The East Carolinian, April 27, 2004






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
4-22-04
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Volume 79 Number 141
FINAL EDITION
THIS IS TEC'S FINAL EDITION OF THE
SPRING SEMESTER. TEC WILL PUBLISH
AGAIN ON TUESDAY, MAY 26.
TUESDAY
April 27, 2004
FromJStart
to r mishJ
2003 - 04: Year in Review
3l n 1
STEVE BALLARD APPOINTED NEW PERMANENT
CHANCELLOR
STUDENTS PROTEST UNC-SYSTEM TUITION HIKES
IN MARCH
DORM SAFETY QUESTIONED AFTER MULTIPLE
VIOLENT CRIMES
HOLLY O'NEAL
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
As the old adage says, the only thing constant
is change. And this academic year at ECU has seen
plenty of it, through growth, reorganization, chal-
lenges and landmarks. While the university eyes its
looming centennial celebration, a look back on the
most important news events of 2003-04 shows the
transformation ECU continually undergoes.
Academics
The cost of obtaining an ECU diploma rose,
despite strong resistance from students. A proposal
to implement a three-year, $300 tuition increase
failed to gain approval from the Student Govern-
ment Association, who partnered with the North
Carolina Association of Student Governments to
protest.
Nearly 200 students from all UNC-system
schools attended the March 24 meeting, where the
BOG amended ECU'S request, passing a campus-
wide, $225 in-state increase and a staggered
increase for the Brody School of Medicine.
Enrollment reached a record high, topping off
at 21,797 last fall and establishing ECU as the third
largest school in the UNC-system. ECU'S size not
only increased, but so did the quality: The 2003-
04 freshmen crop had the highest average SAT test
scores thus far.
U.S. News & World Report magazine named
Brody School of Medicine 19th in medical schools
emphasizing primary care, fourth in rural medicine
and 15th in family medicine. The School of Allied
I lealth Sciences' rehabilitation counseling graduate
program ranked 15th for a third consecutive year.
STUDENT BODY ELECTS NEW SGA EXECUTIVE
COUNCIL
see REVIEW page A2
UNIVERSITY ENROLLEMENT REACHES
RECORD HIGH
Four years, a lifetime of ECU memories later
Span shows growth of
students, university
RACHEL LANDEN
SENIOR WRITER
The passage of time inevitably
equals change.
If this is your first year at ECU,
chances are you are not the same
person or are in the same place
that you were a year ago.
If four yean have passed since
you first stepped foot in the hal-
lowed halls of academia, then
it's almost certain you are a new
person in a new place.
You are a product of the
knowledge you have acquired,
the people you have met and the
things you have seen and done.
You cannot leave ECU untouched
or unchanged. After all, ECU
today is not the same as it was
yesterday or one year ago, and it
is especially not the ECU of four
years ago.
The university has grown and
changed, and hopefully you have
as well. But lest you forget some
of the most memorable moments
of your college career, The East
Carolinian is once again here to
remind you.
Growth and change have
definitely become pivotal for the
university. Enrollment reachedan
all-time record high in the fall of
2003 with 21,756 students. And
as for further evidence of growth,
the 2003 freshman class held the
highest ever average SAT score of
1050.
An increase in student popu-
lation emphasized the need for
expansion of campus facilities.
A totally renovated Student
Health Center opened in August
2001. In the years following, the
Rivers Building, Jones Hall and
Mendenhall Student Center have
received their own makeovers.
In 2002, ECU saw the
completion and dedication of
the Murphy Center, a $13 mil-
lion facility for athletic strength
and conditioning. And in August
2003, the $66 million Science
and Technology Building opened
its doors to students.
There is no doubt the exten-
sive on-campus construction has
proved to be a hassle for faculty
and students. The costs alone are
enough to give you a headache,
but not as great as the one that's
been causing stress and frustra-
tion among students this year.
In March, the UNC Board of
Governors approved a series of
increases in tuition and fees that
will go into effect this fall.
The BOG also approved the
selection of ECU's new chancel-
lor. Steve II.ill.ml, provost and
vice chancellor for academic
affairs at the University of Mis-
souri-Kansas City, will enter his
new position in June.
Ballard will succeed Interim
Chancellor William Shelton as
ECU's leader after Shelton took
the reins following William
Muse's resignation in Septem-
ber of 2003.
Scandals erupted and rumors
ensued in the wake of a tumul-
tuous turnover of leadership.
All the big names seemed to be
leaving, and not under amicable
circumstances.
William Swart, vice chan-
cellor of academic affairs, was
reassigned to a faculty position
almost immediately after Muse
left his job.
In December 2002, Head
Football Coach Steve l.ogan
resigned, to be replaced by the
Florida Gators' defensive coor-
dinator John Thompson.
Former Housing Director
Emanuele Amaro was arrested
in February of 2003 for embez-
zling more than $100,000.
Several months later, Ath-
letic Director Michael llamrick
vacated his position in order to
join the staff at UNLV.
Though national events
did not specifically happen on
campus, many of them effected
students, faculty and the uni-
versity. The attacks of Sept.
11, 2001, occurred many miles
away, yet their impact could be
felt in Greenville.
ECU grieved with the rest of
the nation as students, faculty
and staff faced the losses of
family and friends. We then took
action in the face of tragedy with
patriotic displays and fundraising
projects. The following year, ECU
commemorated the date with a
candlelight vigil.
As a result of the attacks,
homeland security became a
major national issue. Today,
campus security is gaining its
own attention following two
sexual assaults in residence halls
and two other incidents involving
weapons on campus. Police have
added more patrols, and access to
each residence hall is now limited
to the building's main door.
But all news is not necessarily
bad news.
Greenville braced for the worst
in September 2003 as Hurricane
Isabel neared the North Carolina
coast. Friday classes were can-
celed, yet nearly 1,000 students
chose to remain on campus in the
residence halls during the storm.
Students celebrated the long week-
end and impromptu vacation with
"hurricane parties
Fortunately though, Isabel
resulted in relatively little
damage, sparing Greenville the
brunt of the storm and the threat
see FOUR page A2
Sexual Assuatt Awareness
throughout AprfT
-o Rape survivors are 13 times more likel to attempt suicide than people who have not been crime victims and six times
more likely than victims of other crimes.
There are an estimated 32,000 rape related pregnancies in the United States annually.
-orecast tec required
Partly Cloudy READING
High ol 72
Wsftwvwdheeastearolrcrjmtoread
about the tons of chemicals that were
seized In Jordan yesterday.
page
One million people gathered In
Washington, DC. In support of women's
tights.
page!
Students played games, partldpated In
wafts and listened to music at Barefoot
on the Mai last Thursday.
Iports
page C1
ECU's Pirates look to continue their
stellar conterence play against louisvlle
In a three-game series In Greenvle.
FYI
Regular exams begin
Wednesday, April 28 and
end Wednesday. May 5 at
10 a.m. Summer classes
begin May 17.





RAGE A2
4-27-04
NEWS
ERIN RICKERT
News Editor
HOLLY O'NEAL
Assistant News Editor
news@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
Medical Mind
The medical class of 2004 presents its play. "The Medical Mind
today 7 p.m. in Brody Auditorium
Alzheimer's Teleconference
The Hospice Foundation of America presents a teleconference on
"Living with Grief: Alzheimers Disease" hosted by Cokie Roberts of
ABC News today from 1:15 p.m. - 415 p.m. in the Brody Auditorium.
To register, contact Mary Spivey at 847-2000
Teaching Awards
The eighth annual Teaching Awards Ceremony is today at
11 am in the MSC Great Room A reception hosted by Interim
Chancellor William Shelton will follow Contact the Faculty Senate
office at 328-6537 for more information
Reading Day
Today is reading day No classes are sceduled to provide
time to prepare for exams
Relay for Life
The Pitt County Relay for Life to raise funds for the American
Cancer Society will be Friday and Saturday at Ihe Pitt County
Fairgrounds Volunteers who are interested In forming teams
should contact Alis Irwin at 317-5803
Food Drive
J & E Harley Davison Co in Winterville will hold a food drive
May 1 to benefit the Food Bank of North Carolina in Greenville
Prizes for the most food donated will be given, and discounts
for Harley Davison merchandise will be exchanged for
donations
Regular Exams
Regular exams begin Wednesday. Apnl 28 and end Wednesday, May 5
at 10 am
Internal Medicine Research
The Department of Internal Medicine holds its 18th annual research
day Wednesday, May 5 from 8am - 3 pm in 2W-40 Brody
Faculty, staff, fellows, residents and other medical students
will give presentations, and Dr Helen Burstin, director of the
Center for Primary Care, will speak on getting a grant
funded
Open House
The Ledonia Wright Cultural Center sponsors an open house
Thursday from noon - 2 pm Door prizes and refreshments will be
provided
Blood Drive
The Staff Senate Rewards and Recognition Committee sponsors a
blood drive Thursday. May 6 from 11 am - 4 p.m. at Sweethearts in Todd
Dining Hall
Graduation
Commencement is Saturday. May 8 in Williams Arena at Minges
Coliseum The morning ceremony begins at 9:30 a.m. The afternoon
ceremony begins at 1:30 p.m. Register on
OneStop
Fee Deadline
Schedules for Summer Session I will be canceled for all
who have not paid tees by Fnday, May 13 at 4 pm
Classes Begin
Classes for Summer Session I begin Tuesday. May 17
Chemistry Placement Test
The chemistry placement test will be Monday, May 17 from 10
am - 11 am and 2 pm. - 3 pm in 309 Science and Technology
Building Students must arrive 10 minutes prior to testing
and bring a No 2 pencil and a nonprogrammable
calculator
Math Placement Test
The math placement lest will be Monday, May 17 at 10 a.m. and
Tuesday. May 18 at 11 30 am in 110 Austin Students should arrive
10 minutes prior to testing and bring a No 2 pencil, a nonprogrammable
calculator and picture identification
Registration Deadline
Wednesday. May 19 is the last day tor late registration and schedule
change for Summer Session I
Deadline
Thursday. May 20 is the last day to add classes for Summer
Session I.
Review
from page A1
SNOWY WEATHER BLANKETS ECU
CONSTRUCTION COVERS CAMPUS
East Carina
v
v
SHELTON CHOSEN AS INTERIM CHANCELLOR
STUDENTS RECALL 911 WITH PEACE VIGIL
Graduating students encountered a revamped winter ceremony. Administra-
tion, in response to low turnout at the large ceremony, scaled back commence-
ment to include only one ceremony and prohibited students from wearing regallia
at their departmental celebrations.
However, student and faculty concern prompted further adjustments. The
December commencement included two large ceremonies, one each for under-
graduate and graduate degrees.
ECU students, past and present, made their imprint on school history.
Hannah Winslow became the first undergraduate to publish a book, titled "Once
upon a Time I was me: Reflections on living as a teenager while pursuing her
degree, and Dan Neil, a 1982 ECU alumnus and L. A. Times columnist, was the
second graduate to win the Pulitzer Prize.
Developments
Evidence of ECU'S physical growth was unmistakable all over campus. One
of the most anticipated additions - the West End Dining flail perched above
downtown Greenville - is scheduled for completion in September 2004.
In all, the school projected to spend $9 million in repairs to areas such as
sidewalks and parking lots. The $190 million Science and Technology Build-
ing opened for classes fall 2003, and renovations on the Rivers and Hannagan
Buildings are soon to be complete.
Expansion on the West Medical Campus began in earnest with the Learning
Village's groundbreaking. Scheduled to begin construction in May, the Learn-
ing Village will initially host a 129-acre complex housing the Schools of Allied
Health Sciences and Nursing and the Laupus Medical Library.
Ownership of the Country Doctor Museum in Bailey was transferred to ECU
to become part of the Laupus Library's History of Medicine program. After clos-
ing for more than a year, the museum, established in 1967, reopened in April.
It displays instruments, diaries, papers, medical books and equipment of past
medicinal endeavors.
Planning began for the North Campus Recreational Facility to be located at
the Intersection of NC 33 and US 264.
Developers envision the NCRF to contain IS multipurpose play-
ing fields, an 18-hole Frisbee golf course, a "world class" skate
park and a championship stadium for soccer, football and Ultimate Frisbee,
among other recreational spaces.
Leadership
Controversy clouded top administrative positions at the beginning of the
fall semester, affecting the need for major structural reorganization during the
ensuing months.
The resignation of Chancellor William Muse in September followed a closed
meeting of the ECU Board of Trustees, where two critical internal audits were
discussed.
One audit said Emanuel Amaro, who resigned from the posi-
tion of associate vice chancellor for student experiences in
January, embezzled money and made improper purchases. Amaro has since
pleaded guilty to embezzlement.
Another audit said part of a $4.6 million grant to the Center for Health Sci-
ences Communications was spent improperly.
Muse denied involvement or knowledge of both cases. Though he said he
planned to return as a business professor in the spring, Muse retired in Decem-
ber.
UNC-system President Molly Broad appointed William Shel-
ton, vice chancellor for University Advancement, as interim chan-
cellor. A 13-member search committee, consisting of school
officials and community leaders, was assigned the task of finding a permanent
chancellor.
Provost William Swart, whose position and appointment were initiated by Muse,
was reassigned to a faculty position in the business school shortly after Shelton took h is
position. Swart underwent criticism for his hiring practices-allegedly Old Dominian
University, and organizational changes.
James LeRoy Smith, executive assistant to the chancellor and philosophy profes-
sor, was named interim vice chancellor of academic affairs.
Responding to the administrative changes, Thomas Feldbush resigned a year
earlier than he planned from his position as vice chancellor for research, economic
development and community engagement.
Shelton combined the division of research with the graduate school under the
chancellor's office. 1 leapxintedJohn Lehman, dean for research and graduate studies
at BSOM, as vice chancellor for research and graduate studies.
Paul Gemperline, chemistry professor, was named acting associate vice chancel-
lor.
After the Chancellor Search Committee submitted its recommendations to Broad,
Steve Ballard, provost and vice chancellor for Academic Affairs at the University ol
Missouri-Kansas City, was announced as ECU'S new chancellor in March.
Ballard will begin his job June 1, and Shelton will return to his former position.
BSOM received a new dean in August. Dr. Cynda Johnson, 52, became one of 11
women to head one of America's 126 accredited medical schools.
Student leadership changed hands when Ticket One tri-
umphed over Ticket Two in SGA's March elections. The election
was shortened from two days to one day when a non-malicious information breach
erased candidates' names and vote totals from online voting.
Safety
Students began to seriously consider their safety after a rash
of violent crimes took place in the dorms. A female student
was raped in her White Hall room Jan. 19, and a month later, another female was
raped in the laundry room of Belk Hall.
Two armed roblwies were reported in Belk. No one has been charged in any of
the incidents.
"Piggy-backing or entering a dorm behind someone who has opened a door
with a key, was given as the probable cause for the criminals' presence in the dorms.
Low-lit and construction-laden areas worried students.
To communicate students' concerns to administra-
tion, the SGA held a Safety Walk in the spring, where
participants located unsafe areas. The concerns were presented to administration.
Campus Living outlined a plan to tackle unsafe areas, includ-
ing adding security cameras and lighting to residence halls, to
ensure safety and reduce crime. The cost for installing cameras in
every dorm would total more than $300,000, one prospective supplier said.
Campus Living conducted its own safety assess-
ment to locate critical areas. Some improvements have
been completed, while others will continue throughout the summer.
The fall semester saw another safety concern, but the school
was powerless to stop it when Hurricane Isabel ravaged east-
ern North Carolina and the Atlantic Coast. The storm's effect was
felt from North Carolina to New York, flooding homes, blacking out cities and caus-
ing at least 29 deaths.
Classes were cancelled for two days, but besides downed trees and power lines,
caused minimal damage in Greenville.
This writer can be contacted at news@theeaitcarolinian.com.
Four
from page A1
of Hoyd-like flooding. This in
itself was enough cause for cel-
ebration, especially when a rather
dismal football season provided
no such relief.
I he Pirates finished the 2(103
Mason with a record of 1-11. The
results were a far cry trom those
in 2001, when the Pirates made
their third straight bowl appear-
ance, that time at the GM AC Bowl
in Mobile, Ala.
Despite the disappointing
record, fans continued to attend
the games, buying up all tickets
lor the October game versus
UNC-Chapel Hill.
Thus far, Pirate baseball is
having another great season.
One year after ECU entered
Conference USA as an all-sports
member, the baseball team won
the (1 ISA title at the conference
tournament in Kinston.
Back on campus, the uni-
versity has provided a wealth of
opportunities for entertainment
and intellectual stimulation.
We've seen Elizabeth Dole visit
campus, heard from Disney
Teacher of the Year Ron Clark,
listened to John Mayer and Jason
Mraz perform at Barefoot on the
Mall and Cone Hollywood for
homecoming.
And now it's almost time to
simply go. The summer is fast
approaching, exams arc almost
upon us, and the May 8 com-
mencement ceremony is soon
to conclude the college career of
some of our fellow East Carolin-
ians.
As you go on your way, new
people, places and events are sure
to shape your life. But the years
you have spent or will spend at
ECU have been or should be
nothing short of memorable.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeas tcarolinian. com.
Failed, failed, failed. And then
PERSISTENCE
Pass It On.
m roiomoi m nun mi
www.lwbfltcHitt.urg
)





