The East Carolinian, July 14, 2004






Volume 79 Number 149
WEDNESDAY
July 14, 2004
Philippines vows to withdraw
troops in order to save hostage
'Fahrenheit' opens
in local theater
A protester shows her support for the release of Angelo dela Cruz, a Filipino worker held hostage in Iraq, during a rally Tuesday in Manila. The
protesters urged the government to heed the abductors' demand that Filipino troops are pulled out of Iraq.
MANILA, Philippines (AP) �
Frantically trying to obtain the
release of a captive Filipino truck
driver with the clock ticking down,
the Philippines said Tuesday it would
withdraw its tiny peacekeeping force
from Iraq as soon as it can.
However, the statement, which
followed all-night Cabinet consul-
tations, was unclear as to whether
Manila was advancing the pullout
as demanded by the Iraqi militant
kidnappers, or was sticking by its
commitment to bring its 51-strong
force home Aug. 20 as planned.
State Department spokesman
Richard Boucher, reiterating U.S.
policy rules out negotiating with
hostage-takers, said the American
Embassy in Manila was seeking
clarification of what the Philippines
government means by saying it
would withdraw its force as soon as
it can. Still, Boucher said this "sends
the wrong message" to the hostage-
holders.
"We certainly noted the remarks
and are disappointed to see remarks
like this at a time when Iraq is fight-
ing for stability and peace Boucher
said.
The spokesman said the United
States was continuing talks with
Philippine authorities.
"1 do think we have to keep the
onus where it belongs, and that's
on the kidnappers. And there's no
excuse for kidnapping, for murder,
for the kind of threats that have been
made against this gentleman and
that he should be released immedi-
ately Boucher said.
The confusion may have been
deliberate as President Gloria Maca-
pagal Arroyo seeks to maintain her
staunch support of the U.Sled war
on terrorism while avoiding a pos-
sible domestic backlash if Angelo dela
Cruz, a 46-year-old father of eight, is
beheaded.
"The Philippine government,
consistent with its commitment, will
withdraw its Philippine humanitar-
ian contingent forces in Iraq as soon
as preparations for their return to the
Philippines are completed Foreign
Affairs Undersecretary Rafael Seguis
told a Filipino reporter in Baghdad.
However, when the Arab televi-
sion station Al-Jazeera aired his state-
ment, Seguis was quoted as saying
the withdrawal would be made "as
soon as possible
The Philippine government,
which has imposed a news blackout
on the crisis, did nothing to clarify
the issue.
"Let us leave the government to
do what is necessary to save the life of
an innocent Filipino and to uphold
see PHILIPPINE page 2
viewers wait in line for 'Fahrenheit'
Viewers' opinions vary
on controversial film
DARLA MORAN
STAFF WRITER
Fahrenheit9ll opened this past week-
end in Greenville. It played to audiences
interested in getting an inside look at the
Bush administration from filmmaker
Michael Moore's perspective.
In the documentary, Moore tries
to uncover the secrets of the aftermath
of Sept. 11 and the reasons behind the
Iraq War.
Greenville viewers had a lot to say
about the film. Some agreed with Moore,
others hated it.
"Propaganda said viewer Joe Kitze-
row, who describes himself as a person
who does not keep up with politics.
"That pretty much sums it up. I found
out a lot of stuff. It definitely makes you
think. There are tots of connections you
don't think of and Michael Moore opens
your eyes to what's going on in politics
Viewer Melanie Glascoe said ft clari-
fied a tot of things about the war that
weren't explained.
"It was fantastic. God bless Michael
Moore Glascoe said.
Her mother, PattJ Gates-Glascoe, said
it showed evidence and gave proof that we
went to Iraq for personal reasons.
Another anonymous viewer com-
mented that the movie was "very truth-
ful" and that "the war was a lie. Bush
has lied to the public and his greed and
stupidity are the reasons we went to war
(in Iraq)
No matter what viewers had to say
about the film, most agreed the movie has
a liberal perspective and would encourage
others to go see it.
This writer can be contacted at
r,ews@theeastcarolinian. com.
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��PWHinHH
PAGE 2
7-14-04
NEWS
news@theeastcarollnlan.com
252.328.6366
COUNTDOWN UNTIL END
OF SUMMER SESSION II
12 MORE CLASS DAYS
Announcements
Salsa Dance
The Folk Arts Society of Greenville
and the ECU Folk and Country
Dancers will hold a salsa dance at
7:30 p.m. on Friday, July 16 in the.
Willis Building. Begin your evening
with dance lessons by Devan and
Holly and music by DJ Ramon. For
more information, call 795-7980.
Summer Theatre
The ECULoessin Summer Theatre
series presents Smokey Joe's Caffr.
The Songs of Leiber & Stoller July
20 - 24 in the McGinnis Theatre.
The musical begins at 8 p.m. each
night, with performances at 2 p.m.
and 8 p.m. on Saturday. For more
information, call 328-6829.
Parking Information
If you are a new or returning student
planning to bring a vehicle to
campus, you must register your
vehicle and purchase an ECU
parking permit. Parking on campus
is limited with a maximum number
of permits sold in each zone. The
parking application process must
be completed online through the
ECU OneStop system, onestop.
ecu.edu. Permits will be mailed to
applicants who register by July 16.
After this date, you may register
online and your permit will be held
at the parking office for pickup. If
you need access to the Internet,
you may use any campus computer
lab, campus library or your local
library.
News Bri
Local
Estranged teen couple charged
with killing girl's mother
MURPHY, NC (AP) - Christopher Albert
Tarantino, 17, threatened to kill his
estranged high school sweetheart's
family after the couple broke up, the
girl said. Now, both are charged with
killing the girl's mother.
Janet E. Crowe, 38, was found stabbed
and shot to death in her Cherokee
County home early Saturday after her
daughter, Lauren Elizabeth Crowe,
called for help, Sheriff Keith Lovin said
Monday. The sheriff arrested Lauren,
16, and Tarantino hours later. Both
are charged with first-degree murder.
"It's really kind of shocking for the
community whenyou have kids involved
in anything where there are violent
crimes or tragic deaths Lovin said.
He would not comment Monday on
a motive, saying his investigators
were still piecing together the case.
Authorities plan to bring it before a
grand jury next week.
Lauren and Janet Crowe filed a
domestic violence complaint against
Tarantino on May 13. A judge issued
a restraining order against Tarantino
the same day.
"I live every day in fear for my life and
for my (family) said Lauren Crowe
in the complaint. Lauren Crowe said
Tarantino physically and emotionally
abused her after she ended their
relationship in April.
She told the court that he threatened to
kill her 78-year-old grandmother, infant
cousin and her uncle. Tarantino had
told one of Lauren Crowe's friends two
days earlier that he could get guns "and
kill many people the complaint said.
Tarantino denied all of
Lauren Crowe's allegations
in court papers filed on May 28.
Murphy High School Principal Jerry
Bracket said Tarantino and Crowe were
good students and both were popular
in the school of 650 students.
"It is devastating news for all of us
here said Brackett. "We're still in a
state of shock. It's not something that
you would expect from a small, tight-
knit community. It's bizarre. We are
going to pray for thes. kids
Crowe and Tarantino are scheduled for
a hearing on Wednesday. A judge will
consider setting bond and appointing
attorneys if the suspects cannot afford
legal representation.
National
AP Poll: More voters see
Bush as decisive, more see
Kerry as intelligent
WASHINGTON (AP) - President Bush
is viewed by more American voters as
decisive and arrogant than Democratic
rival John Kerry, according to an
Associated Press poll. Voters are more
likely to see Kerry as intelligent.
Asked who makes them feel more
optimistic about the future, slightly
more voters choose Bush than Kerry,
the poll conducted for the AP by Ipsos-
Public Affairs found. Both candidates
are viewed as wealthy by nearly all
voters, with slightly more seeing Bush
as wealthy than Kerry.
Two-thirds in the poll think the president
is decisive, the biggest character
advantage the president has over
Kerry in the poll. A majority, 52 percent,
also say they think Bush is arrogant.
The poll asked voters whether they
would or would not use each of
seven words - likable, intelligent,
decisive, compassionate, honest,
arrogant and wealthy - to
describe Bush and then Kerry.
Kerry and Bush are evenly matched
on qualities like compassion, honesty
and likability. Bush has a 22-point
edge over Kerry on the question
of who is decisive. Two-thirds said
Bush is decisive and fewer than half
said that of Kerry. Only two-thirds of
Democrats said Kerry is decisive.
As Kerry prepares to introduce himself
to the public at the Democratic
National Convention in two weeks, one
of his biggest obstacles is convincing
voters he can provide the kind of firm
leadership needed in a time of war
and terrorism.
Bush's confidence and unwillingness
to change his stand despite opposition
are viewed negatively by some.
A majority, 52 percent, said he's
arrogant, more than the 44 percent
who view Kerry that way.
The AP-lpsos poll of 804 registered
voters was taken July 5-7 and has a
margin of sampling error of plus or
minus 3.5 percentage points.
World
Military cartographers have
begun moving route of West Bank
barrier closer to Israel
JERUSALEM (AP) - Cartographers
have begun moving the planned route
of the West Bank separation barrier
closer to Israel, in line with an Israeli
court ruling that the government must
reduce hardships for the Palestinians,
officials said Tuesday.
Also Tuesday, Prime Minister Ariel
Sharon made overtures to two religious
parties to join his shaky coalition, a
day after he made a similar offer to
the moderate Labor Party, political
sources said. In courting religious
parties, Sharon apparently was trying
to defuse opposition in his Likud Party
to bringing in Labor.
The West Bank barrier is to run 425
miles. One-fourth has already been
built. The changes will be made
mainly in the section still in the
planning stages.
