The East Carolinian, April 22, 2004







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Volume 79 Number 140
� THE EAST CAROLINIAN
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THURSDAY
Divers compete underwater
some students say the intersection at the
bottom of College Hill is dangerous.
Intersection at 10th
Street, College
becoming dangerous
Students' safety in question after
morning accident occurs
KEITH S. BYERS
STAFF WRITER
A morning traffic accident at the intersection of
College Hill Drive and 10th Street has ECU faculty,
students and officials concerned.
The two-car accident, which happened early
April 7, involved a student who was exiting College
Hill and making a turn onto 10th street.
The driver making the turn was "T-boned"
by an eastbound car - narrowly missing a group
of students who were standing in the street
waiting for the light to change, according to
witness Rick Kilroy, Ph.D visiting assistant
political science professor and assistant director for
military programs. There were no injuries.
Kilroy said if the man driving the eastbound
vehicle had veered to miss the car making the
turn, he would have plowed right into the students
crossing the street.
The intersection doesn't have a concrete
median. Kilroy has seen students standing in the
middle of the street while waiting for the crosswalk
light to change on different occasions.
"If they could wait just a couple of more minutes
for the light to change, it could save their lives
said Kilroy.
A factor that may have caused the crash, Kilroy
said, was the early-morning sunlight.
He believes the eastbound driver couldn't see
the car making the turn.
If an accident or violation occurs on College
Hill, the ECU police respond. The Greenville Police
Department handles anything that may happen on
10th Street. U.tlime w�e a-probUm with the stop-
lights or crosswalk indicators, the City of Greenville
would make changes or repair anything that wasn't
working correctly.
ECU police Patrol Capt. Beth Watkins said she
couldn't recall any accidents occurring at the inter-
section, but was aware of the safety issues.
"It's a complex area said Walkins. "You have
pedestrian traffic and vehicle traffic, and it's a big
intersection
Senior communication major Johnathan Dowler
said seeing near-accidents, jaywalking and speeding
around the intersection is nothing new.
"1 used to see people almost get hit daily
see SAFETY page A2
Scuba divers participate in one of many underwater games and activities during a fundraiser for the American Cancer Society.
Club plans to raise
$10,000 for American
Cancer Society
NICK HENNE
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Scuba Diving
Club is hoping to raise $10,000
for the American Cancer
Society by playing underwater
games Saturday.
James I.el.iever, event chair-
man, said the club wanted to find
a creative way to do a fundraiser
and decided on Saturday's event
when he saw the idea online.
"We hope to make this an
annual event said LeLiever.
"The purpose of it is just lo
raise money for the American
Cancer Society while doing some-
thing we love
Planned activities include
chess, golf, cycling and poker.
The event will also fea-
ture a "silent auction" lo give
away scuba diving equipment
and a prie drawing. Prizes
include a dive trip off the North
Carolina coast, and the grand
prize is a seven-day "live aboard"
scuba diving cruise valued
at $2,000.
LeLiever said the event got a
positive reaction from the diving
community in eastern North
Carolina, who has assisted the
ECU club in running the event.
The club has raised $6,500
worth of merchandise and cash
donations from these sponsors.
LeLiever said he encour-
ages anyone to come out
and participate. There is no
registration deadline and divers
need to be scut� certified -
others can volunteer.
"It's targeted as a community
event LeLiever said.
Three categories of the event
include divers who spend one
hour under water, marathon
relay divers, a group of four
divers who alternate turns under
water for the duration of the
12-hour event and individual
marathon divers who spend the
entire 12 hours under water
with short breaks each hour.
"Each category must raise dif-
ferent amounts of pledge money
to participate LeLiever said.
Each diver must bring prop-
erly maintained scuba diving
equipment. Air fills will be pro-
vided for the marathon category
teams, but the one-hour divers
need to come with a full tank
of air.
Mike I lillier of Virginia Beach
originally created Dive for a Cure
in 1997. Canadian Paul Davies
embraced the idea and has
made it a foundation of events
all over North America.
Davies, now chairman of
the llve foi � t iir !��" �
Canada, said he encountered
the idea at a booth in Vir-
ginia Beach and "ran with it"
as he brought the idea up to
Canada. He helped LeLiever run
ECU's fundraiser.
Davis, who lost both of his
parents to cancer, said he is
driven to help the cause.
Steve Bailey, junior geogra-
phy major and vice president of
the scuba diving club, said he
see DIVE page A2
f) Event Info
Dive for a Cure Is In Mlnges
Coliseum Pool Saturday, April
24 from 9 am - 9 pm
For more Information, visit
vvww.ecu.eduorgdlveclub or
www.dlveforacure.com.
Students look ahead to Democracy Summer
March SGA election winners were sworn into
executive office last night.