4-27-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
)
News Briefs
Local
Descendants claim Lumbee
falsely claim heritage
PEMBROKE (AP) - Descendants
ol a group of American Indians
recognized by the federal government
in 1938 complain that the Lumbee
tribe is using their history to help their
case for federal recognition and the
financial benefits that come with the
status.
Documentation showing 22
Waccamaw-Siouan Indians certified
as Native Americans in 1938 was
included in information given to the
Senate Committee on Indian Affairs
and House Resources Committee
during hearings on federal
recognition for the Lumbees.
Descendants of the Siouans want
the information stricken from the
record.
To be recognized, the Lumbees have
to show a presence of American
Indians in Robeson County.
In 1935, an anthropologist with
the former Commission of Indian
Affairs examined 209 people to
determine whether they had a half-
degree or more of Indian blood.
The commission sent letters to 22
people in 1938 saying they were
entitled to benefits under the Indian
Reorganization Act. but they were not
given tribal status.
NC workers make
up tax difference
RALEIGH (AP) - Corporate income
taxes are paying for a shrinking
share of stale services, leaving North
Carolina workers to make up much
of the difference
Gov. Mike Easley, his Republican
challengers and business interests
believe the percentage of tax revenue
provided by corporate income taxes
should fall even more to spur
economic development
The percentage of total tax
collections from corporate income
taxes has fallen from 118 percent in
the 1987-88 fiscal year to 6.6 percent
the past fiscal year, according to data
supplied by the General Assembly's
fiscal research division The declining
corporate burden can be traced to
the economic downturn, tax shelters
and a lowering of the corporate
income lax rate.
At the same time, the tax burden
has shifted
The share of lax revenue coming
from individual income taxes
rose from 467 percent of total tax
collections in 1987-1988 to 51.8
percent in 2002-2003. Individual
taxpayers accounted for as much
as 55.6 percent in 2000-2001.
National
Southern California wildfire
nearly contained after destroying
two mobile homes, nine vehicles
TEMECULA, Calif. (AP) - Firefighters
on Monday began to get the upper
hand on a 2,334-acre wildfire that
had threatened as many as 400
homes in Riverside County.
The blaze, which broke out in a motor
home on Sunday afternoon, was 90
percent contained Monday morning,
said Stephanie Swanstrom, a county
fire information spokeswoman
It had threatened as many as 400
homes before firefighters began
to surround it overnight. The fire,
which spread from the motor home
to nearby vegetation, destroyed two
mobile homes and nine vehicles.
About 540 firefighters, aided by
four helicopters and two air tankers
battled the flames throughout the day
Sunday until the aircraft had to be
grounded at dusk.
Temperatures, which reached the
90s in the area on Sunday, were
expected to soar to near 100 on
Monday.
Bush Calls for Ban
on Broadband Taxes
WASHINGTON (AP) - Tying high-tech
innovation to prosperity. President
Bush is using a speech in a swing
state to address an election-year
vulnerability, a sluggish job market
that hasn't rebounded with the
national economy. In a speech
Monday in Minnesota, Bush is urging
Congress to slap a permanent ban
on taxes consumers pay for high-
speed Internet hookups called
broadband
He also is touting proposals to make
electronic medical records the norm
and move hydrogen fuel technology
from the lab to the showroom.
World
Chinese lawmakers:
No universal suffrage in Hong
Kong in 2007, 2008
HONG KONG (AP) - Mainland China
dealt a crushing blow to Hong Kong's
hopes for full democracy Monday,
when its most powerful legislative
panel ruled the territory won t have
direct elections for its next leader or
for all its lawmakers in 2008.
Many people in Hong Kong have
been demanding the right to
democratically elect a successor to
their chief executive, Tung Chee-hwa,
a former shipping tycoon chosen
for his position by an 800-member
committee that lends to side with
Beijing.
But the Chinese National People's
Congress Standing Committee said
"universal suffrage shall not apply"
to the selection of Tung successor in
2007 or members of the Legislative
Council the following year.
U.S. troops move into Najaf to
replace Spanish, vow to keep
out of holy places
NAJAF. Iraq (AP) - U.S. soldiers
rolled into a base in the Shiite holy
city of Najaf on Monday to replace
withdrawing Spanish troops and put
pressure on a radical anti-American
Shiite militia that controls parts of
the city
The base is about three miles from
the Shiite holy shrines at Najaf's heart,
which the U.S. military has vowed to
steer clear of to avoid outraging Iraq's
majority Shiite Muslims.
The move deploys US. troops within
the Najaf urban area for the first time
since a large force massed outside
the city earlier this month to put down
the Al-Mahdi Army militia of radical
cleric Muqtada al-Sadr
TEC is now hiring staff writers. Apply at our office located
on the :2nd floor of the Student Publications Building.
One million activists rally
for women's rights in D.C.
Activists wave signs and shout their beliefs to one another and onlookers Sunday.
� Experience required
� Must have a 2.0 GPA
� 4
1L
March for Women's
Lives largest protest in
American history
PETER KALAJIAN
STAFF WRITER
More than one million
men, women and children par-
ticipated in The National March
for Women's Lives in Washing-
ton, D.C. Sunday.
The march addressed issues
from abortion rights and con-
traception to sex education
and worldwide reproductive
concerns.
At final count, the march
was confirmed as the single
largest protest march in U.S.
history.
A coalition of women's
groups, including the National
Organization lor Women and
Planned Parenthood organized
the event.
Demonstrations and speeches
were held on the National
Mall, directly in front of the
Capitol building, and the march
proceeded for several miles
past the White House and
through downtown Washing-
ton.
1 ining the protest rmrtr,
several hundred anti-abortion
activists and religious groups
offered a differing perspective
on the issues. Police detained
more than 40 individuals
throughout the day for pro-
testing without a permit.
The march eventually
returned to the starting point
where a number of celebrity
speakers and national women's
rights advocates took the stage.
Presenters included such
names as actor Ashley Judd,
Julianne Moore, former Secretary
of State Madeline Albright and
media mogul led Turner.
Long-time pro-abortion
activist and comedienne Whoopl
Goldberg took the stage bran-
dishing a coat hanger, a symbolic
gesture of the millions of back-
alley abortions performed before
abortion was legalized in 1973,
"Some people asked me why
1 came on stage carrying a coat
hanger, and I'll tell you why; it's
because we're never going back
to the way it was. Never said
Goldberg.
Since September 11th, Wash-
ington, D.C. has maintained a
closed airspace over the city, so
no news helicopters were allowed
to film the march from the
air.
Security around the march
was tight, with municipalities
in Virginia and Maryland con-
tributing reinforcements for
the Washington Metro Police
Department.
Dozens of riot police and
officers on horseback lined
the protest route, maintaining
a separation between pro-life
activists and marchers.
A number of streets, most
notably Pennsylvania Avenue,
were closed to traffic for the dura-
tion oi the day's activities.
A Secret Service helicopter
circled the crowd all afternoon.
Women's rights activist Moby
ended the afternoon with an
acoustic rendition of the classic
Buffalo Springfield protest song,
"lor What it's Worth
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
1
FOfcCE
Anti-abortion protesters
bicker with marchers.
Clip and save this information � Write these dates on your calendar!
2004-2005 PARKING PERMITS
All vehicle registration will be completed on-line.
Register by July 16th to have your permit mailed home.
VEHICLE REGISTRATION & PERMIT SALES FOR 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC YEAR
� Parking Permit sales for current permit holders in zones A1, A2, A3 and B2 will be APRIL 19-30, 2004. If you have one of these permits, it
is imperative that you make your decision to retain your current zone status and complete the on-line vehicle registration before 5:00 p.m.
on April 30th. If your current zone permit is not repurchased by this date you will forfeit your current zone permit and will be required to
reapply.
� On May 3, 2004, available permits remaining after the April 19-30, 2004 registration for zones A1, A2, A3 and B2, will be offered to facul-
tystaff and students on the current waiting lists. Permits will be offered in sequential order until zones are filled to maximum capacity.
� On May 10, 2004, the ECU OneStop Vehicle Registration will open for ALL permit applications to include B1, B3, C and D zones, and zones
listed above. Applicants will be assigned permits based upon availability or will be placed on the appropriate waiting list.
If there are no spaces in the desired zone, you may add your name to the zone waiting list.
Maps showing the parking zones are posted at www.ecu.eduparking.
HOW TO REGISTER:
1. Gather information needed for the registration process including:
� vehicle make, model, license plate number
� insurance company name, policy holder's name, policy number
� housing information if living on campus next year
� credit card information if paying by Visa or Mastercard
Be sure you have all of this information because once you begin the on-line process you
will need to finish completing the form in order to purchase your parking permit.
2. Go on-line to ECU OneStop: onestop.ecu.edu, login with your ECU user ID and pass-
word. Click on Vehicle Registration listed under Security and Transportation.
3. Complete the on-line form. If you are paying by check, be sure to print out the e-mail
verification you receive and SEND IT WITH YOUR CHECK to the parking office.
Parking and Transportation Services
305 E. Tenth Street � Greenville NC 27858
252.328.6294
www.ecu.eduparking
IMPORTANT SUMMER
PARKING INFORMATION
Students who currently hold 2003-2004, Freshman
(D Zone) permits may use any B2 or C Zone park-
ing areas for the first summer session, through
June 30. Students who currently have a D Zone
permit but will be living on College Hill during first
summer session must contact Parking &
Transportation Services to have their permit vali-
dated for A2 Zone parking.
If you do not have a current ECU parking permit,
you may purchase a summer session permit from
the Parking & Transportation Office located at 305
E 10th Street during regular business hours.
Permits for 1st session ONLY are $20. Permits for
2nd session ONLY are $20. Permits for BOTH 1st
and 2nd sessions are $30.00
For more information on summer session parking
and the parking program, visit our web site at
www.ecu.eduparking. If you have questions,
contact our office at (252) 328-6294.





PA, it M
I
4-27-04
OPINION
Michelle A. McLeod
Editor-in-chief
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Erin Rickert
News Editor
Amanda Ungerfett
Features Editor
Ryan Downey
Sports Editor
Meghann Roark
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Slstrunk
Photo Editor
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
Holly O'Neal
Asst News Editor
John Bream
Asst Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Asst Sports Editor
Daniel Roy
Production Manager
Amanda Vanness
Asst Photo Editor
252.328.6366
252.328.6558
252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, The East Carolinian prints 9,000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular academic year
and 5,000 on Wednesdays during the summer. "Our View" is the opin-
ion of the editorial board and is written by editorial board members.
The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor which are limited to
250 words (which may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and include
a telephone number. Letters may be sent via e-mail to editor@theeast
carolinian.com or to The East Carolinian, Student Publications Building,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more information.
One copy of The East Carolinian is free, each additional copy is $1
Our View
TEC would
like to take
the oppor-
tunity to
congratu-
late those
graduating
seniors who
have contrib-
uted to this
university in
one way or
another.
It is amazing that yet another year is coming to
an end and some students will soon be packing
their bags to head home for the summer while
others will be forced to crack open the books
and partake in summer courses at ECU.
Regardless, some things always remain the
same. An entire segment of the current student
population will no longer be considered stu-
dents at ECU, but forever known as alumni.
TEC would like to take the opportunity to
congratulate those graduating seniors who
have contributed to this university in one way
or another.
We wish you the best of luck in your future
endeavors, and may the education that you
received guide you through your career path
as well as life.
To think the university has changed so much
over the last year. There were many changes
in the administration including the loss and
gain of a chancellor. Construction littered the
campus, bringing renovations and a better
ECU to Greenville. Crime plagued the campus
and students looked to administrators for
heightened safety in dorms, causing security
measures to be altered indefinitely.
As German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche
once said, "What doesn't kill us makes us stron-
ger Although the future of the ECU community
is unsure, we do believe this year's events will
only help to make our university a stronger,
more reputable one.
Over the past year, TEC has also experienced
many changes. Our staff has worked hard to
bring the campus the most relevant and timely
news possible. Just as the university continues
to change and grow, so does our paper.
However, the quality of a student newspaper
is only as good as the students deem it to be.
Whenever you read something that makes you
upset or helps you relate, we encourage you to
voice your opinion to us, whether it be through
a letter to the editor or joining our staff.
Yes, it has been an amazing year. So much
has changed and yet we have come back to a
common place - commencement.
Congratulations, graduates.
The purpose of TEC's opinion pages is to invoke
conversation in ECU's community. To respond to an
opinion on this page, please send your letter, with your contact
informarJon for verification, to edttor@theeastcarolinian.com.
In My Opinion
Four years later and all grown up
ECU's effects delayed
but endearing
MICHELLE MCLEOD
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
I'm not sure when it
happened, but sometime
between being dropped off at
Jarvis Hall freshman year and
)I.iiiii� iiK for next weekend's
graduation, I realized that I'd
grown up.
I don't mean "grown up"
in terms of gelling a job and
paying all my own bills �
although after graduation, I
know that's what's nexl.
Hour years ago, I arrived
on campus a naive, obnoxious
freshman. Now, I'm leaving�
still a little obnoxious hut
definitely smarter and wiser.
And when I think back, I can
attribute this evolution only to
ECU and the experiences I've
had here.
My decision to attend
ECU was not rooted in any
long love affair I had with
the school. Being a Baltimore
native, ECU was far enough
away from home to rule out
pop-up family visits but close
enough to travel home on the
holidays. That, and the fact
(hat the purple-trimmed letter
read "Accepted
Now, I can honestly say
my decision to attend ECU
was the right one, but three
years ago, three months
ago or even three days
ago, I'm not sure I was aware
of it.
After reflecting on what I
would write for my last edi-
torial, these feelings kind of
crept up on me.
It was during this time I
realized those acquaintances
I met during freshman year
are now treasured friends.
Those professors I
despised for assigning too
much work in too little time
taught me responsibility and
accountability.
The job I took as a copy
editor al the school newspa-
per my sophomore year has
given me the opportunity to
play an active role in my uni-
versity community and has;
more than anything, clarified
the direction of my future.
And the school I chose for
all the wrong reasons now has
a special place in my heart.
ECU has proven educa-
tional in the experiences I've
been offered both in and out
of the classroom.
After four years of educa-
tion, I feel that I have been
taught the skills that will
ensure success in my future
endeavors.
Compared to journalism
schools across the country,
or even across the state,
the Strength or weakness of
my undergraduate program
is debatable�but my pro-
fessors made the best of it
and inspired me to do the
same.
Serving as editor-in-chief
of The East Carolinian is an
experience that is hard to ver-
balie, because to me, doing so
doesn't do it justice.
It's an experience that 1
wouldn't trade for anything in
the world, as it allowed me to
work with a talented and moti-
vated team of "ECU's finest
Living and breathing 7"�C for
the last year has allowed me
to learn a lot about myself and
other people.
Somewhere, amid all the
stories and pictures, this
experience taught me the
importance of teamwork.
Amid all the meetings
and deadlines I learned that
my opinion is not always the
right one.
And somewhere amid all
the complaints and concerns,
I developed the tools necessary
to make it in the "real world
For those students continu-
ing at ECU, my only advice can
be summed up in the some-
what clich6, but appropriate
adage, Carpe Diem.
Don't squander the oppor-
tunities that ECU has to offer.
It's never loo late to make the
most of your time here.
Each new school year holds
new promise, another year to
get better grades, another year
to become more involved,
another year to prove that
you can do whatever you set
your mind to.
Because the worst end to a
college career is looking back
and having no memories,
no moment when you took
a stand, no time when you
fought for your university to
be a better place.
ECU gave me the encour-
agement and the opportunity
to do these things. For these
reasons, I'm proud I'm a
Pirate.
Thank you, ECU.
Opinion Columnist
Coffee, Tea or Pee?
The diaperless baby
threatens sanitation
ANTHONY MCKEE
STAFF WRITER
Picture this if you can: You
are in a nice restaurant with your
significant other. You are sitting in
a secluded lxoth waiting for your
food to come. Solt music is quietly
playing over the speakers.
Your conversation is soft,
about nothing in particular. The
tone of voice, exchanged looks
and gentle touches leave no doubt
as to how the night will end. The
anticipation makes your stomach
flutter
Your food comes and you
begin acting.
Suddenly, a woman si reams,
jumps up. gtabs her baby and
runs down the aisle toward the
rest room (and you), holding the
child at arms length and howling
a drawn-out, anguished "N-o-o-
o-o-o You quickly see why.
Flowing Iron) the child, like
water through a hose, is a steady
stream of urine. You notice is
the woman gets closer that It is
spraying everywhere, left, right,
up, down, as the child is houm (d
around in the mother's mad
dash.
As they come closer to your
table, you both duck. A futile
effort.
As they pass and you both get
splashed, you notice your food
and drinks also being hosed.
Your appetites, and the amo-
rous evening, are ruined.
What would you do in such a
situation?
While the question and the
situation are rhetorical at the
moment, they may become rela-
tively common occurrences.
In response to the "disposable
diaper crisis" currently befalling
the world's landfills, some envi-
ronmentalists openly espoused
babies going diaperless during
the recent celebration ol the
!4th annual Earth Day.
It would appear (as stated by
People Smarter I han You) that
disposable diapers can take up
to S00 years to fully decompose
(I'll leave it to the imagination
as to how they got that figure).
Not only that, but they can take
up as much as one-half of one
percent all the way to almost 2
percent of landfill space.
Gasp!
Alright, to some people
those are daunting Statistics.
Still, it's no big deal, lust throw
Jack or Jill's little bottom into
cloth diapers and get on with
life. Problem solved, right?
Well, actually, no. Unless,
that is, you want to be seen as
one of the planets evil pollut-
ers (Re. conservatives) andor, as
one i reative individual phrased
it. part of "the Evil Empire of
Western Diapering
It seems thai the amount
ol laundry detergent and water
needed to clean those cloth
diapeis sends shivers of horror
down environmentalist spines
as well as giving them visions
of planet-wide disaster. And
since these people can't wait
lor science to invent a better
mousetrap err diaper; their
only solution is no diapers at all.
They see it as a "retro, cutting-
edge environmentally friendly
scheme
For those of you who are - or
plan to be- "good" parents, don't
fret. Everything has already been
figured out for you.
The organizations (and yes,
there are several) advocating the
diaperless approach have books,
instruction manuals, Web sites
and advice columns designed to
instruct ignorant parents.
While these can be verbose
and overly awed about primitive
toileting skills, they all boil down
to one basic philosophy: Get "in
tune" with your baby's bodily
signals and "hold them over
toilets, buckets and shrubbery or
any other convenient receptacle
when nature calls
And for those times when
you go out, bring along a tightly
lidded bucket for your little
bundle of joy.
Can you imagine the prob-
lems that would be created if
this idea caught on?
What would your neighbor,
or the local fast food joint man-
ager, have to say if they caught
you holding Jack over their
bushes because you missed "the
signal?" Or if you were eating and
Jill's earlier meal was being, shall
we say, evacuated with gusto? Or,
as first postulated, you got a warm
shower because the "timing" was
off? Who would willingly put up
with that?
Additionally, there are par-
ents who are either unwilling
or unable to potty train their
children now, with diapers. How
many stories have you heard
about children as old as five or
six and in school still wearing
diapers? What happens if they
don't wear diapers at all? Would
you want to send your children to
school under those conditions?
What about the cleanup
responsibilities? If you can't get
some people to clean up after
their pet (inside or outside) how
can you expect them to clean up
after their baby? Will we eventu-
ally have to look out for baby as
well as dog poop before we sit in
the park or on the beach?
Of course, the diaperless baby
is not the only toilet issue that
some environmentalists have an
inordinate interest in.
Some of the other intensely
interesting issues are the flush-
ing toilet (an "environmental
disaster" according to some)
and urinals.
That is why Al Gore is affili-
ated with a "waterless urinal"
manufacturer and there is a
strong push for acceptance of
"dry toilets" (These are boxlike
contraptions that, when you are
done, you have to cover your
waste with sand or some other
substance. Oh yeah, you also
have to empty them when they
are full).
There are phrases, both
psychological and cultural, for
people fixated on toilet issues.
All things considered, they seem
appropriate at the moment.
As crazy as this may sound,
these, and other equally absurd
ideas, have supporters, both
private and political. And even
ludicrous ideas can catch on.
Anybody hear of pet rocks or
the "Invisible pet"?
These people intend to force
their ideas on everyone else. They
believe that they know, and care,
more than you and me - that
they are right and everyone else
is stupid. That's a dangerous and
arrogant combination.
But getting back to diaper-
less babies, the day may well
come when that's an acceptable
practice.
If it does, you might as well
get into the habit now of carrying
a raincoat or umbrella with you
when you go out to eat.