Security officials said Tuesday that
the planners' decisions were based
on the criteria established by Israel's
Supreme Court in a ruling last month,
and that last week's world court
decision on the barrier was not a
factor.
Militants kill Bulgarian hostage;
Iraqi police arrest hundreds
In criminal sweep
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) - Militants
in Iraq said they killed a captive
Bulgarian truck driver and threatened
to put another hostage to death in 24
hours, Al-Jazeera television reported
Wednesday.
Jordanian militant Abu Musab al-
Zarqawi's Tawhid and Jihad group
said last week it would kill the two
truck drivers if the United States did
not release all Iraqi detainees by last
Saturday.
The group earlier claimed
responsibility for beheading of
American businessman Nicholas
Berg and South Korean translator Kim
Sun-il. It is also blamed for attacks that
killed 100 people ahead of the transfer
of power to Iraqis last month.
In a video broadcast on Al-Jazeera,
the group said it had carried out its
threat against one of the men and
would kill the other in 24 hours.
Three men with their faces covered
by black masks stood over a kneeling
hostage, identified by reporters as
Georgi Lazov, 30.
The video contained the killing but it
was not broadcast because it was too
graphic, said Al-Jazeera spokesman
Jihad Bailout. He declined to say how
the killing was carried out.
Philippine from page 1
our nation's interest presidential
spokesman Ignacio Bunye said.
"It is not for us to judge and
raise our voices now that Angelo's
life hangs in the balance. This is
the most sensitive point in the hos-
tage crisis. We must unite behind
Angelo's family, keep our peace and
pray hard
Seguis' TV appearance came after
the militant group, Iraqi Islamic
Army-Khaled bin Al-Waleed Corps,
issued a statement at 11 a.m. EDT
Monday that suddenly advanced a
deadline for Philippine action on the
group's demands and gave Manila
only three hours to respond.
The deadline - the third srtice
dela Cruz was seized July 7 - passed
with no indication on his fate. His
kidnappers said he had been moved
to the place where he would be killed,
and Al-Jazeera aired a plea from the
captive, asking Arroyo to yield to
their demands.
Dela Cruz wore an orange gar-
ment similar to those worn by
two other hostages who have been
beheaded - American Nicholas Berg
and South Korean Kim Sun-il. He
asked that his body be sent to the
Philippines for burial should he be
killed.
Feliciano dela Cruz Jr brother of
the captive, woke up to the news that
the deadline had lapsed.
"We don't know anything he
said, complaining about a govern-
ment-mandated news blackout on
tense negotiations with the kidnap-
pers. "We are asking our president
where our brother is
Military spokesman Lt. Col.
Daniel Lucero said a plan was in
place for a "phased pullout" from the
three areas in central Iraq where the
Filipinos are based.
"The troops have been pre-
warned that they may be asked at
any time to move out he said.
"That means they should pack up.
But we have not gotten the final
order to go
In his televised statement, Seguis
also made a heartfelt plea to the
kidnappers.
On behalf of the Philippines
and dela Cruz's family, Seguis said,
"I appeal to your compassion and
mercy for his release
Seguis, who was in Baghdad
working to get dela Cruz freed, said
that Islam was a religion of peace and
compassion.
"I appeal to you and to your kind
hearts as Muslims to please release
Angelo dela Cruz so that he can
return to his family and children
he said.
Recognizing the fine line that
Manila was taking to obtain dela
Cruz's release while remaining one
of Washington's closest supporters,
Secretary of State Colin Powell called
Arroyo.
"We applaud President Arroyo's
decision not to give in to terror-
ists and not to agree to an early
withdrawal of Filipino forces State
Department spokesman Richard
Boucher said Monday.
But Arroyo's handling of the
crisis has also drawn criticism. In a
second day of protests demanding
the Philippines pull out of Iraq, about
300 left-wing activists were dispersed
by baton-wielding police outside
Manila's Quiapo Church.





7-14-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE 3
Former ECU student comes
to Greenville to promote book
Minges holds signing
for 'Slave Narratives'
MATT COCKRELL
STAFF WRITER
Patrick Minges, a former ECU
student, has been traveling up
and down the East Coast promot-
ing his newest book, Black Indian
Slave Narratives, the fruition of 15
years of research.
The first person narratives are
from the point of view of Native
Americans and African Americans.
Minges had a plethora of narratives
to read through.
"In the 1930s, The Work Progress
Administration interviewed 2100 ex-
slaves, I had to pull the narratives I
used for my book out of all of these"
said Minges.
Minges, also a former TEC writer,
said, "Writing for The East Carolinian
taught me about writing stories ftiat
were interesting to people. My first
book was a narrative history, and the
second book is a collection of other
people's stories. Being a writer for
The East Carolinian taught me just
that, stories
Minges graduated from ECU with
a masters in counseling. In 1986, he
moved to New York City and began at
Union Theological Seminary. Within
that same year, he began working for
Amnesty International (AI) USA in
the communication department.
He also did publications and
started producing books for AI. In
1997, he left AI to work at Human
Rights Watch as the Director of
Publications and was responsible
for the publication of its research in
print and electronic format.
Minges then got his doctorate
in American Religious History from
Union Theological Seminary and the
focus of his research is on the inter-
actions between African Americans
and Native Americans in the 19th
century.
"I have been lucky enough to
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have partici-
pated in sev-
eral ground-
breaking
conferences
on the
subject
matter
and have
published
several
papers
in journals and anthol- o-
gies said Minges.
"I have rewritten my dissertation
as a book and it is being published
by Routledge Press as Slavery in the
Cherokee Nation: The Keetoowah Soci-
ety and the Defining of a People: 18SS
- 1867 which was published in July
of 2003
Minges will be at Greenville's
Barnes and Noble at 7 p.m. on July
16.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
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Tom Krausman, left, wades through flood waters Monday in Maryland.
Heavy rain causes flooding
along East Coast, more than
500 evacuated in New Jersey
(AP) � A foot or more of rain
fell in parts of the Northeast, forcing
hundreds from their homes, ruptur-
ing small dams and slowing Amtrak
trains to a walk.
No injuries had been reported
in the stricken areas of New Jersey,
Pennsylvania and Maryland, but at
least one woman had a harrowing
rescue.
Tammy Spiese was trying to clear
debris on her property near Read-
ing, Pa when rising water carried
her into a drainage pipe. She had to
be pulled out by her husband and a
police officer.
"I was in the water up to my
neck said Spiese. "It was very power-
ful and I had to hold onto the rocks
above
South-central New Jersey was hit
the hardest with at least five small
dams rupturing during the night, said
Kevin Tuno, the Burlington County
emergency management coordina-
tor. Many of the dams in the area
hold small reservoirs in low-lying
residential areas.
"We have a lot of houses and
vehicles that were damaged Tuno
said Tuesday.
The heaviest rainfall in Burling-
ton County was about 13 inches at
Tabernacle, the National Weather
Service said.
More than 500 county residents
were evacuated from their homes
and from the roofs of cars stalled on
flooded roads.
"First they started with one family
and then another family and then it
rapidly escalated Tuno said.
Parts of northeastern Mary-
land got up to eight inches of rain
that flooded streets and basements
Monday, and some motorists had to
be rescued when their cars stalled in
deep water, officials said. Most of the
water had subsided by Tuesday morn-
ing and major roads were reopened,
said Harford County official Ernie
Crist.
At least 15 Amtrak passenger
trains were delayed Monday evening
in Maryland, said spokesman Daniel
Stessel. Water flowing over the tracks
in many places forced north and
southbound trains to slow to just two
mph, or walking speed, he said.
An estimated six inches of rain
fell in eastern Pennsylvania's Berks
County, where firefighters used a
boat to rescue three people and a dog
trapped in two homes by Manatawny
Creek, which rose about four feet in
minutes.
Water and mud rushed into a
bowling alley Monday at Pottsville in
eastern Pennsylvania after a sodden
embankment behind the building
collapsed, and custodian John Bova
and his wife hurried to open doors to
let the flood out. Then they shut off
the electricity and fled, he said.
Get caught reading.

tec






PAGE 4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
7-14-04
Bin Laden confidant turns himself in to Saudis
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia � A con-
fidant of Osama bin Laden surren-
dered to Saudi diplomats in Iran and
was flown to the kingdom Tuesday, a
potentially valuable asset in the war
on terror because of his closeness to
the fugitive al-Qaida chief.
Khaled bin Ouda bin Moham-
med al-Harby, a crippled sheik, was
shown on Saudi TV being pushed in
a wheelchair through the Riyadh air-
port. He is the most important figure
to surface under a Saudi amnesty
promising to spare the lives of mili-
tants who turn themselves in.
"Thank God, thank God I
called the embassy and we were very
well-received al-Harby told Saudi
TV in the airport terminal. "I have
come obeying God, and obeying the
(kingdom's) rulers
Al-Harby - also known as Abu
Suleiman al-Makky - is considered
a sounding board for the al-Qaida
chief rather than an operational
planner for his terror network, a U.S.
counterterrorism official said, speak-
ing on condition of anonymity.
Another U.S. official said al-
Harby was not a senior member of
al-Qaida. The official, who declined
to be identified, called him "an aging
mujahideen
Decades ago, al-Harby fought
the Soviets in Afghanistan - report-
edly alongside bin Laden - and it is
believed he lost his legs there. Al-
Harby was seen in a videotape that
emerged about two months after
Sept. 11, seated with bin Laden at
a dinner where the al-Qaida leader
talked about the attacks on the World
Trade Center and the Pentagon.
At the gathering, bin Laden
praised the Sept. 11 attacks and cred-
ited them with inspiring conversions
to Islam.