New SGA executive
council begins duty
Student leaders sworn in last night
PETER KALAJIAN
STAFF WRITER
In the annual Student Government Association
Banquet, Student Body President Ian Bacr and his
Executive Council said goodbye to a year of lead-
ershi), while this year's winning ticket was sworn
into Executive Council.
"This year, our student government has shown
that we don't break when a strong wind blows
said Baer.
"We have lobbied for lower tuition and more
financial aid for students. I have full confidence
in the incoming administration to continue
see SGA page A5
Program a lesson in
social justice
JASMINE D. HARRELL
STAFF WRITER
Ten students from Greenville,
Carbaro and Charlotte will
have the opportunity to
spread the message of cam-
paign and voting rights
reform in North Carolina this
summer.
Democracy Summer, now
in its fifth year, was inspired
by the work of the civil
rights movement.
The program hires
students for the summer
to work as advocates for democ-
racy by promoting diversity and
funding to help those who do not
have the money to run for
office.
Peter Walz, organizer for
Democracy North Carolina,
said students will visit the
state legislature, give public
presentations, plan commu-
nity rallies and experience
community organization.
"The program was started
because we saw an opportu-
nity to train a lot of young
people and give them hands-on
experience to be community
organizers said Walz.
This year's theme, "Youth
taking action to promote
democracy for all of us
will, for the first time, allow
students to help register voters
in local areas.
Participants will be trained
from May 26 - 28 and will
work May 31 -July 30.
After listening to a pre-
sentation about the pro-
gram, Maria Dillard, senior
sociology and philosophy
major, immediately got involved
last summer and worked
to change how candidates
financed their campaign in state
and local elections.
The resulting influence was
the Judicial Election Reform Bill
that was recently passed.
"The program gives you
a lot of freedom to develop
what type of projects you
want to work on said Dillard.
"I enjoyed being able to
meet and work with those in
the community who really
have devoted their life lo some
cause.
"It's a great job, it's
something that in a few months
you learn a lot of things related
to community organizing
After leaving Democracy
Summer, Dillard and two
other students were inspired
to start an ECU chapter of
Democracy Matters and
a community group called
Democracy Alliance of
Eastern Carolina.
Undergraduate students
ages 17-24 that are not enrolled
in any summer courses
meet the qualifications for
Democracy Summer.
Students can qualify to
receive up to six hours of
class credit, depending upon
their major's department,
and receive $2,000.
"Applicants need a com-
mitment to social justice
and the need to improve
our democracy and willing-
ness to get out there and
talk to people Walz said.
Walz said there is still
one open position in Carbaro
and Greenville, but anyone
interested should e-mail him
a cover letter and resume
as soon as possible.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinion. com.
Program provides students real-life experience.
Contact Info
If you are interested in learning more about
Democracy Summer, visit the Web
site at www.democracy-nc.org for more
Information, or e-mail Peter Walz at
peterwaM�democracy-nc.org.
Applications for open positions will be accepted
until all available space are full.
Sexual Assualt Awareness
throughout
Sexual assault survivors' isits to (heir physicians increase by 18 percent (he year of the assault, 56 percent the year after
�and 31 percent the second year.
� Eighty percent of rape victims will suffer from chronic physical or psychological conditions.
Forecast tec required
Mostly Sunny READING
Online
News
High of 85
Visit wwwtheeastcarollnlan.com to
read about the evidence thai was found
iradmtestble In the Kobe Bryant case
page A2
A Russian spacecraft drooped off an
American. Dutch and Russian crew at
the International space station
Features
page I
TEC takes a look at advertising and the
negative affects that In can have on
women's self Imae.
P0rtS paged
ECU'S Pirates look to continue their
steter conference play against LDUtsvie
In a three-game series In Greenville.
The 25th annual Barefoot
on the Mall wi take place
today from noon -6 pm on
ECUs mat





PAGE A2
ec
NEWS
ERIN RICKERT
News Editor
HOLLY O'NEAL
Assistant News Editor
news@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
4-22-04
Teaching Awards
The eighth annual Teaching Awards Ceremony is Tuesday, April 27 at 11
a.m. in the MSC Great Room A receplion hosted by interim Chancellor
William Shelton will follow Contact the Faculty Senate office at 328-6537
for more information
Reading Day
Tuesday. April 27 is reading day
Regular exams
Regular exams begin Wednesday, April 28 and end Wednesday, May 5
at 10 a m
Graduation
Commencement is Saturday, May 8 in Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum
The morning ceremony begins al 930 am The afternoon ceremony
begins at 1 30 pm Register on OneStop.
