The East Carolinian, June 30, 2004






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 79 Number 147
WEDNESDAY
June 30, 2004
ECU launches
new systems
engineering
program
Unique program designed to
meet interests of students
NICK HENNE
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's new systems engineering
program, which began March 19,
has attracted 45 student applicants,
15 Ph.D. engineering faculty and
has started some controversy among
UNC system officials as to whether
the program is necessary.
Ralph Rogers, dean of the college
of technology and computer science,
said he feels the program will benefit
ECU and help meet demands of both
ECU and eastern North Carolina.
"We think there is a lot of interest
out there certainly there is a lot of
interest in business and economic
development community at ECU
having an engineering program
said Rogers.
Rogers said systems engineering
is a unique engineering program
proven by research to be successful.
"Systems engineering is really
about solving problems. It empha-
sizes the management and design of
a total system Rogers said.
"The way we teach engineering
as well as the engineers we produce
are going to be different than you
would find in many other places
Rogers said the difference is that
in ECU's program, students will be
actively engaged in engineering
courses during their first semesters.
At other universities, engineering
students spend their first semesters
taking math and science and don't
get involved in engineering courses
until their later semesters.
Rogers said this non-systems
engineering system causes a large
percentage of students to discontinue
see ENGINEERING page 3
Bush pushes for democratic
reform in Middle East countries
President Bush speaks at Galatasaray University Tuesday in Istanbul, Turkey.
ISTANBUL, Turkey (AP) � A day
after Iraq's new interim government
claimed power, President Bush said
Tuesday that "freedom is the future
of the Middle East but made clear
that what he means by democracy is
not wholesale acceptance of Western
pop culture.
"When I speak about the
blessings of liberty, coarse videos and
crass commercialism are not what I
have in mind Bush said in remarks
before ending a five-day trip to Ire-
land and Turkey.
"There is nothing incompatible
between democratic values and high
standards of decency
In another self-criticism
after acknowledging widespread
suspicion of U.S. motives, Bush said:
"When some in my country speak in
an ill-informed and insulting manner
about the Muslim faith, their words
are heard abroad, and do great harm
to our cause in the Middle East
Muslims also bear some respon-
sibility for tensions between the two
cultures, Bush said.
"When some in the Muslim
world incite hatred and murder with
conspiracy theories and propaganda,
their words are also heard by a gen-
eration of young Muslims who need
truth and hope, not lies and anger
At the speech on the grounds of
Galatasaray University, next to the
Bosporus Strait that has long been
a symbolic link between Europe
and Asia, Bush cited Turkey as an
example of how democracy can flour-
ish in the Muslim world. He heralded
the transfer of sovereignty to Iraqis,
a step he said was giving rise to "the
world's newest democracy
At the same time, Bush raised
no objection to new interim Iraqi
Prime Minister lyad Allawi taking
hard-line measures to deal with
militantssuchasAbuMusabal-Zarqawi,
the most wanted man in the country.
Allawi said Tuesday he will announce
emergency measures - steps likely to
temporarily curb the kinds of free-
doms Bush was advocating for the
Middle tost.
His audience sat silently
throughout his remarks, giving brief
applause when he finished. Just
behind Bush as he spoke was a bridge
spanning the Bosporus and a 17th
century mosque, its two slender mina-
rets pointed skyward.
Gun-toting security officers
floated by in a black rubber raft, along
with gunboats, and a low-flying black
surveillance helicopter cruised over
the speech site twice, forcing Bush to
raise his voice.
Pharmacy experiences increase in prescription costs
Price inflation hurts business
at toted low-cost'pharmacy
AMANDA UNGERFELT
EDITOR IN CHIEF
The ECU Student Health Ser-
vice pharmacy is experiencing an
increase in prescription contracep-
tives, ultimately hurting business at
the toted "low-cost" pharmacy.
Popular contraceptives, such as
LoOvral and Ortho-Cyclen, have
increased in price from $10 to $42.
"The majority of the business
that we SHS Pharmacyl do is In
contraceptives said Greg Morris,
pharmacy manager.
"The price increase! nas ,lurl a
lot of students
Morris said the reason students
received contraceptives at such a
low cost is because pharmaceutical
companies offer "trial packs" at a
discounted price to students. Such
trial packs aren't available at neigh-
borhood pharmacies.
Morris said the companies offer
these trial packs in hopes that stu-
dents will become familiar with the
brand and will continue to buy it
when they leave the university.
According to Morris, many of
the contraceptives have patents that
last about seven to 10 years. When
the patents run out, cheaper generic-
brands are created, decreasing sales
for the brand name prescriptions.
"Now, when students leave school,
see PHARMACY page 2
WEATHER FORECAST
TODAY
Scattered Thunderstorms
High of 83
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PAGF 6-30-04
NEWS
nevirs@theeastcarollnian.com
252.328.6366
COUNTDOWN UNTIL END
OF SUMMER SESSION II
22 MORE CLASS DAYS
Announcements
Parking Information
If you are a new or returning
student planning to bring a vehicle
to campus, you must purchase an
ECU parking permit. Parking on
campus is limited with a maximum
number of permits sold for each
zone. The parking application
process must be completed online
at www.onestop.ecu.edu. Permits
will be mailed to applicants who
register by July 16. After this date,
you may register online and your
permit will be held at the parking
office for pickup.
Marathon and Fun Run
The Greenville Jaycees present
the 10th Annual Flat Out 5K and
Fun Run on July 3, beginning at
the Town Commons off First Street.
Pre-registration is available,
plus race day registration and
check-in information, at the Willis
Building. Call 353-6030 for more
information
Dissertation Defense
The Department of Communication
Sciences and Disorders presents
"Naming and Rhyme Recognition
Abilities in Children Diagnosed
with Childhood Apraxia of Speech"
by Betty L Smith at 11 a.m. July 8
in 105 Belk
Correction
In a June 23 article titled
"Ordinance affects housing
options for students information
in the sub-heading was incorrect.
The heading should have read
"Policy states no more than
three unrelated people can share
residence
News Briefs
State
Durham YMCA's bar on
family rate for same-sex
couples ends Duke deal
DURHAM. NC - YMCA of the Triangle
Area will stand by its policy of refusing
family discount memberships to same-
sex couples, leading the organization
and Duke University to sever a
promotion agreement.
Duke had promoted the YMCA in its
employee literature and on its Web
site in exchange for Duke employees
receiving breaks on memberships.
That 2002 agreement will end
Aug 27. about a month before the
original contract was set to expire.
Duke had threatened since April to
end its relationship with the YMCA
if the nonprofit's officials refused to
offer family memberships to Duke
employees who are part of same-sex
couples.
"We are a private organization and
cannot allow outside organizations
to shape or dictate our policies or the
timing of any changes said YMCA
spokeswoman Dorothy Brown.
Some local YMCA branches, including
the one in Chapel Hill, allow same-sex
couples to pay the family membership
rate.
Jury awards damages to
NC woman inseminated
with wrong sperm
WILMINGTON, NC - A jury awarded
more than $400,000 on Monday to
a North Carolina woman artificially
inseminated with "unwashed" sperm.
The jury of five men and seven
women returned a verdict of $85,000
in compensatory damages and
$350,000 in punitive damages to
Kelly Chambliss.
The $350,000 in punitive damages will
have to be reduced to $250,000 by
New Hanover County Superior Court
Judge W. Allen Cobb Jr.
John Martin, attorney for the fertility
clinic, said the state legislature capped
punitive damages at either three times
the compensatory damages or a
maximum of $250,000.
The total adjusted award will be
$335,000.
The ruling was less than what
Chambliss' attorney, Gary Shipman,
had asked the jury to award for
physical and emotional damages,
but more than he asked in punitive
damages.
"WeYe pleased with the courage of the
jury said Chambliss. "We hope this
never happens to anyone else again
Chambliss, 37, walked into a Coastal
Area Health Education Center fertility
clinic in August 2002 for her 12th attempt
at pregnancy Nurse practitioner, Julie
Ramsey, inseminated her with the
contents of an unlabeled syringe.
The syringe contained unprepared
sperm left over from another client's
procedure two days before.
Chambliss said she became violently
ill right after the procedure.
Nation
Bird flu could threaten humans
worldwide, research suggests
WASHINGTON (AP) - A type of bird flu
that has killed millions of chickens is
becoming more infectious to mammals.
Scientists fear it could cause the next
worldwide pandemic in humans.
The avian flu has forced authorities
to slaughter millions of chickens and
other fowl in Asia to stem outbreaks in
recent years. Thousands more have
been killed in the United States and
elsewhere.
Already the flu has passed from birds
to humans in Hong Kong, killing six of
18 people infected in 1997, and human
cases have been reported since then
in Vietnam and Thailand.
Now China-based researchers
studying the H5N1 strain of the flu
report that it has been changing over
the years to become more dangerous
to mammals. Their research, based on
tests in mice, is reported in Monday's
issue of Proceedings of the National
Academy of Sciences.
World
Israeli air strike hits Gaza
City building after Palestinian
rocket attack kills two
BEIT HANOUN, Gaza Strip (AP)
- Palestinian militants fired a new
barrage of makeshift rockets into
southern Israel early Tuesday, despite
the launch of an Israeli offensive meant
to halt such attacks.
The salvo, which moderately wounded
one man, came a day after a rocket
attack killed two Israelis, including a
3-year-old boy, in the border town of
Sderot.
The pre-dawn Israeli military operation
came in response to the Sderot attack.
It marked the first time in nearly
four years of fighting that the crude
homemade Qassam missiles killed
Israelis.