"We calculated in advance the
number of casualties from the enemy,
who would be killed, based on the
position of the tower. We calculated
that the floors that would be hit
would be three or four floors bin
Laden said on the tape.
"I was thinking that the fire from
the gas in the plane would melt the
iron structure of the building and
collapse the area where the plane hit
and all the floors above it only. This
is all that we had hoped for
In a statement, the Interior
Ministry said al-Harby contacted
the Saudi Embassy in Tehran from
the Iranian-Afghan border, where
he was stranded. It was not disclosed
what al-Harby was wanted for, and
his name does not appear on the
kingdom's list of 26 most-wanted
militants.
Some al-Qaida operatives close to
bin Laden - notably Khalid Shaikh
Mohammed - have provided vital
intelligence to U.S. officials seeking
top terror suspects and clues to attack
plots. However, he is in American
custody, and it was not immediately
clear how much access U.S. authori-
ties would have to al-Harby or his
interrogation.
Wearing traditional white robes
and Arab headdress, al-Harby was
carried off the plane before being
put in a wheelchair. He was accom-
panied by his wife, dressed all in
black, and their son, a Saudi security
official said.
The Interior Ministry said al-
Harby will be taken to a hospital for
medical care. It did not elaborate on
his condition.
Al-Harby is the third man to
take advantage of the monthlong
amnesty that King Fahd offered
militants on June 23. One of the
other militants who surrendered
under the amnesty is Othman Hadi
Al Maqboul al-Amri, No. 21 on Saudi
Arabia's most-wanted list.
Al-Harby described the amnesty
as a "generous offer" and urged other
militants to take advantage of it.
Separately, Interior Minister
Prince Nayef acknowledged for the
first time Tuesday that Saudis had
infiltrated neighboring Iraq to join
the insurgency against U.Sled
forces.
"Surely, there are Saudis Prince
Nayef told reporters late Monday
of the foreign fighters detained in
Iraq. "But the number, and how
(they got in to Iraq) is not available
to us now
His statement came after repeated
denials of Iraqi reports that Saudis are
fighting in the insurgency.
Iraq's Human Rights Minister
Bakhtiyar Amin said Monday there
were 14 Saudis among 99 foreign
fighters in detention. Also, Saudi
newspapers have published obituar-
ies and funeral reports for at least
four Saudis said to have died fight-
ing in Iraq.
Prince Nayef said hundreds of
other militants have been detained
and some have already been con-
victed in court. He did not provide
exact numbers, but he said more
trials were coming.
Nayef warned there would be
no extension to the amnesty that
expires July 23, and declared that
the kingdom's fight against terror
is not over.
Since May 2003, the country has
suffered a series of suicide bomb-
ings, gun battles and kidnappings
that tended to target foreign
workers. The attacks have been
blamed on al-Qaida and its sympa-
thizers.
"There are still things we have
to deal with, and we should not
be surprised if anything happens
Nayef said. "We are totally prepared
to face any emergency
In Washington, State Depart-
ment spokesman Richard Boucher
said the Bush administration has
been pressing for better border con-
trol. "We've worked for a long time
with all the neighbors of Iraq to try
toet better control at the borders
he said.
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PAGE 5
7-14-04
OPINION
Amanda Ungerfelt
Editor in Chief
Robbie Den-
Features Editor
Tanesha Slstmnk
Photo Editor
Alexander Marcinlak
Web Editor
Ryan Downey
Sports Editor
Nina Coefleld
Head Copy Editor
Newsroom
252.328.6366
2K,3S8,6558
Our View
With the recent
findings by
the Senate
Intelligence
Committee, we
have to ques-
tion what the
government
has been doing
lately.
Like many Americans, we've been
under the impression that the CIA
and our government were the fore-
most leaders in intelligence gather-
ing.
However, a report released by the
Senate Intelligence Committee Friday
accused the Bush administration of
relying on false information from the
CIA that detailed the potential threat
of Iraq. According to the report, the
administration used these false intel-
ligence reports as justification for
declaring war on Iraq.
The panel's Republican chairman
said Congress might not have
approved sending troops to Iraq, had
lawmakers known the truth.
The committee's top Democrat
agreed with the chairman, stating if
the threat had been understood, the
resolution to authorize war wouldn't
have received sweeping approval.
With these recent findings, we have
to question what the government has
been doing lately.
Our confidence in the abilities of the
CIA, the Pentagon and the Depart-
ment of Defense to do their jobs is
deeply shaken.
What disappoints us most is the
agencies that were put in place to
serve as a check and balance of the
elected officials are failing us. They're
becoming products of politics.
Democrats in the Senate are now
calling for an investigation to exam-
ine whether the White House had
manipulated the intelligence it
received. We agree that it's time such
an investigation took place.
Opinion Writer
Kerry shakes things up in preparation for November
Democrats may still
have hope in Edwards
PETER KALAJIAN
OPINION WRITER
My dear Mr. Kerry, I think
you may be on to something.
It would appear that Dem-
ocratic presidential nominee
John Kerry has finally begun
realizing a few things about
himself. With his selection
of senator John Edwards as
his running mate, Kerry may
finally be able to overcome the
glaring deficiencies which the
national press and the Republi-
can power machine have been
so generous in pointing out
ever since his announcement
that he would seek the highest
office in the land.
Articles and opinions in
right wing press outlets like
the Wall Street Journal and
the Fox News Network have so
lambasted Kerry in the eyes
of many voters that he is now
more of a caricature than even
our sitting president, George
W. Bush, and that is saying
something. Kerry has also
been widely criticized for his
privileged upbringing and East
Coast golden boy education
credentials. Then, of course,
there is Kerry himself.
Many people whom I have
spoken to about this issue cite
their mistrust of Kerry as their
number one problem with the
man. He does not always proj-
ect an attitude of confidence
and trustworthiness, an act
that George W. Bush has been
practicing since his days as a
wild party boy in Houston and
has sharpened to a fine point.
It's amazing how a person
whose life experiences are so
far removed from the experi-
ence of most Americans can
be constantly portrayed as a
hero to "average, hardworking
Americans" and someone who
"knows the values of America"
(that quote appeared in one of
the 16 major television ads run
so far by the Bush campaign).
Both Kerry and Bush were
brought up in a world where
wealth and privilege were the
norms, but Bush has been able
to somehow de-emphasize that
aspect of his past and recast
himself as a champion of
rights and interests of average
Americans. This brings us to
the point - Kerry has chosen
a man who is known to pos-
sess many of the qualities he
himself may be lacking.
Edwards grew up relatively
poor in rural South Carolina
and earned a law degree with-
out the help of rich parents
and influential relatives. He is
almost blindingly charismatic,
his ever-present campaign
grin and youthful demeanor
appearing to invigorate Kerry
simply through his presence.
Edwards has a solid voting
record in Congress and is a
highly popular senator among
North Carolinians. He has
two small, cherubic-looking
children and a very support-
ive wife.
If all goes well, he will be
exploiting both of them on a
daily basis to maximize their
public relations value in the
next five months - welcome
to American politics in the
21st century.
John Edwards was a smart
decision for the Kerry cam-
paign, one that I thought would
have come much sooner. For
all of its money and political
influence, there is one thing
I fear the BushCheney cam-
paign may be lacking in the
eyes of American voters come
November - trust. I suppose
that is to be expected, though,
when you lie and exaggerate
to the American people for
four straight years and make a
laughingstock of the sanctity
of government.
Bush has to go, and with
the help of his newfound
ally, Kerry might just be able
to make it happen. Here's to
hoping.
Opinion Writer
Pro-abortion activists argue on false court information
'Landmark'court case
based on deception
ANTHONY MCKEE
OPINION WRITER
Approximately 4,000 die
every day - that's more than 1
million dead each year. Com-
pounded over the years, that's
more than 40 million human
beings killed. That is more than
all the deaths - civilian and
military - during all of World
War II.
I am talking about the
number of children killed
through abortions in the United
States - and just the United
States.
My opinion of abortion is
simple - it's infanticide.
Before anyone starts spewing
things such as "it's my choice" or
"stay out of my uterus read on.
While ways of aborting chil-
dren have been around since
ancient times, the whole issue
here has been based on lies by
abortion proponents, starting
with Roe v. Wade.
The plaintiff in Roe v. Wade,
Norma McCorvey (Roe), admit-
ted later that her statement of
becoming pregnant after being
gang raped was a lie. This was a
fact that her lawyers knew and
chose to overlook. Therefore, the
basis for suing for the right to have
an abortion was based on a lie.
Incidentally, McCorvey never
had the abortion she supposedly
sued for. She gave the child up for
adoption. In addition to that, in
1995, she stated she was going to
spend the rest of her life working
against abortion.
So, the "landmark" decision
making abortion legal through
the second trimester, was know-
ingly argued with false informa-
tion. The case of Doe v. Bolton is
another example of this tactic.
The original "Doe" in this
case was a pregnant woman who
went to the Atlanta Legal Aid
and was "encouraged" to file suit
in exchange for assistance with
a divorce and child custody pro-
ceedings. She never wanted an
abortion, nor did she get one.
Not wanting to be deterred
by such a minor detail as the
truth, a Legal Aid lawyer named
Margie Pitts Hames decided
to replace the original "Doe"
with another pregnant woman,
Sandra Cano.
Like the original "Doe
Cano did not want an abortion.
The only way that she became
part of the case is because Hames
and her associates tricked her into
signing whatever papers were put
in front of her in exchange for
help with her divorce. Hames also
offered to help Cano pay for the
abortion - she was willing to kill
another woman's child to further
her cause. Fortunately for Cano
and her baby, she ran away before
she could be coerced.