Chemistry Placement Test
The chemistry placement test will be Monday, May 17 from 10 a.m. -11
am and 2 pm - 3 pm in 00309 Science and Technology Building
Students must arrive 10 minutes prior to testing and bring a No 2 pencil
and a non-programmable calculator
Paper Person
The student at the top of today's paper is Chris Melton, senior painting
major
Announcements
Oratorical Exhibition
The School of Communication sponsors an oratorical exhibition today
at 6:30 p.m. in Wright Auditorium featuring the best speakers in COMM
2410 and 2420.
Co-ops and Internships Workshop
The Office of Student Professional Development offers a workshop today
from 2 pm - 3 pm in 1012 Bate to assist students looking for co-op and
internship opportunities.
Physics Colloquium
C Ruth Kempf, Ph.D physics professor, will speak on nuclear security
in Russia and give an overview of ECU'S Center for Security Studies
and Research Friday at 3:15 pm In E-213 Howell Refreshments will be
served at 3 p.m.
Technology and Teaching
3-D visualization in classrooms will be discussed at "Conversations about
Teaching with Technology" Friday from 2:30 p m. - 4:30 p m in 307 Science
and Technology Building
Education Graduate Fair
The College of Education will hold a graduate program fair Saturday from
9 a.m. - noon in the Speight Building. Information will be available for
students who wish to pursue a graduate degree for work in educational
settings or obtain alternative licensure. Registration and reception begin
at 8:45 am.
Dive for a Cure
Scuba divers from ECU will raise money for the American Cancer Society
Saturday from 9 am - 9 p m at Minges Coliseum pool Games and events
will be provided All certified divers can participate Contact Jamie LeLiever
af 327-3391 for more information

Dances of Universal Peace
The Dances of Universal Peace - sacred dances that honor the world's
spiritual traditions through song, gentle dance and contemplation - will
be Saturday from 4 p m - 6 p m in 244 MSC
Deadline
Monday, April 26 is the last day to submit grade replacement requests.
Community Forum
The Greenville - Pitt County Chamber of Commerce will hold a community
Issues public forum Monday, April 26, at 6 p.m. at J.H Rose High
School The forum will address critical issues facing the community,
including crime, substance abuse, economic development, education
and cultural activities A light supper will be provided Call 752-4101 for
more information
Classes End
Monday. April 26 is the last day of classes
Coastal Resources Lecture
James P. Delgado, executive director of the Vancouver Maritime
Museum, will speak about the discovery of a former Union submarine off
Panamas coast Monday. April 26, at 7 p.m. in 307C Science and
Technology Building.
Medical Mind
The medical class of 2004 presents its play, "The Medical Mind Monday.
April 26 and Tuesday. April 27 at 7 p m in Brody Auditorium
News Briefs
Local
Wllkes County commissioners
ban dangerous exotic animals
WILKESBORO (AP) - Wilkes County
commissioners, citing the death
of a boy killed by a pet tiger, have
voted unanimously to ban private
ownership of inherently dangerous
exotic animals.
A 400-pound tiger owned by his aunt
killed 10-year-old C J Elleron Dec 16,
2003 His classmates and teachers
attended a public hearing last month
to support the ban
Sylvia Smith, a veterinarian and
a co-chairwoman of the county's
animal-control committee, presented
the committee's recommendation for
a ban lo commissioners Tuesday.
The goal, she said, was to protect
the public, to treat people fairly and
to protect the animals.
Owners of exotic animals have six
months to find them homes outside
the county. A violation would be
a misdemeanor. Civil penalties
for continuing violations would be
$500 for the first day and $250 a
day after that. The owner would also
be required to reimburse the county
for the costs of capture, care and
placement of the animal
NC farmworkers sue growers
association, charge blacklisting
RALEIGH (AP) - Nine Mexican
farmworkers on Tuesday sued a
North Carolina farm labor broker,
accusing the group of blacklisting
them for reporting dangerous working
conditions and seeking care for
work-related injuries.
The blacklisting is part of a larger
scheme in which the names of
more than 17,000 farmworkers
were placed on an "ineligible
list" circulated in Mexico and the
United States, an attorney for the
workers said.
The farmworkers sued the North
Carolina Growers Association in
Wake County Superior Court,
charging that more than 1,000
employers refused to hire workers
placed on this list for complaining
about things like a lack of drinking
water in the fields.
National
Greenspan: Recovery on track,
interest rates to rise at some point
WASHINGTON (AP) - Federal
Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan
told Congress on Wednesday that
Americas economic recovery has
good momentum and that low,
short-term interest rates will have to
nse at some point, though he didn't
say when.
