The East Carolinian, June 9, 2004






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 79 Number 144
Harrington
Field expansion
project underway
New stadium boasts more
seating, other amenities
MATT COCKRELL
STAFF WRITER
The Harrington Held expansion
is currently underway with the new
stadium scheduled to be complete in
February 2005, just in time for the
next season to begin.
"The main reason for the
revamping of the stadium is so we
can hold NCAA tournaments said
Todd Marshall, project manager for
Facilities Engineering and Architec-
tural Services.
"NCAA regulation states that
you have to have a 3,000 seat capac-
ity to host tournaments
The new stadium will boast
this 3,000-seat capacity, which is
double what the old stadium could
hold. It will include bleacher and
individual
seating as
well as press
(boxes and
upgraded
seating for
booster club
participants.
Theupgraded
seats will include chair backs.
The new stadium will
also include a locker room for the
home team, a training room, a
coach's office and indoor batting
tunnels that can be used year-
round.
Architects developed the
design of the new stadium with
input from the ECU Board of Trust-
ees and the baseball coaches.
The Harrington Field parking
lot will be paved and expanded
to include a pedestrian plaza,
an area between the parking lot
and the front of the stadium which
will give fans a place to meet
before the game. The new park-
ing lot will be able to hold up to
100 cars.
see FIELD page 2
-
WEATHER FORECAST
TODAY
Isolated Thunderstorms
High of 90
CONTACT US
BY PHONE
252.328.6366 (newsroom)
252.328.2000 (advertising)
FYI:
Wednesday, June 16 Is the last day for
graduate students to drop courses without grades.
FIND US
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INSIDE
Opinion
Features-
Sports
-page 6
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Mi
PAGE?
6-09-04
NEWS
news@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
COUNTDOWN UNTIL END
OF SUMMER SESSION I
9 MORE CLASS DAYS
Announcements
Health Sciences Event
Dr Brian M Clark of the Division
of Reproductive Endocrinology &
Infertility, Department of ObGyn in
The Brody School of Medicine will
present "Adenomyosis: Facts and
Fictions today at 1 p.m. in the Pitt
Country Memorial Hospital Auditorium
For more information, contact Clara
Richards at 744-4669
Iraqi School Supply Drive
A school supply drive for Iraqi children
is being held now through June 14.
Organizers are asking for donations of
pens, pencils, paper, toys, art materials,
organizational supplies, etc. Donation
boxes are located in the Dowdy
Student Stores. Mail Services. Student
Professional Development and Medical
Bookstore. For more information,
contact Jane Rahm at 328-6050 or
Leslie Craigle at 328-6468, ext 4. or
visit TheEastCarolinian com
Parking Information
Students who currently hold
2003-2004. Freshman (D Zone)
permits may use any B2 or C Zone
parking area for the first summer
session, through June 30. Students
who currently have a D Zone
permit but will be living on College
Hill during first summer session must
contact Parking and Transportation
Services to have their permit validated
for A2 Zone parking If you do not have
a parking permit, you may purchase
summer session permits from
the Parking and Transportation
office Permits for Summer Session
I are $20 and permits for Summer
Session II are $20 Permits for both
sessions are $30 For more information,
call 328-6294
News Briefs
Local
Suspect in UNC-Wilmington
shooting found dead in
Great Smokies Park
CHEROKEE, NC - A fugitive charged
with killing his girlfriend exchanged
gunfire with authorities at a western
North Carolina roadblock and was
found dead in a creek after his car
crashed in a ravine, authorities said
Tuesday.
John Peck, 28, a former University of
North Carolina at Wilmington student,
was charged last Saturday with first-
degree murder in the death of ex-
girlfriend and UNC-W student Christen
Marie Naujoks, 22. Law enforcement
officials said Peck, who had been at
large since the shooting, was armed
with an assault rifle and considered
dangerous.
"He was found in the Great Smoky
Mountains National Park He tried
to run away. Some gunfire was
exchanged said Chief Deputy Tom
Parker of the New Hanover County
Sheriff's Department.
Law enforcement agencies in western
North Carolina were advised Monday
to be on the lookout for Peck. Officers
had encountered a man believed to
be Peck at Newfound Gap on the
Tennessee-North Carolina line about
11:15 p.m park officials said.
Park rangers and Cherokee police
officers set up a roadblock after that
man was seen driving south on US.
441. The car turned around at the
roadblock, and shots were fired shortly
after 11:30 p.m park officials said.
Peck, wearing a T-shirt and short
pants, was found dead face down in a
creek at the bottom of a 60-foot ravine,
several miles north of the roadblock
His wrecked car and a weapon also
were in the ravine
The cause of Peck's death has not
been determined.
Orange schools chairman
quits over plagiarized
graduation speech
HILLSBOROUGH, NC - The chairman
of Orange County's school board
resigned his position but will remain
on the panel despite an uproar started
when he plagiarized the speech he
gave during a high school graduation.
Keith Cook, 61, said Monday he
planned to remain a member of the
school board and a candidate for re-
election this year.
Cook apologized to his colleagues and
the public at a school board meeting
Monday night, calling the incident "an
honest, human mistake Cook said he
also thought it "troubling" that some
have called him unethical.
Cook, who has been on the school
board for 10 years, recited a speech
at Orange High School's May 28
graduation that was nearly identical to
a 1998 commencement address made
by former Health and Human Services
secretary Donna Shalala.
Cook initially said he wrote the speech,
but later admitted that he had searched
the Internet for graduation speeches
and found Shalala's. He said he didn't
attribute the speech because he didn't
know it was Shalala's
Parents and students complained that
students doing the same thing would
be punished. Students found to have
plagiarized any work receive a grade
of zero. The student can also receive
a short-term suspension.
National
White House hopes
economic summit will help
heal rifts with allies over Iraq
SEA ISLAND. Ga. - As President Bush
plays host Tuesday to world leaders
critical of his Iraq policies. White House
officials are hoping the Group of Eight
summit proves a turning point where
he and his adversaries on the war
permanently set aside their differences
on the war.
Bush stacked his schedule of meetings
Tuesday with leaders from countries
that were critical of the Iraq war: Russia.
Canada and Germany. His first meeting,
though, was with Prime Minister
Junichiro Koizumi of Japan, which
sent hundreds of troops to southern
Iraq on a humanitarian mission.
Iraq and the broader Mideast have
eclipsed the official economic
agenda of the annual gathering of
industrial powers the United States,
Japan, Germany, France, Britain, Italy.
Canada and Russia.
But summit officials said they intended
to announce agreement Tuesday on
fighting famine on the Horn of Africa,
cutting poverty and developing an HIV
vaccine. A G-8 declaration on promoting
democracy in the Middle East was
expected Wednesday.
Administration lawyers
concluded president has
legal authority to order torture
WASHINGTON - Administration
lawyers concluded in a policy paper
last year that a president can legally
order interrogators to torture terrorist
suspects.
The lawyers, who were not identified
by name, were part of a working group
writing a policy governing interrogation
techniques to be used at the prison for
terrorist suspects at the U.S. naval base
at Guantanamo Bay. Cuba.
However. Pentagon spokesman
Lawrence Di Rita said Monday that
the final set of interrogation methods
adopted for use at Guantanamo in
April 2003 are humane, legal and
useful - and more restrictive than the
methods some had proposed.
Di Rita described the paper as a staff
legal analysis that was part of an
internal administration debate on how
Held from page 1
In addition to other construc-
tion, the parking lot, stadium
entrance and surrounding field
areas will also he upgraded with
landsi aping work.
This writer can be contacted
at news@theeastcarolinian.com.
to obtain intelligence from al-Qaida
operatives in U.S. custody, within the
confines of a standard of humane
treatment. The intelligence sought was
to prevent terrorist attacks, he said.
The contents of the paper, labeled
"draft" and dated March 6.2003, were
first reported in Monday's The Wall
Street Journal. A portion of it was then
obtained by The Associated Press.
The lawyers who prepared it include
attorneys from both the Defense and
Justice departments, and possibly
other parts of the government.
World
Car bombs shake two Iraqi
cities; six European soldiers
die in blast south of Baghdad
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Two car bombs
exploded Tuesday in separate cities in
Iraq, killing at least 14 Iraqis and one
U.S soldier. Dozens were wounded,
including 10 American soldiers. A
U.S. Marine was killed in action west
of Baghdad.
Elsewhere, six coalition soldiers, two
Poles, three Slovaks and a Latvian were
killed in an explosion while defusing
mines in Suwayrah. 25 miles south of
Baghdad, authorities said.
The Slovaks and the Latvians were
the first deaths from either of the two
countries in Iraq, Polish officials said
in Warsaw.
One of the car bombs blew up as a
convoy of provincial council members
passed by in the northern city of Mosul
The council members escaped injury,
officials said Nine people died and
about 25 were injured, the U.S. military
said. The Mosul deputy police chief
was hurt, but not seriously
In the other attack, a suicide attacker
detonated a car bomb during rush hour
outside the American forward operating
base War Horse in Baqouba, about 30
miles northeast of Baghdad
ARE YOU
s underway for the expansion of Harrington Field.