To make a long story short,
Hames and her supporters argued
a case they knew was based on
total lies before the Supreme
Court of the United States. Their
actions resulted in the decision by
the court that opened abortion
up to the moment of birth to pro-
tect the "health" of the mother.
In this instance, "health" was
defined as physical, emotional,
economic, etc.
Two cases that changed
the political, social and moral
landscape of our country were
fabricated for the political and
personal reasons of a small group
of people. In an ironic twist,
the same groups that foisted
these bogus cases on the court
now demand they abide by the
arguably illegal decisions that
resulted.
The direct result of the
actions of a few amoral, unethical
individuals has been the murder
of more than 40 million of our
fellow Americans and many
millions more worldwide with no
end in sight. The ultimate indi-
rect consequences of the killing
of so many children could be just
as grave however, if not more so.
Consider the following
story:
Mother Teresa was asked by a
young person why God had not
sent us a cure for AIDS.
Her reply?
He may well have, but we
aborted it.





PAGF6
7-14-04
FEATURES
ROBBIE DERR
Features Editor
features@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Horoscopes
Aries (March 21-April 19) - Take care
of the folks back home by venturing
farther than ever before.
Taurus (April 20-May 20) - The best
conversations are the ones
that come naturally when you're
gathered with the ones you love,
in a place where you're all relaxed.
Gemini (May 21-June 21) - Continue
to ask questions, but then don't sit
around waiting for somebody else to
come up with the correct answers.
Cancer (June 22-July 22) - Follow
through on paperwork associated with
money, like rebates, coupons and sales.
Indications are that you can profit from
doing extra reading.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) - You're thinking
more quickly than most other people,
and moving more rapidly, too.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept 22) - They say
to let your conscience be your guide.
That's a great suggestion, especially
when your conscience is hollering at
you the way yours is now.
Libra (Sept 23-Oct 22) - Get your
team together and decide on an
objective. Then, help your teammates
win the prize. Don't worry about an
older person with no sense of humor.
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) -
Are you willing to say what has to be
said to the person who ought to know?
Your loyalty could be rewarded, but be
careful.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) -
Important information can be gathered
now, so ask questions. Capricorn (Dec.
22-Jan. 19) - Ask questions before you
spend your money.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) - Listen
attentively to another person's plans.
He or she has the enthusiasm and you
have the technical skill.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) - Give
the job your full attention for just a little
while longer. The manual labor should
be done by tomorrow,
and all you'll have left is the cleanup.
Summer theatre closes
'Smokey Joe's Cafe' pays
tribute to greatest songs
of 1950s and 1960s
RASHENA DRAUGHN
STAFF WRITER
"Hound Dog "Kansas City
"Love Potion 9 "Stand By Me"
and "Jailhouse Rock" are just a few
of the greatest hits of the 1950s and
1960s and are on the menu at Smokey
Joe's Cafi. The ECULoesin Summer
Theatre will be putting on its third
and final production in a series of
All-American shows.
The series started with Damn
Yankees. The second show was
AlwaysPatsy Cline. The series will
conclude with Smokey Joe's Cafe, a
musical revue of Jerry Leiber and
Mike Stoller's music. Smokey Joe's
Cafe's songs were made popular by
artists like Elvis Presley, The Coasters,
The Drifters, Ben E. King and Peggy
Lee. Leiber and Stoller were said to
be the Rogers and Hammerstein of
Tock n' roll.
Leiber and Stoller's songs provide
the basis for electrifying entertain-
ment that illuminates the golden age
of American culture. In an idealized
1950s setting, the classic themes of
love won, lost and imagined blend
and radiate throughout the show. The
show features nearly 40 of the greatest
songs ever recorded. However, Smokey
Joe's Cafe isn't just great pop music,
it's compelling musical theatre.
Leiber and Stoller began writing
songs together as teens one summer
in the early 1950s. They rocked the
music world by constantly
mixing R&B and pop. Their
songs went to the top of the charts
and they started a record label, Red
Bird, where they would go on to
influence several artists.
The show features 11 g�
students in the theatre
arts program including,
Jordan Barwick, Lindsey
Bramham, Kathryn Engleke,
Nikki Jenkins, Amanda Kay,
Timothy McNeill, Candice Rogers,
Lisanne Shaffer, Michael Tahaney,
Michael Thomas and Dowler
Young.
The featured guest artist is
Glenn Townsend. Townsend is a
professional actor who has per-
formed Pacific Overtures: Jump N' J
Jive with Peter Nero and Phill)'
Pops and European tours with the
Harlem Gospel Singers. He has also
performed in opera choruses such
as Porgy and Bess. Townsend is well
spoken of in the theatre department.
"Glenn has a beautiful deep bass
voice said Jeff Woodruff, managing
director for the school of theatre
and dance.
Smokey Joe's Cafe includes a five-
piece orchestra, which is made up
of a guitar, electric keyboard, bass,
saxophone and a drum set. You are
sure to be entertained by the music,
as well as the dance numbers. With
an expanded cast to include dancers
and a great set, it's a family-friendly
show that everyone can enjoy.
The show will run July 20 - 24
at the McGinnis Theatre located on
campus behind the Wright Build-
ing. Tickets are on sale now and can
be purchased through the Central
The cast of Smokey Joe's Cafe pose
Townsend during a rehearsal for the
Ticket Office on the first floor of
Mendenhall. It is open Monday
- Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and on
weekends 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tickets can
also be purchased at the McGinnis
Theatre box office, which is located
at 106 Messick and only open on per-
formance days from 5 p.m. to curtain
time. Tickets for the general public
are $30 and student tickets are $15.
The theatre department is
optimistic about the show. They
are hoping it will go over well with
the fans.
"I'm really excited about it. It's a
really fun show Woodruff said.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
around guest artist Glenn
play.
rt
Smokey
Joe's
Who: ECULoessin Summer
Theatre
What. Smokey Joe's Cafe
When: July 20-24 at 8 p.m.
?Saturday at 2 p.m and 8 p.m.
Where: McGinnis Theatre
Tickets: Public - $30,
StudentYouth-$15
Stepping stone to stardom: ECU'S 'Smokey Joe's Cafe'
One actress'journey into
world of musical theatre
NIKKI JENKINS
STAFF WRITER
It wasn't until the ripe old age of
23 that I discovered my passion in life.
I had just earned a degree in genetics
from the University of Maryland,
but found laboratory research far
from fulfilling.
So I returned to
my hometown
of Greenville,
NC, and began
attending ECU
to study some-
thing I had
always loved
- music.
During my
first year, I strug-
gled to find my niche. I tried every-
thing from opera to jazz to liturgical
JENKINS
music. I even traveled to Atlanta,
Ga. to audition for "American Idol"
(with no luck). Still, I couldn't find a
perfect fit. One day, I saw a television
ad about auditions for the Farmville
Paramount Theatre's production of
Footloose. I auditioned on a whim
- much to my surprise, I earned a
principle role. I had so much fun
doing the show that I realized musi-
cal theatre was my "thing I had
found a new goal - to become a
Broadway star.
Of course, a dream that big could
hot be achieved overnight. I knew I'd
have to take it one step at a time. My
first step was to change my major from
vocal performance to musical theatre
and begin taking acting and dance
classes along with my voice lessons.
I also did a lot of personal research
on musical theatre - reading books,
watching shows and talking to people
with experience in the business. I
continued to audition for other shows,
which eventually led to a leading role
in a local production of Joseph and
the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.
However, the biggest step occurred
when I saw the announcements about
ECU's auditions for the theatre depart-
ment's summer production of three
popular musicals from the 1950s:
Damn Yankees, AlwaysPatsy Cline
and Smokey Joe's Cafe. It sounded like
a great opportunity. I was especially
interested in Smokey Joe's Cafe, a rock
n' roll music revue. Still, this wasn't
a small-scale show at a local theatre.
Was I good enough for a professional-
level musical at a top university?
Despite my fears, 1 wasn't about
to let this opportunity slip through
my fingers. With the help of my
voice teacher, I picked two appropri-
ate songs and practiced them until
they were strong audition pieces.
I also had to memorize some lines
from Damn Yankees for the acting
portion of the audition. By the
time the audition date arrived, I
was ready. I sang my two songs
and read some lines before a panel
of four faculty members of the
theatre department. Needless
to say, I was nervous. Still, I felt
the audition went very well.
Apparently, the panel felt that way
too. Within the week, I received
a phone call offering me a role in
Smokey Joe's Cafe. After a few joyful
squeals, I accepted.
It is now July and the 12-member
cast of Smokey Joe's Cafe is hard at
work putting the show together. We
practice music and choreography
from 10 a.m. to 6:30 p.m Monday
through Saturday. It's hard work, but
I am loving every minute of it. I've
learned so much just from rehearsals,
and I can't wait until the show opens.
My experience with Smokey Joe's Cafe
is an important step on my path to
stardom.
Look out, Broadway, here I come!
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
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7-14-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE 7
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Translucent concrete lets
the light shine through
WASHINGTON (AP) � It used
to be only Superman who could see
through concrete walls, but an exhibit
at the National Building Museum
shows mere mortals can do it too.
Called "Liquid Stone the show
features variations of translucent con-
crete, a newfangled version of the old
construction standby that offers a com-
bination of aesthetics and practicality.
One display is a wall of translu-
cent concrete blocks. When someone
stands in front of it and light is shone
from behind, the person's shadow
can be seen clearly on the other side.
"I think it's beautiful in itself, so
it might be attractive in a restaurant
or a hotel said G. Martin Moeller Jr
the museum's senior vice president.