Under the cover of intense machine
gun fire, Israeli tanks and bulldozers
blocked roads in the northern Gaza
Strip - the start of what security officials
said could be an extended operation
in the area.
Web porn case upheld "M��acy �.�
WASHINGTON (AP) � The
Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that a
law meant to punish pornographers
who peddle dirty pictures to web-surf-
ing kids is probably an unconstitu-
tional muzzle on free speech.
The high court divided 5-4 over a
law passed in 1998, signed by former
President Clinton and now backefl by
the Bush administration. The majority
said a lower court was correct to block
the law from taking effect because it
likely violates the first Amendment.
In considering the issue a third
time, the court did not end a long
fight, however, the majority voted
to send the case back to a lower court
for a trial that could give the govern-
ment a chance to prove the law does
not go too far.
The ruling in Ashcroft v. Ameri-
can Civil Liberties Union was the last
of nearly 80 cases decided in a busy
court term that ended Tuesday with
no announcements that any of the
nine justices would retire. The year's
marquee cases involving presidential
power to deal with suspected terrorists
wereannounced Monday, and, for the
most part, represented a loss for the
Bush administration.
The majority, led by Justice
Anthony M. Kennedy, said there may-
have been important technological
advances in the tive years since a fed-
eral judge blocked the law.
Holding a new trial will allow
discussion of what technology, if any,
might allow adults to see and buy
material that is legal for thf-m while
keeping that material out of the hands
of children.
Justices John Paul Stevens, David
H. Souter, Clarence Thomas and Kuth
BaderGinsburg agreed with Kennedy.
Tuesday's pornography ruling is
more nuanced, but still a blow to the
government. It marks the third lime
the high court has considered the case,
and it may not be the last.
The ACLU and other critics
of the anti-pornography law said
that it would restrict far too much
material that adults may legally see
and buy.
"We're very pleased with the deci-
sion said ACLU lawyer Ann Beeson.
"The status quo is still with us and
the court made it safe for artists, sex
educators and web publishers to com-
municate with adults without risking
jail time
Beeson said that after repeated
losses in court, the government may
choose to drop any further defense
of the law. There was no immediate
word from the Bush administration.
The law, which never took effect,
would have authorized fines up to
$50,000 for the crime of placing such
material within the easy reach of chil-
dren on the internet.
they will go to pharmacies! and buy
the generic brand Morris said.
Since generic versions have
recently become available for con-
traceptives like LoOvral, Ortho-
Cyclen, Ortho-Tri-Cyden and Tri-
phasil, Morris said pharmaceutical
companies see no need to keep offer-
ing students trial packs at low costs
because they will ultimately begin
buying the generic brands when they
finish school.
"The prices are slowly increasing
on many of the trial packs. Eventually,
we'll just sell the regular packs that
other pharmacies do Morris said.
The pharmacy does offer the
generic versions of contraceptives,
however, the generic medications
are still higher than the name brand
trial packs. For example, a stu-
dent who takes Ortho-Cyclen used
to pay $10 for the name-brand
prescription, but now has to pay
$28 for the generic prescription.
Although students are paying
more for their prescriptions, Morris
said that price increases are hurting
business because many students
are taking their prescriptions to
other pharmacies that welcome
outside insurance. At press time,
the SHS pharmacy does not honor
outside insurance.
"We're working real heavily on
one (insurance) contract that has
over 200 insurance companies. The
lawyers are currently reviewing it
and we're hoping to have it by the
end of the summer Morris said.
According to Morris, many
insurancecompanies will not allowSHS
to welcome outside insurance because
the pharmacy only caters to students
and not the entire general public.
This writer can be contacted at
news&theeastcarolinian. com.






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6-30-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGF 3
Saddam to face charges in Iraqi court this week Engineering trompagei
Iraq's interim Prime Minister lyad Allawi, right, and Justice Minister Mailk
Dohan al-Hassan speak at a news conference in Baghdad, Iraq Tuesday.
BAGHDAD, Iraq � Saddam Hus-
sein will be transferred to Iraqi legal
custody and face charges in an Iraqi
court this week - but he won't go on
trial for months and he will stay in
a U.Srun jail because the country
doesn't have a suitable prison, the
prime minister said Tuesday.
Prime Minister lyad Allawi prom-
ised an open proceeding when
Saddam faces war crimes charges,
including genocide.
Eleven other "high-value detain-
ees" also are expected to face justice,
Allawi said at his first news confer-
ence since the U.Sled coalition
handed over sovereignty to his gov-
ernment Monday.
"I know I speak for my fellow
countrymen when 1 say 1 look for-
ward tothe day former regime leaders
face justice Allawi said.
Saddam will be transferred to
Iraqi legal custody Wednesday and
face arraignment before an Iraqi
judge Thursday, Allawi said.
Within hours, Iraqi authori-
ties announced arrest warrants for
Saddam and the 11 others, includ-
ing former Deputy I'rime Minister
Tariq Aziz.
The list also includes Ali Hassan
al-Majid, also known as "Chemical
All former Vice President Taha
Yassin Ramadan and two of Saddam's
half-brothers, according to the head
of the Iraqi Special Tribunal, Salem
Chalabi.
Allawi was asked whether his
Cabinet had finalized plans for emer-
gency rule as have been proposed
publicly by a number of officials
since the interim administration was
announced June 1.
"We will tell you about those
procedures later - maybe tomorrow
or the day after tomorrow Allawi
said.
"We will tell you about those
procedures that were adopted by the
Cabinet
Government officials have not
spelled out what measures might
be imposed. However, Iraqi media
have speculated they might include
special rules for searches, detentions
and curfews in specific areas where
see SADDAM page 4
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the major before they are exposed to
engineering courses.
"Being an engineer is
about solving problems and
delivering a product, what we hope
to do is begin to have students work
on real projects and seeing real
solutions starting from their fresh-
man year Rogers said.
In ECU's systems engineering
program, Rogers said the engineering
students will be grouped together in
the same courses not only for the
engineering, but for the math and
science courses as well.
This system, which is not com-
monly used by other universities,
will increase engineering students'
opportunities to work together in
teams, giving them a more realistic
workplace experience in engineer-
ing.
"This is the way engineers really
work - in teams Rogers said.
Research in engineering educa-
tion, Rogers said, has found this
system to be
very successful �mmmmmmm,m�m
in keeping stu-
dents in engi-
neering, espe-
cially for females
and minority
groups, as engi-
neering has in
the past been a
predominately
white male
major.
Rogers said
the research con-
ducted has shown
this system to
increase the retention rate of engi-
neering students by 10 - 25 percent.
Rogers said ECU'S systems engi-
neering program will not only ben-
efit ECU as it attracts an increased
number and variety of students, but
also eastern North Carolina. Busi-
nesses see engineering as a resource
for technical expertise, which there
is a demand for in this area.
As far as economic develop-
ment in the region, Rogers said
an increased amount of engineers
would make a good asset for incom-
ing businesses, which will, in turn,
benefit the overall marketing in
the region.
Before ECU was approved
to begin the program, NC State
University officials and members
of the North Carolina Board of
Governors voiced concerns about
the new program.
Issues raised included how the
new program would affect ECU'S
demand for state funding and com-
petition for engineering resources
in North Carolina.
Rogers said as the new program
grows, there would eventually be a
need for more money to carry on and
expand the program.
However, he does not see money
being an issue in the years to come.
ECU's systems engineering program
will not require costly items used by-
other engineering programs such as
engineering laboratories.
Rogers a Iso adds that t he program
plans on seeking funding from other
outside sources and will not be solely-
dependent on state funding.
"We need to find philanthropy,
we need to find the ability to do out-
side research to find other sources of
income Rogers said.
"I don't believe looking to the
state to solve all of our needs will be
successful
While the only concentration
in the new engineering program is
systems engineering, Rogers said as
the program expands, other concen-
trations will be made available to
students. This increase in size, Rogers
said, will also allow the program to
receive an increased amount of fund-
ing from ECU.
�"����"��� Despite the
"The way we teach ��nccr"s voiced'
Nino Masmari,
engineering as well as the dean of the coi-
engineers we produce are
going to be different than
you would find in many
other places
Ralph Rogers
Dean of ECU's College of
Technology and Computer Science
lege of engineer-
ing at NCSU, said
he does not feel
ECU's new pro-
gram will pose
a major threat
to NC State In
receiving state
funding and
resources.
Masmari said
he feels the main
determining factor of state funding
rests on North Carolina's economy.
"The economy of the state
basically dictates the amount of
resources and funding an institute
receives said Masmari.
"All public institutions have
suffered from the downturn in the
economy
Masmari also said the struggle
for receiving funds and resources
is prevalent within any col-
lege and state institutions and
engineering is no exception.
He said he does not feel
ECU's new program will hinder
NC State in recruiting engineer-
ing students in North Carolina.
Rogers agrees that ECU's program
will not affect other universities.
"We're not trying to beat NC
State or UNC Charlotte or any-
other school in North Carolina
Rogers said.
"We're trying to be ECU, we're
trying to be different than anyone
else, we're trying to address a par-
ticular need
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.





PAGE 4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
6-30-04
Saddam from page 3
insurgent activity is strong.
On the streets of Baghdad, sev-
eral Iraqis said they were happy to
hear that Saddam would have Iraqi
justice, but they urged the court to
treat him fairly.
"I hope that he will get a fair
trial and not be executed because the
people have suffered a lot because
of him. I want him to get a life sen-
tence said Ahmad Chatub.