42704
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A5
Exam Week (April 28 - May 5) Hours and Information
Group Exam Schedules
(he
CHEM1121, 1131,1151.1161
Monday, May 3 from 5 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
CHEM 0150, 1120,1130. 1150,1160
Friday. April 30 from 5 p m. - 7:30 p.m.
FREN 1002; GERM 1002; SPAN 1002,
1003
Wednesday, April 28 from 5 p.m. - 7:
30 p.m.
FREN 1101, 1103; GERM 1001; SPAN
1001, 1004
Tuesday, May 4 from 5 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
MATH 1065
Wednesday, May 5 from 5 p.m. - 7:30
p.m.
Dorm Closings
Students must leavetheirdorms by Saturday,
May 8 at 10 a.m. Students graduating
at this time have until 1 p.m. to leave
Libraries
A. J. Fletcher Music Library
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
8 a.m. - 10 p.m.
Friday, April 30 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday, May 1
Noon - 5 p.m.
Sunday, May 2
I p.m. - 10 p.m.
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
8 a.m - 10 p.m.
Joyner Library
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
24 hour operation
Friday, April 30
Close 9 p m.
Saturday, May 1
9 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Sunday, May 2
II a.m. - 24 hour operation
Tuesday, May 4
Close 2 a.m re-open 730 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Wednesday, May 5 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Laupus Library
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
730 a.m. - midnight.
Friday, April 30
7:30 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Saturday. May 1
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sunday, May 2
Noon - 10 p.m.
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
7:30 a.m. - midnight
Wednesday, April 28 - Tuesday, May 4
24-hour operation
Wednesday, May 5
Close 11 p.m
Mendenhall
Wednesday, April 28
7 a.m. - midnight
Thursday, April 29
7 a.m. - 1 a.m.
Friday, April 30 - Saturday, May 1
7 a.m. - 2 a.m
Sunday, May 2 - Wednesday, May 5
7 a.m. - midnight
Rawl
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Friday, April 30
8 a.m - 5 p.m.
Saturday, May 1 - Sunday, May 2
Closed
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday. May 5
7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Dining
Computer Labs
Austin
Center Court
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday. April 29
6:30 a.m. - 10: 30 p.m.
Friday, April 30
6:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Saturday. May 1
9:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Sunday, May 2
9:30 a.m - 1030 p.m.
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
6:30 a.m - 10:30 p.m.
Croatan
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
7 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Friday, April 30
7 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday, May 1 - Sunday, May 2
Closed
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
7 a.m. - 7 p.m
The Galley
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
7:30 a.m. - 1 a.m.
Friday, April 30
7:30 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Saturday, May 1
Noon. - 9 p.m.
Sunday, May 2
Noon -1 a.m.
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
7:30 a.m. - 1 a.m.
Mendenhall Dining Hall
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
7 a.m. - 9: 30 p.m 11 a.m. - 2 p.m 4:
30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday, April 30
7 a.m. - 9:30 p.m 11 a.m. - 2 p.m 4:30
p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 1
10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m 4:30 p.m. - 7:30
p.m
Sunday. May 2
10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m 4:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
7 a.m. - 9: 30 p.m 11 a.m. - 2 p.m 4:
30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
MSC Java City
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
7:30 a.m. - 10: 30 p.m.
Friday, April 30
730 a.m. - 1:30 am
Saturday. May 1
11:30 a.m. - 1:30 a.m.
Sunday. May 2
11:30 a.m. - 10:30 p.m
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
7:30 a.m. - 10:30 p.m.
Pirate Market
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
7 a.m. - 1 a.m.
Friday, April 30
7 a.m. - 10 p.m.
Saturday, May 1
Noon. - 10 p.m.
Sunday, May 2
Noon - 1 a.m.
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
7 a.m. - 1 a.m.
The Spot
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
8 a.m. - midnight
Friday, April 30
8 a.m. - midnight
Saturday, May 1 - Sunday, May 2
Noon - Midnight
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
8 a.m. - midnight
Todd Dining Hall
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
7 a.m - 9: 30 p.m 11 a.m. - 2 p.m
4:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday, April 30
7 a.m - 9:30 p.m 11 a.m. - 2 p.m
4:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 1
10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m 4:30 p.m. - 7:30
p.m.
Sunday, May 2
10:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m 4:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
7 a.m. - 9: 30 p.m 11 a.m. - 2 p.m
4:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.
The Wright Place
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
7:30 am - 9: 30 p.m.
Friday, April 30
7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday. May 1
10 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Sunday, May 2
Closed
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday. May 5
7:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Building Hours
Wednesday, April 28
7 a.m. - midnight
Thursday, April 29
7 a.m. - 1 a.m.
Friday, April 30
7 a.m. - 2 a.m
Saturday, May 1
Noon - 2 am.
Sunday, May 2
Noon - midnight
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday May 5
7 a.m. - midnight
Central Ticket Office
Wednesday, April 28-Friday April 30
9 a.m. -6 p.m.
Saturday. May 1 - Sunday, May 2
1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Monday. May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Bowling
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday. April 29
9 a.m. - midnight
Friday, April 30
1 p.m. - 1 a.m.
Saturday. May 1
Noon - 1 am
Sunday, May 2
1 p.m. - midnight
Monday, May 3 - Tuesday, May 4
9 a.m. - midnight
Wednesday, May 5
Closed
Billiards
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
9 a.m. - midnight
Friday, April 30
1 p.m. - 1 a.m.
Saturday, May 1
Noon - 1 a.m.
Sunday, May 2
1 p.m. - midnight
Monday. May 3 - Tuesday, May 4
9 a.m. - midnight
Wednesday, May 5
Closed
Student Recreation Center
Building Hours
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, Aril 29
6 am - 11:30 pm
Friday, April 30
6 am -10 pm
Saturday, May 1
9 am -10 pm
Sunday, May 2
9 am -11:30 pm
Monday, May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
6 a.m 11:30 p.m.
Adventure Center
Wednesday. April 28-Thursday. April 29
3 pm. -9 pm
Friday. April 30
3 p.m. - 6 p.m.
Saturday, May 1 -Sunday, May 2
Closed
Monday. May 3-Wednesday. May 5
3 p.m. - 9 p.m.
Book Stores
Dowdy Student Stores
Wednesday. April 28 - Thursday, April 29
7:30 a.m - 7 p.m.
Friday, April 30
7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday. May 1
11 a.m - 3 p.m.
Sunday, May 2
Closed
Monday. May 3 - Wednesday, May 5
730 a.m. - 7 p.m.
U.B.E.
Wednesday, April 28 - Thursday, April 29
9 am. - 7 p.m
Friday. April 30
9 a.m. - 6 p.m
Saturday, May 1
10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sunday, May 2
Closed
Monday. May 3 - Wednesday. May 5
9 a.m. - 7 p.m
Campus Offices
Student Health Services
Wednesday. April 28-Thursday. April 29
8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Friday, April 30
8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday, May 1 - Sunday, May 2
Urgent Care Only 9 a.m. - noon
Monday, May 3 - Tuesday, May 4
8 a.m. - 7 p.m.
Wednesday, May 5
8 a.m. - 5 p.m
Cashier's Office
Wednesday, April 28 - Friday, April 30
8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday, May 1-Sunday, May 2
Closed
Monday, May 3-Wednesday, May 5
8 a.m. - 5p.m.
Student Professional Development
Wednesday, April 28 - Friday, April 30
8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday, May 1-Sunday, May 2
Closed
Monday. May 3-Wednesday, May 5
8 a.m. - 5p.m
Its like having a
personal snapper far
year books.
It may seem early to think about fall semester book rush. But, by filling out one
simple form now, you can have your book buying done before you even get back
to campus in August. You'll have more time at the pool, catching up with friends,
or setting up your new place. Using Dowdy Student Stores' Textbook
Reservation Program is like having a personal shopper for your textbooks!
Sign up now for our TEXTBOOK RESERVATION PROGRAM!
We'll get your schedule, pull your books, box them up, and charge them to your
credit card, scholarship or financial aid deferment account. All you need to do
is pick them up!
No Lines No Crowds. No Worries.
W
'llrf Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support Scholars!
Wright Buiklng � wvwz.studentstores-ecu.edu
2523284731 � 177.499-TEXT
Stop in today, and pick up a
Textbook Reservation Form at the
Customer Service desk at Dowdy
Student Stores. Applications can be
returned by mail or in person.
Application deadline is August 1.
Valid ECU 1 Card or drivers license must be shown in order to pick up books. Check store web site for textbook reservation pick-up dates and locations. No hassle resular fall
semester textbook refund and exchanse policies apply when you save your receipt.
�J






PAGE A6
1KL LAST CAROLINIAN � NLWS
4-27-04
Memorial will be held to honor two students
Friends, family reflect
on fraternity members'
accomplishments
NICK HENNE
STAFF WRITER
Two fraternities are holding
a memorial service today at
6 p.m. in Wright Auditorium in
honor of their two brothers who
recently passed away.
The memorial will honor
James Thompson from Sigma
Alpha l.psilon and Nick Dragicev-
ich from I'hi kappa lau.
Kelly Thompson, James'
sister, said she and her family-
are coping with the loss day
by day.
"We just know lie's in a better
place we'll always have memo-
ries ol him said Kelly.
Parker Kowe, who was a i lose
Mend ot James, said his death
was a shock to many of the
fraternity brothers, and it rcalls
hit them hard at the Funeral. Ik-
said he feels he is affected by
lames death more than other
people because he was James'
RXKmnate, pledge brother and
best Friend,
"He had a i outstanding
personality. He would do any-
thing liu anybody said Kowe.
Parker said lames enjoyed
lisbing, intramural sports, and
s Ideo games.
James was a sophomore biol-
ogy major and was scry involved
in the fraternity.
W hen the I r.itiTii it sol
unteered With Children al I'itl
mints Memorial Hospital.
Janus "was alwa)i the tirst to
sign up said lake lane, junior
marketing major and president of
Sigma Alpha F.psilon fraternity.
Alls Shope, senior marketing
major, who svas a friend of Nick
Dragicevich from Phi Kappa lau,
said vshile it's a bad situation, she
is trying to remember the good
limes she had with Nick.
"It's kind ot shocking - you
hear about those things hap-
pening, but you don't expect it
to be one of your friends said
Shope
Shope said Dragicevich was
one of the friendliest people she
knew, and she hopes there is a
good turnout at the memorial
service.
Dragicevich would have been
graduating this May with a con-
struction management degree
and gone on to start his new job
in Virginia Beach.
"Any sort of unexpected
death like that is traumatic said
Joe Dragicevich, Nick's father.
"It doesn't make a lot ol
sense how something like this
could happen
Both of parents said they
hope some good can come of
the loss by teaching a lesson to
other college students.
This writer can be contacted at
newi@theeastcarolinian.com.
rt
Memorial Info
The memorial service wtll be
today at 6 p.m. In the Wright
Auditorium.
Selling books brings unexpected cash
Students can shop
around for best rate
KRISTIN DAY
STAFF WRITER
Now that the semes-
ter has ended, it's time to
sell that book you use to
prop up your table. But
getting rid of your books is
not about saving space; sell-
ing books back is about getting
the most money possible.
Book buy back started
yesterday and will run until
the last day of exams on
May 3.
Director of Dowdy Student
Stores Wanda Scarborough
said students receive half
the price the store will
sell the book for next
semester.
However, the bookstore
can only take back a cer-
tain number of each text.
Waiting until the last day
to take a book back might
result in a new addition to
your bookshelf.
Textbook Manager of
UBE. Tony Parker said his
store does not take books the
professor does not request.
He also said the store will
not accept books that
have no national wholesale.
I'arker said if UBE can use
a book next semester, they
will give the student SO per-
cent of the purchase price
back.
UBE will extend its hours
during the book buy back
period, and Dowdy has trail-
ers set up around campus for
students' convenience.
If you miss the deadline
to sell back, Scarborough
said Dowdy always buys used
books. Selling them back at a
later time, however, may result
in a loss of money
Scarborough also said there
is a small possibility thai a
book could be bought back
next semester it students still
need it.
Another option many stu-
dents are trying is selling their
books on the Internet.
I Kay and Amazon.com
a I low users to sell books directly
to other students and get
a fair amount of money in
return.
But it pays to
read the line print.
Cheapbooks.com is part
of Amazon. The Web site
says putting an item in its
marketplace doesn't cost "until
your item sells "
After someone buys
the book, Amazon
receives 99 cents plus a sales
fee.
TeXtbookX.com is another
book selling Web site.
It claims sellers tail reirise
up to WO percent more
than typical buy back piiies.
During the week of
Other sites, such as
ecampus.com, will buy
the book from owners
themselves. Most of these places
oiler free shipping and will
pay what the book is Worth. In
some cases, if the' text is in high
many ECU students return their books in hopes of pocketing extra spending money.
teacher to inform their class
demand, the amount increases.
I he people at bookbyte.com
offer an additional 10 percent
for in-store credit. They also
accept lab manuals and study
guides as long as they can be
used again.
Phis is especially useful
if Dowdy or UBE will not
take a book back because
the accompanying CD is
missing.
IF every other option falls,
you may try asking your
next semester that they can
buy the required text
from you for a cheaper
price than bookstores.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcaroiinian.com.
SUMMER BINGO
APRIL 27TH @9:30PM
HUGE ICE CREAM BAR!