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NOT IF YOU
HAVEN'T TOLD
YOUR FAMILY.
www.shareyourlife.org
1-800-355-SHARE
� Common or Og�n trow Dostum





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6-09-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE 3
Alliance signed with Uruguayan research Reagan fr0mPager
Exchange programs available
for students, professors
NICK HENNE
SENIOR WRITER
The North Carolina Agromedi-
cine Institute of ECU recently formed
an exchange program with BIO Uru-
guay, a Uruguayan research institute
that allows students, professors and
researchers worldwide to participate
in studies at their institute.
In 1999, Molly Broad, president
of the UNC system and Jorge Battle,
president of Uruguay, signed a mem-
orandum of understanding creating
an alliance between all 16 institutes
in the UNC system and five institutes
in Uruguay. Under the alliance, an
educational exchange program is
made available for both students
and professors.
Within the last year, activities
have picked up under the alliance
with the involvement of BIO Uru-
guay and different institutes in the
United States, said John Sabella, asso-
ciate director of the North Carolina
Agromedicine institute.
" BIO Uruguay is formed as a
non-profit research and training
institute Sabella said.
"The purpose of BIO Uruguay
is to promote through research eco-
logical farming practices tor regional
farmers as well as faculty in universi-
ties throughout the world to come
and conduct research in these areas
and to provide opportunities for
student exchanges
BIO Uruguay is an institute spe-
cializing in organic agriculture and
agro-ecology was recently founded
under the umbrella of the signed
agreement, Sabella said. The insti-
tute, open to students and research-
ers throughout the world, works in
conjunction with the North Caro-
lina Agromedicine Institute located
in Greenville at ECU'S west research
campus, as well as with representa-
Students research in Uruguay as part of a new exchange program.
tives from the rest of the 15 schools
in the UNC system, Sabella said.
Alda Rodriguez, co-founder and
director for research and training at
BIO Uruguay, said BIO Uruguay is
not only an institute for training and
research, but a place where new ideas
are generated from the theoretical
idea of ethological agriculture and the
conservation of natural resources.
"We believe in development
of alternatives through the coming
together of the academic world and
the areas of agriculture and culture
and the rural world said Rodriguez.
"We support this identity
throughout this country and our
region
Rodriguez said participants can
benefit in BIO Uruguay exchanges
because BIO Uruguay has an infra-
structure set up to receive students
and give students firsthand involve-
ment in many aspects of their cul-
ture including organic production
of fruits and vegetables, ethological
production of animals, and natural
and ethological control of diseases
and pests. At the same time, BIO Uru-
guay exchanges are rich in national
culture with literature and music,
Rodriguez said.
Students who participate in a
BIO Uruguay exchange program are
eligible to earn course credit, fulfill
internship requirements and are
given firsthand farming experiences
in a rural country they could not pos-
sibly experience in the United States,
Sabella said. Students and professors
interested in participating in a BIO
Uruguay exchange can register at
the international Programs office
by talking with Sabella or Charles
Lyons, director of the North Carolina
Agromedicine Institute. There is no
application involved in the registra-
tion process, Sabella said.
While BIO Uruguay is a non-
profit institute, participants are
required to cover certain expenses of
their trip. Expenses include airfare,
ground transportation, housing,
meals and instruction. The total cost
of a study is dependent on the a mou nt
of time spent in BIO Uruguay and
what activities a student chooses to
do while at the institute, Sabella said.
Sabella said the cost of BIO Uruguay
is relatively cheap when compared to
other exchange programs.
"Uruguay is a very, very cheap
country Sabella said.
Uruguay is a centrally located
see RESEARCH page 5
The library then opened to
throngs who were bused about five
miles from a college that closed to
provide parking. By evening, the
wait for buses had grown to hours
as crowds sought to make the pil-
grimage before the period of lying in
repose ended at 6 p.m. Tuesday.
Among the first were Gov.
Arnold Schwarzenegger and wife
Maria Shriver, who stood silently,
crossed themselves and left. But
0 most of those who came were regu-
1 lar folks.
Patricia Roccaforte, 61, of
Tustin, said Reagan had made her
f feel safe.
"I was praying the whole time
he was alive we would live up to
all he thought we could do Roc-
caforte said.
"He was so optimistic about us.
He's in the hands of God now as he
always has been
Some of those passing the
casket crossed themselves. A man
in cowboy boots and jeans held his
hat over his heart.
"On my way out, I saluted him
both of us did said Don Procter,
83, a former Marine who came from
Altadena with his wife Lorraine.
Though brief, the time in the
library was enough for Scotia Alves,
51, of Camarillo, who said she and
her husband started a car stereo
company in their garage at the
beginning of Reagan's presidency.
"Reaganomics was good for
business I felt gratitude to him
Alves said.
Charles Shelton, 38, a Los Ange-
les lawyer, was struck by the range
of people.
"It's a testament, how broad his
appeal was said Shelton, who voted
for Green Party candidate Ralph
Nader in 2000 and plans to vote for
Democrat John Kerry, but called
himself a "Reagan Republican
"He's a different type of Repub-
lican Shelton said.
"The man was a very good man,
very graceful, which made it easy to
support him Shelton said. "He was
lough, yet graceful
Roxana Jones, 47, brought two
daughters in school uniforms.
One of them, Shanley, 15, said she
learned, in school about Reagan's
fight against communism.
"He was just an awesome guy,
and 1 call him my president Jones
said.
Leslie Williams, 48, of Mission
Viejo, said she has been a Marine
reservist since age 18.
"My commander-in-chief
epitomized the will of the greatest
country on Earth to pursue freedom
forall freedom-loving people Wil-
liams said.
Mandy Thorn, 37, of Northridge
waited three hours to pass Reagan's
casket. She remembered most of
Reagan's speech after the space
shuttle Challenger exploded on
Jan. 28, 1986.
"I think it was the way he
came across in speeches that made
the country feel safe even though
something tragic had happened
Thorn said.
Salvador Ayala, 74, came from
Simi Valley with three other vet-
erans.
"He won the Cold War without
firing a shot. He was the greatest
president that we ever had, and I'm
a Democrat Ayala said, who served
in the Korean War.
On Wednesday, Reagan's body
is to be flown to Washington, D.C
wheTe there will be a ceremony that
night in the Capitol Rotunda. The
body will then lie in state.
Friday will be a national day of
mourning, with all federal offices
and major financial markets closed.
The state funeral will be held at
Washington National Cathedral,
with President Bush delivering a
eulogy.
The body will then be returned
to the Reagan library for burial
Friday evening.
Get caught reading.






PAGE 4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
6-09-04
Cicada invasion deafens
nation's Eastern coast
After 17 years, cicadas rise from the ground to begin their mating process.
Bugs emerge after 17-year
hibernation underground
LISA TUMBARELLO
STAFF WRITER
The month of May marked the
return of the Bnxxl X cicada to many
parts of the Eastern United States.
The tiny locust-like creatures with
transparent orange veined wings and
beady red eyes have created deafening
noise to those in their paths and will
be leaving behind a lot of waste when
they die off in thexoming weeks.
The Brood X cicada last emerged
17 years ago in 1987, starting the cycle
that brought us this year's cicada
Today's cicadas are found in areas
spanning from New York to North
Carolina, Illinois to Delaware and
everywhere in between. They can be
found in at least some part of 15 states
and the District of Columbia.
The life span of a cicada is just
more than 17 years, but only about
six weeks is spent above the ground.
Cicada nymphs emerge from deep
underground after feeding on tree
sap for 17 years. When the outside
temperatures are just right (in the
months of May and June), the
nymphs crawl to the surface by the
millions and invade neighborhood
airways and infest trees.
The adult cicadas then shed
their skin and spread their wings.
The males take refuge in the trees
and begin the buzzing mating call
that has filled the air of the East,
deafening its residents.
The cicadas mate and drop their
larva into the ground where it will
bury itself for the next 17 years. The
adult cicadas then die off into mid-
June and we can expect to see them
again in 2021.
The buzzing noise created by the
cicada is what creates most of the
problem. Cicadas don't bite or sting,
they just make plenty of noise. How-
ever, the males only produce the song
of a cicada. It is their way of serenad -
ing the females in order to mate.
However, the song of a cicada is
not a little song. Their buzzing can
reach more than 100 decibels. Their
noise is louder than the music in your
car, louder than a jackhammer and
comparable to a motorcycle.
The noise is produced inside
the drum-like organ tymbals,
which are on either side of the abdo-
men. To make noise, the male tenses
the muscle attached to the tymbal
and creates vibrations, letting out its
?
see CICADA page 5
Cicada Facts
Brood X Territory (certain
areas in these states):
Deleware, Georgia, Illinois,
Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland,
Mississippi, North Carolina,
New Jersey, New York, Ohio,
Pennsylvania, Tennesse,
Virginia, West Virginia and
Washington DC.