"Looking forward, the prospects for
sustaining solid economic growth
in the period ahead are good
Greenspan said in prepared testimony
to the Joint Economic Committee
Greenspan, in striking an upbeat tone
about the economy, noted a much-
waited for improvement in the hiring
climate after a long period in which an
uneven economic recovery had failed
to produce significant increases in
the nations payrolls
Oregon judge orders halt to
gay weddings, but gives legal
recognition to same-sex marriages
PORTLAND. Ore (AP) - Katharine
Sprecher and Nitzye Gonzalez
sobbed in the corner of a county
clerk's office, wiping each others'
tears away
They had filled out a marriage
application, gotten married at the
Metropolitan Community Church
and returned to the county with the
paperwork to make it all official.
But their return was just moments
too late.
A judge told Multnomah County to
stop issuing gay marriage licenses
Tuesday - but also ordered the
state to recognize the 3,000 licenses
already granted in the county.
The decision by Multnomah County
Circuit Judge Frank Bearden marked
the first time in the nation that a judge
has recognized gay marriage. An
immediate appeal was expected.
"These are the first legally recognized
gay marriages in the country said
Dave Fidanque, the ACLU executive
director in Oregon. "In no other
same-sex marriages that have taken
place has there been a court order
saying the state must recognize
them. That's what's truly historic about
this opinion
World
Polish leader says Spanish
withdrawal from Iraq raises
issue for Poland
WARSAW, Poland (AP) - Poland's
outgoing prime minister said
Wednesday that Spain's withdrawal of
troops from Iraq could not be ignored,
a first hint that Poland may be having
doubts about its mission there.
"We cannot turn a blind eye to the
fact that Spain and others are leaving
Iraq Prime Minister Leszek Miller told
the Polish news agency PAP
"We will not make any rash gestures
he said.
"The final decision about the pullout
will be agreed and thought over, but
the problem exists"
Miller, who is stepping down May 2,
said the problem would be addressed
by his successor.
"I cannot say when we will leave Iraq,
but I am sure the new prime minister
will be more precise Miller said
Poland leads a multinational
contingent of 9,500 troops in central
Iraq, and is the largest contributor to
the force with 2,400 soldiers of its own.
Some 1,300 Spanish troops that the
Madrid government has said it will
withdraw are also in the sector.
North Korea's Kim pledges to
pursue 'weapon-free goal' in
nuclear talks
BEIJING (AP) - North Korean leader
Kim Jong II said during a visit to Beijing
that he wants to end the standoff over
the North's nuclear program through
dialogue and is committed to a
"nuclear weapon-free goal China
announced Wednesday.
Kim and Chinese leaders agreed to
"jointly pushing forward" six-nation
talks on the North's nuclear program,
the official Xinhua News Agency said.
The report, issued after the secretive
Kim left the Chinese capital on
Wednesday, was China's first public
confirmation of his three-day visit.
Kim's visit came just days after Vice
President Dick Cheney traveled to
Beijing last week and urged Chinese
leaders to press the North to reach
a settlement.
Immigrants hold mock graduation to support bill
WASHINGTON (KRT)
� Wearing graduation caps
and gowns, more than 80 stu-
dents held a mock graduation
ceremony Tuesday outside
the Capitol to press Con-
gress to approve a bill that
would grant them legal immi-
grant status.
More than 65,000
undocumented teen-agers are
expected to graduate from high
school this spring. Many of
them were brought to the
United States as young
children by their
parents and have lived here most
of their lives.
lrJ.�.u.n�-i.lil ntudent
face the prospect of deportation
and can't legalize their immigra-
tion status. Their home states
are required to charge them
the higher out-of-state
tuition rates, making college
unaffordable in many
cases.
"As a result, these children
lose an educational opportu-
nity to develop their talents
and, in return, our country
loses the benefits of their
potential contributions as
educated professionals and
taxpayers said Rep.
Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-
Calif the chair of the
Congressional Hispanic Caucus
and one of the co-sponsors of
the bill.
The Development, Relief
and Education for Alien Minors
Act, known as the DRI.AM bill,
would legalize students who
entered the United Slates before
they were 16, have gradu-
ated from high school and are
enrolled in college. It also would
authorize states to offer them in-
state tuition.
The act is being debated
during a year that Hispanic
voters are expected to play an
important role in a close presi-
dential election.
According to recent polls,
education and immigra-
tion are top concerns for the
Hispanic population.
The bill received the bipar-
tisan support Of the Senate
judiciary Committee in
October, but the Senate's lead-
ership is holding back a vote,
waiting for the White House to
signal its position.
"Our question lo America is
how can anyone sleep if immi-
grant students can't dream?"
said Deepak Hhargava, the
executive director ol the t enter
for Community Change, a
Washing ton-based nonprofit
group that's committed to
Students rallied in Washington, D.C. for immigration status.
supporting low-Income com-
munities and that organized
Tuesday's event.
Marcos Zapata, 23, who's
from San Diego, said he flew
to Washington to deliver
(),()()() petitions from illegal
Students in California to
President Bush. Zapata said his
parents brought him to the
United States when he was 10,
and he never questioned his
legal status until he applied
to college and was
denied financial aid
because he didn't have a Social
Security number.