Another man, Basil al-Timimi,
said Arabs would accept the verdict
if the trial takes place in an Iraqi
court.
"The main objections of Arab
countries about thearresl ol Saddam
Hussein was thai In- was arrested by
Americans, and not Iraqi people
said al-Tlmlml.
"Now he will be tried in an Iraqi
court and he will face Iraqi justice,
I don't think it's so complicated to
make a judgment on him
He said he was sure Saddam
would face execution.
The trials for Saddam and the
II others won't occur for months,
and Allawi urged the Iraqi people
to be patient He acknowledged
that more than one million Iraqis
are missing as a result of events
that occurred during the former
regime - and that many Iraqis want
justice done.
But he insisted Saddam must
receive a "just trial, a fair trial
" We would I i ke to show t he world
that the new Iraq government means
business and wants to do business
and wants to stabilize Iraq and put it
on the road toward democracy and
peace Allawi said.
"We want to put this bad history
behind us and move toward a spirit
of national unity and reconciliation
in the future
Allawi said Iraqi leaders
requested that coalition forces
retain custody of the deposed leader
"until correction services are fully
capable of providing for their
safety and secure detention of the
accused
Saddam, who was captured by
U.S. troops Dec. 13, is being kept at
an undisclosed location in or near
Baghdad and has been interrogated
by the CIA and FBI.
The tribunal that will try Saddam
has a budget of $75 million. It will
rely on a mix of Iraqi criminal law,
international regulations such as the
Geneva Convention and experiences
of bodies such as the Rwanda war
crimes tribunal.
The U.S. Justice Department has
been gathering evidence for a war
crimes case against Saddam, while
other International groups have been
sifting through mass graes where
U.S. officials say victims of Saddam's
regime were buried.
Saddam's military also used
chemical weapons against troops and
civilians during the Iran-Iraq War
and during a Kurdish uprising.
Allawi said the Iraqi Cabinet is
still discussing whether to reinstate
the death penalty.
lustice Minister Malik Pohan
al-llassan said Saddam could have
a foreign lawyer if an Iraqi lawyers'
association agrees.
The Jordanian lawyer claiming
to represent Saddam has argued that
the ousted leader should be released
because handing him over to Iraq's
new government would violate inter-
national law.
Ziad al-Khasawneh, one of
20 Jordanian and foreign lawyers
appointed by Saddam's wife, Sajidah,
said the United States has no legal
basis to keep prisoners, including
the ousted ruler, now that it has
transferred authority to an interim
Iraqi government.
Saddam was granted prisoner
of war status after his capture.
Although he is alleged to have
committed crimes against his own
people, he has not been charged with
any offense.
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RA0E5
M IHLUU -JHhJL I 1
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OPINION
Amanda Ungerfelt
Editor in Chief
Robbie Derr
Features Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Alexander Marclnlak
Web Editor
Ryan Downey
Sports Editor
Nina CoefielrJ
Head Copy Editor
Newsroom
Fax
252.328.6366
252.3286558
Our View
Independence
is defined as a
state of
thinking, or
acting for
oneself-not
being influenced
or controlled by
others.
On July 4,1776, the United States claimed
its independence from England and
Democracy was born. This weekend,
America will celebrate the Fourth of July
- the day of its independence.
Independence is defined as a state of
thinking, or acting for oneself - not being
influenced or controlled by others.
As Americans, we have this - a freedom that
is revered and envied by other nations.
Thousands of people flock to the land of
the free and the home of the brave" each
year, in pursuit of the "American Dream
something that is so foreign to them, but
so commonplace to us.
In appreciation of this, we remove the
Pledge of Allegiance from schools, cover
our independence on one day per year,
and on that day. we launch fireworks with
no reverence to what they're for.
TEC wants to remind our readers not to get
so caught up in the activities that you forget
the meaning of the day.
An excerpt of one of the most revolutionary
documents ever written, the Declaration
of Independence of the United States of
America that Congress ratified on July
4, 1776, exemplifies the meaning of the
Fourth:
"We hold these truths to be self-evident;
that all men are created equal; that they
are endowed by their Creator with certain
inalienable rights; that among these are life,
liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that
to secure these rights, governments are
instituted among men, deriving their just
powers from the consent of the governed,
- that whenever any form of government
becomes destructive of these ends, it is
the right of the people to alter or to abol-
ish it
Opinion Writer
The word 'liberal' has come to be a four-letter word
Democrats, liberals
on the ropes
PETER KALAJIAN
OPINION WRITER
Growing up, I remember
my parents telling me stories
about where they were when
watershed events in American
history took place. The assas-
sinations of Bobby and John
Kennedy, the moon landing
in 1969, the death of Martin
Luther King - these things
were forever lodged in the
national consciousness.
On some level, I was
always a bit jealous of that.
What major events would 1
be able to tell my children
about? On Sept 11, 2001, fate
provided one. The events of
that terrible day have for-
ever imprinted themselves
on the minds of all Ameri-
cans, liberal and conservative
alike, and unlike most topics,
crossed the deep partisan
chasm which separates our.
national government.
There is one other
moment, perhaps the worst
political miscalculation I can
recall. Nine little words which
opened the floodgates and
nearly brought down one of
the most successful presidents
in the history of the United
States - "I did not have sexual
relations with that woman
With these nine words,
William Jefferson Clinton,
the 42nd president, did more
damage to the liberal cause
in America than can ever be
truly calculated. I was a young
man, still In high school, but
all I could think was, "Mr.
President, I hope you are tell-
ing the truth, because if not,
that's the end of you
Since the 2000 election,
all three branches of our
national government have
been lost to the Republi-
can juggernaut, (a situation
which, as 1 understand it, is
somewhat antithetical to the
idea of checks and balances
within government, but that's
another column entirely),
and the word "liberal" has
come to mean unpatriotic,
soft and weak on crime. I feel
that as an unabashed liberal
and dedicated Democrat, it
is my responsibility to try
and dispel some of these
misnomers.
First of all, questioning
the actions of the government
and our national leadership
is not unpatriotic. On the
contrary, it is a fundamental
responsibility of all Ameri-
cans to question the behavior
of these people when we feel
they act in a manner contrary
to our national interest.
1 am also fervently
opposed to the death penalty.
Why? Because two wrongs do
not make a right (never have)
and since the United States
is all too happy to take the
moral highroad on human
rights issues. Perhaps then
it is somewhat hypocritical
for us to still employ state-
sanctioned execution to deter
our citizens from committing
crimes.
The biggest problem facing
liberals in America today is
our lack of solid national lead-
ership. The reason Democrats
are often looked down on as
weaker candidates is that, very
simply, they are. Their politics
may be far more sensible, but
unfortunately, politics don't
win races, people do. Until
the Democratic Party can find
itself a suitable candidate, the
American people will remain
under the thumb of Bush,
Cheney and the rest of the
corrupt Republican power
structure in Washington.
Opinion Writer
Take a break from woes to experience good things in lite
'Conservi-Nazi' takes
a break from ranting
TONY MCKEE
OPINION WRITER
For those out there look-
ing for another rant from the
conservi-Nazi (as one of our
illustrious and very capable
liberal-whacko educators called
me recently) I am going to have
to disappoint this week. I'm in
too good a mood because I've
been thinking about all the
good things in my life.
1 recently celebrated my
20th wedding anniversary to
a very special lady and I thank
the good Lord every day for
leading me to her. I also spent
most of the weekend going
through all of our old photos
in order to keep a promise I
made to my stepsons years ago
- that when they got married I
would find every photo of them
they wished was never taken
and present them to their
wives.
Son number one, age 26,
has been married a couple of
years. Son number two, age 23,
is taking the plunge in August.
Not only do I consider what
I am doing (with my sainted
wife's willing assistance) a
simple matter of keeping my
word, I also see it as exercising
my God-given right as a parent
to embarrass the snot out of my
children.
Seriously though, life is
pretty good both personally
and with the country.
Gas prices are coming
down. Not as fast as they went
up, but they never do. I'm
still annoyed at having to pay
more than 40 cents in taxes for
every gallon of gas (somewhere
around 25 cents state tax and
18 cents federal), but what can
you do? Like the saying goes,
you can count on just four
things in this life - being born,
paying taxes, dying and paying
more taxes.
The economy is another
point of pleasure. It just keeps
on going and going. Even the
"bad" news the press tries to
put out can't hide the fact that
the news is good. Think about
it. When you see headlines like
"F.conomy Grows at Slower
than Expected Rate that is
good news. Why? Because
the economy is growing and
has been for quite some time
- even the press can't hide it
anymore.
The job market news is just
as good. All the negative bleat-
ing has all but stopped in the
face of the inevitable increase in
new hires. Anybody with just a
little common sense and the
initiative to do a little research
knows that jobs are always the
last category to increase in an
economic recovery. Again, even
the politicians and the press
can no longer hide that fact.
What else? Well, we still
live in a free country, one
that people are still willing to
die fighting for as well as risk
their lives trying to get into.
How many other countries
can you think of that people
are flocking to for the oppor-
tunity to just live in freedom
and peace?
Yeah, I know there are
some of you that will read this,
cry that "things are horrible
and then proceed to list every
negative thing you can think
of to prove me wrong. Know
what? I don't care.
If you want to go through
life being depressed, angry and
despondent, that's fantastic.
More power to you. Sulk on.
Just don't try to drag me or any-
body else along with you.
There are a lot of good
things going on in the country
and the world right now, if
you care to look for them. The
Bluebird of I lappiness is always
in the sky. It can either sing for
you or crap on your head. The
choice is yours.