"But it might also be used in an
indoor fire escape where you wanted
light to come through in case of a power
failure. It could become a lifesaver
The translucent blocks are made
by mixing glass fibers into the com-
bination of crushed stone, cement
and water, varying a process that has
been used for centuries to produce
a versatile building material. The
process was devised by Hungarian
architect Aron Losonczi in 2001.
"The idea came from a work of art I
saw in Budapest he said in a telephone
interview from southeast Hungary.
"It was made of glass and ordinary
concrete, and the idea of combining
the two struck me. Then I went to
Stockholm to do post-graduate work in
architecture and it developed there
One of the first demonstrations was
a sidewalk in Stockholm made of thin
sheets of translucent concrete. It looks
like an ordinary sidewalk by day, but is
illuminated at night by lights under it.
A company in Aachen, Germany,
called LiTraCon for "light transmitting
concrete makes translucent blocks and
plans to have them market-ready this
year. Andreas Bittis, in charge of market-
ing, said that thus far, they have mainly
been used in demonstration projects,
such as the Stockholm sidewalk.
Bittis has many ideas for practical
uses. "Think of illuminating subway sta-
tions with daylight he suggested in an
e-mail. Or using the concrete for speed
bumps and lighting them from below
to make them more visible at night.
Translucent concrete is strong
enough for the uses for traditional con-
crete, and chemical additives can greatly
increase the strength. Moeller pointed
out, however, that until demand
increases, experimentation continues
and production costs fall, the price of
any new product will be significantly
higher than similar older products.
Will Wittig, who teaches archi-
tecture at the University of Detroit
Mercy, has developed concrete panels
shown in the exhibit that in some
places are only a tenth of an inch
thick. He said he has ideas about an
all-concrete building, part of which
would consist of ordinary opaque
concrete and the translucent kind.
Inventor Thomas A. Edison had
the idea of an all-concrete house
almost a century ago. Though he
worked on it for years and spent a lot
of money, the idea never caught on.
Today's concrete buildings have
skeletons of steel, but Moeller said
that could become obsolete with the
development of a recently invented
self-reinforcing concrete, though
that may be many years off.
The Lafarge Group, a French
firm that says it is the world's larg-
est producer of concrete, sponsored
the exhibit and is showing off a
recent variety called "Ductal" that
does not need steel reinforcement.
The exhibit shows how a light rail
terminal has been built in Calgary,
Alberta, almost entirely of Ductal,
with concrete arches spanning 20
feet and the concrete only a quarter-
inch thick.
A smooth-textured, tubular
sample is shown in the exhibit.
Known to the museum staff as "the
pretzel it looks like a long and hope-
lessly tangled garden hose.
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PAGE 8
Underground TV: The
beauty of The Beast'
(KRT) � TV critics often call days, Biography Channel
television "The Monster" or "The CLEAN SWEEP
Beast That's because, with all the If you're the kind of person who
cable and satellite options out there, worries about letting the newspapers
it just keeps coming at you. The stack up or about not having enough
tapes pile up on our desks, near our shelf space for your books, this show
TVs and sometimes in our kitchen should make you take heart. At least
cabinets. you're not the guy who had about 10
So what are we, and probably computers, not all of which worked,
you, missing? There are a lot of little that he wouldn't throw out.
shows on little networks that get An organization team comes in
very little attention. We're not talk- to help people like this, and often
ing about cable hits like "NipTuck" tough love is needed to get the job
and "The Daily Show" here but done. When you see what some folks
about more offbeat, underground accumulate, you'll realize that obses-
shows that have managed to develop sive-compulsiveness and neatness
small but hard-core fan bases, which don't always go hand-in-hand. S p.m.
doesn't necessarily mean they're weekdays, 7 p.m. Saturdays, TLC
�ood THE GRAHAM NORTON
This overview is hardly compre- EFFECT
hensive, but if you're looking for a BBC America fans know the
new show to latch onto, here's your puckish Norton from "So Graham
chance. Warning - cable companies Norton a talk show during which
being what they are, some of these the British comedian would do, well,
shows might not be available on your just about anything. Celebrity guests
cable system. either go along with Norton or look
AIRLINE stunned at what they've stumbled
Take a trip into the friendly, and into,
often unfriendly, skies with this Time will tell if the tamer stan-
reality series which chronicles the dards of U.S. television, even on
joys and frustrations of Southwest Comedy Central, lessen a little of
Airlines employees who deal with Norton's bite, but it should be fun
drunken passengers, malodorous finding out if it does. 9 p.m. Thurs-
fliers, the occasional celebrity and days, Comedy Central
other disparate disgruntled types. MXC
It'll make you appreciate that bag That's short for Most
of peanuts even more. 9 p.m. Mon- Extreme Elimination Challenge, a
days, A&E Japanese stunt-game show imported
CLASS OF XX for the use of the juvenile minds at
Biography Channel just kicked Spike TV, which is having quite the
off this show, which highlights field day with the show. Note: Don't
what the channel calls "break- try any of this at home. 9p.m. Thurs-
out" years for certain celebrities, days, Spike
OK, so the first year was 1988 MYTHBUSTERS
and Dustin Hoffman was one of Adam Savage and Jamie Hyne-
the "breakouts even though his man, who look like nerds trying to
breakthrough year was really 1967. be cool, get to be cool anyway as
Guess any success after "Ishtar" is a they poke holes in urban legends,
breakout. We love time-warp stuff complete with experiments to see if
like this, however, so we'll grant the certain legends ever "could" work. 9
show artistic license. 8 p.m. Tues- p.m. Thursdays, Discovery
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BRADFORD CREEK
3 Bedroom And 2.5 Bath Duplexes.
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ll'dfiliiT





7-14-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE 9
DO THE MATH, OR NOT
Those "all inclusive Apts
$385-325 per monthperson
3 or 4 bedrooms
Roommate matchingjust like the
dorms
Computer room on site
Fitness center
Utilities includedusually only a
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$357 average rental price
per person per month
Wyndham Court Apts
$225 per person
2 bedroom apts.
YOU pick your roommate
You probably already own a computer
Multi-millionrec. center on campus
paid for by your ECU tuition
Energy efficient- average utility bill
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Cinema Scene
STUDENT UNION FILMS
FREE WITH ECU ONE CARD.
Eurotrlp - An American teen on the
verge of graduation discovers his
German pen pal who helped him
translate his German homework is
really a beautiful girl. He and a friend
set out on a road trip across Europe
to meet her. R
Showing today at 9 p.m. at the SRC
outdoor pool and July 15 at 7 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre.
IN THEATRES THIS WEEK
Anchorman: The Legend of Ron
Burgundy - When feminism marches
into the newsroom in the form of
ambitious newswoman Veronica
Corningstone, Ron is willing to play
along at first - as long as Veronica
stays in her place, covering cat fashion
shows, cooking, and other "female"
interests. But when Veronica refuses
'to settle for being eye candy and steps
behind the news desk, it's more than
a battle between two perfectly coiffed
anchor-persons it's war. PG-13
Cinderella Story - Modern-day
comedy set in Southern California's
San Fernando Valley about a young
and slightly dorky high school student
who goes through a transformation
to become one of the hottest girls in
school. PG Movie comes to theatres
July 16.
Dodgeball: A True Underdog
Story - In this raucous comedy, a
small local gym is threatened with
extinction by a gleaming sports and
fitness palace unless a group of
social rejects can rise to victory in a
dodgeball competition. PG-13
Fahrenheit 911 - Filmmaker
Michael Moore examines the events
of 911 and the political landscape
surrounding the attack. R
Garfield - In his film debut Garfield's
owner, Jon, takes in sweet but dimwitted
pooch Odie, turning Garfield's perfect
world upside down. But when the
hapless pup disappears and is
kidnapped by a nasty dog trainer,
Garfield, maybe for the first time in his
life, feels responsible. PG
I, Robot -1, Robot is a thriller in which
a detective investigates a crime that
might have been perpetrated by a
robot - even though this futuristic
society's "Three Laws of Robotics"
dictate that such an event is an
impossibility. PG-13 Movie comes to
theatres July 16.
King Arthur - The Roman Empire
has begun to crumble, and England
has been torn apart by territorial tribes
clamoring to rule all the lands. It is up to
Arthur and his ragtag group of warriors,
including Lancelot and worthy fighter
Guenivere, to unify the country and
bring peace. PG-13
Shrek 2 - A sequel to DreamWorks'
hugely successful original, the story
opens with Shrek and Fiona returning
from their honeymoon to find a letter
from Fiona's parents inviting the
happy couple to dinner. Mom and
Dad heard their daughter had wed,
but assumed she married Prince
Charming. They are a bit shocked when
they meet their new son-in-law. PG
Sleepover - In the summer before
their freshman year in high school,
Julie (Alexa Vega) has a slumber
party with her best friends, Hannah,
Yancy and Farrah - and they end up
having the adventure of their lives. In
an attempt to cast off their less-than-
cool reputations once and for all, Julie
and her friends enter into an all-night �
scavenger hunt against their "popular
girl" rivals. PG
Spider-Man 2 - Peter must face
new challenges as he struggles to
cope with the gift and the curse of
his powers while balancing his dual
identities as the elusive superhero
Spider-Man and life as a college -
student. PG-13
The Notebook - A young woman
comes to the coastal town of Seabrook,
North Carolina in the 1940s to spend
the summer with her family. Still in
her teens, Allie Hamilton (Rachel
McAdams) meets local boy Noah
Calhoun (Ryan Gosling) at a Carnival.