"This act would help not
just me, but millions of students
like me, who need a driver's
license, who want to go to col-
lege, who need a permit to work
Zapata said.
Another student, Marie
Nazareth Gonzalez, 18, was
born in Costa Rica and raised
in Jefferson City, Mo. She
said she was a member of the
National Honor Society and
the school track and tennis
team, and volunteered in her
church and community.
"What makes me angry is our
nation's immigration laws don't
take any of this into account
she said.
Safety
from page A1
Dive
from page A1
said Dowler.
He said "everyone" - drivers
and pedestrians - is to blame for
problems at the intersection.
Dowler said last year a car hit
a student, but it didn't result in
serious injury.
"I am scared to drive there
now Dowler said.
"They pedestrians don't syn-
chronize with the lights. It's only
a matter of time before someone
is hit
Dowler has advice for both
motorists and pedestrians.
"They need to pay atten-
tion - just be aware of what's
going on. We are in college, we
should be able to do this without
any problem
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
feels it is important for everyone
to participate because it increases
the awareness of cancer.
He said the club plans to
continue the event in future
years.
The scuba diving club,
founded last semester, cur-
rently has 47 active members.
The club makes trips off the
North Carolina coast and is
organizing a trip to the Bahamas
lor fall break.
The American l ancei Soci-
ety is a nation-wide volunteer
based organization dedicated
to eliminating cancer as a
major health problem by pre-
vention, research, education,
advocacy and service.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
hl'lliMrU
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4 22-04
THL LAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
COME CHECK OUT THE
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ELECTRONICS DRAWINGS
STOP BY FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN:
Friday, April 23, 2004 1PM -4PM
Location: Mendenhall Student Center Brickyard
ALSO: Visit the Best Buy Activity Zone
at the mtvU Road Trip Rest Stop @ Minges Coliseum
on Sunday, April 25!
East Carolina
UNIVERSITY
G3GQ
Academic Computing Environment
What is it?
ACE is a campus-wide effort addressing the support of
student technology in the academic environment.
Beginning In the fall of 2004, specific academic programs
will begin requiring or strongly recommending their
students to own a computer. The degree programs vary on
when the computer will be required within the life of the
program.
In response to these requirements and recommendations,
the ACE program has a selected vendor(s) and models it
will support. We believe these models will bring quality and
value to our students.
ACE will provide training and troubleshooting for students
who purchase one of the low-priced, select models.
Purchasing a computer for students NOT enrolled in a
requiring program is OPTIONAL. However, any student can
take advantage of the special pricing and available
support. � y
zsn
lonald I. Dowdy
Student Stores
College of Education
Business Education
Marketing Education
; Information (ethnologies
College of Arts and Sciences
Biology
College of Technology and Computer Science
Construction Management
Industrial Distribution
Industrial Technology
Information and Computer Technology
Planning
DesignDrafting
Manufacturing
School of Art
Communication Arts
School of Medicine
College of Human Ecology
Criminal Justice
Stronqly Recommended
College of Education
Graduate Program
Music Education
Teaching Fellows
Theatre Education
College of Arts and Sciences
Anthropology
- Physki
v
www.ecu.eduace
Detailed information flbOul specific programs and itqulrwwnti can be found at wwwecu.eduace.
i
CM
LL
Soft crabbing improvements
net big win for ECU venture
lames Reho, a visiting
assistant professor in ECU'S
chemistry department, and
Gabe Dough, senior geology
major with a minor in business
administration, competed in
Ihe five Ventures 2004 competi-
tion, an annual university and
community enlrepreneurship
event held April 7 at the Uni-
versity of North Carolina at
Charlotte.
Reho and Dough's venture
company, Shore Shudders, was
developed to improve efficiency
and profitability of commercial
crabbing through the chemists'
composite.
They have since changed
the business name to an alter-
nate spelling - Shine Shedders
- but the idea remains the
same: Replace the traditional
soil shell crab trapping
method of live bailing with
their new composite baiting
technique. Simply put, the
product will save crabbers
"time, money and bites Reho
said.
"We were looking to modern-
ize the way soft crabbing is done-
today Reho said.
"The time crabbers spend
during the peeler season is very
valuable. In six to eight weeks
these guys can make In excess of
$100,000
Traditional methods lure
molting female crabs to pots by
using a male crab as bait females
seek out males for protection and
mating during molting.
The Shure Shedders way
replaces the male crab with the
chemical composite, a time-
released concoction designed to
mimic the luring capability of the
male crab.
Using the chemical in lieu of
the male circumvents the need
to harvest bait crabs during shed-
ding season, thus saving time and
money, said Reho.
The budding com-
pany, founded by Reho and
Dough, will develop and com-
mercialize the crab-catching
composite.