4-27-04
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4-27-04
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J
Alumni Association announces
2004 service award winners
Three people honored
for commitment to ECU
LUKE SPENCER
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Alumni Association
announced it would recognize
three North Carolinians in 2004
for their dedication and service
to ECU.
Two different types of awards
will he jjivon: The Distinguished
Service Award and two I lonorary
Alumni Awards.
The Distinguished Service
Award is one of the most presti-
gious giver by ECU to its alumni.
According to the Alumni
Association, the award "recog-
nizes individuals who attended
ECU and have demonstrated
exceptional loyally and sup-
port" to the university. This
year's Distinguished Service
Award recipient is Betty Speir.
Speir, a 1963 ECU graduate
who received her master's degree
in educational administration, is
a retired guidance counselor. She
worked at North Pitt High School,
served on the ECU Board of
Trustees from 1995-2003 and is a
former member of the North Car-
olina State Board of Education.
In addition to Speir's Dis-
tinguished Service Award, the
Alumni Association also pre-
sented Honorary Alumni Awards
to James "Jim" Black, speaker of
the North Carolina Mouse of
Representatives, and to Betty
Debnam, a former teacher and
the creator and editor of The
Mini Page.
The Honorary Alumni Award
is given to individuals who did
not attend ECU but have shown
loyalty and support of the uni-
versity.
Black was selected for rec-
ognition because of his support
for the proposed cardiovascular
institute at ECU.
Debnam was selected
because of her long service to
the university. She was inducted
into the College of Education's
Hall of I'ame in 2003 and has
agreed to fund two recent uni-
versity initiatives: the Debnam
Early Literacy Resource (ienter in
Joyner Library and the Debnam
Early Literacy Scholarship in the
College of Education.
"These three recipients exem-
plify service to their community
and service to this institution,
and we are gratified to be able to
recogniethat service said Paul
Clifford, associate vice chancel-
lor for Alumni Relations.
The Alumni Association will
formally present the awards at
the annual Awards Ceremony
May 7 at the Greenville Hilton.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Five graduates honored for
exemplifying ECU excellence
Recipients to be
recognized during
commencement
DANIEL SHUMAN
STAFF WRITER
I :ive seniors will be given the
Robert II. Wright Alumni Leader-
ship Award at ECU's commence-
ment ceremony Saturday. May 8.
Drew Edward Davis, Gail
Kennedy. Daphne Harrington,
Kevin Lamm and l.eanne Smith
will receive the prestigious
honor.
Kennedy, a 52-year-old
mother of two, said, "I feel very
honored to receive this award. I
guess being dedicated to what I
was trying to achieve helped me
earn it
After raising two children
who graduated from college
and now work in Raleigh, Ken-
nedy left her job as a teach-
ing assistant to finish her
education as an elementary edu-
cation major.
In addition to keeping up a
household in Johnson County,
she got an apartment in
Creenville to make it easier for
her to attend school, Kennedy
said. She graduates with a 4.0
GPA and has already begun her
new career, having been released
early from student teaching
requirements to take a full-time
first grade teaching position.
According to the Alumni
Center, Davis and Lamm
will both finish their
undergraduate studies with a
degree in economics with minors
in business administration and
business, respectively.
Davis plans to attend BSOM.
Smith, who will continue at ECU
in graduate school, is an English
major
'These five students exem-
plify what ECU is about ECU is
proud to welcome them into the
Alumni Association said Paul
Clifford, associate vice chancel-
lor for Alumni Relations.
He said the only hard-set
standard of qualification for the
award is that the student have a
GPA of 3.5 or higher, and that he
or she be nominated by a faculty
member.
The award recognizes not
only the students' academic suc-
cess, but also their contribution
to the surrounding community.
Collectively, this year's
recipients have volunteered
with organizations such as
Meals on Wheels, the Humane
Society, Diabetes Association,
Relay for Life, Department of
Social Services, Read Across
America and several others.
Some of them may continue to
volunteer after they graduate.
"I've volunteered for
Habitat for Humanity for the
past two years almost every
Saturday, and I plan to keep
doing it after graduation said
Harrington.
The commencement cer-
emony at which the recipients
will be recognized takes place
at Williams Arena in Minges
Coliseum at 2 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at
news�theeastcarolinian. com.
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PAUL A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
4 27-04
Funding approved
for organizations
With gays, lesbians in mind, straight couples
choose domestic partnership over marriage
SGA senators meet for the last time this semester.
SGA to keep student fee
STEPHEN RICE
STAFF WRITER
Campus organizations
who were approved for Stu-
dent Government Association
funding will receive their
money.
In the last SGA meeting,
senators approved $375,000 in
lunds for 82 organizations.
I he niirease from the previ-
ous year brought concerns over
whether the budget would be
sufficient.
However, in Monday's meet-
ing senior political science
major loseph Payne reported to
senators that the organizations
wonkl receive their appropria-
tions.
In addition, SGA will be
able to keep its student fee of
S16.S0 per student, which was a
propoted method of meeting the
increased funding needs.
In other business, sena-
tors discussed a resolution in
support of National PanHellenic
organizations having plots on
campus.
Plots are areas or objects
on campuses that recognize
these groups. They can be a
decoration of the group's
colors on trees or even park
benches or blocks on the
ground.
The NPHC is made of the
"divine nine" historically black
fraternities and sororities.
Senators voted and passed
the resolution.
This writer can be contacted at
news&theeastcarolinian. com.
-8 NOT IliOUOH ��t in our ,r��"N
NO WONDER PEOPLE THINK
MARTHA GRAHAM
IS A SNACK CRACKER.
CHICAGO (AP) � As same-
sex couples fight for their right
to marry, some straight couples
- who could marry if they
wanted to - are deciding against
it. Instead, they're registering as
"domestic partners an option
offered by some cities and coun-
ties, mainly with gay and lesbian
couples in mind.
National statistics aren't
available, since some munici-
palities don't track domestic
partners' gender or make their
registries public. But experts art-
noting early signs that, while
the marriage rate continues
to decline, these alternative
arrangements are piquing some
straight couples' interest
Some heterosexuals, follow-
ing a trend already popular in
such countries as Sweden and
France, choose domestic partner-
ship for practical reasons.
Christopher Price and Bonnie
Fletcher, both 25, did so In New
York City last fall so they could
qualify for student housing for
couples at Mount Sinai School of
Medicine, where they are gradu-
ate students.
Not ready to marry, Price
calls their decision "a good, first,
small step
"The first thing you do is you
move in. The next thing you do
is get a dog he says, chuckling.
"And then you'll find out who's
responsible or not
Others are making a political
statement as a show of support
for same-sex couples who don't
have the same option. And some
groups, led by heterosexuals, are
even calling for a "marriage boy-
cott" to protest a proposed con-
stitutional amendment defining
the institution as between a
woman and a man.
"1 just don't think the state
should be in the position of sanc-
tioning who should be a family
and who shouldn't says Jenni-
fer Gaboury, another New Yorker.
She and Jacob Goldfinger,
both i.i, registered as a domestic
partners last year and, instead of
having a wedding, invited family
and friends to their "commitz-
vah The ceremony included
the traditional Jewish breaking
of the glass after they exchanged
vows. But there was no minister
or justice of the peace and no
marriage license.
Gaboury says she arrived at
her decision not to marry in col-
lege, after realizing that a lesbian
To support gay friends who cannot get married, straight couples are opting for u
nons.
friend couldn't do so. Goldfinger
grew to share her views. He says
getting married "would have
been like eating at a segregated
lunch counter
Those calling for a marriage
boycott applaud the decision,
even if dissuading couples from
legally tying the knot is dif-
ficult.
So far, Phoebe Rosenberg
Jones - a straight, single, 26-
year-old from Los Angeles, who
recently posted the site Boycott-
marriage.com - says she's per-
suaded one couple to postpone
their wedding and has others
considering it.
"I would just like to get more
straight people engaged in the
issue - no pun intended says
Rosenberg Jones, whose opposi-
tion to a constitutional amend-
ment inspired her to act.
Dorian Solot says she's also
heard from several couples who
are boycotting marriage. She's
executive director of the Alter-
natives to Marriage Project, a
nonprofit that provides infor-
mation and support to couples
who don't wish to marry - and
that posted its own boycott page
last month.
"It becomes clearer every
day that when it comes to rela-
tionships and families, there's
no one size that fits all says
Solot, who is registered as a
domestic partner with her
longtime companion, Marshall
Miller. They live in Albany, NY,
and recently celebrated, as Solot
calls it, their 11th "unmarried
anniversary
Frank Furstenberg, a sociolo-
gist at the University of Pennsyl-
vania, says it's not surprising I hat
some couples - especially young
ones - are shunning marriage
"as a sign of solidarity" with
their lesbian and gay peers. In
fact, he wonders if pushing the
"one man, one woman" defini-
tion might only further the
trend.
"We are genuinely running
the risk of making marriage
uncool says Furstenberg, a
senior research scholar at the
Council on Contemporary
families.
But David Popenoc, a sociolo-
gist who tracks marriage trends,
calls the idea of a marriage boy-
cott "idiotic
As co-director of the National
Marriage Project at Rutgers Uni-
versity, he argues that the focus
should be on creating more
stable and committed relation-
ships - gay or straight.
"My concern about that is
children. The less stable the
relationship, the worse it is
for children he says. Choos-
ing domestic partnership over
marriage, he contends, often
"represents a decline in com-
mitment
Marion Willctts - a sociolo-
gist at Illinois State University
who has surveyed straight
domestic partners - argues that
that's not always the case.
But she says couples who
choose domestic partnership
need to do more to define their
relationships legally. She found,
for instance, that those she sur-
veyed had done little to prepare
for the death of a partner or a
potential break up.
"It concerned me she says.
"There wasn't a lot of plan-
ning for the future
FREE
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Wright Place (back dining areal
Mon April 26 - Thurs April 298:00 am to 7:00 pm
Fri April 308:00 am to 5:00 pm
Sat May 111:00 am to 3:00 pm
Mon May 3 - Wed May 58:00 am to 7:00 pm
College Hill. Speight & Mendenhall
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Mon April 26 - Fri April 308:30 am to 5:00 pm
Mon May 3 - Wed May 58:30 am to 5:00 pm
The Galley
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Student Stores
Wright Building � 328 - 6731 � www.studentstores.ccu.edu
45 Mi
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PAGE A9
m TUt tAST CAHOUNIAN
4-27-04
CLASSIFIEDS
TO PLACE AN AD
Come by The East Carolinian office
on the second floor of the Student Publications Building
(above the cashiers office)
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
RATES
Students (w valid ID) $2 for 25 words or fewer
Non-students $4 for 25 words or fewer
5d per word over 25
All classified ads must be prepaid.
DEADLINES
Thursday at 4 p.m. for the next Tuesday's paper
Friday at 4 p.m. for the next Wednesday's paper
Monday at 4 p.m. for the next Thursday's paper
F0RAFI1I
Pirate's Cove, Available Now, Sublet
furnished apartment. Special Price:
S325 all included. Call now 919-
846-7360.
Need someone to take over lease for
May-July. Special offer $300mo.
Regular $360. Pirate's Cove Arts.
Call leremy at 910-367-1527.
3 bedroom, 2 bath duplex, Meade
St walk to campus, hardwood
floors, ceiling fans, washerdryer, all
kitchen appliances, large frontback
yard, attic and storage shed. J675
month. Call 341-4608.
Melbourne Park upscale one
bedroom for rent. Cathedral ceiling,
balcony, dishwasher, walk-in closet.
New, quiet neighborhood on
Wimbledon Drive. NO DEPOSIT,
April rent paid. (252)717-7173.
1, 2, 3, 4, 5 bedroom houses and
duplexes. Available Fall 2004. ALL
walking distance from ECU. Call
531-5701
3 bedroom house located 2 blocks
from ECU, 1211 Cotanche, nice,
clean, fenced backyard, available
now. Call 355-3248 or 355-7939.
Nice Duplex, 2 bedroom convenient
to ECU, S595month, available June
1st, pets OK w deposit, fenced
backyard. Call 355-3248
Stratford Villas 3 bedroom, 3 bath
houses for rent. Located across from
baseball stadium. All appliances
including washerdryer, security
systems, private patios. $1050 per
month. Call Chip at 355-0664.
3 bd & 1 ba Duplex for rent. Located
on Stancil and close to campus.
Features include kitchen appliances
including new washer and dryer,
and fenced backyard. Pets OK with
negotiable fee. $660.00 per month.
752-6859
Spacious two-bedroom duplex
with large living room and eat-in
kitchen with washer and dryer.
Duplex includes large deck and off
street parking. Water and sewer
included in rent. $475 per month.
Available August 1st. Call 752-5536
for appointment.
pinebrook apt. 758-4015- 1&2 BR
apts, dishwasher, CD, central air
& heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or 12
month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, & cable.
Apartment Available May 3 on
campus, Ringgold Towers. Fully
furnished, near downtown. Sublease
through July 31. Lease renewable.
$450mo. Asking $350mo. OBO.
758-5266 or (910)309-5549.
417 W 3rd Street, 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
dining room, living room, w garage,
washerdryer included, available 8
104, no pets, $650 mo excellent
condition, 2 blocks from campus, call
252-327-4433
Houses and apartments for rent near
campus. 3,4, and 5 bedroom houses
available. 1 bedroom apartments
available. Call (252)353-5107.
For rent: Upscale 3 BR3 Bath Near
campus, only if you like the BEST!
Call 252-561-7368 or 561-7679 or
dayle@bellsouth.net
Pre-Register for spacious 2 and
3 bedroom townhouses. Full
basement, enclosed patio WD hook-
up, no pets. 752-7738 daytime 7:30
to 4:30.
Near ECU & downtown- 12 block
from ECU, 2 blocks from downtown.
4 bedrooms, 2 bath, very large 2
story house, very nice, central HVAC,
all appliances. $1400 month. 252-
717-6551. Lease to begin Aug. 2004
(possibly sooner)
Anyone looking to move into Pirate's
Cove now please contact Brenda at
704-202-2775 or 252-885-0097.
Rent includes everything, $360
month, available now or May 1st.
Now Preleasing For Fall Semester-
1,2 and 3 bedrooms. All units close
to ECU. Cypress Gardens, jasmine
Gardens, Peony Gardens, Gladiolus
Garden, Wesley Commons North,
Park Village, Cotanche Street, Beech
Street Villas and Woodcliff. Water and
sewer included with some units. Pets
allowed in some units with fee. For
more information contact Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
Great Place! Walk to campus and
bars. 2 bedroom, newly renovated,
located on Holly Street off 1 st street.
CHEAP! CHEAP! $425 a month.
Available NOW! Call 258-6776
Wyndham Circle Duplex- 2 bedrm2
bath, great condition, wd hook-ups,
popular student location, deck, best
lot in Wyndham (919)847-7410,
(919)630-5930.
Blocks to ECU, 1,2,3 bedrooms, all
appliances, central heatAC, see
collegeuniversityrentals.com or call
321-4712.
Three bedroom, 12 block from
campus, 2 bath. $950month. 252-
341-8331
Apartment for rent in Wilson Acres
for $325 a month. You would take
over lease as soon as possible. Please
contact me at 919-389-8367.
Immaculate TownHouse, 2 BR, 2
BA, Safe neighborhood in G'ville,
convenient, all appliances, no pets,
pool, tennis, fenced patio, $700mo.
919-734-4267: Day and 919-735-
8106: Night.
Tired of noisy neighbors above and
below in apartments? Maplewood
Properties has duplexes for rent. 2
bedrooms, 1 bathroom with central
air, stove, refrigerator, and WD
hookups. Conveniently located off
10th street behind Papa John's.
$450 per month. No Pets. Call 752-
6186 ext. 205. Call now limited units
available
Near ECU & downtown- 12 block
from ECU, 2 blocks from downtown.
3 bedroom, 2 12 bath, new carpet,
central HVAC, all appliances, $875
month. 252-717-6551. Lease to
begin Aug. 2004.
Apt. for rent starting in Fall semester.
2 bedroom Si 1 bath, 12 block from
ECU and 2 blocks from downtown,
all appliances, central HVAC, nice St
clean. $62.5month. Call 252-717-
6557.
Dockside Duplex 3 BDRM, 2 Bath.
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Blast letters
4 Appraise
8 Automatons
14 Flying saucer
15 Lena of
"Havana"
16 Old Testament
prophet
17 More morose
19 Marina of "Star
Trek: TNG"
20 Indigo or woad
21 Naive idealists
23 Lofty
25 Rule of an
organization
26 Four six-packs
27 Tavern brew
28 Cheap liquor
29 Disney and
Whitman
30 John and Benny
32 Periodical, briefly
33 Putting in a
warehouse
34 Underground
chambers
38 Period
39 Predicted
40 Invigorating
43 Wife of Niles
Crane on
"Frasier"
44 Costello or
Ferrigno
45 Male sheep
46 Principal artery
47 Yin and
48 Limb
50 Corded fabric
51 Lodged
52 Female
monsters
56 Reciprocal
57 A Diamond
58 Marie Saint
59 Siberian plain
60 TV sports award
61 Cub quarters
DOWN
1 Harbor boat
2 Org. of Giants
3Ta-ta
4 European capital
5 The Greatest
i 2001 Tribune Media Servicn. Inc
All rights reserved
6 Coloring hippie-
style
7 Signs on
8 Plant new seeds
9 Musical medley
10 Avian abodes
11 Bony
12 Eager desire
13 Mouths off
18 Popeye's Olive
22 Guy's sweetie
23 Some putouts
24 Scads
25 Bob Hope film,
"Call Me "
28 Knowing smile
29 Signals bye-bye
31 Dons fancy duds
32 "West Side
Story" song
34 Retinues
35 Backslid
36 Light gas
37 Close-fitting
39 Approaching the
end
40 "Tragic Overture"
Solutions
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composer 47 Sure thing!
41 Communicate by 49 Tide type
tapping
42 Attribute to a
cause
43 Extinct bird
46 Muddle
50 Depend
53 Tear
54 Actress Arden
55 Luis Obispo,
CA
1-unit available immediately, 1
building w 2 units side by side-
available August 3, 2004. Got 6
friends who want to room? This
is ideal! Call eff @ 252-327-4433.
WasherDryer included, no pets.
Two BR one bath recently
renovated duplex beside Town
Commons 111B and 113 Holly
Street. Central heatair. Easy walk
to ECU. $425month. 258-6776.
Twin Oaks townhouse, 2 BR, 1 12
bath, end unit on ECU campus bus
route. Patio, pool, WD hook-up.
$575 per month. Call 864-346-
5750 or 864-228-3667.
Apartment Sublease for summer
(June Si July, May if possible).
Pirate's Cove, $360 per month,
furnished, includes all utilities
except telephone. Also, two
basketball courts, two computer
labs, beach volleyball, tanning
beds, and game room. Please call
252-725-3168
Near ECU St downtown- 3
blocks from ECU, 5 blocks from
downtown. 5 bedroom, 2 bath,
newly remodeled, nice St clean,
all appliances, 2 kitchens, central
HVAC downstairs and window AC
upstairs. $1325 month. 252-717-
6551. Lease to begin Aug. 2004
Large one bedroom, one block
from campus, $400month. 704-
953-8739
Now Preleasing for Fall Semester-
1,2 and 3 bedroom duplexes 6t
townhouses. College Towne Row,
Verdant Street, Cannon Court,
Cedar Court, Lewis Street and
2nd Street. All units close to ECU.
Pets allowed in some units with
fee. For more information contact
Wainright Property Management
756-6209.
Pirate's Cove Apartment sub-
lease available for June and July,
only $250 per month! Call Matt is
interested 732-718-9375
Looking for a Summer Apartment?
Subleasing a Master Bedroom in a
3 bedroom, 3 bathroom apartment
at Riverwalk. Rent is $351, but
willing to be flexible and lower
price by helping with payment.
Please call Karri at (252)531-5162
for details.
Three bedroom duplex for rent
near ECU. Available immediately.
Rent $618-Call 752-6276.
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015-1 Si 2 BR
apts, dishwasher, GD, central air
Si heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or 12
month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, St cable.
Female roommate wanted to
sublease bedroom in four bedroom
four bathroom apartment in Pirate's
Cove for the summer andor next
year. One roommate is staying.
May pick other roommates or pot
luck. Summer rent is $360 and next
year's rent is $370. Please respond
a.s.a.p. Cara 252-413-6991 or cell
301-814-7748.
Next school year Aug. 2004-Aug.
2005, Pirate's Cove $370month,
everything included, 3 Christian
roommates. Contact Brandon at
329-9174 or 919-270-6683
18 yr. old male seeking male
roommate for 2 bedroom
apartment. 12mo. lease starts
next Aug. @ RiverPointe Village,
all-inclusive, furnished $450mo.
Quiet, studious, non-smoker, non-
drinker, no pets. 919-608-2514 or
bab0824@mail.ecu.edu
Two Rooms for rent, furnished or
unfurnished, $275 a month not
including utilities, phone, cable,
close to campus. Call 329-0761.
Female Roommates, 2 needed to
share 3 BR Condo. Each BR has
private bath and phonecomputer
connections, appliances include
washer and dryer, 5 blocks E. of
campus (flood free). $300 per
month and share electricity 752-
3262
Roommate needed for summer
and fall. 2 blocks from campus.
$242 per month plus half utilities.
2 BD 1 BA serious inquires only.
Call 758-4774, leave message.
FOR SflLt
For sale: 5 piece sectional sofa,
includes two recliners, one pullout
bed, neutral color, good condition.
$250 or OBO 756-0723
washerdryer lor sale $200.00
for both. Call 412-7051. Ask for
lessica.
Matching couch and loveseat tor
sale. $150 tor both pieces. Must sell
by May 8th Call 910-770-2909 or
email at agb0429@mail.ecu.edu
ECU Volunteer Center
Connecting Comput and Community.
I 10 Chrisienbury Gym
328-2735 � volunteer@mail.ecu.edu
The most dangerous
animals in Ihe forest .
I don't live there.
HELP 111TED
Child Care for 312 year old girl to begin
ASAP. Pool available, Winterville area.
Flexible schedule. Call 321-0484.
Loving babysitter needed for infant
boy. Monday-Friday, 8:30a.ml:
00p.m. all summer. Hours beyond
summer more flexible $6.50ttour.
Non-smoker, reliable car, references.
Please leave message, 329-0101.
Spanish-speaking childcare needed
for 3-year-old boy. Native speaker
preferred. References required. Will
need transportation to Farmville.
20 hoursweek starting in May. Call
753-6357.
Responsible sitterchauffeur needed for
three boys age 7, 11, 15. After school
TuTh and summer TuWTh, 25 hours
week. Near campus. Male applicants
welcome! 758-6787.
Wanted- Nanny to keep two children
in our home; refeiences required; 8-6
during summer months, 12-6 during
school; call 752-6933 and leave
message.
Lifeguards needed. Myrtle Beach
now and summer. Good pay St
conditions. Call 843-448-9122 or
email ehuggins@sc.rr.com.
Female dancers wanted for spring
summer night club, 9 p.m 2 a.m
not nude or topless dancing. Must be
at least 18 yrs. old. Call 347-9770 or
341-8270.
Summer work $12.25 guarantee
appointment. Flexible schedules,
great resume experience. No
experience needed. Salesservice.
Conditions apply. Call 353-6860.
worktorstudents.com
Food Delivery Drivers wanted lor
Restaurant Runners. Part-time
positions (6-12hr. including tips.)
Perfect for college students! Some
luiu h time (11a-2pm) M-F availability
required. 2 �ay radios allow you ro
be anywhere in Greenville when not
on a delivery. Reliable transportation
a must and knowledge of Greenville
streets advantageous. Call 756-5527
or check out our website @ www.re
staurantrunners.com. Sorry no dorm
students.
Looking for the best summer of your
life? Camp Easter Seals in Virginia has
job openings for camp counselors and
program leaders (aquatic, horseback
riding, music, nature, sports, and
more). Work with children and adults
with disabilities at one of our beautiful
camping facilities. Staff members
come from across the US and around
the world. Room, board and salary
provided. For information contact
Lauren Lightfoot at (804)633-9855 or
lightfoot@va.easter-seals.org
Seeking Mystery Shoppers! Perfect for
students. Flexible work from home or
school. FTPT. Make your own hours.
Call toll free 800-816-9590.
Finally! Earn $5 in 10 mins each week @
brandport.com! Watch ads, earn cash.
Free registration.
Tutornanny needed- for ages 12,
11, St 7, minimum 3.0 GPA, strong
in math skills, non-smoker, reliable
vehicle, good driving record, flexible
hours, some cooking. Call 752-1572
lor interview
Wanted! Reliafjle, honest, energetic
people to monitor crops. From May
through August, 2004. We train!
Must have own dependable vehicle.
Learn to ID insects, weeds and
other field conditions. No Nights.
Hourly pay i mileage. Must be 19
or have 1 year of college. Mail or fax
resume with cover letter and work
experience to : MCSI, POB 370, Cove
City, NC 28523 Fax: 252-637-2125
mmt lawhorn@mc siag.com
Lifeguards, pool managers, coaches
ARE YOU
NOT IF YOU
www.shareyourlife org
1-800-355-SHARE
I Coeeon or O19V11 Tmjt tanNon

FREE
� of poor maintenance response
� of unrelurned phone calls
� of nois) neighbors
� of crawl) critters
�of high Utility bills
� of BCD parking hassles
� of ungrateful landlords
� of unanswered questions
� of high rents
� of grumps personnel
� of unfulfilled promises
� of units thai were not cleaned
� of walls that were never painted
� of appliances that don't work
Wyndham Court &
Kastgatc Village Apts.
3200 F Muscles Dr.
1561-RENT or 531-9011
www.pimiuck property
management, com
MONITORED NIGHTLY BY SECURITY
SUMMER
WORK
� Great Pay
� Great Experience
� Close To Campus
� No Canvassing
� No Cold Calling
� Sales Service
� Conditions Apply
Call Now: 353-6860
Apply Online
www.worksforstudents.com
in Greenville, Farmville, Wilson,
Atlantic Beach. Call Bob Wendling
714-0576.
Congratulations to Kappa Delta's
graduating seniors; Stephanie
Sanders, (enny Mann, Allison Brognia,
Amanda Gibbons, Alana Herod,
Christina Call, Lindsey D'Emilio,
Allison Cowan, Christi Lewis, and
Danielle Mershon. We love you all
and will miss you very much!
Congratulations to Ian Baer on being
Kappa Delta's 2004 Daggerman!
Thanks for all of your help and
support. Love the sisters of Kappa
Delta.
The sisters of Kappa Delta would
like to congratulate the Formal
Committee for being our sisters of
the week. You did an excellent job
girls, we all had a blast!
oie
Elementary School teacher looking
for donated computer or will
purchase if necessary. 341-1183,
leave message.
Full Time Students Stop wasting
your Time and Talents on PT obs
with bad hrs. & pay LOOK! For
1 weekend a month the National
Guard wants you to go to college,
FREE TUITION! Learn a job skill k
stay a student! FT students get over
J800mo in Education Benefits Sr, PAY
for more info. CALL 252-916-9073 or
visitwww.1-800-GO-GAURD.com
The Ledonia Wright Cultural Center
will sponsor an Open House on
Thursday, April 29,2004 between the
hours of 12 noon and 2 p.m. You are
cordially invited to come by and visit
with us, see the Cultural Center and
its resources, have light refreshments,
and meet other students, faculty, and
staff. Door prizes will also be available
lor students. We are located next to
Greene Hall.
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PAGEA10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
4-27-04


yvev roirttC'
Village kpAKTMtms
Welcome to River Pointe Village Apartment - the new student community that i all about student!
Conveniently located adjacent to the Eaat Carolina University Campus, River Pointe Village's fully
furnished apartments feature all the comforts a student needs to feel at home when you're studying
and when you're nok Our all-inclusive rent means your electricity, water, cable and internet access
are all in one emy payment! We feature a study lab with internet access, full-tize washers & dryers, a
fitness center, basketball & volleyball courts, a swimming pool, tanning beds and much more! Plus
we're located on the ECU shuttle route! Call or visit us online for more information!
Community Amenities
� A vaulted living room and reception area
� All-inCluSive rent (electricity, water, cable 6 internet access)
� A fully furnished model unit
� Tanning beds
� A multi-purpose game & recreational room
� A fully equipped fitness room
� High-tech, 247 internet accessible
study hall area
� Pool and courtyard patio area
� Basketball and volleyball courts
� Designated parking per unit
� Located on the ECU shuttle route
2 Bedroom � 923 sqft 3 Bedroom � 1,225 sqft 4 Bedroom � 1,385 sqft
Ambling Management Company
P�oreuioNAU.v Manaocd By:
v, y. river
Unit Features:
� Fully furnished floorplans
� Large balcony w locking storage
� Broadband internet and cable
connections in every bedroom
� Full-size washer and dryer
� Ceiling fans
� Built-in study areas
� Private bathrooms JL at
� Much more! ��
A'jf- . o m
2)758-8002
Community amenities
CAMPUS0POINTE
2 and 3 Bedroom Apartments
Visit our leasing office at
2230 NE Greenville Blvd.
252.758.6766
www.campus-pointe.com
campuspointe.ecu@pickeringandco.com
Conveniently located near the intersection
of 10th and Greenville Boulevard.
�spacious clubhouse with fitness center
� comfortable lounge with large flat
screen TV & Playstation
�game room with billiards, air hockey &
foosball
� computer media center
�swimming pool with hot tub
�beach volleyball
�on ECU bus route
Apartment features:
�fully equipped kitchens
(i.e. dishwashers, microwave & disposal)
� private bedrooms & private baths
�washer & dryer included
�high-speed internet access included
�cable TV included
� individual 10 and 12 month lease available
� all utilities included except phone service
($75mo electricity allowance 2bd. apt.)
($105mo electricity allowance 3bd. apt.)
S
The way college life should be.
�iprtfiTTil