Over the course of one passionate and
carefree summer in the South, the two
fall deeply in love. PG-13
The Terminal - Tom Hanks stars as an
air traveler inadvertently exiled to JFK
airport after a coupe in his homeland
erases the validity of his passport He
finds himself the victim of bureaucratic .
red tape and is forced to take up
residence in the terminal. PG-13
White Chicks - Shawn and Marion
Wayans play two ambitious but unlucky
FBI agents who go deep undercover
as female, high society debutantes
to infiltrate the sophisticated world of
the Hamptons in order to investigate
a kidnapping ring. PG-13





PAGE 10 7-14-04
SPORTS
RYAN DOWNEY
Sports Editor
sports@theeastcarolinlan.com
252.328.6366
Sports Briefs
ECU student-athletes excel
outside athletic arena
ECU student-athletes have not only
exhibited great athletic success
during the past year, but have also
excelled in the classroom and
contributed greatly to the community.
For the 2004 spring semester, 45
percent of ECU student-athletes
recorded a 3.0 or better grade point
average. Nine teams had a team GPA
of 3.0 or higher during the semester,
which represents an increase from
seven teams from the 2003 spring
semester.
Official thinks Expos will move
Baseball's No. 2 official expressed
confidence Monday that the Montreal
Expos will move before the 2005
season, but wouldn't set a new
deadline for a decision. The Expos
were bought by the other 29 teams
before the 2002 season. Baseball
at first hoped for a decision by July
2002, but later pushed it back to the
2003 Ail-Star break and then to this
year's break. The bidding areas have
said in recent weeks that they think a
decision could be made by late July
or early August.
Dolphins' Thomas expected
back before regular season
Miami Dolphins middle linebacker
Zach Thomas may miss a couple of
exhibition games, but is expected
to be 100 percent by the start of the
regular season following arthroscopic
knee surgery. Thomas hurt his left
knee during drills Thursday and
underwent surgery Friday to repair
torn cartilage. He faces a six-week
rehabilitation and is expected to be
available for the final two preseason
games, his agent said Saturday.
Thomas, a five-time Pro Bowler, has
led the Dolphins in tackles seven of
the past eight years.
Pirates earn preseason honors
�.�� � -�PPi
BRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
If the Pirate nation is looking for
a good omen for the upcoming foot-
ball season, one need look no further
than the list of Pirate football players
who were honored as some of the best
in the nation and conference based
on preseason projections.
A theme of sorts has developed
for Pirate punters over the last 10
years. ECU football seems to perpetu-
ate great punter after punter and this
year's leg, Ryan Dougherty, is no Q
exception to the trend. Dougherty &
was named by Phil Steele as the sev- p
' Uj
enth-ranked punter in the nation, ��
as well as being named to the pre-
season first team all-conference by t
six different publications, including 8
Sporting News.
' , , , t . i
see PIRATES page 13 cu fans will be watching a number of players vie for top individual honors at their respective positions
Football season hinges on pivotal games The Disc
Pirates back to a traditional
all-Saturday schedule
ERIC GILMORE
STAFF WRITER
The ECU football team's sched-
ule finally takes a more traditional
route than in seasons past. Though
it wasn't unusual for the Pirates to
play on a Tuesday or Thursday night
for increased television exposure,
all games this season fall on Satur-
days. The Pirates will also not play
on Friday night, which, in the past,
caused an uproar with high schools
from around the state.
The Pirates are slated to play 10
of the same opponents as they did
in last year's campaign. The only
newcomer to the schedule is the most
anticipated, a Nov. 27 showdown
in the Bank of America Stadium in
Charlotte with rival NC State.
Heading into fall practice, the
Pirates are still in the process of learn-
ing a new offensive system under new
offensive coordinator Noah Brindise.
The Pirates will have to improve
on a dismal offensive 2003 season
where they only averaged 18.1
points per game, putting them 107th
nationally. The tailback position
would be the best bet for the scor-
ing to improve. ECU is one of only
three college teams in the nation to
have two former 1,000-yard-rushers
on its team in Marvin Townes and
Art Brown.
However, the lack of an estab-
lished quarterback and an inexpe-
rienced crop of wide receivers and
offensive line could deter the Pirates
from being among the country's
scoring leaders as they were for most
of the Steve Logan era.
In contrast to the offense, the
defense has a considerable amount
of experience. Six starters are return-
ing from a team that finished 84th
in total defense. An energetic Jerry
Odom saw his young group blossom
over the course of the season espe-
cially in the secondary, where the
Pirates finished 31st in pass defense.
Linebacker Chris Moore is the
nation's leading returning tackier.
Moore will anchor the linebackers while
freshman All-Conference cornerback
Erode Jean will lead the secondary.
The run defense remains a ques-
tion mark. The Pirates only return
one starter on the defensive line in
Guy Whimper. The Pirates will need
to put pressure on the opposing quar-
terbacks in Odom's blitzing schemes.
Below is a quick breakdown of the
four most pivotal games of the season.
ECU at West Virginia
Last year, many Pirate fans did
not know what to expect coming
into the first game under the John
Thompson era. The result was a 33-
point loss at the hands of conference
opponent Cincinnati on national
television. This year will be much
the same.
However, what the Pirates and
their fans will know is that West
Virginia is loaded. The Mountaineers
have been ranked as high as fourth in
some preseason publications. Coach
Rich Rodriguez, in his fourth year at
the helm of WVU, has his faithful
fans expecting a terrific season.
The Pirates will have to contain
quarterback Rasheed Marshall and
the multiple formations that the
Mountaineers will throw at the
Pirates. Marshall directed 65 plays
last year for a whopping S55 yards.
Most of the yards came on the ground
where West Virginia consistently has
one of the best offensive lines in the
nation. JUCO transfer Kay-Jay Harris
will likely be the featured back.
ECU will also have to contain
star receiver Chris Henry. Henry
is coming off a season where he
averaged 24.5 yards per catch with
10 touchdowns. Erode Jean will
likely be matched with Henry. In
order for ECU to pull the upset, the
Pirate offense will have to control
the ball with the ground game.
It will be no easy task consider-
ing the Mountaineers have never
lost to the Pirates in Morgantown.
ECU vs. Wake Forest
The Pirates have dropped three
in a row to the Demon Deacons and
have never beaten Head Coach Jim
Grobe during his tenure at Wake
Forest. Steve Logan's 1998 squad beat
Grobe while he was the head coach
at Ohio University.
The Pirates last defeated Wake
Forest at home in 1997 on a last second
two point conversion thanks to a recep-
tion by then running back Scott Harley.
The task will not be an easy one
for the Pirates who committed five
turnovers last year, which led to 17
Wake Forest points.
James Pinkney, the likely starter at
quarterback, will have to limit the inter-
ceptions because lockdown corner-
back Eric King will be looking to better
his three interception total of 2003.
The Pirate defense will have a
tough time containing the many con-
fusing formations Grobe implements
in his offense. It will be imperative
that the ECU defense recognizes who
has the ball and where the exchanges
are made. Adding to the problem
will be quarterback Cory Randolph,
running back Chris Barclay and
senior wide receiver Jason Anderson.
The Pirates will be gunning for
their first home win since November
23, 2002, the longest home drought
see FOOTBALL page 12
Golf Diaries
Came up short again
ROBERT LEONARD
STAFF WRITER
I had a hot streak of playing well
and finishing well in tournaments
last fall. I was hoping to continue that
streak this summer and finally get that
Phil Mickelson tag off my shoulder.
As I have pointed out in every
article, my playing has been below
par - about the only thing under
par this summer. Going into the
tournament this weekend in Burling-
ton, I was concentrating on a fresh
start, maybe put four rounds of golf
together and compete for the win.
I will kill all the suspense right
now and let the cat out of the bag -1
did not win this weekend. I was not
concerned about where I finished, I
just wanted to play golf like I know I
can. I finally put four rounds of golf
together this summer.
The tournament was the Ala-
mance County Pro-Am at gorgeous
Cedarock Park. The park has a mon-
strous 20-hole course mainly in a
field, and a technical short course in
the woods. We would play a different
set of tees at each course, so every
round was different. My worst finish
in a four PDGA tournament came in
this tournament last year, so I was
out for revenge on the course.
The first round was like some-
thing you ride at Bush Gardens - an
up-and-down roller coaster. I started
on a 415-foot par three, where my tee
shot would land somewhere within
about four feet of the basket for a
drop-in birdie. That's the up part
see DISC page 12





7-14-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE 11
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BRADENTON, Fla. (KRT) �The
next place you might see Maria
Sharapova is on a Wheaties box. Or
on television extolling the virtues
of a mobile telephone that works in
a pinch.
She's bound to show up on the
pages of countless magazines and on
billboards, selling everything from
beauty products to sports equipment
to the latest fashions.
Can a Maria Sharapova bobble
head doll be far behind?
Deciding what products, services
and causes the 17-year-old Wimble-
don champion will endorse is a pleas-
ant issue, but an issue nonetheless for
her management team at IMG.
In the matter of a fortnight (give
or take a couple days), the 6-foot blond
Russian who calls Bradenton home
has emerged from her cocoon as a but-
terfly of dazzling beauty and allure.
"She is one of those special
people in my business where you sit
back and answer the phones said
Keith Kreiter, the founder and presi-
dent of the Chicago-based athlete
representation and marketing firm,
Edge Sports International Inc.
"There is not a whole lot of proac-
tive work that needs to be done on
her behalf.
"Women's tennis has been look-
ing for a new hero, a fresh face and
she embodies everything marketers
and mainstream corporations are
looking for. She is beautiful, young,
very well spoken and her story is
quite remarkable Kreiter said.
"I think her (annual) marketing
revenue could exceed eight figures
in the near future, not only with
national deals but international
companies with worldwide reach.