(By the way, for those of
you who feel cheated by the
lack of rant this week, fear
not. 1 plan to risk my mental
well-being and go see Michael
Moore's "Fahrenheit 911" this
week. I may not do the column
about that this week, but what-
ever subject comes up, it's going
to be fun).





6-23-04
FEATURES
ROBBIE DERR
Features Editor
features@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
What are your plans
for the Fourth
of July?
KATE CHANDLE
SENIOR EXERCISE SPORT
SCIENCE
"Party
LAUREN MCSWAIN
SOPHOMORE SPEECH
THERAPY
"Going home to spend the
weekend on the lake
VIVIAN KARIMAKWENPA
SENIOR MARKETING
"Sleeping
Local areas explode with
Food, fun, entertainment and
exercise are all part of
Fourth of July festivities
CAROLYN SCANDURA
STAFF WRITER
Independence Day is the national
holiday celebrating the signing of
the Declaration of Independence
on July 4, 1776. Although many
people don't really reflect on the
significance of. this day, they do
enjoy all the festivities. Since the
early 1800s, thetraditfon of picnics,
parades ancj firejworks are among the
favorite activities of Independence
- .Us
Day patrons. These traditions have
stood the test of time, especially
here in eastern North Carolina.
ECU students celebrate various
events throughout the year. Gradu-
ations, holidays, birthdays, but no
celebration is quite like the Fourth of
July. ECU is fortunate to have many
neighboring towns that hold annual
celebrations throughout the year. If
you want to getiypur Fourth of July
weekend started the healthy way,
the 10th Annual Fiat Out .Sk & Fun
Run, sponsored by the Greenville
Jaycees will be held July 3, The race
will start on First Street at the Town
Commons, downtown Greenville.
You can register July 3 or pre-register
by calling 353-6030, Represent the
6-2-
�&t
Pirates and pre-burn those Fourth
of July calories!
The town of Farmville will be hold-
ing their annual Fourth of July celebra-
tion starting at 6 p.m July 4. The cele-
bration will take place downtown, near
the new county court house where they
will have music, games, food, enter-
tainment and of course, fireworks.
When asked to describe the set-
ting in Farmville on the Fourth of
July, a representative of the Parks and
Recreation Department said, "Our
celebration is like a Norman Rockwell
type picture. Quaint but fun
Admission to the celebration is
free and the fireworks display is sched-
uled to take place right after dark.
If you are looking for a water-
front firework show, Washington,
NC is the place to be. The town of
Washington, the first town to be
named for George Washington,
holds an annual fireworks display
see LOCAL page 9
mm
o
Local Events
Greenville:
July 3
10th Annual Rat Out 5k & Fun Run
July 4 at 4 p.m.
Fourth of July Festival
Farmville:
July 4 at 6 p.m.
Fourth of July celebration
Washington;
July 4 at 9 p.m.
Waterfront fireworks show
Ways to have a safe and enjoyable Fourth of July
Tips to having a safe holiday
RASHENA DRAUGHN
STAFF WRITER
For most people, the Fourth of
July is spent outside with family and
friends. Whether at the beach or at
home, the day is filled with fun and
celebration. Of course, no Fourth of
July celebration would he complete
without ending the night with spec-
tacular fireworks. Unfortunately, in
the midst of what should be an enjoy-
able event, the all too common issue
of injury creeps in.
According to the U.S. Consumer
Product Safety Commission, 8,800
people were treated for fireworks
related injuries in 2002. An esti-
mated 12 percent of fireworks related
injuries treated in emergency depart-
ments required hospitalization.
People who are actively participat-
ing in these activities are more
frequently injured and sustain more
severe injuries than bystanders.
Thirty percent of all fireworks
related injuries involve hands and
fingers. Eye injuries are 28 percent
and 15 percent are attributed to head
and face injuries. More than half of
the injuries are burns, which are
about 60 percent of the injuries, with
contusions and lacerations being the
second most frequent.
Injuries may result from being
too close to fireworks when they
explode. Risk of injury increases
when someone bends over to look
more closely at a firework that has
been ignited, or when a misguided
bottle rocket hits a nearby person.
Experimenting with homemade
fire works like those made from
the powder of several firecrackers is
extremely dangerous.
Sparklers, a common consumer
firework, are largely considered
harmless. However, they are the
second leading cause of fireworks
related injuries requiring trips to
the emergency room. Sparklers can
potentially ignite clothing and hair
and can reach temperatures of 1,800
degrees Fahrenheit, which is hot
enough to melt gold.
In addition to medical costs
directly and indirectly attributable
to fireworks injuries, U.S. fire depart-
ments reported approximately 21,700
fireworks related fires in 1998 that
were estimated to have cost $15.6
million in direct property damage.
On a typical Fourth of July holiday,
fireworks cause more fires in the
United States than all other causes
combined.
If you plan on doing your own
fireworks display, you should know
the difference between legal con-
sumer fireworks and dangerous
explosives. The Federal government
banned �80, �100, Blockbuster
and Quarterpounder explosives in
1966. These products contain no
manufacturer's label. Cherry bombs
and quarter sticks are also illegal in
the United States.
"Greenville law says you are only
to set off fireworks that have been
purchased in North Carolina said
Corporal Sherri Williams, spokes-
person for the Greenville Police
Department.
Most fireworks are illegal in our
state. North Carolina state law per-
mits only consumer fireworks, which
were formerly known as Class C fire-
works. The state prohibits explosive
or aerial fireworks, roman candles
and rockets or similar devices.
Greenville has had few problems
with the illegal use of fireworks.
O
Holiday
Safety Tips
1. Read and follow all warnings
and instructions.
2. Be sure other people are out
of range before lighting fireworks.
Never aim or throw fireworks at
another person.
3. Before lighting fireworks, place
them on a smooth, flat surface
that is a safe distance from
all structures, dry leaves and
flammable materials.
4. Never try to re-light fireworks
that have failed to function. Wait
15 to 20 minutes, then soak the
"duds" in a bucket of water
before disposing.
5. When lighting fireworks, keep a
bucket of water nearby in case
of a malfunction or fire.
6. Never use fireworks indoors.
7. Never place your face or any
other body part anywhere near
a firework.
see SAFETY page 10





6-23-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE 7
)ut 5k & Fun Run
July
lay
ty Tips
w all warnings
s.
Deople are out
lighting fireworks.
row fireworks at
fireworks, place
ioth, flat surface
istance from
Iry leaves and
erials.
light fireworks
I to function. Wait
;s, then soak the
ket of water
ig
fireworks, keep a
' nearby in case
n or fire,
vorks indoors,
ur face or any
t anywhere near
.�
AFFORDABILITY
CONVENIENCE
LOCATION
WYNDHAM COURT
2 Bedroom And 1 Bath Apartment.
5 Blocks From ECU.
Energy Efficient � Kitchen Appliances.
Washer & Dryer Hookups � Central Air & Hea
i
Pets OK With Deposit.
EASTGATE VILLAGE
2 Bedroom And 1 Bath Apartment.
Fully Equipped Kitchens.
Washer & Dryer Hookups � Central Air & Heat.
On ECU Bus Route.
24 Hour Emergency Maintenance.
Pets OK With Deposit � Nightly security patrols.
BRADFORD CREEK
3 Bedroom And 2.5 Bath Duplexes.
Country Club Living Without The Price.
On Bradford Creek Golf Cours
Approximately 1,350 Sq.t
Fully Equipped Kitchens � Washer & Drye
Pets OK With Deposit � Covered Parking.
DOCKSIDE DUPLEXES
3 Bedroom And 2.5 Bath � 6 Blocks From ECU.
Approximately 1350 Sq.ft.
Fully Equipped Kitchens.
Washer & Dryer.
Pets OK With Deposit � Covered Parking.
RIVERWALK
3 Bedroom And 3 Bath Houses.
Kitchen Appliances � Dishwasher.
Washer & Dryer � Central Air & Heat.
Covered Parking.
No Pets Allowed.
561 -7679 Or 561 -RENT 3200-F Moseley Drive � Greenville, NC 27858
Professionally managed by Pinnacle Property Management
.�'? . � ' X: - �$- � .
WWW.PINNACLEPROPERTYMANAGEMENT.COM
Offering Apartments & Houses, Plus Duplex Communities
Convenient To ECU, Pitt Community College & The Medical District
if'
ECU offers wide variety
of beneficial services
Easy ways for students to get
the most of their educations
RACHEL LANOEN
SENIOR WRITER
If the South Is famous foi its hos-
pitality, then perhaps ECU should he
known for its services. The university
oiler free assistance to students to
aid them in their personal, academic
and professional lives.
Center for Counseling and
Student Development
Because personal issues often do
interfere with one's academics, it is
important to deal with, and solve
them before they lead to greater
problems in other areas. This is
where the Center for Counseling
and Student Development comes in.
Located on the second floor of the
Wright Building, accessed through
a side door between Wright Audito-
rium and the Wright PlaceStudent
Stores, the center offers individual
counseling, couples counseling,
groups and workshops. There are
also psychiatrists available to provide
medication evaluations, consultation
and prescriptions, if necessary.
Students can call to schedule an
appointment duringthe week, but emer-
gencies may be seen on a walk-in basis.
The counseling process, whether
it be an individual session, with a
significant other or a group, is a way
to explore issues, learn new coping
methods and ultimately increase
personal satisfaction.
Academic Advising Center
Although the Academic Advising
Center is in charge of the Freshman
Seminar, this unit is available to
help all undergraduates with their
academic questions and goals.