4-27-04
PAGE C1
427 04
Athletics Year in Review
SPORTS
RYAN DOWNEY
Sports Editor
TONY ZOPPO
Assistant Sports Editor
sports@trieeastcarollnlan.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
Free Group Fitness Classes
Students who are overwhelmed by the end of semester are invited to come
out to the SRC and relieve stress by joining in on free group fitness classes
from April 28 - May 8. See class schedule for specific times.
For more information, call 328-6387
Sports Briefs
Manning Involved in draft day swap
In one of the more bizarre first hours in recent NFL draft history, Eli Manning
was taken with the first pick by the San Diego Chargers on Saturday,
for whom he later announced he wouldn't play An hour later, the Giants
obtained him for another quarterback, Philip Rivers, who they had taken
with the fourth overall pick. Meanwhile, the rest of the draft went on around
that soap opera. With the second pick, Oakland took offensive tackle
Robert Gallery of Iowa and with the third, Arizona chose wide receiver
Larry Fitzgerald of Pittsburgh, a ball boy for Cardinals coach Dennis Green
when Green coached in Minnesota. Not only did the Chargers get Rivers,
who completed 72 percent of his passes last season at NC State, but they
also got the Giants' third-round pick this year and their first and fifth next
season
Collins expects to be ex-Giant real soon
Having failed to trade Kerry Collins on Saturday, the New York Giants
reportedly are close to cutting ties with their quarterback of five years
Newsday reported that Giants general manager Ernie Accorsi laid out a
plan to restructure Collins' contract during a Monday morning meeting
and that Collins refused. Collins is owed $7 million in 2004 and the club is
unable and unwilling to keep him at that price after trading for Eli Manning
during Saturday's first round of the NFL Draft, Newsday reported. Collins
told the newspaper he left the meeting with Accorsi with the impression
he would be released later this week. Collins, a 1996 Pro Bowl selection,
struggled last season, throwing for 3.110 yards with 13 touchdowns and
16 interceptions while starting In 13 games. New York ended the 2003
campaign with a 4-12 record.
Chiefs trade for Eagles OL Welbourn
Disgruntled Eagles guard John Welbourn got his wish. The Eagles dealt
the offensive lineman to the Kansas City Chiefs on Sunday for a fifth-round
pick in this year's draft and a fourth-rounder in 2005. Eagles coach Andy
Reid said next year's selection becomes a third-rounder if Welbourn plays
half of the Chiefs' snaps during the upcoming season. Welbourn told the
Eagles earlier this month that he was unhappy with his contract situation
and wanted a new deal When the team refused, Welbourn asked to be
dealt. He then made his displeasure with the organization public Friday in a
radio interview, during which he questioned coach Andy Reid's recent drafts
The 6-foot-5,318-pound Welbourn could fill the Chiefs' void at right tackle,
which was left when John Tait signed with the Chicago Bears as a free
agent. The Eagles selected Welbourn in the fourth round of the 1999 draft
and he became a starter at left guard the following season. His departure
breaks up a group that has started together for the last four seasons.
Woes didn't impact Rams pick of Smoker
The St Louis Rams found no conflict in drafting a quarterback with a
history of substance abuse one day after defensive end Leonard Little was
arrested on suspicion of drunk driving charges. Coach Mike Martz selected
Jeff Smoker of Michigan State in the sixth round Sunday. Martz said the
situation facing Little, who pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter in a
1998 fatal accident in which he was driving drunk, couldn't be held against
Smoker Police arrested Little for speeding about 4 am. Saturday He was
booked and released after being issued two traffic summons, and a court
appearance has been scheduled for June 9.
Saint Joe's retires Nelson's No. 14 jersey
Saint Joseph s retired jersey No 14 Friday, punctuating the career of Jameer
Nelson, the Hawks' only Ail-American Nelson, a consensus national player
of the year, led Saint Joseph's to a 30-2 record this season, the best mark
in school history. The 5-foot-11 point guard is the school's career leader in
points (2,094) and assists (713). The Hawks won their first 27 games They
reached No. 1 in the AP poll and were a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament
for the first time, advancing to their first regional final since 1981
Broncos coach awarded contract extension
Greg Graham, who led Boise State to a 23-10 record last season and the
first consecutive postseason victories in school history, was awarded a
five-year contract extension Friday worth more than $13 million The state
Board of Education approved the deal, reportedly the most lucrative for a
college basketball coach in Idaho. The Broncos finished the regular season
with a 21-9 record and then beat UNLV and Wisconsin-Milwaukee in the
NIT before losing 66-53 to Marquette Graham, who was 13-16 in his first
season at Boise State, will see his salary jump from $115,000 this year to
$135,000 in 2005, while his media and public appearance compensation
will increase from $40,000 to $90,000. Graham's salary will rise annually over
the life of the contract to $170,000 for the 2008-09 season. Depending on
the teams success. Graham could also receive bonuses up to $12,000
Surratt granted release from scholarship
Miami guard Armondo Surratt will transfer after he was granted a release
from his scholarship Friday, less than two weeks after the school hired
Frank Haith as head coach. Surratt, a sophomore from Oakland. Calif was
originally recruited by former Hurricanes coach Perry Clark, who was fired
last month after going 64-55 in four seasons. Haith was the associate head
l coach at Texas The 5-foot-11 Surratt averaged 5.6 points and a team-high
40 assists last season, starting 29 of the Hurricanes' 30 games. He started
44 of 58 games in his career.
Chattanooga promotes Shulman to head coach
Chattanooga promoted interim men's basketball Coach John Shulman to
head coach Friday. Shulman, who became the Mocs' interim coach after
Jeff Lebo left for Auburn on April 8. said he was "realizing a dream
Sports hit records,
suffer losses
BRANDON HUGHES
SENIOR WRITER
National Championships.
That's the ultimate goal for all
ECU athletics. In all reality, only
a handful of sports can make it
that far. Pirate baseball will have
an opportunity to bring home a
title over the summer.
ECU is ranked No. 7 in the
nation after 16 consecutive wins.
The Pirate offense was featured
on the front page of ESPN's
college sports Web site, and it
seems that Head Coach Randy
Mazey has his squad bound for
Omaha. Trevor Lawhorn's 19th
homerun on the season was
a two-run walk-off shot that
completed the sweep over
Louisville this weekend.
ECU hopes that next season
will bring similar success to other
Pirate sports. ECU football has
completed spring practice, and
afterjohn Thompson's inaugural
season, the Pirates have nowhere
to go but up in 2004. A one-win
season is over, and some solid
recruits should propel ECU out of
the Conference USA basement.
However, ECU won't climb
too far up the ladder, at least not
for several years. Thompson's era
is just beginning, and with good
recruiting and the departure of
some of the best teams in C-USA,
the Pirates will soon be at the
top. Look for a sub .500 record
in 2004, a better mark in 200S
and back to a major bowl game
in 2006. They will be without star
offensive lineman Brian Rimpf
next season after the Baltimore
Ravens drafted the Raleigh native
in the seventh round.
Men's soccer fell on hard
times in 2003, winning just four
games. Key seniors are departing,
and it could take years just for
second-year Head Coach Michael
Benn to reach a .500 record.
ECU volleyball dominated
their non-conference schedule
but lost their last six games toC-
USA opponents. Alexis Jones was
the only departing senior, so the
Pirates will have a good nucleus
of young players.
Women's soccer fared much
better than their male counter-
parts but will lose standout Penny
Perrott. A 7-7-5 record might
improve a few games in 2004.
Both the men's and women's
swimming and diving teams
The football team had its ups and downs during the season.
have the talent and abil-
ity to bring home a (USA
championship. The two squads
earned second place honors at
the C-USA Championships, and
Diane Parker was named C-USA
Swimmer of the Year for the
second year in a row.
Cross-country displayed a
strong showing throughout the
season and should move up a
few spots in theC-USA meet next
year. The men's and women's
teams both finished 8th in the
conference tourney and it looks
as though the women's squad
will have plenty of experience
coming back.
Bill llerrion got his basket-
ball squad off to a hot start, hut
a key injury to senior Gabriel
Mikulas sent the Pirates into a
tailspin. ECU was able to pull
out late to make the C-USA
tourney. Until powerhouses like
Cincinnati and Louisville leave
C-USA, the Pirates don't have a
legitimate chance at the NCAA
tournament. After another
recruiting class like 2003 and
2004, however, llerrion will take
the Pirates to the Big Dance.
Women's basketball was
absolutely on fire with a 14-4
record, but never won another
game. Courtney Willis will be
missed - the senior averaged a
double-double and was invited
to a WNBA tryout. Coach
Sharon Baldwin-Tener's contract
was renewed and the lady Pirates a
will see a small improvement and
make it past the first round of the
C-USA tourney.
Track and field has been
struggling somewhat, but both
teams will have the opportu-
nity to improve. The season will
continue into the summer and
the men hope to improve on
their eighth place finish in the
C-USA Indoor Championships.
The women came in ninth.
Men's tennis finished
the regular season with an
impressive 14-6 mark but
recently fell to Tulane in the
C-USA quarterfinals. All of the
eight-man roster will be back next
year with hopes of getting deeper
into the tourney.
Women's tennis wrapped up
their season with a 10-13 record,
but expect improvement next
season. They have a key recruit
coming In, and Paulina Sierplnski g
is the only departing Pirate. �
Men's golf was victorious ��
early in the season during �

see REVIEW page C6 Men's basketball finished with a trip to the C-USA tourney.
The Pirates' swimming program had another great year.
Pirates collect 16 straight, rise in polls
ECU sets school,
C-USA record
BRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
The Pirate baseball team is
on a mission, and their latest
victim was Louisville as they
swept another Conference USA
series on their quest toward
Omaha, Net), and the College
World Series.
After an emotionally drain-
ing victory at NC State on
Wednesday, the Pirates reloaded
to take three from the Cardinals,
6-4, 9-7 and 5-4, in one of their
closest three-game series of the
season.
"They're pretty good said
Head Coach Randy Maey.
"They got a lot of subs st.irt-
ing for them, anil those kids play
with a lot of energy. They've got
nothing to lose. You have to give
those kids a lot of credit because
they battled hard
The reason the Cardinals
started so many subs was due
largely in part to injury of six
Louisville starters. However, they
still managed to make the series a
nail-biter for the Pirate fans.
Game one was a scoreless
affair until the bottom of the
third. Mark Minicozzi led off
the inning with a double to left
field. Billy Richardson's single to
center plated Coz and gave the
Pirates their first lead, l-O. Trevor
lawhorn's two-out single to left
scored Richardson and pushed
the score to 2-0.
(ireg Bunn cruised through
the first lour innings of the con-
test, striking out nine Cardinals
while allowing only one run oil
of an error. I he righty then ran
into a bit of trouble in the fifth
when he gave up a home run to
Mark Jurich, which knotted the
score at 2-2.
Matt Bishop replaced Bunn
in the sixth when Bunn loaded
the bases with two outs on con-
secutive walks. Bishop came up
huge as he struck out Jurich, the
undisputed best offensive player
on the team.
Bishop, who is coming off
of Tommy John surgery, wasn't
scheduled to return until late in
the season, if at all. He did return
and has yet to walk a batter in 20
innings of work.
"I'm just trying to keep
rehabbing and getting ahead of
batters said Bishop.
"That's the key. I don't like
walking people. That's just put-
ting someone on for free
Bishop's clutch three and
one-third innings of work on
Friday allowed the Pirates to
keep the rest of their bullpen
fresh, which would prove to be
huge as the series progressed.
"We didn't want to stretch
Bishop out there Mazey said.
"But he was getting outs.
You know (Thursday) was the
one-year anniversary of his sur-
gery. Many doctors will tell you
it takes 18 months to get back to
100 percent. But he attacked his
rehab. That tells you what kind
of kid he is
The Pirates increased their
advantage to S-2 with a three-
run sixth. Darryl I.awborn led
off the inning with a double to
center. A Minicozzi double scored
Lawhorn and Minicozzi moved
to third on another single from
Richardson. Ryan Jones, who
leads the nation in slugging per-
centage, doubled to the gap in
right center field, scoring both
runners.
Louisville cut the lead to
one in the seventh off a Ryan
McKinnon two-run job but could
muster up no more offense in the
game
Jones drove in another run
In the eighth to produce the
6-4 final.
Minicozzi led the Pirates
at the plate with a 3-for-4 per-
formance with an RBI and two
runs scored. Among so many
great Pirate players, Minicozzi
has slipped under the radar this
season and is quietly having one
ol the best seasons in conference
with a .383 batting average, while
slugging .624 with eight home
runs and 32 runs driven in. This
unsung hero of the Pirates will
definitely be a factor in ECU's
journey toward Omaha.
Paige added three hits with
a run scored. Jones had two hits
with three RBIs and the late-surg-
iug Richardson added two hits of
his own with an RBI and two runs
scored.
The story of game two would
have to be the superhuman per-
formance of red-shirt freshman
Mike Cirace. In a coach's decision,
(irace started his lirst game since
game three of the Charlotte series
and he made sure Mazey would
never regret his decision.
I lie youngster had a grand
The Pirates have continued to outpitch and outgun the
competition during their impressive 16-game winning streak.
slam in the first and an equally
backbreaking double in the
eighth that plated I wo more runs
and eventually proved to be the
game winner.
"I wasn't necessarily expect-
ing to have this kind of day when
I found out I was starting said
Grace.
"I just wanted to contribute
any way possible like everyone
else. But 1 was excited to get my
chance today, so 1 just went up
there, relaxed, and good things
happened
Mazey said the decision
to sit Drew Costanzo wasn't ,i
knoi k onostanzo's play of
late, just a coaching hunch that
(irace would have a big game if
he had the opportunity to get
some at-bats.
"It's a sign of a good team
when you can run guys oil the
bench like that and get good
production from them Mazey
said.
"We're going to need Mike,
and he's been sitting for a while,
so I told Drew that I was going
to put him out there today to get
him some at-b.its and keep him
from getting stale over there
The Pirates came out in game
two with the intent ol destroy-
ing an already beat-up Cardinal
team. ECU plated seven first-
inning runs, and it looked .is il
the rout was on.
Paige doubled to begin the
inning. After a walk to Jones and
a single by I. Lawhorn, Grace's
titanic shot brought the crowd
to their feet and gave the Pirates
a 4-0 lead.
Kiittardson continued his
.i BASEBALL page C6
n
Top 25
Rk TeamW-lLW
1. Texas41-61
2. Stanford31-62
3. Rice33-73
4. Miami30-94
5. Long Beach State29-95
6. Louisiana Slate31-lt7
7. ECU35-69
8. South Carolina29-1110
9. Mississippi31-116
10. Wichita State28-712
11. Notre Dame32-88
12. Arkansas29-1320
13. Tulane30-1216
14. UC Irvine26-1116
15. Oklahoma26-1613
16. Texas A&M33-1217
17 Virginia35-915
18. Auburn28-1414
19. Oral Roberts33-719
20. Southern Miss.30-1111
21. Florida31-12NR
22. Clemson27-14NR
23. Tennessee31-1121
24. Central Florida32-923
25 North Carolina31-1125






PAGI C2
M EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
�4-27-04
Erroyl Bing shines as ECU
All-Stars take ACC Seniors
Game tops $90,000 for
Jimmy V Foundation
ERIC OILMORE
STAFF WRITER
The last time an ECU men's
baskethall team heat a team
afflillated with the Atlantic
Coast conference was more than
25 years ago. On Jan. 27, 1979,
with a close two-point win over
Ga. Tech, the I'irates recorded
their only victory over an ACC
opponent
The drought ended Friday
as a team of ECU former play-
ers united to outscore a team
of ACC seniors, 122-115. In the
game played at Williams Arena in
Minges Coliseum, it seemed to be
more fun than competitive.
KP Sports Co. sponsored
the charity event and helped
to benefit, in part, the Jimmy V
Foundation for Cancer Research.
The event raised approximately
$95,000.
Krroyl Bing understood the
importance of raising cancer
awareness.
"I lost my mother and grand-
mother to cancer, so any time you
can help raise money for a cause
like this, it's great said Ring.
The trio of Lestor Lyons, Der-
rick Wiley and Bing proved to be
too much for a talented ACC
team. Lyons, who ranks second in
career scoring and almost single-
handedly rewrote the ECU record
books, was the oldest player on
the flour However, it did not look
like Lyons lost a step since gradu-
ating in 1994. Lyons led ECU to
its last appearance in the NCAA
tournament in 1993.
Wiley led the Pirates in scor-
ing with consistent jumpers and
an array of dunks. Wiley sank
several three-pointers and lay-
ups to give the I'irates the lead.
Bing, the second all-time
rehouiidcr .it ECU, seemed to be
.it home In the paint battling on
the boards.
Bing was undersized being
matched up with the 6-foot-9
Mai viand senior Jamar Smith.
Marcus Melvin, an N(. State
senior, put on an offensive show
for the ACC team.
Even though official stats
wen- not kept, Melvin dazled
with 45 points, including seven
three-pointers
Melvin was working the
crowd and was seen clicking
his heels in the air after several
three-pointers.
The only Pirate player that
was not coached by ECU Mead
Coach Bill llerrion was Lyons.
Joining Lyons on the roster
were seniors Wiley and Bing,
along with alumni Travis Hol-
combe-laye, Brandon Hawkins,
Garrett Blackwelder and Larry
Morrisey. Shawn Moore, who
graduated for Marshall and
played seven seasons overseas,
also played for the Pirates.
The ACC players included
NC State's Melvin and Scotter
Sherrill, Virginia's Todd Billet.
Wake Forest's Alan Williams,
Maryland's Jamar Smith and
North Carolina's Da mien Price,
Jonathan Miller and Phillip
Mcl.amb.
The trio of North Carolina
players was booed upon entering
the floor. Clemson player Chris
Hobtw was signed up to play but
did not show.
Duke's Chris Duhon and
Georgia Tech's Marvin Lewis did
not participate due to scheduling
conflicts.
The Pirates were in great
danger of being blown out in
the early going. The Pirates
were down 30-10 early but put
together a late run tOCUl the lead
to 57-49 at halt.
The Pirates took their first
lead with a little under 10 min-
utes remaining at 94-92.
Keith Peten,I.O ot KP Sports
Co organized the event. One can
only hope that with a great cause-
in the Jimmy V Foundation, the
game becomes an annual event.
At the very least, it would give
ECU another chance to deteat the
ACC.
This writer can be reached at
sports@theeotcarolinian.com.
Wrestling event to benefit charity
Relay for Life dabbles
in non-running sports
ROBERT LEONARD
STAFF WRITER
Need a break from studying?
Want to watch some professional
wrestling? Want to have the
chance to help save a life? This
Saturday, you can do all three.
Relay for Life, a group
aimed at raising money for
cancer research, in cooperation
with Just Cause Pro Wrestling
(JCPW), is hosting a charity
wrestling event this Saturday
at 7:30 p.m. at the Pitt County
Fairgrounds.
A portion of the ticket
sales will go to Relay for
Life and all the concession
profits will go to the charity as
well.
West Potter, an ECU senior
and the publicity chair for Relay
for Life, is excited about the
event.
"It's going to be a lot of fun
said Potttr.
"And it's for a really good
cause
The Greenville Relay for
I ile Chapter is one of the
largest in the area. The chapter
was able to raise a great deal of
money last year lecause of fund-
raising events like this.
Potter, who lost both
grandparents to cancer, knows
the importance of finding a cure
for this sickness.
I seryone should come out to
this event Potter s.iul.
"Just about everyone knows
someone who has been afflicted
with cancer
JCPW only does charity
events and is not as harsh as
wrestling seen on television.
Ron Mills, senior official for
JCPW, likes the product his group
puts out.
"We don't have any cussing
or blood said Mills.
"It's just clean wrestling
Mills also said he would
be officiating the main event,
a match between David
Flair, son of Rick Flair, and
(jeorge South, an old rival of
Rick's.
Tickets are $4 for kids in
advance or $5 at the door, K tor
students, $8 for adults in advance
or $10 at the door. Tickets can
be purchased ahead of time at
Wings Over Greenville.
The writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Going Home For
The SummerP
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East Carolina
UNIVERSITY
G3QQ
Academic Computing Environment
What is it?
ACE is a campus-wide effort addressing the support of
student technology in the academic environment.
Beginning in the fall of 2004, specific academic programs
will begin requiring or strongly recommending their
students to own a computer. The degree programs vary on
when the computer will be required within the life of the
program.
In response to these requirements and recommendations,
the ACE program has a selected vendor(s) and models it
will support. We believe these models will bring quality and
value to our students.
ACE will provide training and troubleshooting for students
who purchase one of the low-priced, select models.
Purchasing a computer for students NOT enrolled in a
requiring program is OPTIONAL. However, any student can
take advantage of the special pricing and available
support. .
Student Stores
Ronald � Dowdy
Strongly Recommended
College ol Education
Graduate Program
- Music Education
Teaching fellows
Theatre Education
College of Arts and Sciences
Anthropology
Physics

8
www.ecu.eduace
Detailed mfomwhon about spectfk programs and rrqui.pmetm ran be found at www.ecu.eduaci!
. -





4 2 04
THE LAST CAROLINIAN � SPORli
PAGE C3

o
�8 a
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a-B.1
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Attention: ECU Students
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The ECU Student Media Board has
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Applications are available in the Media Board office.
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Pirate softball team
beats out St. Louis
The Pirates finished their road trip with another sweep, led by pitcher Keli Harrell
Lady Pirates add three
wins to C-USA record
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
STAFF WRITER
The softball team cappd off
their nine-game road stretch in
great style last weekend as they
swept St. Louis In a three-game
series.
The wins improved the l.ady
Pirates' record to 44-16-1 and 8-
10 in conference play.
Coming oil of two previous
losses against North Carolina,
ECU had to get hack on traek
Saturday when they opened
play against St. Louis. Alter a
three-hour rain delay, the l.ady
Pirates suited up in their first
game of the series, which I hey
won i-o. Freshman pitcher Keli
Harrell had five strikeouts and
allowed only one hit in the
team's shutout.
The winning continued
for the l.ady Pirates on Sunday
when they opened up their dou-
bleheadei against the BtUlkeru
with a 14-5 victory.
After starting the game
down 0-4 in the first inning.
ECU responded In' scoring 14
straight runs, which included
a three-run homer by junior
infielder Mandi Nichols in the
top of the fourth.
In the second game of the
doubleheader, LCU's pitching
shined as Harrell once again took
center stage. Harrell recorded
an impressive 12 strikeouts and
allowed only four hits in the
team's 5-2 win.
The win marked Ranch's
13th complete game this season
and set her record at 14-5.
With three conference wins
against St. Louis, the Lady
Pirates are now tied tor fifth in
the Conference USA standings.
ECU will have to maintain their
pace in order to get into the C-
USA tournament at the end of
the season.
This weekend, the l.ady
Pirates will look to improve
their conference record when
they return home for the last
time this season to host South-
ern Miss.
Came one of the three-game
series against the Golden Lagles
starts Saturday at 1 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
Get caught reading, fi
us will pick up and drop off from
the parking lot located between
studio and BB&T on Evans Street
2004 season. (488, 627, 610, 617,
78, 86, 819, and 826) Bus departs
at 5:30 PM, and returns after the
$6.00 per person, includes ride
to and from game, ticket into the
game. All 12oz. drinks are $1.00
Tickets can be purchased at the bus on game day
but seats are limited. For more Information or
reserve seats for your group contact: Elizabeth at
282.627.9111
WL
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Brown & Brown
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3493c south Evans St. phone 752-0952 752-0753
Bedford Commons, Greenville W.blow li;ill(llIO lialtoi IU NAOMI