Sound Decibel Chart:
Whisper - 20
Jackhammer - 90
Cicada - 90 -100
Motorcycle -100
cruising the
information
highway,
pull off on
our new exit





6-09-04
e
n
it
:om
6-09-04
THE EAST CAROLINA � NEWS
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PAGES
Research from page 3
Students learn in a small setting as part of the Uruguay exchange program.
country with access to various other
well-known locations including
Buenos Aires, Rio Dejaniero and the
Amazon, Sabella said. Sabella adds
that Uruguay is a small, rarely vis-
ited country containing only three
million people and has only urban
campuses with rural settings in the
heart of the country.
"BIO Uruguay is an opportunity
for something different Sabella said.
Amy Krauss, senior and double
major in social thoughtpolitical
economy and comparative literature at
the University of Massachusetts, com-
pleted an internship requirement for
her major and an independent study
doing a BIO Uruguay exchange.
"Stepping outside of our usual
context of thinking allows a differ-
ent and sometimes reality-shattering
kind of learning said Krauss.
"I learned a little bit about
organic agriculture, as well as Uru-
guay's agricultural economy and
culture as a whole
Krauss said she also learned a lot
of Spanish, befriended several Uru-
guayan students and now has an
improved and broader sense of inter-
personal and global relationships.
This writer can be contacted
at news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Cicada from page 4
cicada song.
There are three different types of
the Brood X cicada, each with dif-
ferent defining qualities. Magicicada
Septendecim is the biggest and most
common of the three, distinguished
by thick orange stripes on the abdo-
men. Magicicada Cassini is generally
smaller than the Septendecim and is
known to be the loudest. The third
type, Magicicada Septendecula, is the
most rare and hardest to distinguish
from the other two.
The cicada emergence serves
many purposes. For one, when the
insects burrow out from the ground
they aerate the soil. The one-inch-
long bugs also supply many other
creatures with dinner. Birds, squir-
rels, deer, dogs, cats, mice and ants
enjoy an occasional cicada snack.
This writer can be contacted
at news@theeastcarolinian.com.
You drank.
You danced.
Youhadse
ryiss'h3
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center
1-800-395-HELP or 757-0003
Sorrx-H- �
845 Johns Hopkins Dr. Suite B
(across from Stanton Sq.)
www.carolinapregnancycenter.org
-





PAGE 6
m C . x. AtKA. . �:
6-09-04
OPINION
Amanda Ungerfelt
Editor in Chief
Robbie Den-
Features Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Alexander Marclniak
Web Editor
Ryan Downey
Sports Editor
Nina Coefield
Head Copy Editor
Newsroom
Fax
252328.6366
252.328.6558
Our View
"My dream
is that you
will travel the
road ahead
with liberty's
lamp guiding
your steps and
opportunity's
arm steadying
your way
America and the world lost one of its great-
est politicians when Ronald Reagan passed
away Saturday. Reagan, our nation's 40"1
president lost his battle with Alzheimer's
disease at the age of 93.
Many of us remember Reagan as the
president who served during leg warm-
ers, Rubik's cubes and the Cold War, but
Reagan was also a successful sports-
caster, actor and an overall outstanding
American.
On February 6,1911, Ronald Wilson Reagan
was bom to Nelle and John Reagan in
Tampico, III. He attended high school in the
nearby town of Dixon and then attended
Eureka College.
After graduation, Reagan became a sports
announcer on the radio and then a Hol-
lywood actor. During the next 20 years, he
appeared in 53 films.
On January 20, 1981, Reagan became
president Only 69 days later, he was shot
by a would-be assassin, but quickly recov-
ered and returned to duty.
During his eight years in office, Reagan
enforced laws to stimulate economic
growth, curb inflation, increase employment
and strengthen national defense. At the end
of his second presidential term, the United
States was enjoying its longest recorded
period of peacetime prosperity without
depression or recession.
Reagan's contributions have a large impact
on the America that we know today. His
decisions were made with our freedoms as
his first priority and he hoped that is what
he will be remembered for most:
"Whatever else history may say about me
when I'm gone, I hope it will record that
I appealed to your best hopes, not your
worst fears; to your confidence rather than
your doubts. My dream is that you will travel
the road ahead with liberty's lamp guiding
your steps and opportunity's arm steadying
your way
'There can be no
greater good than
the quest for peace,
and no finer purpose
than the preservation
of freedom
Pres. Ronald Reagan
1911-2004
Opinion Writer
ANWR is valuable resource that should be utilized
Environmentalists are to
blame for high gas prices
ANTHONY MCKEE
OPINION WRITER
We have all heard the accu-
sations that Halliburton and
other oil companies are guilty
of "price gouging" to increase
profits. What we haven't heard
is any evidence to back up the
accusations.
Anybody who bothers to
look beyond the media-hyped
hysteria will realize that we
won't be given any such evi-
dence either, mainly because
the accusations are deliber-
ately crafted to create fear and
suspicion.
Gas prices have increased
this year for many reasons.
There are the usual culprits
such as a decreased on-hand
supply, increased demand as
the weather warms up and the
government-required change
from winter to summer fuel
formulations.
There have also been other
factors contributing to the price
increase this year, such as the
oil price increase by OPEC,
Investor and stock market
unease and Democrat and envi-
ronmentalist obstruction.
for vears, Democrats
and environmentalists have
stood shoulder-to-shoulder
in a concerted effort to block
any attempt to utilize vast,
untapped resources that would
help reduce the United State's
dependence on oil imports. We
are once again paying the price
for their short-sighted, politi-
cally motivated actions.
These two groups have
used any and all available tools
(mainly the courts) to block off-
shore exploration and drilling
for oil and natural gas, which
are there in abundance. They
have blocked building new
power plants and refineries,
leading to higher utility and
manufacturing costs (which
get passed on to the con-
sumer). Then there is the big
one blocking any attempt to
tap the oil reserves that are in
the Alaskan National Wildlife
Refuge.
The reasoning behind
the opposition that has been
mounted by environmentalist
groups and their Democrat
allies against drilling in ANWR
is dubious at best and calculat-
ingly destructive to American
interests at worst. Especially
when you carefully analyze
their "objections" and realize
they fall apart under even
minor scrutiny.
Their main argument, that
there is the possibility for spills
that could "destroy" the ANWR
and cause untold environmen-
tal damage or endanger wildlife
habitats, is disingenuous on
several levels.
The technology exists that
makes drilling and extract-
ing oil more efficient and less
environmentally intrusive than
ever before. This technology is
in use today in other parts of
the world and functioning
fine, making the likelihood of
a major problem minimal. The
environmentalists and Demo-
crats know this, but choose to
ignore it.
The other parts of this
argument, that the ANWR
will be destroyed and that
local wildlife habitats will be
harmed, fall victim to the same
rational analysis.
The ANWR covers an
immense area, more than 1.5
million acres. The area pro-
posed for drilling is a minis-
cule part of the total area. Even
assuming the worst, a terrorist
attack andor a catastrophic
spill, the area that would be
affected is minor, as would the
impact be on local wildlife.
Almost every year, the issue
has been debated in Congress
and, each time, it has been
blocked by environmentalists
and their Democrat allies.
In 1995, both the House and
Senate passed legislation
authorizing drilling. President
Clinton vetoed it.
If drilling had been
allowed to proceed as was
recommended in 1987, what
might the difference be today?
Obviously, we will never
know. But it is something to
keep in mind.
Keep in mind that some
of the same Democrats and
environmentalists who have
blocked drilling in ANWR
since 1987 are the same people
who are now blaming President
Bush, OPEC, the oil companies,
anybody but themselves, for
the current cost of fuel. Keep
in mind that these people are
willing to lie and twist the
truth, as well as force us to pay
higher prices, all in the name
of politics.
lose an'





tilized
more than 1.5
The area pro-
ing is a minis-
total area. Even
rorst, a terrorist
a catastrophic
that would be
or, as would the
ical wildlife,
ry year, the issue
ed in Congress
ie, it has been
ironmentalists
mocrat allies,
the House and
d legislation
I ling. President
it.
g had been
oceed as was
in 1987, what
rence be today?
e will never
l something to
Ind that some
Jemocrats and
lists who have
mg in ANWR
he same people
iming President
; oil companies,
hemselves, for
it of fuel. Keep
tiese people are
and twist the
i force us to pay
ill in the name
PAGE 7
6-09-04
FEATURES
ROBBIE DERR
Features Editor
features@theeastcarollnian.com
252.328.6366
What type of diets do you
think work the best, and why?
ALICIA DOBSON
FINANCE
"I think low calorie diets
with portion control work best
because people's biggest problem
is eating too big of a serving
RYAN SCARBOROUGH
CRIMINAL JUSTICE
"I don't agree with the At kins
Diet because you have no energy
after a couple of days so you don't
work out, and therefore you don't
lose any weight
TYLER PARHAM
HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
"I think that a lot of these
new diets are just fads. The Atkins
Diet, which controls carb intake,
causes weight gain as soon as you
are off the diet. Good eating and
exercise is the best solution for
staying in shape
0t Summer
fLose weight with the low-carb trend
RACHEL LANDEN
SENIOR WRITER
As the mercury rises, and swimsuits make their
way into the sun, people often look to drop a few
pounds.