Students who are undecided or
reconsidering majors are especially
encouraged to make an appoi nt ment
with an advisor or drop in at thecenter,
located in A-l 13 Brewster Building.
Advisors help students explore
majors and develop a course plan to
reach a degree in a particular field,
If someone in this office cannot
answer a question, they will guide .)
student to the appropriate resource
in order to make the most of his or
her academic potential.
Joyner Library Reference
Department
The Reference Desk at Joyner
Library doesn't have all the answers.
Instead, they have the means tohelpyou
locate whatever it is you're looking for.
The reference librarians are
available to assist students in finding
information, even if it means just
pointing them in the right direction
for their research.
To set up an individual research
consultation lasting approximately
one half hour, students may submit
an e-mail request or call the Refer-
ence Desk during the week.
Appointments may be scheduled
for Monday -Thursday or Sunday after-
iKxins. Once the Reference Department
receives a request, they will contact
the student to confirm the date and
time for an individual consultation.
University Writing Center
Experiencing writer's block? A
visit to the University Writing Center
might help alleviate the problem.
Created primarily to help sup-
port students in Writing Intensive
courses, the University Writing
Center offers one-on-one tutorial ses-
sions designed to help students learn
how to correct their own mistakes
and improve their writing.
The Writing Center staff will not
write a paper for you, however, they will
listen to what you have to say in order
see SERVICES page 10
Prelgnant?
Call 757-0003 or
1-800-395-HELP
All services are free of charge
FCarolina Pregnancy Center
A Member of Care Net Offering
� Free Pregnancy tests
� Information on your choices
� Confidential pregnancy counseling
� is- A� Pregnant y sni)n services
� Limited Medical Services
K45 Johns Hopkins Dr. Suite It
I Across from Stanton Square)
"WW.iurolinHpngnaiH n nU'r.org






PAGE 8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
6-23-04
Cinema Scene
STUDENT UNION FILMS
FREE WITH ECU ONE CARD
Barber Shop 2 - Barbershop is
back! A sequel to this falls runaway
hit, Barbershop 2 re-teams the original
filmmakers to style another crowd-
pleasing comedy. Spend another
hilarious day with the crew at Calvin's
shop in the South Side of Chicago
PG-13
Showing today at 9 p m. at the SRC
outdoor pool and July 1 at 7 p.m in
Hendrix Theatre.
IN THEATRES THIS WEEK
Around the World in 80 Days - Jackie
Chan stars in this adaptation of Jules
Verne's classic novel about thrill seeker
Phileas Fogg, who sets out to break the
record for traveling around the world,
but encounters many challenges along
the way. PG
Dodgeball A True Underdog Story
- In this raucous comedy, a small local
gym is threatened with extinction by a
gleaming sports and fitness palace
unless a group of social rejects
can rise to victory in a dodgeball
competition PG-13
Fahrenheit 911 -Filmmaker Michael
Moore examines the events of 911 and
the political landscape surrounding the
attack R
Garfield - In his film debut Garfield's
owner, Jon, takes in sweet but dimwitted
pooch Odie, turning Garfield's perfect
world upside down. But when the
hapless pup disappears and is
kidnapped by a nasty dog trainer.
Garfield, maybe for the first time in his
life, feels responsible. PG
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of
Azkaban - Harry Potter and his friends
Ron and Hermione return as teenagers
to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and
Wizardry for their third year of study,
where they delve into the mystery
surrounding an escaped prisoner who
poses a dangerous threat to the young
wizard. PG
Shrek 2 - A sequel to DreamWorks
hugely successful original, the story
opens with Shrek and Fiona returning
from their honeymoon to find a letter
from Fiona's parents inviting the happy
couple to dinner. Mom and Dad heard
their daughter had wed, but they
assumed she married Prince Charming
So they're a bit shocked when they
meet their new son-in-law. PG
Spider-Man 2 - Peter must face
new challenges as he struggles to
cope with the gift and the curse of
his powers while balancing his dual
identities as the elusive superhero
Spider-Man and life as a college
student. PG-13
The Chronicles of Riddick - Riddick,
the anti-hero from Pitch Black, has
spent the last five years on the move
among the forgotten worlds on
the outskirts of the galaxy, eluding
mercenaries bent on collecting the
price on his head, R
The Day After Tomorrow -
Climatologist Jack Hall's (Dennis
Quaid) research indicates that global
warming could trigger an abrupt
and catastrophic shift in the planet's
climate PG-13
The Notebook - A young woman
comes to the coastal town of Seabrook,
North Carolina in the 1940s to spend
the summer with her family. Still in
her teens, Allie Hamilton (Rachel
McAdams) meets local boy Noah
Calhoun (Ryan Gosling) at a Carnival.
Over the course of one passionate and
carefree summer in the South, the two
fall deeply in love. PG-13
The Stepford Wives - A couple
moves to what appears to be the
perfect small town Soon, they learn of
a sinister plot the men of the town have
constructed to render their partners
perfect. PG-13
The Terminal - Tom Hanks stars as an
air traveler inadvertently exiled to JFK
airport after a coupe in his homeland
erases the validity of his passport He
finds himself the victim of bureaucratic
red tape and is forced to take up
residence in the terminal. PG-13
Two Brothers - Two Brothers is the
story of twin tiger brothers who are
born amidst the temple ruins and
exotic jungles of French Indo-China.
Separated as cubs and taken into
captivity, one tiger is forced to become
a circus performer, the other a trained
killer. PG
White Chicks - Shawn and Marlon
Wayans play two ambitious but unlucky
FBI agents who go deep undercover
as female, high society debutantes to
infiltrate the sophisticated world of the
Hamptons to investigate a kidnapping
ring. PG-13
6-2:
I
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$357 average rental price
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Wyndham Court Apts
$225 per person
2 bedroom apts.
YOU pick your roommate
You probably already own a computer
Multi-millionrec. center on campus
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Energy efficient- average utility bill
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Total savings: $2088 per yearunit
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6-23-04
6-23-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE 9
Gas is almost $2.00gallon,
We're 5 blocks from ECU
University Terrace
3 bedroom 3 bath condominiums
Monthly Rent ; $900
Security Deposit: $500
� Kitchen Appliances w
dishwasher and disposal
� Full size laundry room
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� Internet capability in
each bedroom
� On ECU bus route
� 5 blocks from ECU
� 1230 Sq. Feet
� Large Closets
� Energy efficient
� Central heat & AC
� Sorry, No pets allowed.
Pinnacle Property Management of NC, INC.
104 D Wyndham (irclc FAX : 561-7617 TELEPHONE : (252) 561-767') (252) 531-9011
EMAIL: PINNACLEMGMT� AQL.COM
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2nd Floor Patio or Back Patio
Dishwashers Available
Pets Allowed with Fee
Energy Efficient
Bike Racks
On ECU Bus Route
Ashton Woods
Spacious Two BedroomOne Bath Units
Free Water & Sewer
Central Heat and Air
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phone (252) 758-1921 fax (252) 757-7722
Extention 60

!tl Si

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VhiI.�
ECU
LOCal from page 6
on their waterfront. The waterfront
offers more than just fireworks,
there are shops, boat slips and his-
toric eateries. The Parks and Recre-
ation Department of Washington is
sponsoring the fireworks display
on the Stewart Parkway at 9 p.m.
For more information, tall
the Parks and Recreation
Department at 975-9367.
The City of Greenville will
be holding their annual Fourth
of July Festival at 4 p.m July 4.
The Greenville Festival is spon-
sored by the Greenville Jaycees
at the Town Commons. The City
of Greenville celebration will
have carnival rides, games, arts
and crafts, food, music and a
colorful fireworks display. The
towns of Ayden and Griffon join
the celebration in Greenville.
A representative of the Griffon
Chamber of Commerce said
People usually just drive on up to
Greenville to see the fireworks
Some ECU students have lived
in Greenville for most of their lives.
One student, junior Jonathan Kernen
said, "I remember when I was little,
they would put ducks in the river and
all the kids would pick a duck and
hope theirs would win. The fireworks
were good too, but 1 really remember
liking the ducks and the music
The Greenville Town Commons
fireworks display will begin around
9 p.m. For more information, contact
the Greenville-Pitt County Conven-
tion Center at 329-4200.
Many F.CU students choose
to stay at home and plan a big
Fourth of July bash in their very own
backyard. Hamburgers, hot dogs
and pulled pork seem to be favor-
ites of many students. Loaded up
with sunscreen and bug spray,
some head down to the river for
some fun in the sun before the fire-
works display. When asked how he
likes to spend the Fourth of July,
senior Stephen Oliver said, "Grill-
ing out with some friends and
attempting to set off our own fire-
works in a safe manner of course
Celebrating our country's
freedom is a great reason to get out
of the house and do something fun.
This Fourth of July lather up with
some sunscreen, drink plenty of
water and celebrate what our found-
ing fathers celebrated 228 years ago
our Independence. Whether you
drive to Washington or Farmville or
stay right here in Greenville, have a
great time celebrating with family
and friends!
This writer can be contacted at
teatures@theeastcaroiinian.com.
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PAGE 10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
6-23-04
Services from page 7
to help you express your own ideas on
papet The staff consists of graduate and
undergraduate students from a variety
ofdlsdplines, ail ofvvhoni have received
intensive Instruction on how to teach
writing, revising and editing skills.
There isn't one specifk site for
the center It is located in numer-
ous buildings throughout campus,
and operates on .1 walk-In basis
with no appointment necessary.