PAGE C4
THE FAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
4-27-04
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PAGE C5
THF I � �
HERE'S WHAT WE BROUGHT YOU THIS YEAR!
AUOUIT
SUE LUDDEKE ART EXHIBITION
FIL1XMERI
BIROO
SEPTEMBER
FILM TALK TO HER
FILM CHICAOO
BIROO
PIRATEUNDEROROUND A ROCK ODYSSEY
(rOUR LIVE BANDS)
MART LlOHTFINE:NURSE WITHOUT BOUDARIES
FILM MATRIX RELOADED
FILM � IBRD IT LIKE BECKHAM
BIROO
FILM -LAUBEROEESPAONOLE
riLM FINDING NEMO
STVDBRT APPRECIATION DAT (MARY EVERTS FOR
STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE IN)
riLM 88 DATS LATER
riLM 8 FASTI FURIOUS
OPEN MIC NIOHT
JAZE AT RIOHT
riLM � OODFATHER MARATHON
PIRATE UNDEROROUND � DEAR FIELDS
OCTOBER
BIROO
NORMROBBINS
riLM CAMP
FILM BRUCE ALMIOHTY
MTV TOUR NAPPY ROOTS
JAMATRIOHT
BIROO MIDNIGHT
PIRATE UNDEROROURD � IOPESFALL1 SCARLET
DAN LEVY COMEDIAN
FILMWRALE RIDER
FILM TERMINATOR 8
OPEN MIC RIOHT
SALSA DARCE
PIRATE UNDERGROUND � ORE AMAXIR KID
WOMEN ROCKTHE MAD TOOK
PIRATE ORDEROROURD � CIOAR STORE IRDIARS
FILM � ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW
riLMNIREOUEERS
riLM � PtRATES OF THE CARIBBEAR
NOVEMBER
PIRATE ORDEROROORD 40ST0S LEAOOE
FILM TME EYE
FILMSEAMISCUIT
PIRATE ORDEROROORD MA IN MADDOX
ART EXMIMITIOR VETS
FILM SWIMWIRO POOL
FILM MAD MOTS t
ODETOTI IK STUl )i:NT UNION
� by comedian Michael Dean I v i i
Qt line up the dates and do the publicity for every
imaginable student activity
We do the most to improve the student body attitude
and we get the least amount of student body gratitude.
VJt provide a vital service that our campus deserves -
Special events for when books and classes get (n mr nerves.
Our school supports the fine work that we do. You
should see the office they gave us - no windows jio view.
It's hard to know what our school is really thinking.
They keep raising tuition, but our budget keeps shrinking.
It's a thankless job, but someone's got to do it. Mfe
go to NACA Conferences to learn tips to get through it.
VUt plan carnivals, casino nights, concerts, and events
we arrange shows in the student center and hold functions in tents.
We bring our school music and comedy and lectures,
too, And then still people bitch that there's "nothing to do
But the truth of our job at the end of the day is that
it's not about praise and it's not about pay
SXk add to the quality of life at our schools. The
events that we program can be great learning tools.
Being a student goes on well after class. And campus
life with no programs would be a pain in the - butt.
Imagine if textbooks were the only thing ever seea
No events, am, or culture to experience in between.
Imagine if the activities board weren't herecoliege
would be high school - with tuition and beer.
When students meet members who plan �vents on this board,
they should thank (. ixl we're working or they w i il I really be bored
Here's some advice to fellow students, who don't attend events they see here:
" Vbu already paid the activities fee it's kind of stupid not to be here
College events make college memories - a changed heart or genuine thrill
Students should stop and thank a board member, although no one ever wilL
Professors work for tenure, administrators work for prudence.
But we bring this campus to life - for the good of ALL die students.
And for those who may think the "progranwiingprkIewefrelfafunny
.Just remember while you're laughing- we're spending all your money!
FEBRUARY
ART EXHIBITION A LECTURE -JUSTIN BUA
BIROO
SLAM POETRY COMPETITION
riLM IN AMERICA
FILM-LOVE ACTUALLY
SBIRDARA COOPER AFRICAN STORYTELLER
PIRATE UNDEROROUND - 5 ELEMENTS
FILM ELEPHANT
FILM THE MATRIX REVOLUTIONS
PIRATE UNDEROROUND OPEN MIC RIOHT
JAZZ AT RIOHT
BIROO
FILM � BROTHER OUTSIDER
FILM KILL BILL: VOL.1
PIRATE UNDEROROURD -TRAILER BRIDE
PIRATE UNDEROROUND - FROM LORELY SHORES A
BURRS OUT BRIGHT
SREAK PREVIEW - CLUB DREAD
COMEDY SHOW - DAT PH AN A KYLE CEASE
FILM 21 GRAMS
FILM-ELF
BIROO
FILM AMERICAN SPLENDOR
FILM-SCARY MOVIES3
PIRATE UNDEROROURD - SWASH IMPROV GROUP
JAZZ AT RIOHT
PIRATE UNDERGROUND - KELLIN WATSON
MARCH
EVENT - RUSSELL SIMMONS' DEF POETRY JAM
EVASONS HYPNOTISTS
PIRATE URDEROROURD-THE RETURN
STUDENT FOUNDERS DAY (VICTORIAN PHOTOS, KEY
OHAINS.ROCK CANDY, DJ. CIOAR STORE IRDIARS)
FILM - HOUSE OF SARD AMD F00
FILMBIGFISH
PIRATE URDEROROURD - PRETTT GIRLS MAKE GRAVES
BATTLE OFTHE BARDS
LECTURE - MOTHERS OF INVENTIONS
FILM CHASINO AMY
FILM DOGMA
PHUT ORDEROROORD� MERCORY RADI0 THEATER
JAUATRIOMT
PI RATE IIIUMMIID - COO RTDO W R M ART C T
FILM KILOMETER ZERO
FILM FREDDY VSJASeR
PIRATE ORDEROROORD � OPER MIC RIOHT
MRATtOMDOlOROORDIOSTIRCASJC
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train
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Lisa Grouse- President
KiDaruel-AssistaiwttHhtTVcsitknt
AaySarwal-FdnwCMmnitU'v(,Jiair
Matt Smith - Cultural Awareness Committee Chair
Lisa Carter- MarketingChair
Amanda Trail - Popular Entertainment Committee (iiair
Thomas Doyle - Spectrum Committee Juur
Napoleon Wright - Visual Am Committee Chair
Amecna Mohyurklin Visual Arts
Caroline Boyd - Program Advisor
Jenna Ctemente- Program Advisor
Anna-Rochelle Barletta - Program Advisor
Audralnornas-RetrejHMMiI'rtignuul Erector
Stephen Gray - Director of Student Activities
Lynn Caveriy - Assistant Director of Student Activities
Napoleon Wrht - Graphic Designer 2003
Jason Mathis - Graphic Designer 2004
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PIRATE URDEROROURD - 0 ARD ROT U A
FASHION BRIGADE
LECTURE KEVIN SMITH
BIROO
PIRATE URDEROROURD - FREE STTLE DJ ARD
MC COMPETITION
EVENT GAME LIFE TOUR
BIROO
ILLUMINA ART COMPETITION
STUDENT UNIONRHA SCAVEROER HURT
FILM - OIRL WITH THE PEARL EARRIRO
FILM ALONG CAME POLLY
PIRATE URDEROROURD - OPER MIC RIOHT
CHIRESEACROBATS
PIRATE URDEROROURD�BATTLE KOALAS A
ART LORD A THE SELF PORTRAITS
ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW EVERT
PIRATE URDEROROURD - VIERRA TERO
CRAIO KAROES MIHD READER
FILM THE TOO OF WAR
riLM - THE RETURR OF THE KIRO
BOTH ARHUAL BAREFOOT OH THE MALL
TOE II TOE B BOY COMPETITION
THE ROOTS-CONCERT
SMEAK PREVIEW - MEAR OIRLS
BIROO
FILM-THE DREAMERS
riLM MYSTIC RIVER
PIRATE ORDEROROURD - MATT WERTZ
MAY
PIRATE UNDERGROUND - THE "ROT SO OOITE RIOT"
RESIDENT
MUCH MORE TO COME NEXT YEAR!

"il
� ��.� � b





1HL LAST CAROLINIAN � SI
4-204
Boutique
The Pirates are in the middle of a fantastic season. After 16 straight wins, they are ranked 7.
Steady play t late with a two-
run job to left that gave ECU the
7-0 lead.
I ouiss Ilk would not go qui-
etly, however, and starter Mike
Tisdale was un-hittahle for the
next si innings.
Things got interesting when
Louisville cut the lead to 7-d in
the eighth ofl a Daniel Burton
no-douht-ahout-it home run to
center.
tirace's two-run douhle got
both of the runs back for the
Pirates and gave them a l-)
cushion beading into the ninth.
Luis I'ardo led the ninth
for the Cardinals with a
home run that cut the I'irate's
advantage to 9-7. Carter llarrell,
who began the ninth lor the
Pirates, then struck out the next
Louisville hitter. With a man on
lirst vitb one away, Kartell got
Juried to pop up to third base
for the second out, The next
two batters reached, however,
and Maey called Kevin Rhodes
out of the bullpen to get the
Pir.itcs out ot the am.
I be sophomore would not
disappoint as be struck out
McKinnon to end the game
Grace led the way tor the
I'irates with a 2-for-4 perfor-
mance witti six RBls and a run
stored. Paige and Jones each
added a COUple of hits while
combining lor three runs suned
and shortstop Richardson had
two RBls.
Louisv ilb ir ing not to
b( swept for the first time
since the 2002 season, took
their first lead Of the series in
game three with a three-run
second inning I heardinals
Collected five bits in the frame,
all ol which went to opposite
field
II I startei Shane Matlunss
then settled down, not allowing
another run in his appearance
as he went seven and one-third
innings, gi ing up eight hits
while striking out a career-high
eight batters.
" that's Shane Maey said.
"lie usually bits a rough spot
earlv in the game and then settles
down. He's a guy we're really
gonna need down the stretch
( ardinal starter HI Rosenberg
would not be outdone by the pet-
romance of Mathews as he kept
the I'irates scoreless until the
sixth inning
lones led oil the frame with
a walk. After consecutive � nts
from T. I awhorn ami Grace, Ryan
Norwood singled to put runners
on the corners I). Lawhorn then
rocketed a triple down the right
field line, si or ing both Jones a nd
Norwood and cutting the Cardi-
nal lead to 3-2.
I be I'irates tied things up in
the seventh off ot a Jones RBI
double that plated Minicozzi,
who drew a leadoll walk.
After both teams went
scoreless in the eighth, a Ron
Braun tWO-OUl single in the
ninth allowed the Cardinals to
reclaim the lead 4-3. The bit
silenced a boisterous I'iralei rowd
who had been rejuvenated when
the I'irates tied the score in the
seventh.
With their backs against the
walls, the I'irates answered in a
big way in the ninth.
Paige singled to start the
frame, lones then popped out
to second. Lawhorn, who had
been pitched perfectly all series,
was only 2-lor-l4 in the scries
as he walked to the plate with
one out.
As with all great hitters, all it
takes is one mistake to make up
lor the lack of production, and
reliever Brian Halford made the
ultimate mistake in banging a
2-0 Off-speed pltl h over tin'
plate. The result - a two-run,
walk-off homer that sailed
over the lungle and sent the
crowd into a frenzy as be trotted
around the bases
"I love pressure situations
said I awhorn
"1 was looking for an off-
speed pitch because that was how
they pitched me all series and I
got one. We were struggling all
weekend on the curveballs, and
I was going up there, trying to hit
one back up the middle and he
hung one I guess. I knew it was
gone as soon as I hit it. It'sa great
feeling to do it, too
With that homerun, Trevor
Lawhorn tied bis brother Parry!
for third on the all-time list
with 19 in a single season. Win-
fred Johson hit 22 dingers in the
1985 season, which gives Trevor
a legitimate shot at setting the
record. The first-year Pirate also
extended bis hitting streak to 17
games.
Paige and Darryl led the
Pirates In the wild contest with
two hits apiece.
With the sweep, the I'irates
have set a new school and C-
USA record lor the longest win-
ning streak at If). ECU improved
to a glittering 35-6 overall and
15-3 InC-USA,
Southern Mississippi entered
the weekend atop the a inference,
but alter being dismantled In
lulane in three games, the I'irates
now sit in tirst With a two-game
cushion over the second place
Green Wave.
live of the top eight schools
in the nation all lost at least
one game this weekend, which
Improved the Pirates' chances ol
receiving their highest ranking
in school history. The I'irates
moved up two spots lo No. 7 in
a Baitbatt America poll released
earlier today
ECU will battle Houston next
in a three-game series beginning
with a Friday game at 7 p.m. Sat-
urday and Sunday's game will
both be at 1 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeaslcarolinian.com.
Review
from page C1
the Pirate lall Intercollegiate
tournament but failed I" linish
better than tilth the rest of
the way. The Pirates were I Itb
out ol 14 teams in the-USA
( hampionslup.
The women have tared miu h
better, especially Adricnne
Mllllcan. Mlllican led the
Pirates to a win anil two second
place finishes and iame ill
seionil heisell in the-LJSA
( hampionslup. Millican will
be back for another year, but
the lads Pirates are losing
tour key plaveis
Pirate Softball has been nearly
as successful as baseball with a
44-16-1 overall record.The Lady
Pirates have done it with a great
blend of hitting and pitching
Junior Maggie i Ingo recently
toned a perfect game and Kate
Manusc and Christine Sherlda
have pounded opposing pitching.
All three are underclassmen,so
expect the Lady Pirates to make a
run at tln -USA title this si. ison
and nest
I'he sports season id
2003-04 has been one that most
Pirate faithfuls would like to
lorget Fans will now be focused
on the success of baseball and
Softball well into the summer, but
for other athletes, there is always
next season. Minges Coliseum
will be one ol the most feared
venues in basketball. A new
State-of-the-art baseball stadium
ison the was, and Dowdy-licklen
Stadium will be louder than ever
in 2004 As long as they play, the
Purple and Cold will be there. As
long,is I lies compete, the Purple
and Gold will be there.
When thej succeed and
bring home the trophy symbol-
izing the blood, sweat and tears
sacrificed, the Purple and Gold
will be there.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
TEC is now hiring staff writers. Apply at our office located
on the 'ind floor of the Student Publications Building.
� Experience required
�Must have a 2.0 GPA

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4-27-04
Mil LAS! CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE C7
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Friday - Fish and Chips
Saturday - Meat or 5 Cheese Lasagna
Sunday - Fried Shrimp Plate
Paily Prink Specials
Monday - 175 domestic bottles
Tuesday - 2 Imports
Wednesday - 1 Mug Pud Lt 4 Pitchers
Thursday - 2 House Hi-ballsWine
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Friday - 3 Margarita S- 2.50 Import of the day
Saturday - 3 lits S- �2.50 Import of the Pay
Sunday - 2.50 Pint Guinness, Pass,
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Amanda Geiger never saw the drunk driver.
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Moii $1.00 Domestic Bottles
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Late Nite Breakfast
Tue-Sat lam-4am
Corner ol 5th & Cotanche
Members of memorabilia industry
trying to profit from Tillman's death
Specialist Pat Tillman, right, a former Arizona Cardinal, walks next to Capt. Christoper Deale, company commander of
B Company first BN 19th Infantry Regiment. Tillman, an Army Ranger, was killed during battle in Afghanistan last week.
(KRT) � When I arrived at
my office about 9:IS a.m. Friday,
I deckled to check eBay to see if
the ghoul patrol was out. I he
news of former Arizona Cardi-
nal Pat Tillman's death was on
every sports and news radio
Station and, I figured, those so
inclined would be lining up to
make a buck off a true American
hero's death.
Exactly the opposite of what
Tillman would have wanted.
At 9:15 a.m there were only
about six Tillman cards in auc-
tion, none ending within three
days, nothing with an opening
bid over $2. None had bids.
The last auction struck me,
so I opened it. It was one of the
same cards that other sellers
were offering, although it had
a $20 opening bid. A check
of the description showed the
seller knew Tillman. He wrote
of Tillman's death Thursday in
Afghanistan as a member of the
U.S. Army.
I decided to check again
about 2() p.m. The results
were shocking, (here were SI
Tillman items. One was a 2001
Upper Deck MVI' rookie card
with an opening bid of 1 cent
and already up to a staggering
$40,000. On the Uth bid. With
20 hours left.
But, eBay cancelled that the
cancellation read "bidder fraud"
and the bid was back "down"
to $5,000. There appears to be
some angry bidders attempting
to sabotage the auctions. One
bidder's user ID is "dont-make-
money-off- fallen -heroes
Many other items, including
other copies of the Upper Deck
card and a 2001 Fleer Tradition
glossy rookie card, had bids up to
$12,000. lor a card that had no
takers at $2 Thursday.
Then there was the auction
titled "Authentic American Hero
Pat Tillman Autograph It began
Friday. It was over $500.
Many Tillman auctions were
ended early, probably so sellers
could hike minimums.
Thing like this are sick.
Putting an item on as soon as
someone dies is morbid. Think-
ing about profiting because of a
person's death is despicable.
Mike Weber of Hall of Fame
collectibles in Mesa also can't
understand the ghoul mental-
ity.
"I know why you called
Weber said. "It hasn't stopped
ringing all day. lt is kind of
morbid. I told them all that I'm
not up to looking for Tillman
stuff today. 1 did notice that I
have a couple of (autographed)
mini-helmets and they are
$100, what they were yesterday
and what they have been since 1
got them. I guess jacking up the
prices is the way the world goes,
but I won't
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
4 27 04
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BUSCH LIGHT
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Kobe Bryant paying steep costs for
defense team: $2 million and counting
KRT) � His defense attor-
neys have tried to tell the
public through 10 months of
pre-trial litigation and reams of
court filings that Kobe Bryant,
their young, charismatic,
multi-millionaire, NBA-star
client and one-time faultless
idol to millions, has suffered as
a man wrongly accused of raping
a 19-year-old woman.
"The accuser's false accu-
sation of rape has exacted a
personal and professional toll on
Mr. Bryant that is as incalculable
as it is indescribable attorney
Hal Haddon wrote in an April
S filing.
What can't be argued is
this case's financial toll an
estimated $2 million ana
counting on Bryant, who returns
to the Eagle County Justice
Center on Monday lor pretrial
hearings.
According to a survey of
legal analysts, private investiga-
tors, security firms, independent
crime laboratories, a private jet
agency and defense experts,
Bryant's continuing battle could
run him close to $10 million by
the time a Colorado jury reads
the verdict.
Bryant, 25, who earns an
estimated $35 million a year
as a marquee Lakers player and
endorser for multiple blue-chip
firms such as Nike and Coca-
Cola, has spared no expense in
lighting the felony sexual-assault
charge that threatens to take his
Hall of lame-hound basketball
career from him and put him in
prison for life.
"How much would you spend
to defend your life?" said (iuss
Guarino, the executive direc-
tor of the Colorado Criminal
Defense Bar.
"Every penny
ON THE DEFENSE
Bryant, who lives with his
wife, Vanessa, and 1-year-old
daughter, Natalia, in Newport
Coast, says he had consensual
sex June 30 with the woman who
was working as a front-desk agent
at the exclusive Lodge and Spa at
Cordillera in Ldwards, Colo.
The woman told Eagle County
Sheriff's Department detectives
that she visited Bryant in his
room and willingly engaged
in kissing and touching before
Bryant forced her over a chair
and raped her.
Bryant was arrested July 4.
He paid $2,500 lo Cilenwood
Springs bail bondsman Richard
Jordan to post the $25,000 hail
for his release.
Bryant then hired the
Denver-based law firm of
Haddon, Morgan, Mueller,
lordan, Mackey Jm Foreman. Part-
ners Haddon and Pamela Mackey,
both well-respected litigators
with high-profile experience,
took the case.
Colorado attorneys estimate
that Haddon and Mackey each
could command $500 an hour.
If this legal team earned $1,000
an hour, a 40-hour work week
would run $40,000; 10 months,
$1.6 million.
'Chancel are that Haddon
and Mackey charged a substantial
initial retainer, significant hourly
charges and have a set, flat fee
with a cap said Scott Robinson,
a Denver attorney familiar with
the firm.
A six-figure retainer in excess
of $250,000 would be "under-
standable and expected" for a
case outside Denver, Robinson
said.
"With two top lawyers in
I lal Haddon and Pamela Mackey,
we're talking seven figures in
total attorneys fees, and that
doesn't even count legal inves-
tigation that would be another
six figures
Also, Haddon and Mackey,
who work full time on the Bryant
case, require a support staff of the
firm's associates, two paralegals
and a security officer, Ed Killam.
They also hired Edwards-based
attorney, Terrance P. O'Connor,
to reduce their 127-mile trips
from Denver west to Eagle.
INVESTIGATIVE COSTS
To build his defense, Bryant's
attorneys have hired at least four
private investigators to comb the
crime scene, interview potential
witnesses and conduct a thor-
ough background search on the
accuser.
Ellis Armistead, the assistant
director of the National Asso-
ciation of Legal Investigators,
said top-notch investigators
charge $125-$150 an hour plus
expenses.
Defense-team investigators
have descended upon 3,500-
resident Eagle to learn about the
accuser, who lived with her par-
ents, a brother and two dogs in a
two-story home on a cul de sac.
They have been to Eagle
Valley Senior High in Gypsum,
where the woman was a cheer-
leader; and to Greeley, where
she was a freshman last year
at the University of Northern
Colorado.
Investigators tracked down
the woman's long-time high
school boyfriend, Matt llerr,
working at Eagle's Texaco gas
station; the Cordillera bellman,
Bobby Pietrack, playing basket-
ball for Fort Lewis College in
Durango; a van load of people
who partied one night with her
in Calgary, Alberta; and a former
friend, Lindsey McKinney, who
briefly lived with the woman in
Eagle and witnessed her May 30
drug overdose.
Said Armistead, a Denver-
based private investigator not
involved in the Bryant case,
"Investigators will go everywhere
to gather every bit information
on every witness
TESTING'S TOLL
The court has allowed Bry-
ant's defense team to conduct
independent laboratory testing
on the case's physical evidence;
rape kits of the accuser and
Bryant, hair and fiber samples,
blood from Bryant's T-shirt
and semen from the accuser's
underwear.
The tests are performed at
the Ventura forensic science
company Technical Associates,
Inc which is run by Marc Scotl
Bryant is spending big bucks on his sexual assault case.
Taylor, a former criminalist in the
Los Angeles Medical Examiner's
Office and a defense consultant
in the 1995 OJ. Simpson double-
murder case.
Each sample that undergoes
DNA analysis costs $1,000, Taylor
said.
The defense already has
retained experts to opine on
every facet of the case from
evidence collection to genital
injuries. Renowned experts
typically charge $300 an hour,
Guarino said.
Forensic consultant Elizabeth
Johnson, formerly ot technical
Associates, already has testi-
fied in the Bryant case. Last
month, University of Colorado
at Denver music professor Rich
Sanders, defense's acoustic foren-
sic expert, appeared in a closed
courtroom tor more than tour
hours to review a 60-minute
audio recording a police detec-
tive secretly took of Bryant's
statements July 2.
Sanders has testilied on audio
recordings ol the Oklahoma! iiy
bombing and 911 tapes in the
Ion Benet Ramsey murder case,
which Haddon worked, and the
Columbine shooting.
"When you look at the names
of the people involved in this
case Guarino said, "Bryant has
spared no expense in getting the
best people on his side
TRAVEL Lot.
Bryant is billed for the travel
expenses for lawyers, experts.
investigators and witnesses,
include the doen or so who have
testified during pretrial. Twice
Bryant has paid lor his accuser to
fly in from Palm (teach County,
Ha where she had resided and
worked at a Del ray Beach barbe-
cue restaurant until March.
"Everything costs. Everything
is on the clock. Luckily for Kobe,
he has the resources Guarino
said, "lor a middle-class person,
this would be a bankrupted"
Since his July 4 arrest, Bryant
has made 13 trips to Eagle, char-
tering a 9-15 passenger private
jet through Revolution Air that
flies from Van Nuys Airport to
the Vail Valley Jet Center at the
Eagle County Regional Airport.
A 1,800-mile round trip
would run about an industry-
average $25,000, according to
Rick Kiev, the RaynAir Private Jets
president who has knowledge of
Bryant's travel arrangements.
The Lakers are paying hall
of Bryant's flight costs during
the season, making Bryant's
running tab for charter flights
around $225,000.
Often two or three of Bryant's
security personnel travel on the
charter. But after the March 25
appearance, Mackey flew back to
I os Angeles with Bryant and took
her young children to Staples
( enter for the March 26 Lakers'
game against Minnesota.
His security detail - Jose
Revilla and driver Kim Slew-
art of Monrovia-based Ortiz
and Revilla Protective Services
- returned to Los Angeles on
Mart h 2bcommercial flightsand
after a night at the $79-a-night
Comfort Inn.
A person working "non-
threatening" celebrity protec-
tive services is $85 an hour plus
S125-$ 175 per diem, said Tony
Alverti, owner of Beverly liills-
based Flve-O Personal Security.
"Working for celebrities and
professional athletes is a compli-
cated business Alverti said. "It's
a 24-hour-a-day job to watch
someone
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(