This summer is no exception. Just this year, an
estimated 50 million people will go on diets, contrib-
uting to the $33 billion weight-loss industry.
With alt the advertising gimmicks, it seems
shocking that as few as 5 percent of dieters may
actually keep the weight off. Perhaps that is because
many desperate dieters rely on weight-loss methods
that provide a quick fix. Plans like the Cabbage Soup,
Beverly Hills or Scarsdale diets may shed pounds fast,
but extremely low-calorie diets or ones that focus on
a single food do not contribute to long-term healthy
eating habits.
If a diet sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
Watch out for buzzwords like effortless, guaranteed
or miraculous. The harsh reality is that dieting is
none of these things.
However, with the right food combi-
nations, coupled with exercise,
losing weight is possible.
It won't happen

V
overnight, but you are actually better off that way.
Rxperts recommend a modest and gradual weight loss
of one to two pounds per week.
Losing weight too last can be deceptive. Your
scale might register less weight, but it could be the
result of losing water and muscle, rather than the
real target, which should be excess fat.
Because one pound of fat is equal to approxi-
mately 3,500 calories, it is possible to lose one pound
just by consuming'500 fewer calories per day. As a
general guideline, though, daily calories shouldn't
fall below 1,200 for women and 1,500 for men.
(f course, caloric needs are dependent on a vari-
ety of factors, including gender, age. current weight
and activity level. The difference in nutritional
needs for each individual underscores the impor-
tance of consulting with a doctor before beginning
any weight-loss or exercise program.
The Internet, the library and even your
campus newspaper can be great sources
for nutritional and health information,
see DIET page i
f Low-Carb
Recipes
South Beach Mashed Cauliflower
instead of potatoes, steam some
cauliflower Once the cauliflower is
soft, using a liquid butter substitute
and nonfat half-and-half, mash the
vegetable. Add salt and pepper to
taste Enjoy this quick, easy and
healthy side dish that is just as
good as the real thing.
Atkins Chocolate Cream Frosty
fPlace 3 ice cubes, i cup water.
2 tablespoons heavy cream and 2
tablespoons sugar free chocolate
syrup in a blender. Blend until
' frothy for a chocolate treat.
The Zone Delight
Mix 1 cup cottage cheese, 1
teaspoon vanilla, 1 package
Splenda, 1 teaspoon cinnamon,
9 almonds. 1 cup strawberries
and 1 cup blueberries. Refrigerate
the mixture for one hour before
enjoying as breakfast or divided
into snacks. �
Teens face heightened pressures of appearance
Importance of looks has
negative effects on students
JESSICA CRESON
STAFF WRITER
Many people wish to have a body
image they are proud and confident
of. Problems arise when the body
image in mind is too extreme or
when the method of having a healt In
body is actually not so healthy.
The recent health and dieting
kick has more people in the gyms
and off carbohydrates.
"Carbohydrates.are necessary
to have proper brain functioning
and provide most of the energy
we use throughout the day said
Robin High, the nutrition director
of ECU.
If a person never saw a super-
model or celebrity on the cover of
magazines and on television, then
maybe the ideal body image would
not be what it is for some people.
Comparing oneself to others is
a sure way to the wrong path of a
healthy body image.
Often times, magazine covers are
altered to make a modelcelebrity
look even thinner and more "per-
fect Real life does not have this
feature, so comparing is useless.
Plastic surgery is common
amongst famous people as well.
This is not a realistic endeavor for
the everyday person either.
see IMAGE page 11





PAGE 8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
6-09-04
AFFORDABILITY
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LOCATION
VWNDHAM COURT
2 Bedroom And 1 Bath Apartment.
5 Blocks From ECU.
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EASTGATE VILLAGE
2 Bedroom And 1 Bath Apartment.
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Washer & Dryer Hookups � Central Air & Heat.
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BRADFORD CREEK
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DOCKSIDE DUPLEXES
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Professionally manased by Pinnacle Property Manasement
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Offering Apartments & Houses, Plus Duplex Communities
Convenient To ECU. Pitt Community College & The Medical District
Improving your workout
with a few simple steps
Earleicia Suggs pauses for a minute during her lifting workout at the SRC.
Top 10 exercising tips
everyone should know
NICHOLAS VICK
STAFF WRITER
With summer in full bloom, there
is no doubt that everyone will want
to show off their sculpted bodies at
beaches and pools everywhere. How-
ever, most people are unsure of just
how to achieve that firm, lean body
that will be the center of attention at
a laid back summer bash.
The SRC attempts to solve some
of these workout issues by having
personal trainers on hand to assist
in any manner necessary. In addi-
tion, there are several helpful signs
posted t hat detail t he proper ways to
train, eat and stretch. The snack bar
gives students the chance to drink a
healthy protein shake before, during
or after their workout.
Even with a multitude of per-
sonal trainers available in many
locations, most people will still find
it hard to get the most out of their
workout. This is due to the fact that
achieving a perfectly sculpted body
is a very tedious task. It's difficult to
achieve that perfect body because
not only is it physically demanding;
it's mentally demanding as well.
Here is a list of the top 10 tips to get
the most out ot your workout.
lop 10 Workout Tips
1 Set Realistic Goals This
tip is especially important for people
that are just beginning to workout.
However, it is equally important for
the seasoned veterans of the weight
room as well.
Danny Wheel, strength and
conditioning coach at ECU said,
"You should focus on yourself, and
definitely don't compare yourself to
any people in magazines or celebri-
ties on television. A beginner needs
to ease into a good rhythm, and find
exercises that he will enjoy
"Being consistent is one ol the
most important aspects of working
out for a beginner. The best way to do
this is to set realistic short term and
long term goals. If a bench weight of
225 pounds is your goal, don't try to
immediately lump to do that. Work
your way up
2. Stretch (before and after
the workout). Stretching helps the
muscles relax and warms up the
body for a workout. If the workout
will consist of cardiovascular activi-
ties, then the legs should probably
be stretched more than any othet
body part. On the other hand, il the
workout will consist of only upper
body training, then that part of the
body should be stretched.
Brian Apple, a physical fitness
trainer at the SRC said, �Stretching
helps to prevent cramps, and is ;i wry
important part of working out You
should probably spend ten minutes
before and ten minutes after on
stretching alone
3. Run (aerobic activity). Kun-
ning is good for the heart, and helps
to build a high tolerance for endur-
ance.
"Running is a great thing to do
if you want to lose weight and really
tone up Apple said.
4. Work Different Parts of
the Body and Rest Thee two
aspects of working out go hand in
see WORKOUT page 10





6-09-04
rkout
steps
xkout at the SRC.
ach at ECU said,
s on yourself, and
mipare yourself to
gaztnes or celebri-
A beginner needs
I rhythm, and find
vill enjoy
tent is one of the
spects of working
The best way in do
tic short term and
'abench weigh) of
irgoal, don't try to
to do that. Work
before and after
�etching helps the
id warms up the
ut. If the workout
jtovascularactivl-
s should probably
e than any othet
other hand, if the
sist of only upper
en that part ol the
retched.
a physical fitness
: said, "Stretching
amps, and is a very
working out. You
ipend ten minutes
minutes after on
ic activity). Run-
ie heart, and helps
ilerance for endut-
great thing to do
; weight and really
lid.
fercnt Parts of
Rest. These two
ig out go hand in
RKOUT page 10
6-09-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
MTV retools channel aimed at students dm.�?
PAGE 9
(KRT)�College students are con-
summate muiti-taskers. Watch them
in any campus hangout eating, talk-
ing and studying while a TV flickers
in the background.
Those sets are more and more
likely to be tuned to a channel
called mtvU, the latest creation of
MTV Networks. The new channel
was launched in January and targets
a college audience. The channel is
playing now in lounges, cafeterias
and other common areas on more
than 700 campuses with a total of 6
million students.
They've grown up on MTV's
basic fast-cycling format, heavy on
music videos. Now MTV has grown
up for them. The new channel's fea-
tures, on jobs and study abroad for
instance, shows are directed toward
an audience of late teens and early
20s. So is the advertising, for cars,
movies and clothes.
At Southern Illinois University
Edwardsville, mtvU plays softly on
five TV sets In the food court. Fresh-
men Sarah Ruffatto and Mark Miller
were there one day, seeming not to
pay attention. Even so, mtvU had
seeped into their brains.
No, they said, most students
don't sit and stare at it. But Miller
said he often watched it at lunch,
and Ruffatto said she did if a song
she liked came on. Both said they
enjoyed it.
Across the river in St. Louis, so did
Harris-Stowe State College student
fanner I leeb, who sat in the campus
cafeteria, schoolwork spread out on a
table. Every few moments he looked
up at mtvU playing on the TV in front
of him. "What I like most about it is
the news breaks he said.
Heeb said mtvU is superior to
College Television Network, which
he watched at the school he used
to attend. "You get a better mix of
videos, and the news seems to be
even better
Actually, the new mtvU is Col-
lege Television Network, retooled and
reborn after MTV Networks bought
it in October 2002. There was lots of
room for improvement, according to
Stephen Friedman, mtvU's general
manager. "They weren't thinking
day-to-day about their audience
he said.