However, when stopping by, it Is
important to take ,i cops of the
writing assignment with which you
are having difficult) and .my work
thai you have already completed.
English 1100and 1200 students
should take their assignment and
visit the I irst Year Writing Studio in
the Department of English
Upon entrance, a staff member
will meet with you tor 30 - 40 min-
utes to go over any major concerns,
brainstorm and formulate a plan of
what to do next. After, you may make
an appointment to meet with your
consultant again or choose to gain a
different perspective by meeting with
a different staff member in the future.
Foreign Language Resource
Center
Located in the same building as
the Department of foreign Languages
and literatures, the Foreign language
Resource Center provides language sup-
pott to Students, especially those in the
lower four levels of a foreign language.
The language lab includes 18
computers with software to supple-
ment the instructional textbooks, as
well as specialized software to assist
111 foreign language composition.
Tutors are also available to work
with students in a one-on-one capac-
ity in Spanish, I rein h and (n'rmait. At
the beginning of each semester, tutors
post their schedules in the lab. During
their scheduled times, theyo wrateon
a first come, first serve basis to assist
Students with learning a language
and completing class assignments
Student Professional
Development
The Office of Student Profes-
sional Development, a department
within Academic Affairs, was created
to help students during college and
after graduation. Its primary purpose
is to make certain ECU graduates
leave college with a job.
By working with employers, the
office creates career partnerships and
opportunities in all sectors. By work-
ing with students, the office identifies
and fosters career skills that should
carry a student from ECU into a
sin i essful position in the workforce.
I his writer can be contacted at
teatures@theeastcarolinian.com.
Safety from page 6
"We haven't had any big
problems. Some people may
have Cherry Bombs but noth-
ing major Williams said
I he Greenville Police Depart-
ment said they have rarely had prob-
lems with students and fireworks.
Some students will be playing it sale
this summer.
"I don't buy fireworks. I just
wait for the city's show said l.atoya
Harris, senior nutrition major.
"My family usually goes to
South ol the Border toby fireworks
and we set them off in my grand-
mother's backyard, but we aren't
doing it this year said ArturoCum-
mlngs, freshman music major.
If you are putting on the fire-
works display yourself, experts
recommend the use of a transparent
mask or glasses made of a strong
material such as polycarbonate.
Even spectators should wear protec-
tive gear. I f someone docs sustain an
eye injury, you should not touch it.
Get medical help immediately.
The best way to avoid injury is
to attend local fireworks displays.
The most you have to do is eat, have
fun and wait for the show to start.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Mark A. Ward
A T
Board
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6-23-04
PAGE 11
6 30 04
I
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ict
sits
SPORTS
RYAN DOWNEY
Sports Editor
sports@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Sports Briefs
Mitchell hired as
Raptors coach
Sam Mitchell was hired as coach
of the Toronto Raptors on Tuesday.
Mitchell, who played in the NBA for
13 years, was an assistant coach for
the expansion Charlotte Bobcats for
the past month. Mitchell, who also
played for Minnesota and Indiana,
spent two years as an assistant with
the Milwaukee Bucks before leaving
for Charlotte. He retired as a player just
two years ago.
Steve Francis accepts
trade to Magic
The Washington Post reported Monday
night that three-time All-Star Steve
Francis has dropped his objections to a
trade to the Orlando Magic, according
to his agent, clearing the way for a
six-player deal that will send McGrady,
Juwan Howard and Tyronn Lue from
Orlando to Houston in exchange
for Francis, Cuttino Mobley and Kelvin
Cato. The newspaper reports the deal
likely will be announced Wednesday.
Francis is flying to Orlando on Tuesday
to meet with Magic management,
including team president John
Weisbrod.
Dolphins TE charged
Miami Dolphins tight end Randy
McMichael was arrested Tuesday for
allegedly hitting his pregnant wife,
sheriff's officials said. McMichael was
charged with aggravated battery on a
pregnant woman, a second-degree
felony that is punishable by up to 15
years in prison. His wife, Cawanna
McMichael, was also arrested on a
domestic battery charge stemming
from an early Tuesday morning fight at
their home. Both remained in Broward
County Jail without bond Tuesday and
it was unknown when they would make
their first court appearance.
Charlotte Bobcats primed for futility?
A look at NBAs newest team
BRANDON HUGHES
SENIOR WRITER
When new Bobcat Head Coach
Bernie Bickerstaff said he would not
be happy if his team took the floor
with their current roster, it may have
been the understatement of the new
millennium. The recent expansion
draft did little more than confuse
and bewilder Charlotte fens and have
them contemplating whether or not
they would rather have the notori-
ous George Shinn and the Hornets
back that left the city several years
ago-
Starting at the center posi-
tion, the Bobcats picked up Jahidi
White, l.oren Woods and Predrag
Drobnjak. White may be the only-
help for Bickerstaff in the front
court.
Woods was an underachiever
in college and while Drobnjak
averaged more than six points per
game as a (tipper, he will need
to impress to earn a roster spot.
There are a few names at forward
that could have a significant role in
the expansion season. Lonny Baxter
and Marcus Fizer were successful in
college, hut have yet to translate that
to the NBA. Still, at least Bobcat fans
have heard of them.
Other forwards included Primoz
Brezec, Desmond Ferguson, Brandon
Hunter, Jamai Sampson and Theron
Smith. Who? Sharpshooter Jason
Kapono and athletic Gerald Wallace
will most likely merit a roster spot,
Disc Golf Diaries
Dad gets medal, son doesn't
ROBERT LEONARD
STAFF WRITER
It's nice to have a weekend off.
With the closest Professional Disc
Golf Association tournament in
Pittsburgh, 1 decided not to play a
PDGA tournament this weekend.
However, the weekend off wasn't
exactly a weekend off.
When you play as competitively
at any sport as I do in disc golf, you
have to practice. During the winter
is when I practice executing shots
and working on my game - summer
time is go time. With the weekend off
and me struggling in tournaments, I
found two one-day non-sanctioned
(the term we use for when a tour-
nament is not a PDGA tour event)
tournaments in Burlington and in
Winston-Salem. Burlington was a
rather large tournament with a PDGA
atmosphere and Winston-Salem was
the host of the North Carolina Ama-
teur State Games.
see DISC page 14
but neither will stand out. Wallace
can throw down with the best of
them, but the question is whether
or not he will see the court enough
to dunk.
A floor general at the point guard
position is required for success in the
NBA and the Bobcats are absolutely
embarrassing at both guard posi-
tions. Sadly, Richie Frahm may be
their most talented backcourt player.
Frahm averaged just 3.3 points per
game and appeared in 54 contests
last season.
The NBA Draft brought new hope
for the Bobcats, however, as they were
ecstatic when the Orlando Magic-
selected high schooler Dwigbt Howard
with the No. .1 overall pick. That
meant the seasoned and very talented
I nieka Okafor would be a Bobcat.
Okafor is the only bona fide star and
will put fans in the seats, at least for
the first few games. However, Okafor
is already stirring up some controversy
in the biggest city in North Carolina.
Okafor announced last week that
he will be competing for the U.S.
Olympic Basketball learn, a move the
Bobcats are not too thrilled about.
Bickerstaff said he knows it's good
to represent your country, but he is
looking at it from a selfish point of
view. He wants Okafor ready to play.
Okafor beat out Brad Miller and
Theo Rat I iff for a roster spot. Miller
and Ratliff? It's not going to be too
much longer before the U.S. Olympic
Team loses.
Brezec will represent Slovenia
and Drobnjak will play for Yugo-
slavia. No word on whether or not
Emeka Okafor, the Bobcats' first pick, shakes hands with David Stern.
Bickerstaff is worried they too will
be ready to play.
Enough with the pessimistic
attitude concerning the expansion
season for the Charlotte Bobcats. I
am sure they will pick up another
big name or two. Just one more fact
to remember. The Chicago Bulls hold
the record for most losses in a season.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcaralinian.com.
Floyd to continue in interim role
FLOYD
Nick Floyd, interim athletics
director at ECU, has agreed to con-
tinue serving in that role until a
permanent AD is named, Chancellor
Steve Ballard announced today.
"Nick has provided top-notch
leadership for Pirate Athlet-
ics since last fall said Ballard.
"I am delighted that he has
agreed to remain at the university
In this capacity
Floyd, who is also the senior
associate director of athletics, has
served as interim athletics director
since Mike Hamrick left for a posi-
tion at the University of Nevada at
Las Vegas in August.
Ballard said Floyd's total com-
pensation package for the coming
year would be $250,000, a figure
that is intended to compensate him
for his work as interim AD since last
August, as well as to make his salary
comparable to that of other athletic
directors in Conference USA.
Floyd, who was a finalist for
the permanent job, had with-
drawn his name last month but is
welcome to pursue the position,
Ballard said.
He said the search for an AD
will continue with the assistance
of a seven-member task force com-
posed chiefly of members of the AD
search committee.
He said the smaller task force
will allow more flexibility in assess-
ing potential candidates for the job.
Members of the task force will be Bal-
lard; ECU Trustees Jim Talton, Steve
Showfety, Margaret Ward and Dan
Kinlaw; John Hudson, a member of
the ECU Foundation Board; and John
Thompson, head football coach.
All but Thompson and Bal-
lard are members of the AD search
committee, which will continue to
provide oversight and advice and will
interview finalists for the position,
Ballard said. Ballard did not set a
timetable for selecting a new AD.
"Finding the right person is more
important than meeting a particular
schedule, but we do intend to move
aggressively Ballard said.