427 04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE B1
A student celebrates her victory at one of the game booths.
Earefcct
en the Mall
feet And
Mill 11 kin
Students John Dixon and Sean Cummings race through an inflatable obstacle course shaped like a sinking ship.
Various organizations made T-shirts as part of a program to end domestic violence.
Students flipped for a bungee harness that propelled them high into the air.
a,1 1 jf1 .B
itr
s�
AM

H
i
r'&'�LfMJ
The band 2 Skinny Dorks played live for students during the Barefoot celebration.
A balloon artist makes a palm tree for a student during Barefoot on the Mall.
A booth offered students a chance to make T-shirts declaring an end to domestic violence. Komal Patel, sophomore autometry major, dips his hand into wax for a wax sculpture.





rAi,i ts
� f jut cjmn �.
427 04
FEATURES
AMANDA LINGERFELT
Features Editor
JOHN BREAM
Assistant Features Editor
features@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Did You Know?
Civil rights leader Coretta Scott King (1927) and radio personality
Casey Kasem (1932) both call today their birthday.
This month is Straw Hat Month and Tackle Your Clutter Month.
This week is Jewish Heritage Week and Industry Week
On this day in 1947. Babe Ruth Day was celebrated at Yankee Stadium
and throughout the nation
Announcements
'Mean Girls'
A sneak preview of Mean Girls starring Lindsay Lohan will show at 7 p.m.
today in Hendrix Theatre
The Student Union Spectrum Committee presents bingo at 9:30 pm today
in Mendenhall Dining Hall This event is free
Films
The Student Union Rims Committee presents The Dreamers on Wednesday
at 7 p.m Thursday at 9 30 p.m Friday at 7 p m and midnight. Saturday at
930 pm. and Sunday at 7 p m Mystic River is showing Wednesday at 930
p.m Thursday at 7 p.m Friday at 9:30 pm. Saturday at 7 p.m and midnight
and Sunday at 3 p.m. All movies are free with a student ID and are located
in the Hendrix Theatre For more information, call 328-4700
Christian Guitarist
Matt Wertz. a Christian acoustic guitarist, will perform from 9 p.m. - 11 p.m.
on Thursday Apnl 29 in Pirate Underground This event is free
Relay For Life
The Pitt County Relay for Life recently kicked off this year's effort by
celebrating the Relays 10-year anniversary The 2004 Relay for Life will be
held on Friday. April 30 and Saturday. May 1 at the Pitt County Fairgrounds.
Relay is now seeking volunteers who are interested in helping form teams
and join in the fight against cancer It you are Interested In volunteering,
forming a team or donating lime or money, please contact Alis Irwin at
317-5803
Chamber Music
The School of Music presents the Four Seasons Chamber Music Festival
directed by Ara Gregorian at 8 p m on Saturday, May 1 in the A J. Fletcher
Recital Hall The group will perform music by Mozart, Bruckner and Dvorak.
Tickets are $5 - $10
Music Fest
The Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee presents the Not So
Quiet Riot Music Fest from 8 p m to midnight on Saturday, May 1 in Pirate
Underground This event is free
New Releases
CDs
The Girl In The Other Room Enhanced. Diana Krall
Between Here And Gone. Mary Chapin Carpenter
012 World (Special edition with bonus DVD, D12
American Idol season 3: Greatest Soul Classics, Various Artists
Van Lear Rose. Loretta Lynn
Been All Around This World. Jerry Garcia & David Gnsman
Trampin Patli Smith
8:09. Joey Mcintyre
Unbreakable Import, Scorpions
Sale Return. Jane Oliver
DVDs
Love Actually Widescreen Edition)
Big Fish
The Monster Legacy Collection (Frankenstein I Dracula I The Wolf Man)
Love Actually Full Screen Edition
ER - The Complete Second Season
The Hound ol the Baskervilles
The Adventures ol Sherlock Holmes
WWEWrestlemaniaXX
The Dick Van Dyke Show - Season Four
The Cooler
TV This Week
"Showbiz Moms & Dads"
Watch parents who will stop at nothing to achieve fame and fortune for their
offspring "Showbiz Moms & Dads" airs tonight at 9 p m on Bravo
"Will & Grace"
Karen (Megan Mullally) and Lyle (guest star John Cleese) decide to forego
a beautiful New-York-In-fall wedding for a quickie ceremony in Las Vegas
With Will (Enc McCormack) and Jack (Sean Hayes) in tow, the couple bumps
into Jennifer Lopez (guesting as herself) - who, on behalf of Rosarlo (Shelley
Morrison), agrees to sing at the wedding Tim Curry ("The Rocky Horror
Picture Snow') also guest stars The two-part season finale airs Thursday,
April 29 at 9 p.m on NBC
Primetime Thursday"
This hour-long show investigates the more sophisticated ways that students
are cheating in schools "Primetime" airs Thursday, April 29 at 10 p.m. on
ABC
2003-04:
A year of memories
Looking back at
what made this
year unique
LAUREN MASON
I SENIOR WRITER
As the school
,ear comes fo an A
end, we can look L. JJ
back at the
FOOTBUGA�es
T IP
THE REAL WORLD VISITS ECU
"X!
at
memories
from last
year and reminisce
friends.
For seniors, this year will forever be remembered as the last time
for many favorite college activities- last tailgate, last Spring Break, last
exam. For freshmen, it was a year of new beginnings with friends,
asses and campus activities. For everyone, it
was a year of entertainment, big
surprises, fun-filled events and,
as always, lots of Pirate pride.
The warm weather of August
welcomed students back as we
celebrated at Piratepalooza before
classes and then again over Labor
Day weekend. The short break prepared
us for September, when we enjoyed
hanging out at Freeboot Friday, cheer-
ing on the Pirates for the first time under
new coach John Thompson and checking
out hot new shows like "One Tree Hill"
and "The O.C Chemistry and electron-
ics majors explored their new home at the
Science and Technology building while we
watched work progress on Rivers and the West
I nl dining hall.
ECU alumnus Vince McMahon gave us the
"Smackdown" in Minges Coliseum, and then Isabel
made her way through eastern North Carolina, bring-
ing back memories of Floyd and fears of flooding.
Greenville lucked out, but we came,
together to help out our neighbors
to the north who received the brunt
of the storm.
While we watched the coastal
flooding on TV, F.SPN2 watched the Pirates play
I louston at Dowdy-licklen, bringing out a huge
crowd for the Tuesday night game. "Bennifer"
canceled their high-profile wedding, Britney
and Madonna shared a
"special" moment and
"Joe Schmo" intro-
duced a new twisted
level to reality TV.
October
brought in cooler DOWNTOWN ON
weather, A Chorus
Line and the first game in
history played in Pirate territory against the
Tarheels. MTV and Nappy Roots visited as
part of the Homecoming
College tour and down-
town Greenville hosted
another crazy Hallow-
een night with increased
security and expanded areas
to contain the crowd. Arnold
surprised us with a victory in California and Demi and
Ashton became Hollywood's hottest couple.
ECU went Primetime in November,
complete with homecoming skits, pep
rallies, parades and an exciting double-
overtime game against South Florida. 1
WRNS took over Minges with a concert that f
included stars Jo Dee Messina, Sara Evans and
the Charlie Daniels Band.
With Thanksgiving break around the
corner, students buckled down for the end of the semes-
ter and looked forward to a long winter break.
Cast members from "The Real World" brought
diversity to campus in December with a visit that
ended at Barcode, the new gay club in town. While
Coral and Malik partied with the Pirates, Martha
Stewart and Michael Jackson started the biggest court
scandals of the year.
We rang in the New Year and returned to school listening
to stories of Britney's marriage and BCS blunders. Panthers'
fans supported the home team onto the Super Bowl where
we experienced a close but disappointing game and the
'wardrobe malfunction" seen around the world.
see MEMORIES page B2
THE
GREAT
RACE
l&
19'Ja
u0M
HALLOWEEN NIGHT
FREEBOOT
FRIDAY
'THE SIMPLE LIFE
Pirate Underground keeps on rockin'
f Event Info
Not So Quiet Riot brings
fresh sound to ECU
JESSICA CRESON
STAFF WRITER
The Not So Quiet Riot is a
music festival combining four
fresh indlerock groups that
will come to E :U. The show will
provide performances from Silent
Sunday News, Letdown, Farewell
and The Argument.
"It's the concert of the year,
and we are going out with a
bang said Amanda Trail, Stu-
dent Union popular entertain-
ment chair
"This is a four-band fesl
with bands who put on a great
show and are also incredibly
(musically) talented
Silent Sunday News is
a Greenville band which
consists of former band mem-
bers from Emerson and Murder
Me Dead. The members are Krik
Matthijs, who is the lead singer
and plays guitar, Matt Kerley
playing the bass, Justin PetTUCC
Not So Quiet Riot Music Festival
Featuring Silent Sunday News, Letdown,
Farewell and The Argument
Saturday, May 1 from 7 p.m. -11 p.m.
Mendenhall Brickyard
Admission Is tree
on guitar and Jonathan Petruce
on drums.
The band described them-
selves as a mix between the
Iwnds Mineral and Further Seems
Forever.
Silent Sunday News has only
lK-eii together for about two or
three months and Not So Quiet
Riot will lie their first show,
so this is an exciting event for
them.
They will be the first band
playing from 7 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
at the musii fest.
" There is a lot of pressure on
this show, but we are optimistic
and confident of our set said
Matthijs, who helped organize
Not So Quiet Riot as well as
The Argument will perform on Saturday. May 1
perform in Silent Sunday News.
Letdown will be playing in
the second set from 7:45 p.m. -
8:25 p.m. The band consists
of Steve Partin on guitar and
vocals, Matt Robinson on bass
and vocals and Brett Wells on
drums and vocals.
Letdown formed in Chapel
Hill in 2001 when Partin and
Wells, a metaljaz drummer
and singer from Greensboro, got
together to form a band. Later,
they met Robinson, a hard-
tore bassist from Raleigh, and
instantly fit together.
Letdown has just lost a guitar
player who is studying physics,
but instead of finding someone
new, they feel they work best now
as a three man band.
"Our songs vacillate
between harsh and pretty, hut
there is always melody and
rhythm said Partin.
"The vocals are belted out
A
see QUIET RIOT page B3