That is where the numbers can get
quite exciting
If Sharapova keeps winning
during the next several years, her
avowed goal is to be No. 1 in women's
tennis. She already has four profes-
sional tournament titles and her
endorsement income could make
the $1 million-plus she earned at
Wimbledon look like tip money.
larapova has
Consider that Anna Kournikova,
another Russian with supermodel
looks who preceded Sharapova at
the Nick Bollettieri Tennis Academy
but has yet to win a professional
tournament, earned about $6 mil-
lion in sponsor bucks in the last
12 months, according to The Forbes
Celebrity 100.
To say the sky is the limit for
Sharapova seems a gross understate-
ment. For now, Sharapova professes
to be unconcerned with her wealth,
trusting her parents, Yuri and Yelena,
agent Max Eisenbud of IMG and
the rest of her support team with
providing a healthy, happy balance.
"I never think about the num-
bers Sharapova said Tuesday on'
"The Today Show adding that the
prize money had already been wired
to her bank account.
"I've never played tennis for the
money because as long as I enjoy it and I
can achieve anything, then the money
will come she told reporters after her
6-1, 6-4 victory against Serena Wil-
liams in the Wimbledon singles final:
"I know that things will start
coming up, many more people will
want to start getting involved. But, I
just want to keep my head cool and I
want to leave (business) to the people
who take care of business. I just go
out and I just play tennis
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PAGE 12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
7-14-04
FOOtball from page 10
since 1970. ECU is 6-4 in home open-
ers for the past 10 years.
ECU vs. Army
In a worst case scenario, the
Pirates could be looking for their first
win when Army comes into town
on Oct. 30. The lone win last year is
not a guarantee as former NFL Head
Coach Bobby Ross takes over the
reins at West Point, NY.
The Pirates have never lost to
the Black Knights in seven meet-
ings. However, the Pirates' eighth
meeting might be their last, as
Army will depart C-USA after the
completion of the 2004 season.
Army and SMU were the only
teams last year to not win a single
game. Army will look to its experi-
ence in order to eke out a win or
two. The Black Knights return 52
lettermen and 18 starters including
wideout Aaron Alexander.
Because rules forbid Army from
listing their recruits prior to fall prac-
tice, the Black Knights are a mystery to
many preseason forecasters. However,
one cannot deny the experience and
prestige that former Super Bowl coach
Bobby Ross brings to the program.
The Black Knights will be gun-
ning for ECU, as they could be
hungry for their first win due to a
brutal first half of the schedule. Army
is an opponent the Pirates cannot
take lightly or a similar experience
from Durham in 2002 might occur.
ECU vs. NC State
The Nov. 27 match-up against
NC State is a game that fans circle
before the season even starts. The
game, set to take place in Charlotte, is
deemed a home game for the Pirates.
However, students will have to pay
full ticket price for the game.
Ironically, the Pirates are unde-
feated at Bank of America Stadium.
In 1996, the Pirates downed the
Wolfpack 50-26 in a soggy field when
Scott Harley set an ECU single-game
rushing record of 351 yards.
It is highly doubtful that a Pirate
running back will be able to amass
anywhere near 351 yards with the
highly talented NC State defense.
The unit returns nine starters
with the talent dispersed every-
where. Eastern North Carolina star
Mario Williams is revered among
the nation's best at defensive line.
Linebackers Pat Thomas and Freddie
Aughtry-Lindsay both have the size
and speed to put pressure on the
quarterback or run down a running
back. Andre Maddox is also a terror
playing the rover position.
Often injured T.A. McClendon
will run for Noel Mazzone's offense.
However, the biggest question sur-
rounds junior Jay Davis and the
quarterback position.
Without Philip Rivers, it remains
to be seen how much NC State lost.
The 1 p.m. kickoff will be the earliest
for the Pirates all season. NC State
will probably be playing with bowl
implications while the Pirates will
be playing for respect. ECU would
love to play the role of spoiler to
their bitter rivals in front of what
will most likely be the largest crowd
of the season.
The Pirate faithful have remained
patient on the promise that John
Thompson and his staff are building
their program through recruiting.
Thompson's second year will be
instrumental as to whether Pirate
Nation stays patient. Being renowned
for having a "win-now" mental-
ity, another season like last year's
could spell the end of Thompson's
reign. A bitter loss to NC State could
spell doom for the momentum that
Thompson has built in recruiting
and forging relationships with the
Pirate family. Only time will tell.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
DISC from page 10
of the roller coaster. A few holes
later, 1 missed a very short putt for
birdie. Next hole - bad approach,
made a bogey. Next hole - tee shot
out of bounds, made a bogey. Next
hole - missed birdie putt. Next hole
- missed par putt. I would battle back
and birdie five of my last 10 holes to
shoot a respectable 57 (-3).
Round two would be on the
woods course and from the long
tees. I shot an amazing 22 (-6) on the
back nine, but would only shoot par
on the front nine for a 49 (-6). This
would be one of the better scores in
my division, so I moved from 12th
into a tie for sixth.
Sunday morning, we returned
to the open course and played the
short tees. This would be the easiest
of the setups all weekend, so I knew
I could make a move either way
very quickly depending on how I
played. 1 would birdie my first four
holes. However, I missed nine birdie
putts on the round. Of course, I had
20 birdie putts. I was hitting every
fairway, putting myself in position
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every hole. My 49 (-11) would tie for
the best round and moved me into
a tie for third. Despite the move, I
was still seven behind the leader and
three behind second place.
We went back to the woods
Sunday afternoon where we would
play the short tees. Short and tight
courses are always frustrating - most
holes are easily reachable, but hard to
birdie. After I made a 40-foot birdie
putt on one, I knew my round would
be good. I would end up birdying 10
out of my first 11 holes. The leader's
seven-stroke lead now became two,
and I was tied for second now. The
leader would pull away and win by
three strokes, but would those three
strokes be over me or Jeff Yahn, the
guy I was tied with for second?
Hole 17-620 foot par four. Yahn
throws a poor drive, but makes a
great second shot. I threw a decent
drive and a horrible second shot.
We would both have four footers for
birdie, which we would both miss.
Hole 18 - 280 foot par three.
Yahn throws a bullet over the top of
the basket and stops about 40 feet
past. I throw a great drive to about
25 feet short. Jeff put the pressure
on me by draining his putt. My
25-footer would tie me for second.
My putt spit out after hitting just
about every chain the basket had,
so I settled for third, finishing at -30
for the weekend and bogey free on
Sunday. I finally put four rounds of
golf together.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
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7-14-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE 13
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be traded by the Lakers to the Miami
Heat for Lamar Odom, Brian Grant,
Caron Butler and a future first-round
draft pick in one of the biggest deals
in NBA history, according to league
sources.
"The parties have agreed to agree
said Perry Rogers, O'Neal's agent.
"It's not anything the Lakers or
the Heat can comment about, but it
seems that all the parties have agreed
that this is going to happen when it's
permissible
With O'Neal headed out and
Phil Jackson already gone, the Lakers
can only hope that free agent Kobe
Bryant will come back, ending the
exodus and preventing this summer
from being possibly the darkest in
franchise history.
O'Neal smiled when approached
by reporters in Orlando, Fla on Satur-
day about the proposed trade, saying
he couldn't comment until later. No
deal can be completed until after 9
p.m. Tuesday night, when the league
moratorium on transactions expires.
Deeply disgruntled with Lakers'
management for an array of reasons
is something O'Neal conveyed to
new Lakers coach Rudy Torojanovich
in a phone conversation.
O'Neal is being granted his wish
to be dealt to a warm-weather city
where he retains the possibility of
reaching the NBA Finals, teaming
with Olympian Dwyane Wade.
What the Lakers get is an infu-
sion of young, athletic talent in the
form of Odom and Butler, both 24,
and a gritty replacement center in
Grant, 32. The first-round pick the
Lakers get is conditional and will
come in 2006 or later.
The Lakers settled on this deal
because they wanted to move O'Neal
to the Eastern Conference and were
severely handicapped by O'Neal's
unwillingness to go to certain teams
such as Indiana - O'Neal threatened to
opt out of his contract after next season
if he was sent somewhere he didn't like.
Also committing to trade, O'Neal
now makes it clear to Bryant, who is
considering an offer from the Clip-
pers, that he'll be the sole focus of
the team if he re-signs.
Lakers general manager Mitch
Kupchak can't be certain what Bryant
intends to do, though.
"I don't know how it's going to
play out Kupchak said.
"1 honestly don't
Denver is joining Phoenix and
San Antonio in dropping out of
the Bryant chase, planning to use
its salary-cap space on an offer to
Kenyon Martin. Still, Kupchak said,
"It just takes one team
Odom, a 6-foot-10 player with
point-guard skills, never has been an
All-Star, but he's someone the Lakers
believe can team with Bryant to keep
them among the NBA's elite.
Pirates from page 10
Chris Moore was named as the
18th-ranked inside linebacker in the
nation by Lindy's. He joined Dough-
erty on the first team conference
selection, garnering the honor from
four sources.
Running back Marvin Townes
was also named the first team All
Conference USA by Blue Ribbon.
Other Pirates receiving preseason
honors were tight end Josh Coffman,
outside linebacker Charlie Dempseyj
defensive back Erode Jean and defen-
sive linebacker Guy Whimper.
The Pirates as a team were
picked to finish ninth in C-USA this
season.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
????????????????????????I
1011-A Red Banks Rd � 321-6374
www.meshcafe.com
Comedian D. S.
Dinner Show
m Late Show
ECU ID FREE Pass
must be 21 yrs. old
????????????????????????