The Five Ventures 2004
competition focuses on essential
qualities of a successful business.
Open to new business ventures
that have an affiliation with a
university in North Carolina or
South Carolina, participants were
required to compete against one
another with their entrepreneur
business plans.
live companies were selected
as the "live Ventures and will
receive legal, accounting, market-
ing and management services for
their start-up ventures.
The Small Business Technol-
ogy Development Center and
F,CU's Office of Technology Trans-
fer provided extensive counseling
sere ices to Shure Shedders In prep-
aration of the competition.
With a patent pending on
their secret composite, the team
plans on conducting extensive
field research this summer with
a goal of having the project out
on the market by the summer
of 2005.
Featuring:
Free Cable TV
Free Water & Sewer
Sparkling Swimming pool
Professional On-Site Management
24-hour Emergency Maintenance
Laundry Center
On ECU Bus Route
WasherDryer Connections
Spacious Floor Plans
Pets allowed with fee
'In some units
mm
Stratford Arms
APARTMENTS
1900 S. Chart
lie, NC 27858
So close to
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PAGEA4
Itec
OPINION
Michelle A. McLeod
Editor-in-chief
editor@ttieeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
4 22-04
Erin Rickert
News Editor
Amanda Ungerfelt
Features Editor
Ryan Downey
Sports Editor
Meghann Roark
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
Holly O'Neal
Asst News Editor
John Bream
Asst Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Asst Sports Editor
Daniel Roy
Production Manager
Amanda Vanness
Asst Photo Editor
252.328.6366
252.328.6558
252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, The East Carolinian prints 9.000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular academic year
and 5.000 on Wednesdays during the summer. 'Our View" is the opin-
ion of the editorial board and is written by editorial board members
The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor which are limited to
250 words (which may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and include
a telephone number. Letters may be sent via e-mail to editor@theeast
carolinian.com or to The East Carolinian, Student Publications Building,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more information.
One copy of The East Carolinian is free, each additional copy is $1.
Our View
While most states prohibit convicted felons
from owning or possessing firearms, North
Carolina does not.
The statute in our state limits gun ownership
for felons by restricting the type of firearms they
can own or possess to one with a barrel of 18
Inches or more and a total length of 26 Inches.
The statute restricts the possession of a firearm
to a felon's residence or owned business.
In simpler terms, any convicted felon in
Greenville can, by law, possess a semi-auto-
matic AK-47 (battle rifle) and not be in violation
of the law.
Another statute that should concern us as
students is the law prohibiting firearms on
campus.
In order for a person to be charged with a
misdemeanor rather than a felony under this
law, he or she must meet the following four
elements: the firearm must be unloaded and
in a locked container; the individual must not
be a student at the educational institution; the
weapon must not be concealed; and the owner
must not brandish it in a threatening manner.
What does this mean for us? You can have any
number of violent convictions on your record,
but if you follow the restrictions above, you're
charged with a misdemeanor.
However, if you go hunting one weekend, return
to your dorm room on Sunday but leave your
loaded rifle (or gun) in your car outside the resi-
dence hall, you're facing a felony charge.
By no means are we advocating allowing
firearms on campus especially in lieu of the
recent violence on our campus and surround-
ing community. We do, however, want students
to fully understand the effect some laws may
have directly on them.
As students, we have a direct responsibility to
require our legislature to look out for our best
interest and safety.
Although firearm ownership is a right protected
by the U.S. Constitution, it is our view that it
becomes a privilege for convicted felons, and it
should not be taken lightly. Nor should students
be penalized more harshly because they have
chosen to partake in higher education.
The purpose of TEC's opinion pages is to invoke
conversation in ECU'S community. To respond to an
opinion on this page, please send your letter, with your contact
information for verification, to editors theeastcarolinian.com,
By no means
are we advo-
cating allow-
ing firearms
on campus
especially in
lieu of the
recent vio-
lence on our
campus and
surrounding
community.
We do, how-
ever, want
students to
fully under-
stand the
effect some
laws may
have directly
on them.
MAYBe IT WASA �MiSmKe.I&
uerr fiieA -resTiFr TfeGemef
Opinion Columnist
Oil prices defy basic economics
It all makes perfect
sense
ANTHONY MCKEE
STAFF WRITER
As I was filling up my
truck one day last week, at a
station where the price had
gone up four cents a gallon
between 8 a.m that morning
and 4:30 p.m. that afternoon
and again later that night
when my wife gave me the
receipt from filling up her
truck, a question popped
into my mind.
I couldn't figure it out,
so I am asking for your
help. Mere's the question:
whatever happened to those
loud-mouthed (and foul-
mouthed), self; righteous
clown V'wfto claimed the war
in Iraq was all about oil?