4-27-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � TEATURES
PAGE B3
es
LIFE'
taleigh, and
r.
t lost a guitar
ing physics,
ng someone
ork best now
I.
vacillate
pretty, but
lelody and
i.
� belted out
OT page B3
Low-carb dinner party rates high on satisfaction
(KRT)�You've made it
through the crucial first two
weeks of your low-carb diet.
The bathroom scale is your
friend again. You're feeling good
about your progress and decide
it's finally time - time for. a
low-carb dinner party.
Some of your friends have
been low-carb dieting, too, but
you're not quite sure how many
carbs they're consuming these
days.
Not to worry! The choices
are abundant, the recipes are
plentiful.
Here are several low-carb
menus to consider serving, with
varying levels of carbs to mix and
match as you wish.
PLAN A: 6 NET CARBS
Drinks: Vodka martinis with
olives: no net carbs (subtract
fiber and sugar alcohol grams
from the carb count to get net,
or usable, carbs.)
Appetizer: Slices of Volpi's
Kotola (prosciutto, mozzarella
cheese and basil roll-ups; sold
at many local markets): no net
carbs
Main course: Tequila-lime
marinated grilled chicken (see
recipe): 2 net carbs
Side dish: Mixed lettuce salad
with vinegar and oil dressing: no
net carbs
Dessert: Sugar-free choco-
late syrup folded into whipped
heavy cream: no net carbs, and a
peanut butter cookie (see recipe):
4 net carbs
PLAN B: 10 NET CARBS
Drinks: Low-carb beer: two
carbs
Appetizer: Steamed shrimp
with two tablespoons Creamy
Carlic Dressing for dipping (sec
recipe): one net carb
Main course: Jerk-Marinated
(irilled Pork Steaks (see recipe):
three net carbs
Side dish: Caesar salad with
purchased dressing and no crou-
tons: one net carb
Dessert: Cubes of sugar-free
gelatin (two or more flavors) in
parfaits with whipped cream
from a can: two net carbs
PLANC: 13 NET CARBS
Drinks: Seven and Seven
made with whiskey and diet
lemon-lime soda: no net carbs
Appetizer: Crunchy and
Savory Almonds (see recipe):
two net carbs
Main course: Steamed lob-
ster with melted butter: no net
carbs
Side dish: Warm asparagus
tossed with vinaigrette: two
net carbs
Dessert: Purchased low-carb
cheesecake with strawberry sauce e
(puree 1 pound frozen berries
with I tablespoon lemon juice i
and sweetener to taste): eight
net carbs.
With the right recipes, you can have dinner parties while sticking to your low-carb diet.
TEQUILA LIME CHICKEN
Yield: 12 servings
13 cup lime juice
13 cup water
3 tablespoons tequila
1 tablespoon sucralose (Splenda)
1 tablespoon soy sauce
2 cloves garlic, crushed
12 chicken breast halves
Combine lime juice, water, tequila, sucralose, soy sauce
and garlic in a zip-top plastic bag. Add chicken; refrigerate
at least 2 hours or up to 1 day.
Prepare a hot fire in the grill. Drain chicken, discarding
marinade. Place chicken on grill, skin-side down. Cook about
10 minutes or until lightly browned. Turn; brown the other
side. Continue to cook, turning frequently, until done.
PER SERVING: 140 calories; l.Sg fat (10 percent calories
from fat); 0.5g saturated fat; 66mg cholesterol; 26g protein;
2g carbohydrate; lg sugar; no fiber; 274mg sodium; 16mg
calcium; 306mg potassium.
Adapted from "500 Low Carb Recipes (lair Winds Press,
$19.95 paperback).
T
LOW-CARB PEANUT BUTTER
COOKIES
Yield: 12 cookies. Nonstick cooking spray
1 cup chunky peanut butter
1 cup sucralose (Splenda)
1 large egg
1 teaspoon vanilla
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Coat a cookie sheet with
cooking spray.
Stir together peanut butter, sucralose, egg and vanilla. Drop by
spoonfuls onto the cookie sheet. With the tines of a fork, flatten
the cookies, making a criss-cross pattern. Bake about 10 minutes,
until centers are no longer wet. Let cool completely before remov-
ing from the cookie sheet.
PER COOKIE: 128 calories; 9.5g fat (65 percent calories from
fat); 2g saturated fat; 18mg cholesterol; 9g protein; 6g carbohy-
drate; 2g fiber; 8mg sodium; 49mg calcium.
Recipe adapted from www.about.com.
JERK-MARINATED
GRILLED PORK STEAKS
Yield: 4 to 8 servings.
2 to 4 Scotch Bonnet or habanero chiles, stemmed (see note)
1 small onion, peeled and cut into chunks
6 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons ground allspice
12 cup grated fresh ginger
2 tablespoons soy sauce
2 teaspoons dried thyme
2 bay leaves, crumbled
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
2 tablespoons sucralose (Splenda)
4 cloves garlic, crushed
8 (4- to 6-ounce) pork steaks
Combine chiles, onion, oil, allspice, ginger, soy sauce, thyme, bay
leavescinnamon, sucralose and garlic in a food processor; pulse until
well combined. Smear the soft paste on the pork steaks, wrap rightly
and refrigerate lor 2 days.
Prepare a medium-hot fire in grill. Cook, turning frequently,
until done, about 40 minutes (the time will vary depending on the
thickness of the meat).
PER SERVING: 416 calories; 2o"g fat (61 percent calories from fat);
8g saturated fat; Ulmg cholesterol; 36g protein; 5g carbohydrate; lg
sugar; 1.5g fiber; 88mg sodium; 59mg calcium; 541mg potassium.
Note: For a milder marinade, seed the peppers. To protect
your hands, use plastic gloves while handling the peppers.
Adapted from "500 Low Carb Recipes (Fair Winds Press)
CREAMY GARLIC
DRESSING
Yield: About 1 cups
l cup mayonnaise
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon ground black pepper
8 cloves garlic, crashed
12 cup olive oil
12 cup wine vinegar
Stir together mayonnaise, salt, pepper, garlic, oil and
vinegar. Cover; refrigerate up to 1 day,
PER TABLESPOON: 77 calories; 8g fat (94 percent calories
from fat); l.Sg saturated fat: 6mg cholesterol; no protein;
O.Sg carbohydrate; no sugar; no liber; 54 nig sodium; 2mg
calcium; 3mg potassium.
Adapted from "500 Low- Carb Recipes (Lair Winds Press,
$19.95 paperback).
CRUNCHY AND SAVORY
ALMONDS
Yield: 8 servings. 2 tablespoons olive oil
4 teaspoons curry powder
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon ground red (cayenne) pepper
2 cups whole almonds
Preheat oven to too degrees. In a saucepan, combine oil.
curry powder, garlic powder, union powder ami cayenne. Stir
over medium heat until hot. Stir in almonds.
Transfer almonds to 1 or 2 foil-covered jelly-roll pans. Bake
until lightly browned, about 10 minutes, stirring twice. Let cool;
store in a tightly sealed container up to 1 weeks.
PER SERVING: 242 calories; 22g fat (82 percent calories
from fat); 2g saturated fat; no cholesterol; 8g protein; 7g car-
bohydrate; l.Sg sugar; 4.5g fiber; ling sodium; 94mg cakiiim;
280mg potassium.
Adapted from a recipe on www.pnga.net, t he Web site of the
Pennsylvania Nut Growers Association.
April 26 (Mon.) - April 29 (Thur.) 11 am - 4 pm
Uptown ureenvnie � did sown cotancne St
252-758-2616
f HH f2& ipr J.
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TO ORDER: 1-800-952-7002
IRTQiKVED
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PAGLB4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
4 204
4-27-C
Save room for sweets
Beauty products look
good, taste great
RACHELLANDEN
SENIOR WRITER
The old saying "A KCOnd on
the lips, a lifetime on the hips
need not apply.
A recent trend in flavored
beauty products presents a vari-
ety of lip and body treats that
taste as good as they look. From
lip glosses to body powders to
beliy button fragrances, flavors
are the focus of this season's
newest beauty buys.
Urban Dei ay and the Dessert
line by Jessica Simpson are some
of the newest and hottest names
in this flavorful market.
At $15, Urban Decay's XXX
Shine Lip Gloss boasts lots of
shine plus a peppermint flavor
that instantly refreshes breath.
The XXX Slick PotGloss, also
$15, provides more options with
four available colors, each with
its own unique flavor, for a red
stain and cherry flavor, try Gash.
For a more neutral tone, Sin is
beige with a coconut flavor.
Urban Decay's Lip Gunk also
smells and tastes delicious. With
fun names like ACDC, I it tor,
Hig Bang and Mid-
night Cowboy,
you can
cover
your lips with the taste of jel-
lybeans, vanilla pudding, cin-
namon red hots and mandarin
orange.
Urban Decay doesn't stop
with just tasty lip coverage.
You can dust on their shim-
mery body powders for $25.
Try honey, cherry lemonade or
caramel. They even recommend
mixing the cocoa ami marshmal-
low flavors together for a unique
s'more savor.
All Urban Decay products
can be purchased at their
Web site as well as in select
boutiques including IMta and
Sephora. Ulta stores are located
in Gary and Charlotte Sephora
also has a location in Charlotte,
but its closest store is in the Crab-
tree Valley Mall of Raleigh.
Sephora also sells products
in the Dessert line. Created
by Jessica Simpson and Clean
Fragrance founder Randi
Shinder, Dessert currently oilers
fragrances, creams and glosses
with sweet scents and tempting
tastes More products, including
exfoliating sugar scrubs and
sheet i heck ulors, are yet to be
released.
Like those in the Urban Decay
line, body and lip glosses by
Dessert shimmer, shine and taste
oh-so-sweet, but the prices are
also slightly steeper. Body gloss
costs $32 and lip gloss is $21.
Deliciously Kissable Fra-
grances come in three blends:
I tench vanilla and caramel in
Creamy, milk chocolate and
coconut in Dreamy, and berry
and green bouquet in Juicy. A
1.7 ounce fragrance costs $45.
For the slightly more
adventurous, Creamy, Dreamy
and Juicy are also available as
Deliciously Kissable Belly Button
Love Potion Fragrances and Kiss-
able Whipped H dyreams with
Candy Sprinkles. The rich and
smooth cream and belly button
fragrance rolls on at $34.
Despite their rapidly
growing popularity, Urban
Decay and Dessert have not
yet cornered the market. Lip
Smackers by Bonne Bell, lip
glosses by Hurt's Bees, and lip
balms and glosses by l.otta l.uv
are still hot-ticket items.
(listing significant!) less
than lip products by Urban Decay
and Dessert, these other brands
bring color, shine and, of course,
flavor to lips with a versatile
smorgasbord of selections
Lip Smackers' tastes include
pink lemonade, cotton candy,
red licorice, milk chocolate mint
and more. Burl's Bees glosses
are fruil-llavored and l.otta Inv
balms and glosses hint that they
are bad for you.
Even with flavors like Sweet
l.irts, Reese's Peanut Butter Cups,
Iwinkies, Cinnabon. footsie Roll
and Junior Mint, you don't have
to feel ashamed for slathering it
on. or going back for seconds or
thirds.
Go ahead and indulge
yourself with the newest in
lip and body products. They'll
make your lips and skin look
great, plus they're calorie free
so you'll never have to teel guilty.
Who knew looking this good
could taste this great?
This writer can be contacted at
ieatures@theeostcarolinian.com.
42k?

Do It Yourself
Make your own flavored lip tint
using Jell-0. Choose your favor-
ite Jell-0 flavor and dip a damp
cotton swab Into the powder.
Lick your lips, drag the swab
across and wait five more min-
utes before licking It off. Finish
off your lips with clear lip gloss.
Horoscopes
Jutes March 21 -Apr 201. Ran brief social
encounters before midweek and avoid
detailed romantic discussions Al
present, nostalgic reflection and quiet
activities will bring renewed energy
Later this week, a close friend may
require complex career or business
advice Offer encouragement but
advocate caution Long-term debl
may quickly prove unmanageable.
Taurus (April 21 -May 20). Home decisions
and (amity promises demand clarity
Loved ones may ask probing questions
or address changing expectations.No
serious or long-lasting effects are
accented, so not to worry Wednesday
through Friday, social obligations and
public responsibility are a source of
concern
Gemini I May 21-June 211. Romantic
choices, social triangles and
conflicting schedules require added
diplomacy Friends and lovers may
be mildly possessive of your time
Don! be unnerved A competition for
your attention should be taken as a
compliment After Thursday, family
relations will intensify
Cancer Utme 22-July 221. Over the next
few days, employment schemes may
trigger intense discussions Late
Tuesday expect close relatives and
friends to outline unusually creative
or unrealistic career plans Sensitivity
to criticism may be high After
midweek, love relationships are a top
pnonty For many Cancenans several
months of strained relations will end
Don't hold back
Leo (July 23-Aug. 221. Old romantic
memories or distant friends
are accented over Ihe next five
days Many Leos will feel drawn
toward the comforl ol yesterday's
relationships. Take extra time for
contemplation and quiet reflection
Later this week, co-workers or
business partners may ask for detailed
written contracts Financial promises
added duties and long-term daily
obligations are accented.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 221. At present,
long-term Iriends or lovers may be
fearful ot change, abandonment or
emotional loss All of this is a quickly
passing mood, so not to worry Do.
however, offer concrete dates, times or
promises After Thursday, watch also
for a sudden increase in workplace
cooperation
Libra (Sept. 23-0ct. 23). Early this
week, a close relative may outline
revised career goals or new
financial aspirations Thoroughly
discuss all ideas and small details
Expect concrete change before
June Thursday through Saturday
highlights complex social triangles
Friends, lovers or co-workers may
feel mildly threatened by last-minute
change Avoid long-term promises, if
possible.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 221. Improved
workplace skills or new educational
programs may soon be key influences
In the coming weeks, many Scorpios
will feel a strong desire to search out
new career opportunities Ask for
advice After midweek, a distant or
isolated relative may make contact
This is a powerful week for renewed
home agreements and subtle family
negotiations Remain receptive to ail
creative proposals
Sagittarius INov. 23-Dec. 21). Home
celebrations and family events will
prove rewarding over the next eight
days Early Monday, a previously
reluctant friend or relative may offer
unique invitations Social insight and
empathy will bring the desired results
Remain open to subtle gestures ot
affection or small apologies Late
Saturday, a brief financial restnetion
may be bothersome
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 201. Financial
promises may be briefly unreliable
After Tuesday, a close friend or family
member may outline a revised long-
term budgeL business plan or payment
schedule. Offer creative suggestions
and encourage further research Later
this week, social habits and daily
family patterns are vital to long-term
relationships Loved ones may ask (or
added commitments, new promises or
shared home agreements
Aquarius (Jan. 2t-Feb. 191. Property
agreements and short-term leases may
require detailed revisions Although
worthwhile, important documents
may present inaccurate calculations
or definitions. An honest review of the
facts will eventually prove helpful. After
Fnday, a new social relationship may
quickly turn romantic Be prepared
for passionate flirtations or sudden
declarations of love
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20) Share private
moments with loved ones and
romantic partners Al present, key
relationships may need to move to
a more intimate or committed level.
Use this time to explore changing
affections or discuss common home,
social or family goals. Thursday
through Saturday also accent
financial decisions and ongoing debt.
Close relatives or romantic partners
may ask for added lime or special
consideration Trust your instincts
If your birthday Is this week Social
politics may become increasingly
demanding over Ihe next 18 weeks.
Friends, lovers and close colleagues
will provide vague promises, but expect
undivided loyalty After mid-June,
watch also for a series of passionate
romantic proposals Short-term
travel, revised living arrangements or
public celebrations are accented
Long-term commitments will be
obvious and reliable by July 8.
Pace yourself and watch for subtle
changes September through late
November also highlight complex
workplace improvements. Promotions,
career security and new job titles
may be on the agenda Stay open
to fast revisions.
Memories
from page B1
Pirate basketball felt the
loss of Gabriel Mikulas and all
of eastern North Carolina felt
the ice and snow that closed the
university.
As we thawed out, Dance
2004 entertained audiences, he
fttSStM nt Hi Christ brought in
millions of dollars and Chart-
ire T heron became our favorite
Xffwrsfcrandan Oscar winner who
wasn't trom New Zealand.
March went by quickly with
a week off for Spring Break and a
new group ot "American Idols"
who made fantasia Hrrmo and
William Hung household names
SGA elections were plagued with
a technical difficulty, but the
voter turnout was one of the
highest ever
With Vprll, we enjoyed visits
from Kevin Smith, another
(,re.it Race down the Hill and
a swingm afternoon with Big
Bad Voodoo Daddy at the 25th
Annual Barefoot on the Mall.
Ihe IV season will see the last
"Friendsand "Sexand thet its
the return ot Tunk'd" and more
ol the ubiquitous "Apprentice"
phrase, "You're tired
Graduation is around the
Corner, and soon Ihe campus
will be filled with caps and
gowns, can Stuffed to the brim
with dorm belongings and tons
of lamily and friends wishing the
new graduates well.
ollegC is seen as the best
yean of our lives, a time when
we will choose our careers,
make life-long Mends, perhaps
find love and truly discover who
we are
This year has flow rj In,
but it will remain In our menu I
rics as one of the best years spent
at ECU. To the graduates of
2004, congratulations and best
ot link in .til ot sour endeavon.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
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4 204
4-27-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE Bb
When you're
cruising the
information
highway
pull off on
our new exit
www.theeastcarolinian.com





PAGE B6
fHI L AST CAROLINIAN � ITATURLS
4 27-04
Names in the News
SS million in 2000, belong! to
the whole family. Thej want
it "partitioned meaning the)
want money tor their share ot
the home.
s with most family disputes,
there may be more here than
meets the ejc Vre the 'renti
taking out their frustrations that
Anna has gone further because
of her supermodel looks (she's
netted latin crooner Enrique
Iglesiasl than her tennis talents
Altii all the gal's never won a
singles tournament.
(KRT) � TheKournikovai Ian
is not feeling the love. Daughter
Anna, the 22-ycar-old tennis
starlet, is being sued by her par-
ents, who claim she's snatched
their Miami Heach house from
them
Sergei and Alia Kournlkova's
suit in Miami-Dadc Circuit Court
alleges that the seven-bedroom
waterfront home, purchased lor
AN ELECTRIC DEFEAT?
More fallout Irom Wednesd.n
night's "American idol" debacle
- the worst upset in recenl music
history, when curvaceous Jen-
nifer Hudson was voted oil the
show. As traumatized tans strug-
gle to recover from the shock, a
new theory has emerged.
According to the syndicated
gossip show "Extra storms in
the Midwest knocked out power
in t hit ago, Hudson's hometown.
So more than IS,(MM) tas there
couldn't watch "Idol" or vote for
their favorite dia I he show's
producers lay there's nothing
they can do.
Meanwhile, Hudson, 22,
is taking her defeat in stride.
"I wasn't shot Iced at all she
said Friday on Fox's "Good Day
Live "If you've noticed, I've
been through the fire As R&B
i.in I riednih Nietsi heoncesaid:
"What doesn't kill me makes me
stronger
PARIS Al VOUR
VIDEO STOR !
Glorious news lor tItizens
eagerly awaiting June Id. when
Iiris Hilton's "The Simple Life2"
debuts on Fox. Now there's some-
thing else to celebrate. I he Kick
Salomon-directed, X-rated vid
starring America's favorite trash-
couture-wearing celebutante will
be released a day earlier.
Red Light District Video will
release a 4S-minute version of the
amateur sex tape to adult video
stores around the country. The
tape, tastefully titled One Night
in Parli, has seven minutes of
never-beforc-seen action.
xL �� �
' i �
IIIM
"H i
vj
rf
M M. � Jt � �
Rock bands lash out against Bush
$�s3m
J
t"�
(KRT) � Without singing
a solitary note, Natalie Maines
and the Dixie Chicks were thrust
into one of last year's biggest
political controversies when the
singer told a London audience
she was ashamed to be from the
same state as the president.
With the country braced lu
war, patriotism was on the charts.
Toby Keith's "( oiutesy ot the
Red. White and Blue I I he Angry
American) and Darryl Worley's
"Have You Forgotten?" were big
hits on country radio, where
the Dixie i links were quickly
ostracized lor Maines' criticism
of Hush's lrai policy.
Hut, as another tainous singer
once observed, the tunes they .ue
a-changin There's a polarizing
presiilenti.il election campaign
under way, and troops base
been in lrai for more than a
year now, which means other
viewpoints are increasingly
surfacing among musicians. In
the same way that Keith and
Worlev exhorted crowds to
support President Bush at a
March 2003 troop rally at
MacDill Air force Base in
lamps, it.i rock stars critical of
the president now are lobbying
their tans.
"We're tr ing to inform
our tans on how bad this
administration is and how the
administration negatively affects
them suss lat Mike liurkelt. ol
punk band NOFX, in an e-mail
about his partisan nonprofit
group Punk Voter.
Sin b organizations use music
to push for voter registration
among young fans, often with a
partisan slant
t �m fttesday, Pun Voter
released K A. Mills Bjisft, I'ol.
, a compilation album featuring
unreleased songs In punk bands
such as Alkaline Mo, less I ban
lake. New Found Glory, Social
Distortion and Sum 41. There's
also a series of "Roik Against
Bush" tours on the road.
Burkell estimates thai his
organization registers about 100
voters at each 1,800-seat concert
hall the tour plays. He and othet
young activists are energized
that such numbers could swing
November's presidential race.
At last month's South
by Southwest Music(infer-
ence in Austin, lexas, the
nonprofit Music for America
was spreading the word at a
"Rock Against Bush" showcase
coordinated with Burkett's
Fat Wreck Chords label and
punkvoter.com. The show
featured punk bands such as
Gainesville, Habased Against
Mel and Minneapolis-based
Dillinger Four
Between angry songs,
musicians lashed out at the
president: "You know the rich
kids you went to high school
with?" barked Dillinger Four
bassist Patrick Costello. "That's
him
On an outdoor patio,
Molly lewis, a representative
of Music For America, was
banding out literature about the
organization, which aims to
motivate at least 1 million
young voters to go to the polls
in November. I ike I'unk Voter,
Music lor America portrays the
Bush administration as wrong
on education, the economy, the
war, health care and other social
issues.
It's a different approach from
the longstanding Rock the Vote,
which takes a nonpartisan stance
on candidates when pushing
young people to vote. Lewis, 25,
claims that method is becoming
outdated.
"It's tough to convince
our peers how important it is
without talking about reasons
to vote and how screwed up
we're getting if we don't she
says, "i hat becomes part of the
message: I nok what's happening
because we're not voting
Quiet Riot
from page B1
-sometimes growling, sometimes
yelling and sometimes soft and
vulnerable, while the guitar,
bass and drums weave an intri-
cate tapestry ot interplay, time
signatures and hooks
A band more widely known,
Farewell, started in the summer ol
2002 in Rocky Mount. I hey have-
now moved to Greensboro to gel
deeper into the indieroi k genre
that is quite popular there.
Farewell features )etl Ellis
Oil drums, Joe Norkus on bass
and vocals, Ionian Bullot k on
guitar and vocals, Marshall
Davis, who is the lead singer and
on keyboard, and Ryan Morgan
on guitar ami vocals. Some nl
Farewell's influences Include
The Cure, Green Day. Alkaline
Trio and Midtown.
Farewell's set is Irom 8:40
p.m 9:25 p in.
Last, but definitely not
least, The Argument will take
stage I be are headlining
Not So Quiet Riot and will be
playing from 9:40 p.m. - 11 p.m.
I be Argument features smii
Simons on the keyboard, Matl
Warder on guitar and vocals.
Brent Bunner on b.iss and vocals
.mil blis Russell on diuins.
i he) are from Morgantown, w
I Ins nationall) known group
has been i ompared to bands sui b
as Ben Folds Five and Jellyfish
They have shared the stage with
large a ts like Train, t Doors
Down, Howie I .i and OK Go
The Argument can be
described as "alt pop" with
Intelligent and original song
writing. I he show will be
full ol energy and talent.
The Wgunieiil was named
among the top 10 unsigned bands
in the country by the American
Music Awards, and Coca-Cola
and was named best in West ii
ginia by Graffiti Magazine.
I he Not So Quiet Riot
is a show that is trying to
bring togethei real up-and-
coming bauds tor students
to see irom the underground
music scene. I he bands will be
different Irom the bands on MTV
that are considered new, emo 01
indie rock.
Ibis show also gi es the
Northarolina music scene a
chance to flourish and blend
together among their peers who
can appreciate and support their
music.
"It is a promotional way of
busting out the up-and-coming
acts ol new, fresh music said
Matthijs
The Not So Quiet Riot is
definitely something fun,
exciting and very different
from what we hear daily on the
radio and IA .
"WZMB will be at the show
promoting and talking to
students. This will be a rad
show and shouldn't be missed
Frail said.
This writer can be contacted at
teaturei@theeaitcarolinian.com.
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4204
THE LAST CAROLINIAN � ILATURLS
PAGE B
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PAGLB8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
4-27-04
You will soon receiVQ
lots of money.
-�
Get more cash for your books at U.B.E. buyback.
U.B.E. BOOK BUYBACK.
The most you've gotten from your books all semester.
Uptown Greenville 516 South Cotanche Street I www.ubeinc.com
your
U.B.E. Uptown Greenville � 516 South Cotanche St.
Monday & Tuesday, April 26 & 27
9:00am to 6:00pm
Wednesday & Thursday, April 28 & 29
9:00.m to 7:00p.m.
Friday, April 30
9:00am to 6:00pm
Saturday, May 1
10:00a.m to 5:00p,
Monday - Wednesday, May 3-5
9:00am to 7:00pm
U.B.E. Remote Book Buyback at the Alpha Phi House
(Bottom of College Hill) Just jog down to Alpha Phi and trade those books for cold cash!
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9:00am. to 5:00pm
Wednesday - Friday, April 28 - 30
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Monday - Wednesday, May 3-5
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 27, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 27, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1732
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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