply
In Person at 425-A S.E. Greenville
Blvd. No Phone Calls.
Afternoons only- Responsible
Christian College Student
needed to pick up and supervise
two children after school. Call
758-5806.
Greenville Recreation St Parks
Department is recruiting
part-time employees for the
following positions: Youth Soccer
Coaches and Referees, Youth
and Adult Flag Football Referees
($12-$17 per game) and Skate Park
Attendants. Coaches must possess
a good knowledge of these sports
and be able to coach young people
ages 3-15. Coaching and referee
hours range from 4 pm to 9 pm,
Monday-Friday with some
weekends. Skate Park attendant's
hours range from 2 pm-dark
Monday-Friday, 10 am- dark
Saturdays and 12 pm- dark
Sundays. Flexible hours according
to class schedules. These positions
will begin in September. Salary
rates start at $6.25 per hour. Apply
at the City of Greenville, Human
Resources Department, 201 Martin
L. King Dr. Phone 329-4492. All
interested in Flag Football Referees
need to contact the Athletic Office
at 325-4550 for information
regarding upcoming training
dates. For more information,
please contact the Athletic Office
at 329-4550, Monday through
Friday, 12-7 pm.
Sylvan Learning Center has part-
time math instructor positions
available. Must be a positive,
energetic, individual with a passion
for helping students. Teaching
experience required. Must be
available for hours: MonThurs.
3:30-6:30. Pick up application or
send resume to 611 East 12th St.
Washington, NC 27889.
Pitt County Community Schools
and Recreation is currently
looking for senior exercise
instructors, youth sports
referees (soccer, volleyball, and
basketball) and volunteer youth
sport coaches. Days, times, and
pay vary depending on position.
Persons interested should call 252-
830-4216.
5 motivated People Needed.
Work from Home. Earn $500 to
$5000 per month. 252-566-
5502 or Toll Free 888-211-5281.
www.252dreams.com
Fast paced, growing company
seeks energetic telemarketers
appointment setters. Excellent
verbal skills a must. Flexible
schedules. Opportunity for quick
advancement. Call after 1pm M-F:
(252)355-0210.
Personals
Get Control of Your Hunger. Lose
weight now with "ShapeWorks"
Free Consultation 252-566-
5502 or toll free 888-235-7041.
www. 2totalcontrol.com
Other
All year round- SKYDIVE! Tandem
skydive or learn to jump on your
own. www.JumpRaeford.com
910-904-0000. Contact us today
for details.
Spring Break 2005- Travel with
STS, America's 1 Student Tour
Operator to Jamaica, Cancun,
Acapulco, Bahamas and Florida.
Now hiring on-campus reps. Call
for group discounts. Information
Reservations 1-800-648-4849 or
www.ststravel.com.
(Bartending! $250day potential.
No experience necessary. Training
provided. (800) 965-6520 ext.
202.
Announcements
Hey ECU students! Special
Olympics Pitt County has
begun recruiting volunteers for
Fall Programs which include
soccer, basketball, rollerskating,
swimming after school and more.
For more information contact
Kelvin Yarrell at (252)329-4541 or
Kyarrell@greenvillenc.gov.
When you're
cruising the
information
highway,
pull off on
our new exit