MTV put a year of thought into
its new product, beginning with a
study of how college students spend
their time. It indicated, for instance,
that they pack 32 hours of activities
into their 24-hour days by doing
some of them simultaneously. "Col-
lege students are constantly interact-
ing with everything around them
Friedman said.
MTV designed its new network
to play to college students' splintered
attention spans and interests. Broad-
cast segments were shortened, to less
than four minutes as a general rule.
Old programs were culled and new
ones added. In one new feature, a
well-known person pays a surprise
visit to a college class. John Kerry
and Jesse Jackson have participated.
Author Frank Mc( :ourt, a former New-
York City public school teacher, Is
coming soon, Friedman said.
Music remains "the heart of the
channel accounting for more than
half of the programming, Friedman
said. Though some of the videos are
the same as on MTV, most are unique
to mtvU, selected for their particu-
lar appeal to college students. These
include Franz Ferdinand, "a terrific
young group" from Scotland, Fried-
man says.
MTV also linked mtvU to its
own Web site, mtvu.com. Students
can click on program schedules, news
and features about music and musi-
cians; merchandise offers, postings
of contests for cash and other prizes,
polls on questions of vital import.
see MTV page 11
but none of these should replace the
expert advice that can only be dis-
pensed by a licensed physician.
Besides, if you are thinking of
starting a diet, deciding where to
begin on your own can be a difficult
task. There are so many diet books
and plans that it can be overwhelm-
ing and stressful to choose just one,
before you even attempt to begin it.
For years, nutritionists empha-
sized the USDA Food Guide Pyra-
mid, but now, the trend seems to be
turning the pyramid upside-down.
On nearly every grocery store shelf,
some new item is turning low-carb to
accommodate the lifestyles of nearly
32 million Americans.
In the very popular Atkins diet,
carbohydrates are the enemy, as
protein and fat become your new
best friends. The concept is that a
high intake of carbohydrates causes
an overproduction of insulin, which
in turn leads to hunger, and subse-
quently, weight gain.
During the first of four phases,
a two week period known as Induc-
tion, dieters using the Atkins plan
severely limit carbohydrates to about
20 grams per day. At the same time,
they are allowed generous portions
of protein and fat in the form of
meat, eggs, cheese and nuts. Because .
of the reliance on meat for protein,
this diet is not suited to vegetarians.
Gradually, one adds carbohydrates
back into the diet, but they are still
restricted to small amounts.
The controversial high fat-low
fiber content is also cause for some
concern. Limiting carbohydrates
causes the body to use stored fat
or muscle for energy, which, when
broken down, produces substances
known as ketones. Ketones are
responsible for suppressing appe-
tite, which could be a benefit of this
diet. However, they are also known
to cause fatigue, nausea and danger-
ous fluid loss.
Despite the high fat, especially
saturated fat, found in the diet, some
people have actually improved their
cholesterol. It seems counter intuitive
that these artery-clogging substances
would actually improve one's heart
health, but some Atkins followers
swear by it.
Developed by a cardiologist, the
South Beach diet also entourages the
consumption of protein and discour-
ages that of carbohydrates. It is dif-
ferent from the Atkins, however, in
that there is no counting of grams of
carbohydrates.
Instead, the South Beach focuses
on lean proteins, healthy fats and
non-starchy vegetables. After the
first 14 days, the second phase allows
for the reintroduction of fruit, whole
grains and fat-free dairy products.
Following the South Beach
diet by the hook means three bal-
anced meals and two snacks per
day. The first two weeks, the most
difficult days of the diet, in which
you eliminate processed foods and
sugar, supposedly helps to banish
cravings.
The third phase, designed for
weight maintenance, is meant to
be a new lifestyle. More vegetables,
lean meats and whole grains, with
fewer processed foods, help lower
bad cholesterol and raise its good
counterpart.
The Zone diet is yet another plan
with a guideline concerning carbo-
hydrates, protein and fat consump-
tion. Followed by the likes of Jennifer
Aniston, The Zone includes four keys
to a healthy weight: the diet, mono-
unsaturated fats, Omega-3 fish oils
and exercise.
The diet involves a 40-30-30
ratio for meals and snacks, whereby
40 percent of calories come from car-
bohydrates, 30 percent from protein
and 30 percent from fat. Following
the ratio can be intimidating, but
for simplicity, the eyeball method
is suggested.
In other words, a serving of pro-
tein, like chicken, should be about
the size of your hand. If, along
with the chicken, you are eating
vegetables, then you can have two
fist-sized servings. However, only
one-fist sized serving of whole-wheat
pasta would be allowed in place of
the starchy vegetables. Finally, toss
in some nuts or a drizzling of olive
oil for your necessary fat.
And don't forget the exercise. In
each ol these low-carb diets, exer-
cise is essential. No matter how you
choose to diet, you must exercise to
lose weight and have a healthy body.
Diet alone is not the answer. In fact,
the National Institutes of Health sug-
gests at least three 20 minute aerobic-
sessions per week.
Losing weight and looking and
feeling great may not be easy, but the
immediate and long-term results are
well worth it. Whether you follow
Atkins, South Beach, The Zone or
some other diet, you must dedicate
yourself to your health. That means
exercise and discipline. It also means
talking to your doctor. Summer isn't
waiting, so why should you?
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolininan.com.
Report news students need to knovtL toe
Accepting applications for STAFF WRITERS
Learn investigative reporting skills
� Must have at least a 2.0 GPA
Apply at oiir office located on the 2nd How of the Student PiibUciflons
I. or call 328-6366





PAGE 10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
6-09-04
Cinema Scene
STUDENT UNION FILMS
FREE WITH ECU ONE CARD.
Underworld - In the Underworld,
Vampires are a secret clan of modem
aristocratic sophisticates whose mortal
enemies are the Lycans (werewolves), a
shrewd gang of street thugs who prowl
the city's underbelly. Kate Beckinsale
and Scott Speedman star in this
modern-day. action-packed tale of
ruthless intrigue and forbidden passion
all set against the dazzling backdrop of
a timeless. Gothic metropolis.
Showing today at 9 p.m. at the SRC
outdoor pool and June 10 at 7 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre.
IN THEATRES THIS WEEK
Garfleld - In his film debut, Garfield's
owner, Jon, takes in sweet but dim-
witted pooch Odie. turning Garfield's
perfect world upside down. But when
the hapless pup disappears and is
kidnapped by a nasty dog trainer,
Garfleld, maybe for the first time in his
life, feels responsible. PG Coming to
theatres June 11.
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of
Azkaban - Harry Porter and his friends
Ron and Hermione return as teenagers
to Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and
Wizardry fortheirthird year of study, where
they delve into the mystery surrounding
an escaped prisoner who poses a
dangerous threat to the young wizard. PG
Raising Helen - When her sister and
brother-in-law die in a car accident,
a young modeling agency assistant,
Helen, takes on the role as guardian of
their surviving three children: Audrey,
Kenny and Sarah. PG-13
Shrek 2 - A sequel to DreamWorks'
hugely successful original, the story
opens with Shrek and Fiona returning
from their honeymoon to find a letter
from Fiona's parents inviting the
happy couple to dinner. Mom and
Dad heard that their daughter had
wed, but they assumed she married
Prince Charming. So they're a bit
shocked when they meet their new
son-in-law. PG
Soul Plane - Nashawn Wade sues
the airline and is awarded a huge
settlement. Determined to make good
with the money, he creates the full-
service airline of his dreams. R
The Chronicles of Riddick - Riddick,
the anti-hero from Pitch Black, has spent
the last five years on the move among
the forgotten worlds on the outskirts of
the galaxy, eluding mercenaries bent
on collecting the price on his head. R
Coming to theatres June 11.
The Day After Tomorrow -
Climatologist Jack Hall's (Dennis
Quaid) research indicates that global
warming could trigger an abrupt
and catastrophic shift in the planet's
climate. PG-13
The Stepford Wives - A couple moves
to what appears to be the perfect small
town. Soon, they learn of a sinister plot
the men of the town have constructed
to render their partners perfect. PG-13
Coming to theatres June 11.
Troy - Based on Homer's "The Iliad
"Troy" tells the story of the Trojan
War, which resulted from the conflict
between Achilles and Hector over
the woman they both loved, Helen
of Troy. R
WOrkOUt from page 8
hand. The body needs time to recu-
perate or eise the muscle will begin
to weaken itself. Never work the same
body part two days in a row.
"We have a quote around here
for our athletes. 'When you rest,
you grow Wheel said.
This theory of resting can
be applied to everyday gym rats
as well.
5. Eat Sensibly. In order for
the body to build muscle and lose
weight, it has to have the right
amount of calories and fiber.
If someone starves them self, their
body will actually start to save
up fat.
6. Wear Proper Clothing.
Loose fitting clothing is the best
type of workout clothes to wear.
However, avoid clothes that are so
baggy that they may get caught
underneath a weight during lift-
ing.
7. Drink Water. Water
hydrates the body without the con-
sumption of unnecessary caffeine
or calories.
8. Have a Consistent Time.
"Working out in the morning is
supposed to be the best for the
body. But I always like working
out late at night myself Apple
said.