You know the ones I'm
talking about. The ones
screaming "No Blood For
Oil! No Blood For Halli-
burton and other equally
quaint, catchy phrases at all
the anti-war rallies.
The ones who spewed forth
their hatred for President
Hush and sometimes even
for America itself (yes, they
really did), the ones where
the press lovingly tried to
give the world the impres-
sion that .50 or so people was
really a "huge groundswcll
of opposition
Those clowns.
The reason I ask is that
the 1-year anniversary of
the war has come and gone,
and gas prices are reach-
ing record highs. When
the supply of bomething
inrirascs, doesn't the price
usually decrease? That is a
basic principle of econom-
ics, isn't it?
Now, if the war in Iraq
is all about oil, wouldn't
it make sense that once we
got the oil pumping again
- which we have - that the
supply would increase and
the prices would go down?
And since the prices
haven't gone down, it makes
an equal amount of sense
that the war In Iraq is not
about oil. Correct?
Of course it makes sense.
To most people it does,
anyway. The only people
that it doesn't seem to make
sense to are certain members
ot the Democrat Party and a
particular wanted terrorist.
During the recent presi-
dential nomination campaign
we can all remember being
treated to a parroting of this
(utterly false) statement by
practically every Democratic
candidate.
I was glad when the cam-
paign was over so I wouldn't
have to hear the same thing
repeated 100 different ways
by nine people. Now I only
have to listen to one.
And John Kerry definitely
hasn't shied away from saying
this at all. Hut 1 digress.
We have all heard about
the bombing in Spain and the
communication from the ter-
rorists that more bloodshed
would follow if Spain didn't
remove her troops from
Iraq. The bombing directly
affected an election (The new
Prime Minister of Spain has
announced that their troops
will he pulled out).
And it has been big news
that a new Al-Qaeda tape
with Osama bin Laden's voice
is being broadcast around the
world. Have you heard what
bin Laden says?
It offers Europe a "truce"
because, among other things,
the war in Iraq is about
enriching multi-billion
dollar American companies!
The same thing that Kerry,
other Democrats and assorted
kooks have been saying.
The world's most wanted
terrorist is sounding like a
campaign ad for the John
Kerry campaign.
Wait! Eureka! I just fig-
ured it out! All those "No
Blood For Halliburton"
clowns went to serve as pro-
pagandists and speechwrlters
for John Kerry and Osama bin
l.aden! Mystery solved.
Follow the logic: Bush
and Cheney are "oil men
Cheney worked for Halli-
burton. The protestors say
the war in Iraq is about oil.
Nothing is heard from the
protestors as the price of
gasoline rises.
Osama bin Laden starts
saying the same thing as
Kerry and the Democrats.
The protestors (the afore-
mentioned clowns) are
working as speechwriters for
Kerry and bin Laden.
It makes perfect sense.
As much sense as that the
war is for oil.
Opinions in Brief
TEC EDITORIAL BOARD
Networks need
original Ideas
First, it started with
NBC's "Joey a spin-off
centered around Matt I.eB-
lanc's "Friends" character.
Now it seems that NBC and
CBS have decided that one
spin-off isn't enough - the
fall lineup will also include
such shows as "Law to Order:
Trial By Jury" and "CSI: New
York
Although both "Law &
Order: Criminal Intent"
and "CSI: Miami" (ave
experienced great suc-
cess as spin-offs, there
comes a time when you
can get too much of a good
thing.
While spin-offs may
make the network lots of
money, they aren't original.
After all, it was originality
that made us fall in love
with these shows from the
beginning.
End of semester blues
If any of you are I ike-
rne, the end of the semester
is both exciting and frus-
trating. It always seems it
never arrives soon enough,
but once it's here, every
project, paper and test gets
crammed into the very last
week.
Just like everyone else
who is faced with this hand-
ful of assignments, I often
get the urge to attack these
"chores" with less drive than
1 initially had in the begin-
ning.
This semester, I plan to
put a little more effort into
my long list ol chores, and
I encourage all other stu-
dents to do the same.
The workload may seem
excruciating for that week,
but once you see the results,
it will all be worth it.
Can't Bush get enough?
Ninety-nine U.S. sol-
diers have died in the last
few weeks we've been in
lallujah. this number, from
April alone, has set a record
of dead soldiers and is close
to the number of soldiers
that died in the War Against
Terrorism that began in
March 200.1 and lasted until
May 2003.
Although many of our
men are dying in combat,
Bush says he'll keep them
OVei there to continue the
battle and plans to send more
if needed.
I think if we stay, things
are only going to get worse.
We should pull out now
and let things calm down
instead of continuing to
send troops over, adding
fuel to the flame. We think
they are crazy in lallujah,
but any nation would act
that way if continually
bombed.