O
For Hire
For more information on ECU
Athletics visit ecupirates.com





PAGE 12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
6-30-04
Cal State Fullerton wins College World Series
OMAHA, Neb. (AP) � After win-
ning the (Allege World Series, Cal State
Fullerton Coach George Morton con-
gratulated hisplayersand staff, kissed his
wife and then went directly to the Texas
dugout.
Norton had to find l.onghoms'
Coach Augie Garrido, the man who
coached Fullerton to its first three
national titles.
"I kind of tiptoed over there with
a tear in my eye and said, Thanks for
the opportunity said Norton.
"Who knows where I would be
without him?"
The Titans beat Garrido's Long-
horns 3-2 Sunday to sweep the best-
of-three championship series.
Horton, who played for Garrido at
Fullerton in 1975and 1976, succeeded
Garrido in 1997 after serving as the
Titans'associate head coach for six years.
Garrido, visibly shaken after the
game, said his thoughts were with
his own players rather than on his
former colleague.
"This moment belongs to
George said Garrido.
"I can't refocus that quickly. My
players are devastated
Jason Windsor pitched a five-
hitter and Kurt Suuki's RBI single
capped a three-run seventh inning
for Fullerton (47-22).
The Titans' sweep was a surpris-
ing end to a season they started
15-16. The 22 losses are the most by
a national champion since Stanford
had 23 in 1988.
"I'm in shock. I'm in awe
llorton said.
"These guys I've been honored to
coach have kept surprising me and
surprising me and surprising me.
This is the greatest turnaround in
Cal State Fullerton history
Fullerton also won national titles
in 1979, 1984 and 1995.
"It makes it even more special to
accomplish this competing against
your mentor and against someone
who laid such a strong foundation for
Cal State Fullerton Horton said.
The top-seeded Longhorns (58-
15) moved through the tournament
with a string of lopsided victories
that made them the favorite against
Cal State Fullerton.
"It appeared by the way we were
playing that we were the best team
and would win this tournament,
which makes it even harder for the
players to understand or accept
Garrido said.
"We did our best. They did
better
Windsor (13-4) threw his second
complete game in the CWS. He struck
out 10 and walked one.
The right-hander shut out South
Carolina on a three-hitter in the
Titans' opener and pitched three
innings of scoreless relief Thursday
in another win over the Gamecocks.
In 21 innings, Windsor gave up
11 hits and two runs, struck out 29
and was named the tournament's
Most Outstanding Player.
"It hasn't sunkinyetsaid Windsor.
"It will take a few days and some
relaxation. I look at it on paper and
it looks great and sometimes I don't
believe it's me
Windsor, a senior, finished the
season with 12 straight wins and
nine complete games after losing four
of his first five starts.
"His numbers are mind-bog-
gling Horton said.
"You can't do it any better than
that. The thing I was worried about
was whether we would go to the
well too many times using Jason
Fullerton, held to five hits over
the first six and one-third innings,
broke through after starter Sam
LeCure was relieved by Buck Cody
(1-2) with the Longhorns up 2-0.
Pinch-hitter Brett Pill tripled
on Cody's first pitch, scoring Bobby
Andrews to make it 2-1. A wild
pitch by Cody scored pinch runner
Brandon Tripp with the tying run.
Ronnie Prettyman reached on a
throwing error by shortstop Michael
Hollimon, and later scored from
second on Suzuki's hit off J. Brent
Cox.
Cal State Fullerton stood at 15-16 at one point during this past season.
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6-30-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE 13
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treras and his newly reunited family
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ready to take in the bright lights of
the city in a moonlight drive.
The Yankees' pitcher promised
to show his family the same sights
of New York City that astounded
him after he defected from Cuba 20
months earlier.
Nestled in the back of a stretch
limo with his wife and two daugh-
ters, Contrtias planned to retrace
the route he took, starting Thursday
night with the office in Yankee Sta-
dium where he pitches against the
Mets on Friday.
The itinerary's next stops were
Times Square and Battery Park, with
the Statue of Liberty in the distance.
For Miriam Murillo-Flores,
daughters Naylenis, 3, and Naylan,
11, it caps an odyssey that began
late last Sunday when they stepped
into a smuggler's boat and fled Fidel
Castro's grip.
For Contreras, it's all a dream
come true.
"This is what I've been dreaming
about for two years he said.
Before leaving Miami on Thurs-
day, Contreras made sure his family
was decked out in new duds.
They escaped with just the
clothes on their back. And those
were ruined when their escape boat
- chased by the Coast Guard - ran
aground off Big Pine Key and they
had to hoof it through the surf to get
safely to shore.
But Murillo-Flores sashayed into
the first class section of Continental
Flight 44 to Newark in brand new jeans
and a pink short-sleeved shirt and
sandals. Naylan was a budding babe
in a brand new green ensemble, and
little Naylenis looked angelic in white.
Clad in khaki slacks and a match-
ing shirt with a gigantic gold Rolcx
on his left wrist, Contreras kept
his shades on for much of the
flight.
During takeoff, Contreras sat
beside his older girl. Later, he sat
beside his wife as their youngest sat
curled up in mama's lap and snoozed.
None of them watched the In-
flight movie, "Duplex starring Ben
Stiller and Drew Barryniore, even
though a Spanish translation was
available. When the New York skyline
came into view, Contreras' translator,
Leo Astacio, rushed up and pointed
out the familiar landmarks.
The Contrerases were the first
passengers off the plane and Murillo-
Flores appeared to be delighted by
her first glimpse of New York and
happy to be back on the ground.
"Bien, bien she said.
Delighted fans pointed and
waved and gave the thumbs-up sign
as the Contrerases rode through
Newark Airport in golf carts.
"Go Contreras one fan said.
Others cheered the Cuban escap-
ees in Spanish.
Contreras, who rarely broke a
smile as he struggled this season on
the mound, beamed and acknowl-
edged the fans with waves and V-for-
victory signs.
Waiting outside the baggage claim
were some of Yankee owner George
Steinbrenner's security guards and
the white stretch Lincoln from Wed-
ding Central Plus Depot in Yonkers
that would take them to Contreras'
hideaway in Westchester.
The Contrerases didn't stop to
pick up any baggage.
They didn't have any.





PAGE 14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
6-30-04
DISC from page 11
Because the tournament was not
sanctioned and I was mainly playinR
for tournament experience, I decided
to play as a pro for the day. While I
knew that I was over my head, 1 felt
the experience I could gain would
he worth the money. There were
only four pros playing - well, there
were three pros and there was me.
I witnessed the three other players
shoot two great rounds. While I
kept up with them here and there, I
would finish right where I expected
to-in fourth.
The pro that won the tourna-
ment shot an incredible 52 (-12) at
Cedarock Park In Burlington. It was
an aniaing round to witness and was
well worth the money just to watch
someone shoot that. 1 played pretty
well and shot a 63 (-1).
Saturday night, I headed to Win-
ston-Salem and met my dad who was
playing in t he state games as well, but
in golf. We hung out Saturday night
and went to our courses to get ready
to play on Sunday morning.
The State Games started with
disc golf back in 1995 and has been
to Raleigh four times, Greensboro
twice, High Point once and was
in Winston-Salem for the second
straight year this year. I have two
Silver Medals hanging on my wall
from the under-16 division of disc
golf and have always wanted the
gold. The state games are a real ly cool
tournament idea.
Amateurs are spoiled in disc golf,
and I'm one of them. We are given
an incredible amount of merchan-
dise that most people sell and make
money with. The State Games turn
us into true amateurs. We play for
medals, and that's it.
We played the same temporary
championship course that I played
two weeks ago in a PDGA event. I
started off with a 58 (even), which
was ok. 1 feel like the
phrase I say every week in this
was "I should have done something
better Sunday, the topic was put-
ting. I missed quite a few putts. I was
only three strokes out of the lead and
two strokes out of third.
Second round started the way
1 wanted, with six straight threes,
two of which were par four holes.
However, I would screw up some
easy holes and get a little bad luck,
and would shoot a 60 (2). The total
of plus two was good enough for sev-
enth, but not quite good enough to
get a medal. The winner would finish
six under, with me eight strokes back
and looking back on another tourna-
ment I totally screwed up.
On the bright side, my dad got a
medal, which he rubbed in my face.
Of course, there were only three in
his division.
Next Week: Zebu Ion
JWs writer can be contacted at
iports@theeaitcarolinian.com.
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PAGE 15
6-30-04
� MkUW -�JL IM
CLASSIFIEDS
ads@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
For Rent
Blocks to ECU, 1, 2, 3 bdrm. house
- 1 each left. Call 321-4712 or see at
collegeunlversltyrentals.com
Houses for rent - 1202-B and 1306 Glen
Arthur and 204 Thirteenth Street. 2 and
3 bedrooms. All located near ECU. Pets
allowed with fee. For more information
contact Wainright Property Management
756-6209.
Two bedrooms, living room, dining,
kitchen and bath, washer, dryer hook-
up. Three blocks off campus, 1212B
Charles Blvd. $400 rent. Call 329-0385.
Spring Forest townhome, 2 BR, 1 12
bath, full-size washerdryer included, near
hospital, immaculate. $600. 321-0424.
No Deposit required. 3 bdrm, 2 bath
duplex on Third St. near ECU campus.
$760 mo. Contact 252-802-0965
Now Leasing for Fall semester - 1,2, &
3 bedroom apartments. Beech Street
Villas, Cypress Gardens, Eastgate,
Gladiolus Gardens, jasmine Gardens,
Park Village, Wesley Commons North
and Woodcliff. All units close to ECU. Pets
allowed in some units with fee. For more
information contact Wainright Property
Management 756-6209.