As long as the body can get
into a normal routine, the time
of day to workout is not extremely
important.
9. Sleep. Eight hours of
sleep is the recommended amount
of time for all adults. Sleeping
only a few hours the day before
a big workout could hamper the
performance for the next day.
The overall workout will
be sluggish without a good
night's sleep.
10. Execute Proper Form
(correct body mechanics). Having
the correct grip and breathing
properly are essential in ensuring
a proper, fulfilling workout. How-
ever, there is no standard way to
go about this. The individual
must find hisher comfort zone
and stick with it.
The most beneficial types
of exercises are multi-joint
because they work on more
than one part of the body at a time.
Some examples of multi-joint
exercises are squats and
bench presses.
All it takes is a little bit of
dedication and a sensible diet to
attain the "dream body" that is
perfect for the summer.
This writer can be contacted at
teatures@theeastcaroiininan.com.
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6-09-04
6-09-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE 11
utine, the time
is not extremely
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mended amount
idults. Sleeping
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arolininan.com.
MTV from page 9
D
Students were recently asked, for
instance, to indicate how they meet
people. They could check one of four
responses: "in my dorm "in classes
"at parties" and "I'm pre-med. Who
are these people' you speak of?"
The Web site also invites feed-
back. Students can log on to com-
ment on programs, submit video
requests, volunteer to be included
in programs, e-mail the VJs and ask
to get mtvU at their schools.
Friedman's goal is to have
mtvU on 850 campuses, reaching
7 million students in the next few
years. It costs colleges and students
nothing; the company provides
free equipment. It makes its money
on advertising, which Friedman
said has almost doubled since the
launch. Asked about profits, he only
said, "So far the response from both
the advertisers and the audience has
been very positive
For the record, MTV Networks
and other cable holdings make up the
fastest growing and most profitable
segment of Viacom Inc. The com-
pany also owns CBS, Blockbuster,
Showtime, Black Entertainment Tele-
vision, Paramount Pictures, Simon
& Schuster plus television and radio
stations, movie theaters, theme parks
and outdoor advertisers.
Mark Miller at SIUEsaid he'd like
to have mtvU in the dorms. Students
at St. Louis University and the Uni-
versity of Missouri at Columbia and
a few other colleges already can get
it in their rooms on campus cable
systems that had College Television
Network before. Friedman wants
to get it on more systems and take
advantage of more "opportunities to
interact with the audience
Not everybody wants to interact
with mtvU. Faculty members on
some campuses have been seen
standing on chairs to reach up and
silence It.
"It's like anything says Phil
Lyons, director of student life at
SLU.
"Different students have dif-
ferent tastes. About every other
month I get someone who comes in
and tells me the programming that
is on there isn't consistent with our
(Jesuit) mission
Last semester one objecting
student set up an online poll that
invited other students to choose
among mtvU and other TV options.
Lyons says the results, from just 100
respondents, were inconclusive.
"Until we get a better idea of
what the students want, we'll prob-
ably maintain mtvU through the
next year he says. "1 think we need
to do our own survey
Image from page 7
College students can have a
hard time with eating healthy,
exercising, insecurities and com-
paring oneself to others. These
things can lead to other maor
issues if they are not kept under
control, such as fad dieting, irregu-
lar eating, compulsive exercising,
diet pills, starvation or vomiting.
"Another problem that some
dieters encounter if they have
limited calories without learning
lifestyle changes, is that they tend
to gain the weight back.
Also, if the diets are ones that
eliminate any one type of food,
students may not be getting the
necessary vitamins, minerals,
or fiber that has been shown
to improve health and reduce
chances of chronic disease High
said
College can be stressful at
first when students don't know
where they fit in, which might
cause them to look at others for
influence.
If the influence is unhealthy,
then problems can develop. Fad
diets and diet pills are some highly
influential things students might
pick up for quick weight loss.
According to Karen Warren,
director of wellness, "the dieting
industry is a $60 billion a year
business.
They want your money, pure
and simple. The marketing is tar-
geted to the college age group
Shows like "The Swan" put an
interesting twist on body image.
Some of these women don't even
look bad in the first place, but
still undergo a ton of surgery to
make them look, and supposedly
feel better.
Sometimes, these women still
feel incomplete after their total
transformation.
"I think that, ultimately, self-
esteem comes from within, and
shows such as The Swan' focus
on outside beauty as being the
ultimate meaning of the word,
when it is not High said.
Viewers might see this show
and start to feel they aren't so
attractive and want to make a dras-
tic change, or acquire a poor body
image when it is not necessary.
There are many indications
to notice if friends are having a
problem.
"If a friend has a preoccupa-
tion with weight and you start to
observe signs of self-starvation
with weight loss, refusal to eat
- except in tiny portions or pre-
occupation with food, these may
possibly be signs that a friend
needs help High said.
Sudden use of diet pills or
other drugs is another major sign
of unhealthy weight loss.
An important thing to remem-
ber when considering one's body
image is that everyone is unique.
"Stop buying in to the lie that
we all have to look alike to be
okay. Celebrate your uniqueness
Warren said.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolininan.com.
O
Warning Signs
"Persistent, negative comments
about the way they look
"Feelings of shame and guilt about
eating behavior and body weight
"Continual dieting, fasting or
restricting food
"Preoccupations with food, weight or
exercise
Use of diet pills, laxatives and
diuretics
"Attributing successes or failures in
life to weight
"Constant comments about his or
her own, or other people's weight
"Belief that reaching a "perfect"
weight is necessary to be happy
Effl�
raid
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6-09-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE 12
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PAGE 13
6-09-04
CLASSIFIEDS
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN






PAGE 14
' 6-09-04
ECU one step closer to Omaha
SPORTS
RYAN DOWNEY
Sports Editor
sports@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Sports Briefs
ECU to distribute tickets
ECU will distribute a limited number
ot NCAA Columbia Super Regional
tickets through the Pirate Club priority
point system Pirate Club members who
qualify to purchase tickets have been
contacted regarding the purchase of
these tickets Orders must be placed by
1 p.m. on Tuesday and can be made by
calling the Pirate Club at 328-4540 or the
ECU Athletic Ticket Office at 328-4500
Flames win Stanley Cup
Ruslan Fedotenko scored twice,
including the critical first goal, and the
resilient Tampa Bay Lightning held off
the Calgary Flames 2-1 in Game 7 to
win their first Stanley Cup. The Flames
were held to only seven shots in a
dismal first two periods before making
a frantic late surge started by Craig
Conroy's power-play goal midway
through the third. Fedotenko scored
on goals created by Conn Smythe
Award winner Brad Richards and
Vincent Lecavalier, and goalie Nikolai
Khabibulin held off Calgary's late flurry
Tampa Bay, an expansion franchise in
1992 and one of the league's worst
teams for much of the time since,
joined the 2001 Colorado Avalanche
as the only teams to overcome a 3-2
deficit in the finals in 33 years.
Bush first MLB pick
Matt Bush, a slick-fielding high school
shortstop from California, was taken by
the San Diego Padres with the No 1
pick in the baseball draft. Bush'was
the first high school shortstop selected
with the top pick since Seattle took
Alex Rodriguez in 1993 His defensive
abilities and strong arm put him at the
top of the draft. With the second pick,
Detroit selected Old Dominion right-
hander Justin Verlander
Pirates take Kinston Regional
r
BRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Randy Mazey's message to his
ball club heading into the regional
was geared towards a magic number
of five, as in five wins away from the
Pirates' ultimate goal of Omaha. His
players responded in a big way by-
cruising through the regional unde-
feated to catapult themselves into a
super-regional match-up with South
Carolina this weekend.
"When we came into this tourna-
ment, we were five wins away from
playing in Omaha said Mazey.
"After the first game, we were
four, then three, and now the number
is down to two. and I think you play ,i
little bit harder when you can seethe
light at the end of the tunnel. And
right now we can see it
ECU, behind the arm of Greg
liunn, blanked I'M -Wilmington
in the championship game ot the
regional, 7-0.
Sunn's performance in the
championship game brought the
light Mazey spoke ot into focus a bit
more as he dazzled UNC-W"s hitters
with his array of devastating off-speed
pitches and jaw-dropping fastballs.
the junior went eight innings,
allowing only two hits - one a bunt
single before being pulled before
the beginning of the ninth. This move
was by Mazey to allow Bunn to walk
off the field to a standing ovation of
the fans.
"dreg Bunn is probably my only
comment said Wilmington coach
Mark Scalf.
"We knew it was going to be
awfully difficult to get much done
offensively. Bunn was tremendous.
It I had a vote for MVP ot the tour-
nament, (ireg Bunn would have had
mine as well as everybody else's
Bunn didn't need the help of Scalf,
as he was named the tournament's
most outstanding player shortly after
the conclusion of the game.
The Seahawk players spoke so
highly of Bunn during the post-
game press conference, it was
almost as if they were Bunn's newest
fans. When asked how Bunn's perfor-
mance stacked up against any other
the Seahawks had seen the whole
season, senior outfielder Chip Grawey
responded with a laugh and spoke as if
he hid never seen anything unite like
what he saw on Monday afternoon.