Wednesday
Karaoke
$50 CASH prize
for winner
hursdav
Live BAND
Big Bertha
No cover charge
Saturdav
DJ "DOG'S"
Dance Party
Starts @ 10pm
Martini Specials
1 2 price selected
appetizers for ladies





PAGE 14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
7-14-04
Don't throw your money away
We have what yon need at a price you can afford at
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I THE EAST CAROLINIAN
tec






PAGE 15
7-14-04
CLASSIFIEDS
ads@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
For Rent
Blocks to ECU, 1, 2, 3 bdrm. house
-1 each left. Call 321-4712 or see
at collegeunlversltyrentals.com
University Area, 3&4 bedroom houses.
Central heatair, DW, stove, oven,
refrigerator, washer dryer hook-ups
at each. Available Aug. 1st. 252-756-
3947, 252-259-0424.
5 Bedroom, 2 12 baths, hardwood
floors, near campus, pets ok. Please
call 531-7489 or 355-1731. $750
mth.
Houses for rent - 1202-B and 1306
Glen Arthur and 204 Thirteenth Street.
2 and 3 bedrooms. All located near
ECU. Pets allowed with fee. For more
information contact Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
Super nice house near campus, central
HVAC, all appliances, 3BR2B $780
mo 3BR2B $900mo 5BR2B
$1200mo 1BR1B $350mo. Call
917-9374, 917-1477, or 353-5107.
Available immediately, pets allowed.
Spring Forest townhome, 2 BR, 1 12
bath, full-size washerdryer included,
near hospital, immaculate. $600.
321-0424.
Now Leasing for Fall semester-1,2, &
3 bedroom apartments. Beech Street
Villas, Cypress Gardens, Eastgate,
Gladiolus Gardens, Jasmine Gardens,
Park
Village, Wesley Commons North and
Woodcliff. All units close to ECU. Pets
allowed in some units with fee. For
more information contact Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
Now Leasing for Fall Semester -
Cannon Court & Cedar Court - 2
bedroom, 1 12 bath townhouse, Free
basic cable with some units. Located
near ECU.
For more information contact
Wainright Property Management
756-6209.
Spacious 2 and 3 BR townhouses, full
basement, enclosed patio, WD hook-
up. No pets. ECU bus route. 752-7738
days 7:30 to 4:30
2 bedroom 1 bath duplex, 112 8th
street across street from Ham's, $575
mo. 2-3 bedroom 2.5-3.5 bath condo
on bus route, Wildwood Villas $695-
$720mo. Call 413-6898 or 758-
4747.
2 & 3 bedroom duplexes, walking
distance to campus, f.p WD conn
vaulted ceilings, 2 baths, private
driveway and back porch, dishwasher.
Call today for security deposit special
758-1921.
Twin Oaks townhouse, 2 BR, 1 12
bath, end unit on ECU campus bus
route. Patio, pool, WD hook-up.
$575 per month. Call 864-346-5750
or 864-228-3667.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments walking
distance to campus, WD conn pets
ok no weight limit, free water and
sewer, call today for security deposit
special 758-1921.
Duplex for rent- 3 bdrm, Meade St
$675.00, call 341-4608
Twin Oaks townhouse, 2 BR, 1.5 bath,
end unit on ECU campus bus route.
Patio, pool, WD hook-ups. $525 per
month. Call 864-346-5750 or 864-
228-3667.
2 bedroom apartments walking
distance to campus, WD conn pets
ok no weight limit, wired for surround
sound, security system, CATS phone
lines, call today! 758-1921
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015- 1 & 2 BR
apts, dishwasher, GD, central air &
heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or 12 month
leases. Pets allowed. Rent includes
water, sewer, & cable.
Stratford Villas 3 bedroom, 3 bath
houses for rent. Located across from
baseball stadium. All appliances
including washerdryer, security
systems, private patios. $1050 per
month. Call Chip at 355-0664.
Roommate Wanted
Female Roommates, 2 needed to
share 3 BR Condo. Each BR has
private bath and phonecomputer
connections, appliances include
washer and dryer, 5 blocks E. of
campus (flood free). $300 per
month and share electricity 752-3262
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath across
from campus $325 rent plus half
utilities. Call Belinda 945-3132.
Female. Share three bedroom home
with two female students. Campus
three blocks. Prefer graduate student.
Central air, ceiling fans, washer, dryer.
$300.00 plus utilities. (703) 680-1676
Roommate needed to share 3
bedroom 2 bath house 1 block
from campus with 2 sisters, must
be responsible and clean. Call 353-
5107 or 830-0878, $250month.
Roommate wanted to share 3BR,
2BA house three blocks from ECU.
$325month plus 13 utilities. Start
rent August first. Very Desperate.
r.ll RarPr at 6-601-1910.
Help Wanted
Full Time students Stop wasting
your time and talents on PT jobs with
bad hrs & pay LOOK! For 1 weekend
a month the National Guard wants
you to go to college, FREE TUITION!
Learn a job skill St stay a student!
FT Students get over $800mo. in
Education Benefits & PAY for more
info CALL 252-916-9073 or visit
www.l-800-GQ-GUARD.com
LOOKING FORagreat summer job?The
ECU telefund has immediate openings
and is looking for outgoing and
energeticstudentstocontactalumniand
parents for the East Carolina Annual
Fund. Starting pay is $6.25 per hour plus
cash bonuses! For more information
and to apply, visit www.ecu.edu
telefund and click on the "jobs" link.
Help Wanted for stock and sales.
Heavy lifting required. Apply at the
Youth Shop Boutique, Arlington
Village, Greenville. 756-2855
Tiara Too jewelry, Carolina East Mall,
Part-Time Retail Sales Associate, Day
and Night Hours, Apply in Person.
The Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting part-time
employees for the following positions:
Youth Soccer Coaches and Referees,
Youth and Adult Flag Football Referee
(12.00 per game), Youth and Adult
Flag Football Score KeepersSite
Attendants. Applicants must possess
a good knowledge of these sports
and be able to coach young people
ages 3-17. Hours range from 4p.m.
to 9p.m Monday-Friday with some
weekends. Flexible with hours
according to class schedules. These
positions will begin the beginning
of September. Salary rates start at
$6.25 per hour. Apply at the City of
Greenville, Human Resources
Department, 201 Martin L. King, r. Dr.
Phone 329-4492. Flag Football Referees
need to contact the athletic office at
329-4550 for information regarding
upcoming training dates. For
more information, please contact
the Athletic Office at 329-4550,
Monday through Friday, 12-7 p.m.
PERSONAL ASSISTANT - Must be
non-smoker, intelligent, flexible hours
including evenings and weekends,
have reliable vehicle. Call 752-1572.
TutorNanny needed for ages 12,11 fit
7. Minimum 3.0 GPA, strong in math
skills, non-smoker, reliable vehicle, good
driving record, flexible hours,some
cooking. Call 752-1572 for interview.
Clerical - State of the Art dental
practice looking for outgoing energetic
student with computer skills. Individual
must be personable & comfortable
interacting with strangers. Needed
4 hours a day, 4 days per week. Pay
starts at $7.00 an hour. Call 752-1600.
Mystery Shoppers needed! Get
paid to shop. Flexible work from
home or school. FTPT make
own hours. (800) 830-8066
Other
Bartending! $250day potential.
No experience necessary. Training
provided. (800) 965-6520 ext. 202
Personal
The Card Post (where every voice
counts!) Report 449 corrected TEC's
typesetting error of TCP's 63004 ad
I wish now to correct a fundamental
() error in my 11 303 writing of that
11303 fax. "The Crisis (dysfunctional
education) within THE CRISIS
(dysfunctional Democracy) should
have been inverted in as THE CRISIS
is DYSFUNCTIONAL EDUCATION
in of which all other crisis' evolve
out of. To understand this is to
understand that it is not a malpractice
in medicine or legislation though a
malpractice in education. Intentional
or unintentional. The doctors &
lawyers are only as great as the
schools they come from. To Prosperity
'n LongLives Tom Drew. P.S. Next
report the evolution of education
evolving out of Wayne Co & reasons
to have hope, on top of hope, on-
top of hope that some hopeless
situations can get much, much, much
better very, very, very SOON!
Required Reading
I m me east Carolinian
tec

Mark A. Ward
Attorney at Law
Board Certified Specialist In State Criminal Law
15 Years Experience In Criminal Defense
� Traffic Offenses
� ABC Violations
� Misdemeanors
� Drug Offenses
� DMV Hearings
� State & Federal Courts
fl g VISA
252.752.7529 � www.mark-ward.com � mward@mark-ward.com
AfHuHtmeitts
PO Bo 30316
Greenville. N( 27833
(252) 355-8007
iMANAtiKR PHONKl
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� Central lie Mi
�Convenient t� Shopping�
t tmU1 Kuui.mt- ml
Mpii.i)
� JJ II.hii Maind nance
75 Club Way Drive
Greenville, NC 27858
(252) 756-6869
(252)756-8381
AMENITIES 1
�P.lll.liH (ill�l.� I mndr) FnciHite
� I Large Ckvou� Pen Utowcd arfPo
�Huge Kiiihcn nbmeb� Swimming iv��f
- wji ih w�n r�pi� i hjktrew Pan w.i
� AIIEkctrk Kitcfaem� ' nl MimhK-n Iriu
� RclrigtmcftVI tmmDowntown, 1 (
� Hokkd RangeCarolina Eexi Mali
� OMn��ni A Doubk SinkPhi OMWHumt) i oflegc
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says it all
or $200 Look and Lease Bonus
paid upon lease acceptance.
Some restrictions apply, call for details.
UNIVERSITY
COLLEGIATE RESIDENCES
SUH is a registered trademark of SUH, Inc.
3535 East 10th Street - 252.758.5551 - Greenville NC 27858


Title
The East Carolinian, July 14, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 14, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1740
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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