Now Leasing for Fall Semester - Cannon
Court & Cedar Court - 2 bedroom, 1 1 2
bath townhouse, Free basic cable with
some units. Located near ECU. For more
information contact Wainright Property
Management 756-6209.
Dockside; 3 BR, 2 bath available 8104.
Includes washerdryer, dishwasher, 1200
SF, walk-in closets, low utilities. Call 327-
4433 for appointment. No pets please.
Spacious 2 and 3 BR townhouses, full
basement, enclosed patio, WD hook-up.
No pets. ECU bus route. 752-7738 days
7:30 to 4:30
102 S. Meade St. 3 BR, 1 bath, washer
dryer included, located 3 blocks from
campus. Available immediately. Call
327-4433.
Three Bedroom duplex for rent near
ECU. Available immediately. Rent $598
- Call 752-6276
2 bedroom 1 bath duplex, 112 8th street
across street from Ham's, $575mo. 2-3
bedroom 2.5-3.5 bath condo on bus
route, Wildwood Villas $695-$720mo.
Call 413-6898 or 758-4747.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments walking
distance to campus, WD conn pets ok
no weight limit, free water and sewer,
call today for security deposit special
758-1921.
Duplex for rent- 3 bdrm, Meade St
$675.00, call 341-4608
Stratford Villas 3 bedroom, 3 bath houses
for rent. Located across from baseball
stadium. All appliances including
washerdryer, security systems, private
patios. $1050 per month. Call Chip at
355-0664.
Spacious two-bedroom duplex with
large living room and eat-in kitchen with
washer and dryer. Duplex includes large
deck and off street parking. Water and
sewer included in rent. $475 per month.
Available August 1st. Call 752-5536 for
appointment.
Sub-lease Apt. Pirate's Cove, $360
mo. Avail, now- July 31, 2004. Contact
Karen N. Lee, 919-894-8348 or 919-
207-0804.
Twin Oaks townhouse, 2 BR, 1 12 bath,
end unit on ECU campus bus route. Patio,
pool, WD hook-up. $575 per month.
Call 864-346-5750 or 864-228-3667.
2 & 3 bedroom duplexes, walking
distance to campus, f.p WD conn
vaulted ceilings, 2 baths, private driveway
and back porch, dishwasher. Call today
for security deposit special 758-1921.
2 bedroom apartments walking distance to
campus, WD conn pets ok no weight limit,
wired for surround sound, security system,
CATS phone lines, call today! 758-1921
3 bedroom, 2 bath duplex, Dockside.
Available in August. Cathedral ceiling,
community dock on the Tar River, washer
and dryer available, $850month. Call
Garrett 258-0366.
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015-1 & 2 BRapts,
dishwasher, GD, central air & heat, pool,
ECU bus line, 9 or 12 month leases. Pets
allowed. Rent includes water, sewer, fit cable.
Twin Oaks townhouse, 2 BR, 1.5 bath,
end unit on ECU campus bus route. Patio,
pool, WD hook-ups. $525 per month.
Call 864-346-5750 or 864-228-3667.
Roommate Wanted
Female Roommates, 2 needed to share
3 BR Condo. Each BR has private bath
and phonecomputer connections,
appliances include washer and dryer, 5
blocks E. of campus (flood free). $300
per month and share electricity 752-3262
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to share 2
bedroom, 1.5 bath across from campus
$325 rent plus half utilities. Call Belinda
945-3132.
Female. Share three bedroom home
with two female students. Campus three
blocks. Prefer graduate student. Central
air, ceiling fans, washer, dryer. $300.00
plus utilities. (703) 680-1676
1 Bedroom, private bath in Quail Ridge
Townhomes $300 plus 1 4 utilities, access
to pool and tennis courts. Call 355-4746
or 902-6107 for interview, ask for Laura.
Room for rent- Female roommate
needed- une & July - $400 includes
rent & all utilities - Walk to ECU - call
336-918-8871
Roommate to share a 2 bedroom, 2
bath condo in Breezewood with young
professional. $400 rent, half utilities, serious
inquiries only. Call ennifer 531-2520.
Help Wanted
PT NANNY, domestic help needed for 2
yr. old and newborn at centrally located
home. May Involve dirty diapers.
Responsible non-smokers only, flexible
hours. Call 9a-1p 353-6999.
Full Time students Stop wasting your
time and talents on PT jobs with bad hrs
& pay LOOK! For 1 weekend a month
the National Guard wants you to go to
college, FREE TUITION! Learn a job skill
& stay a student! FT Students get over
$800mo. in Education Benefits & PAY
for more info CALL 252-916-9073 or visit
www.1-800-GO-GUARD.com
Looking for a great summer job? The
ECU telefund has immediate openings
and is looking for outgoing and energetic
students to contact alumni and parents
for the East Carolina Annual Fund.
Starting pay is $6.25 per hour plus cash
bonuses! For more information and to
apply, visit www.ecu.edutelefund and
click on the "jobs" link.
PERSONAL ASSISTANT - Must be
non-smoker, intelligent, flexible hours
including evenings and weekends, have
reliable vehicle. Call 752-1572.
TutorNanny needed for ages 12, 11 &
7. Minimum 3.0 GPA, strong in math
skills, non-smoker, reliable vehicle, good
driving record, flexible hours, some
cooking. Call 752-1572 for interview.
Clerical - State of the Art dental practice
looking for outgoing energetic student
with computer skills. Individual must be
personable & comfortable interacting
with strangers. Needed 4 hours a day,
4 days per week. Pay starts at $7.00 an
hour. Call 752-1600.
Part-Time office help - Small local law
firm seeks part-time office help. Duties
to include filing, answering telephone
calls, and some typing. Send resume to
Office Manager, PO Box 483, Greenville,
NC 27835-0483
Mystery Shoppers needed! Get paid
to shop. Flexible work from home or
school. FTPT make your own hours.
(800) 830-8066
Other
Bartending! $250day potential. No
experience necessary. Training provided.
(800) 965-6520 ext. 202
The Card Post ( .where every voice counts!)
The following is a follow up fax (11303) to
the faxing (11303) of TCPs Report 445
(published here 62304). Also the USA
Today's 101303 article mentioned below
addressed the then escalating suicide rate of
American troops in Iraq: To: Congressman
Jones & DC & Greenville Congressional
Staff, NC State Board of Elections Director
Gary Bartlett & Wayne Co. Board of
Elections Director Gary Sims 11303 To
advance understanding of my use of the
word 'URGENT 1303 4:30 faxing) is
to address 103103 taped conversation
with Wayne Cos Report 443's '3 points
of understanding & companion question:
He shifted focus of conversation away from
answering question to inquire "what
problem exists with '911' in Wayne Co. I
then addressed the crisis within The Crisis
(dysfunctional education) within THE
CRISIS, (dysfunctional Democracy) via the
question " If Wayne Co's. '911' hotline
had a call needing a suicide prevention
specialist could one be provided? " He did
not wish to answer 7 proceeded to close
down open dialogue via addressing "matter
needs to be presented to him in writing
I responded that I have presented "Report
427" to all Wayne Co. elected officials to
the governor all Health Care Directors to
Carmen Hooker Bueller(DHHS) & none
have responded to its question of accuracy.
I couldn't leave his office fast enough to
please him. A ask now are Report 427
& USA Today's (Gregg Zoroya 101303)
column accurate? If so & though that
puts me on a higher level of alert yet
I have ideas for constructive solutionsl
To Prosperity 'n Long Lives Tom Drew
(11 401) The Card Post Report 427 Bless
Inn As a citizen reporter I have been on
high alertsince confirming 1198 that
ECU does not provide suicide prevention
training. & ultra high alert since 91101
with continuing confirmation that neither
a suicide prevention specialist or training
exists in NC. To Prosperity 'n Long Lives,
Tom Drew P.S. In response to an offer of a
'flag plateI offer in return a plate saying
"Blessed are the Peace Makers Refused.
Copy for WCC Bulletin Board 11601 7:30
p.m. To Students, Administrators, Faculty
& Employees of WCC In seeking healthy
in-depth open discussion with one & all
to explore the accuracy of statements
of initial part of Report 427 & praying
that someoneanyone can prove me
wrong & thus for finding none can
such discussion & confirmation be found
at WCC? Please inform via Wayne Co Public
Library (Ash SL) fax 731 -2889 (confirmation
phone is 735-1824) if possible. Or
not. To Peace, Tom Drew P.S. Hope to
share the twin stories of 'The Barefoot
Editor & 'The Barefoot Doctor as well
For Sale
PENTIUM 3 Desktop Millennium
Edition, 127MB RAM, 20GB, Fast CD
RW, Ethernet, WORD, EXCEL, monitor,
mouse, subwoofer, $350 OBO, call 756-
7796 or e-mail ape0713@mail.ecu.edu
At least 4.000 new students need to be informed about your organization � business
� ?l� club. TEC'S Pirate Preview is your one opportunity to make a great first impression.
- m We will mail this directly to homes at fJQ CHARGE TO YOU!






6-30-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE 16
r

or $200 Look and Lease Bonus
paid upon lease acceptance.
Some restrictions apply, call for details.
STERLING UNIVERSITY
Manor
COLLEGIATE RESIDENCES
SUH is a registered trademark of SDH, Inc.
3535 East 10th Street - 252.758.5551 � Greenville NC 27858


Title
The East Carolinian, June 30, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 30, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1738
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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