Despite all the praise. Bunn
deferred the glory to his teammates.
"I was in a zone today and, with
these guys playing great defense. I
liked our chances said Bunn.
The Pirates seemed sluggish
offensively until the fourth, when
Billy Richardson, who is often
overlooked in such a powerful ECU
lineup, delivered a two-out two-strike
double that drove in Mark Minicozzi
and John Poppert, giving the Pirates
the early 3-0 lead. "
Poppert then led off the sixth with
a home run, which marked his second
such blast ot the regional. Ryan Jones
drove in another runner and pinch
hitter Jake Smith ripped the first
pitch he saw from reliever Adam
Paul for a two-run double that
painted the gap in left, increas-
ing the Pirate advantage to 7-0.
"There have been times this
year when I've looked at our lineup
and there are some guys that aren't,
swinging it real well, but I'm going to
leave this tournament thinking we're
pretty hot Mazey said.
"I feel good about every guy that
steps to the plate right now
The hot hitting began in the first
two games of the tournament when
The Pirates won the Kinston Regional in a shutout Monday afternoon.
ECU put a scrappy Stony Brook team
away late for an 8-2 triumph before
cake-walking to an 11-4 victory over
Wilmington on Sunday.
Wilmington defeated Tennessee
in the nightcap on Sunday to force
the rematch ot the Pirates and Hawks
in the championship.
John Poppert, Ryan Norwood,
Mark Minicozzi, Ryan Jones and
Drew Costanzo were all named to
the all tournament team, joining Greg
Bunn who received Most Outstanding
Player honors.
ECU continues to build on their
school record for wins. The overall
mark for the Pirates is now 51-11,
and the Pirates are now ranked No. i
in the latest national collegiate base-
ball writers' association poll, jumping
South Carolina.
Being a former player and coach
atClemson University, Mazey knows a
lot about the South Carolina program.
"I know a lot of people are picking
them to win the national champion-
Pirates head down south
College World Series at stake
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
The ECU baseball team heads to
South Carolina for super regional
action. The Pirates and Gamecocks
seemed to have no trouble advancing
through their regional, setting up the
match-up for this weekend.
1 (A) I lead Coach Randy Mazey is
familiar with the Pirates' next oppo-
nent. Mazey played and began his
coaching career at Clemson, one of
like Gamecocks' fiercest rivals. Some
of the other number one seeds. Rice,
Ole Miss, Virginia, Stanford, Notre
Dame and Arizona State, did not fare
too well and were eliminated.
"There wouldn't be any better
place for me to celebrate my trip
to Omaha than on that tiekl right
there because I've got a history of
those people not liking me a whole
lot and I've got a history of not liking
them a whole lot said Mazey.
After winning their three games
by six or more runs every contest,
see PIRATES page 17
ship this year, which is great, because
it were going to bie the best, we're
going to beat the best Mazey said.
"I'm an old lemson guy, so there
wouldn't be any better place to cel-
ebrate a trip to Omaha than on that
field because I got a history of those
people not liking mea whole lot, and I
have a history of not liking them.
"It's going to be exciting. It's
really a great college baseball atmo-
sphere
The Pirates will head down
to Columbia with their collec-
tive guns blazing as they begin
their dogfight with the Game-
cocks and the home crowd on
Saturday with a i p.m. showdown.
Tickets will be hard to come by,
as the game was officially announced
a sellout just hours after the tickets
were released to the general public
Monday.
This.writer can be contacted
at sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Basketball
favorite upset
Spring intramural champs fall
ERIC GILMORE
STAFF WRITER
Every d rea m has to come to an end.
The Dream learn II fell to Makaveli in a
nail biter 50-44 Thursday night inside
the Student Recreation Center. Maka-
veli scored first and never relinquished
the lead in the overtime period to end
the Dream leant II reign.
With the clock ticking away and
down three points, the Dream Team
II chose to foul instead of possibly
Hiving up a tying three-pointer.
see B-BALL page 16





6-09-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE 15
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Softball teams prepare
for summer intramurals
Champion to be crowned
in three-game series
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
STAFF WRITER
This summer session, the two
teams of ECU Transit and the
Summer Champs are participating
in intramural softball. They will
square off in a best-of-three series
starting next Monday to determine
the softball champion of summer
session one.
The Summer Champs are coming
off an undefeated spring season
which culminated with winning
the spring championship.
ECU Transit, a team comprised
of ECU student bus drivers, have
experience on their side.
The team has been playing soft-
ball for more than five years and is
looking to bring home the champi-
onship this summer.
Emily Parsons, the team captain
for ECU Transit, will be trying to
lead her team into winning their
first softball championship.
"We did pretty well last season.
Out of about six games we went 3-3,
we have never won a championship
though said Parsons.
Todd Brewer, the team captain
for the Summer Champs, is ready to
repeat his team's spring success.
"Our team is pretty strong.
We have some of the same people
returning from the spring season
said Brewer.
The goal for the Slimmer Champs
and ECU Transit is to have fun.
"We want to have a good time,
play good and enjoy ourselves
Brewer said.
ECU Transit is looking forward to
taking time off from the work day.
"We just want to go out, have fun
and relax Parsons said.
"Softball is a way for all of us
to get together and get away from
school and work
The two teams are scheduled for
a doubleheader at the intramural
fields next Monday at 6:30 p.m.
Play will then continue on Tues-
day at 6:30 p.m. with the final game
of the three-game series.
This writer can be contacted
at sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Bunn breaking through
Pitcher inspiration to fans
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
From day one of the 2004 college
baseball season, the ECU Pirates have
worn their game face day in and day
out. One Pirate, however, might just
have the most intimidating game
face of all - Greg Bunn.
Bunn has been unbeatable
this year, going 10-0 and helping
the Pirates advance to the Super
Regional this weekend against South
Carolina by hurling eight masterful
innings and giving up just two hits
in the regional championship against
UNC-W.
"I only got about two hours of
sleep last night, waiting for this
game said Bunn, who was selected
by the Montreal Expos in the fifth
round of Monday's baseball draft.
"But I came out, I thought I would
be tight, but it just felt right
Bunn's outstanding pitching per-
formances in his freshman season,
which earned him a spot on the
see BUNN page 18
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PAGE 16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS '
6-09-04
6-CK
B-Bdll from page 14
Makaveli player Juwon Crowell
sank the first free throw to pull within
two with just five seconds left in regula-
tion. The ECU wide receiver missed the
second free throw on purpose. Fellow
football player Erode Jean scored on the
offensive tip-in to tie the score 41-41
with two seconds left.
Makaveli was playing without
team captain Garret Peterkin. The
ECU wide receiver was ruled ineli-
gible after having an illegal player in
a previous game.
"It was a little play that we do
every now and then, during prac-
tice said Peterkin.
Makaveli scored two quick bas-
kets in the overtime period. They
used their superior quickness in forc-
ing the Dream Team II into several
crucial turnovers late in the game.
The Dream Team II had a chance
to win the game via a forfeit when
several members of Makaveli failed to
show up on time, but instead decided
to play. The first half was abridged to
ten minutes rather than the regular 20.
Makaveli used just four players until
a fifth player entered the game with
2:24 left in the first half.
The Dream Team II led by as
many as ten with 1:34 remaining in
the second half when big body Mark
Hayes was called for a technical foul.
Makaveli closed regulation with a
12-5 run. The Dream Team II missed
crucial free throws down the stretch.
Maurice Galloway, Lamar Pearson
and Josh Parker were all guilty parties.
Team captain for the Dream Team
II Mike Smith is not accustomed to
losing. The core of his team won the
Spring Intramural Championship for
the Gold Division. The team has only
dropped one game in two years
during the spring session. Despite
the impressive record, Makaveli knew
they matched up well with the Dream
Team II.
"We knew we could match up
with them. You just have to know
how to play them. We played them
last season too. It was a real close
game and we only lost by two
points Peterkin said.
Juwon Crowell and Erode Jean
combined to score 35 of Makaveli's
50 points with 20 and 15 respec-
tively. Mike Smith led the Dream
Team II with 17 points.
Both teams now stand at 1-1 with
two regular season games remaining.
Stank on Ya stands undefeated at 2-0,
with winsover Dirty Half DozenandThe
Show Stop. Stank on Ya still has yet to
meet either Makaveli or Dream Team II.
Makaveli and the Dream Team II
are early favorites to face each other i n
the tournament championship.
This writer can be contacted
at sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
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6-09-04
6-09-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE 17
g-
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ENTS
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Pirates from page 14
the Pirates feel pretty good about
their chances this weekend.
"I'm going to leave this
tournament right now thinking
that we're pretty hot the whole
way one through nine and 1 feel
good about really every guy
that steps to the plate right now,
which is a pretty good feeling
Mazey said.
Not only are the Pirate batters
hot, the Pirate pitching is on fire
too. Shane Matthews, Brody Taylor
and Greg Bunn, along with reliev-
ers Carter Harrell, Scott Andrews,
Ricky Brooks and Matt Bishop have
combined to only give up six runs
thus far in postseason play. Not
many teams can say that.