Page B6
THURSDAY September 2, 2004
XfyltyMdxe treats
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Love the Penguins? Hate the Penguins? Write km �� let cm know! Email: twopenguiniinatub�yahoo.�ow
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PAUL
BIUVOKEEFE www.mmuv.com
H, fOB CRVIN6 OUT LOUD.
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Machinery part
4 Dramatic
divisions
8 Greek city-
state
14 The Greatest
15 Noble address
16 Trojan hero
17 Halloween
image
19 Canoe kin
20 Vow
21 Handsome guy
23 Links peg
24 Language of
Bangkok
25 Enjoy a repast
26 Pays heed to
28 "Misery" star
30 Hair of a goat
32 Penh
35 Contact
40 Sigma follower
41 Most roomy
43 Pension $
44 "The Rime of
the Ancient
Mariner" bird
46 "The
Sanction"
48 Court partitions
49 Swivel
51 Vedas reader
54 Brewed
beverages
56 6-6-44
60 Lennon's Yoko
61 Get back to
63 Uncommon
64 Newton-John
66 Common
wedding gift
68 Stop
69 Fascinated by
70 Make lace
71 Cooks in
vapors
72 Jacket or collar
73 NASA's ISS
partner
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Sebastian
2 Arabic word for
God
3 Mazda model
4 Invite
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5 Noisy insect
6 Pioneer marts
7 Hall
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8 Munro in print
9 Child's toy
weapon
10 Even one
11 "Giant" ranch
12 Available buyer
13 Pompous fools
18 Groucho's
brother
22 Part of the Bible
27 Pipe bend
29 Lack of
professional skill
31 Cries of surprise
32 Mom-and-pop
grp.
33 Actor Linden
34 Gist
36 Golfer Ernie
37 Shift dirt
38 Mineral matter
39 Much removed
42 "A-Team" guy
45 Plus
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50 Comfortable
with
51 Gangsters
52 Bay
53 Dissonance
57 Italian poet
58 Regions
59 Gossipmonger
62 Has a meal
65 Routing word
67 Nol of
55 Composer Blake Cambodia
CAMPUS EVENTS CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 2 004
Special Events on September 10 I World Peace Week Sept 19-24
ECU JAZZ ENSEMBLE CONCERT
hendrixtheatre, 7pm $5.oo for ecu Students
$ 10.00 for ECU FacultyStaff (in advance)
get ready to groove to the smooth tunes of our ecu jazz
Ensemble under the artful direction of caroll Dashiell!
SEPTEMBER 10 (FRIDAY)
ECU Family Weekend 04 ISpecial Events at Mendenhall & Student Rec Centerl
I ��
pm-lOprr,
enter

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For more Information on other ECU campuswide events check your ECU Email accounts for "THIS
WEEK AT ECU" announcements or contact 328-4700. This campus event calendar information
sponsored ECU Student Involvement Team
World
Peace Vigil
Tuesday, September 21
Steps of Joyner Library, 7pm
Join us for a special evening
ill reflections and musical
performances focusing on world
peace featuring the Gospel Choir,
Native American Drummer
Singers (Gray Wolf Jr.). .student
and (acuity speakers and more!
Sponsored by the ECU Student
Involvement Team, rormore information
call Joanna Iwata at 328-4()0.
Sunday, September 19 - Dnm;es lor-
Universal Peace, 4-6pm, Mendenhall
244. FREE. Sponsored by the ECU Student
Involvement Team.
Tuesday, September 21 - ECU World
Peace VigilUnited Nations International Day
ol Peace. Joyner Library (steps facing the
malll, 7pm. FREE. Sponsored by the ECU
Student Involvement Team.
Wednesday, September 22 Social Jus-
tice Institute: Speaker (Topic: 'What Have Wo
Come fa? Wars Between the Generations
7:30pm. Murphy Center. FUEL Sponsored
hrthn Lnrinnia Wright Cultural CenterOffice
of Intercultural Affairs.
'Thursday, September 23 - The Rumi con-
cert: A Turning Night of Stars with Coleman
Barks liuieriiationally renown poet and trans-
lator uf Riiiui), David Darting (cello. Glen Velez
(percussionl, Zuleika (dancel, 8:00pm, Wright
Auditorium. Free for ECU students wOne
Card $5.00 (or ECU lacultysta(1$10.00 public.
'Friday, September 24 - Arts for Peace: Po-
etry MusicDance Workshop with Coleman
Barks, David Darling, Glen Velez, ZUlelka
10am-12:30pm. Wright Auditorium. FREE.
FREE Student Tickets: RUMI CONCERT
�Sponsors of Coleman Barks two-day residency at ECU include: ECU Student Involvement Team
Student Union, Ledonia Wright Cultural CenterOffice of Intercultural Student Affairs, Center for
Off-Campus LivingOffice of Adult & Commuter Student Services, Division of Student Life Carol
Grotnes Belk Distinguished Professorship Endowment, College of Fine Arts and Communication
(School of MusicSchool of Art & Design), Thomas Harriot College of Arts and Sciences and thP
English Writers Reading Series.


Title
The East Carolinian, September 2, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 02, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1745
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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