ECU will have its hands full
this upcoming series, however.
South Carolina is the number two
national seed and has solid hitting
and pitching as well.
The Gamecocks have hit one
more home run than the Pirates
this season, but overall, the Pirates
have better offensive output from top
to bottom. Landon Powell and Steve
Pearce, the regional most outstand-
ing player, are going to pose the big-
gest threat at the plate. Both have hit
to have, let alone an entire staff of
seven guys. The Gamecocks have
plenty of pitching for this weekend
and look to mix it up against the
Pirates, possibly bringing a lot of
off-speed hurlers. .
ECU will bring their ace
and regional Most Outstanding
Player, Greg Bunn, in the first
game of the best-of-three series,
looking to get ahead early and
give the crowd little to cheer
about.
My predictions: The Pirates will
win game one with Bunn on the
hill. A freshman will start for the
Pirates in game two probably, and
may crumble under the big time
pressure.
I think the Gamecocks will take
game two and have an enormous
amount of confidence heading
into the third and final game of
the series.
ECU, however, will respond
not only with pitching but with
offense, and they will show they
deserve the national recognition
they have played so hard all year to
earn. The Pirates will win game three
and move on to Omaha.
home runs 19 times this season. A 3.38 era is good for one pitcherThis writer can be contacted at sports@theeastcarolinian.cam.
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PAGE 18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
6-09-04
Blinn from page 15
2002 Louisville Slugger Freshman
All-America team, helped to jump-
start an outstanding career thus
far for the junior. However, Bunn
has seen his ups and downs off the
field.
In the same year Keith Leclair
was stricken with Lou Gehrig's,
Bunn and his family faced a bit of a
challenge as well. Bunn's father suf-
fered a heart attack, which removed
him from his work place and left the
financial load on his mother.
Bunn took it upon himself to
make sure his family would be okay
after such a terrible incident.
Enter Bunbun's. A New York
style hot dog stand. Founder and
CEO: Greg Bunn.
"My mom was running low on
money due to all the medical bills
from my dad's heart attack Bunn
said.
"He is doing good now, but
she needed help paying for a lot
of it so that is why I established
Bunbun's
Bunn's efforts at the hot dog
stand helps not only his mother,
but helps the very man who placed
a baseball in his hands at the age of
two-his father.
Bunn lifted his first baseball
trophy in 1988, the first of many in
his, thus far, outstanding career.
Bunn also got his feet wet
in another area of the athletic
realm when he tried his luck at
running.
"I went out for the indoor track
team one time, but I quit that after
about two weeks Bunn said.
"Baseball was always my dream
going up as far as I can remember
back. I always wanted to be a baseball
player
In high school, Bunn could
play almost every position on the
field, but he shined brightest on the
mound.
In his senior season at Wake
Forest-Rolesville High School, Bunn
was named to the all-state team due
largely in part to his five complete
game shutouts in the season. He also
was tagged as team MVP the same
year as well.
Along with his great pitch-
ing in high school, Bunn also put
up impressive offensive numbers,
batting more than .300 for his
three-year career on the varsity and
launching 17 home runs.
This year is Bunn's third season
with the Pirates, a season he says is
different from the first two.
"This year, the team has good
chemistry. Everybody gets along with
everybody and we all pick each other
up Bunn said.
The Pirate unit works together
defensively as well as offensively.
"The hitters obviously pick us up
when we (pitchers) don't do good and
we pick them up when they are strug-
gling Bunn said.
"This year, we did a lot more run-
ning and worked hard on agility and
just basically got after it more
Getting after it more is a
motto Bunn uses every day as well
as his Pirate teammates, and it is
paying its dividends. The Pirates
already have a conference title
and regional championship title
under their belt. The kind of
numbers the Pirates have put up
have ECU in great shape to
make their first trip to Omaha,
Neb. and play in the College
World Series.
"A trip to Omaha would mean
a heck of a lot to this program
Bunn said.
"We are getting a new stadium
which will help bring recruits
in and if we go to Omaha they
are going to want to come here as
well
Omaha would mean a heck
of a lot to Greg Bunn after his efforts
to get the Pirates to the promised
land. Bunn's opponents are batting
a measly .187 against him this
season, which may explain why his
record on the year is an unblemished
mark of 10-0. Bunn's earned run
average is among the best on the
team, 2.66, and his 109 strikeouts
leads the team.
All ofthisand one may think Bunn
may not have time for academics.
"I am doubling majoring in Math
and Physics Bunn said.
"School is hard, but I am making
decent grades
Greg Bunn is a student, a hot
dog stand owner, a baseball player,
but most importantly, an inspira-
tion to all young baseball fans who
may be faced with adversity in
their lives. Bunn made the best of
his situation, following the lead of
one of his mentor's in Keith Leclair.
The number three nationally
ranked Pirates are just two games
away from Omaha as they head
down to Columbia, SC for the series
starting Saturday.
This writer can be contacted
at sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Pirate radio 1250 and the
Klnston Indians present:
The Thirsty
Thursday Party Bus!

Bus will pick up and drop off from
the parking lot located between
the Pirate Radio studio and BB&T
on Evans Street (Behind UBE)
Every Thursday home game for the
2004 season. (810,617, 78,86,
819, and 826) Bus departs at 5:30
PM, and returns after the game.
CO
W $6.00 per r
$6.00 per person, includes ride
to and from game, ticket into the
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all night at Grainger Stadium
Tickets can be purchased at the bus on game day
but seats are limited. Pop more Information or
reserve seats for your group contact: Elizabeth at
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333.
Your Talk Station





)-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE 19
and drop off from
located between
) studio and BB&T
; (Behind UBE)
a, includes ride
ie, ticket into the
irinks are $1.00
nger Stadium
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"Where it Pays to Care"
Lecture over.
Why don't kids collect
sports cards any more?
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One writer's take on NBA
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BRANDON HUGHES
SENIOR WRITER
NBA Finals
I'm saying it right now, the
Detroit Pistons will beat the Los
Angeles Lakers in seven games.
If Smarty Jones can be upset in
the Belmont, then the Lakers will
undoubtedly fall to the swarming
defense of Detroit. It was clearly an
omen to all underdogs. The Pistons
have the best defense in the NBA
and will shut down the Lakers. They
have already taken game one in Los i
Angeles. Also, Darko Milicic will be
the NBA Finals MVP. Seriously, I'm
taking the Pistons.
ESPN and the Spelling Bee
ESPN is supposed to be the lead-
ing "sports" network. Shouldn't
sports be aired 247 then? Apparently
the athletes in the National Spelling
Bee want more recognition. The net-
work recently aired the competition
.JSS
1m ML111-� 0.
Detroit and LA. face off tonight.
along with hours upon hours of the
2003 World Series of Poker and dog
shows. I'm starting to feel like an ath-
lete just by writing this article.
The fall of baseball cards
I've got some beef with kids
today. When I was little, my hobby-
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PAGE 20
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
6-09-04
CardS from page 19
was collecting baseball cards. I col-
lected all my favorite players and
thought I was so cool because I had
more cards than any of my friends.
Years down the road, you learn
cards you threw around and bent
up were worth money. Luckily, most
of mine survived. Kids don't collect
sportscards any more. My seven-
year-old cousin collects Pokemon
cards instead.
I asked him why and he said
all his friends have them and that's
why he likes them. He hardly even
watches the show. They have a Poke-
mon show? Come on, what is wrong
with kids these days? Their cartoons
suck, what ever happened to Teenage
Mutant Ninja Turtles?
Why would a kid trade a Barry
Bonds autographed card for a Pika-
chu card? Maybe because they draw
their powers from something other
than steroids. By the way, that's the
only Pokemon character 1 know,
honestly.
Intramural sports at ECU
How many play intramural sports
at ECU? Hundreds of athletes quench
their competitive spirit with intramu-
rals now their high school careers are
over. What's the deal with the playoff
system? The regular season doesn't
even matter, as long as you win once,
then you are in the playoffs.
Our football team went unde-
feated, but for some reason, played
another undefeated team in the first
round. That's like having the best
two teams play in the conference
finals instead of the championship.
Wait a second, I guess that happens
in professional sports too.
ECU wins World Series
It hasn't happened yet, but it looks
like an easy road to Omaha. Just have
to get out of Kinston and by 15 other
teams who have advanced to the Super
Regionals. Vanderbilt, South Carolina,
Georgia, Georgia Tech, Florida State,
Miami, Arizona, Tulane, LSU, Arkan-
sas, Florida, Texas ASM, Texas, Cal. St.
Fullerton and Long Beach State have
all moved on. Sounds like a bunch of
cupcakes to me.
Gary Barnett retains job
There must be something in
the water out there in Colorado.
Somehow, Colorado football coach
Gary Barnett is still heading up the
program amid rape allegations. People .
were horrified with all the drinking
and promiscuous acts. As college stu-
dents, we know better.
Once Barnett called his former
female place-kicker a horrible player
right after she made her experience at
Colorado public, he should have been
sent packing.
This writer can be contacted
at sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 9, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 09, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1735
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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