It's like taunting a bee-
hive and saying that the
bees are crazy - you're going
to get stung. The Iraqis are
also holding some of our
men hostage and saying that
if we don't pull out, they'll
be killed. It seems like this
option is OK with Bush,
though. He has no intention
to pull out. He is sticking
with it until the end, no
matter how many men he
has to sac rifii e.
Be in touch
with the world
I don't know anybody
at ECU who saw President
Bush's press conference
last Tuesday. I made sure to
see it. It was an important
event, and only the third
time Bush has held an open
primetime press conference
in his term.
The closest anybody i ame
to seeing the event seemed
to be finding out about
the event while waiting
for "American Idol Con-
gratulations, folks. Those
of you - and there were
many - who chose to miss
the event deprived your-
selves of another chance
to learn something about
important issues affecting
the country.
Of course, if you missed
it, you can find the tran-
script online.
That's right, the machine
you use to visit Home Star
Runner, bored.com and
download music and porn
can also be used to catch
up on the day's news. In
fact, the same network that
shows "American Idol Fox,
owns a 24-hour news chan-
nel.
It is possible that some of
you should tune into it every
once in awhile. If Fox doesn't
suit your tastes, there's
MSNBC and CNN. I once
defended the general student
population when an elderly
lady said that students at
E( U didn't read and didn't
care about the world. I told
her she was close-minded
and blind.
Don't let her be right! Get
an informed opinion! I know
people who want to vote who
don't even care enough to
know who is running.
Truth in advertising
Another common sense
study about teens and smok-
ing has come out, linking the
prevalence of underage use
to advertising.
It shows after Minnesota
cut funding to anti-smoking
programs. Including TV ads,
the number of teens who
said they would smoke rose
10 percent.
Even though I find anti-
smoking and anti-drug com-
mercials somewhat laughable
(missives from truth.com
usually provoke laughter
around the living room
rather than serious contem-
plation), the power of media
to positively or negatively
influence viewer opinion is
undeniably there.
Whether you choose to
smoke or not should be your
own decision.
But there shouldn't
be a discrepancy In the
information presented - a
million ads promoting the
coolness of smoking to
one warning of its dangers
is fair only to the tobacco
companies.
As a national health con-
cern that affects more people
than just the smoker, it's
necessary to counteract the
subtle peer pressure of the
media, if it helps - by saving
lives, by reducing health care
costs - I don't see why such
measures wouldn't exist.
Time magazine
should reconsider
'Heroes and icons' list
Among the celebrities to
make Time's "Heroes and
Icons" list were golfer Tiger
Woods, soccer star David
Beckham and California's
newest governor, Arnold
Schwarzenegger.
Does one of these stick
out like a sore thumb or is
it just me?
Schwarzenegger is neither
my hero nor my icon. For me,
he falls under the category of
"Lucky Idiot
True, it was a magnificent
feat the day he - a man who
has never held public office
and claimed to admire Hitler
- was elected governor. The
only influence he's made
is to encourage everyone
without an education to
run for political office
and make our governmental
system out to be a popularity
contest.
Yes, he's changed poll-
tics. But definitely not for
the better.
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4-22-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGEA5

ltM
f.
READY FOR
SUMMER BINGO
APRIL 27TH @9:30PM
MENDENHALL DINING HALL
Weird News
Man crosses 'robbing bank'
off to-do list
KANSAS CITY, Kan. (AP) - A man
who added "rob bank" to his to-
do list pleaded guilty to robbing
six banks in suburban Kansas City.
John Sarver pleaded guilty
Monday in U.S. District Court to six
counts of bank robbery.
Sarver, 47, of Kansas City, Kan
admitted robbing the banks in
suburban Leawood, Prairie Village,
Shawnee and Olathe between
January 2002 and December 2003.
In each case, Sarver handed a
teller a note demanding money.
After his arrest on Jan 2, officers
searching his home found the list
reminding him to rob a bank
Pastor auctions off eulogy
GRAND ISLAND. Neb. (AP) - The
Rev Jim Keyser promises to say
nice things at your funeral - if
you're the highest bidder
The pastor of Trinity United Methodist
Church said he felt a little out
of step as he tried to think of
something related to his work that
he could offer at Saturday's Rotary
Radio Auction.
After all, people can't buy redemption,
he said.
So alongside the auction's
portable DVD player, the gas grill,
sprinkler systems and other worldly
items, Keyser is offering a eulogy.
"For an extra $50, I'll say some
really nice things Keyser said.
Keyser's offer of a eulogy for
the charity auction began as
tongue-in-cheek at first. But auction
co-chair Randy Blair said it took
on a life of ils own. so to speak.
The auction now has a package
that includes a funeral urn and
cremation service.
Canadians turn out for
laughter classes
VANCOUVER (CP) - Louise Ayotte
is attracted to people who laugh,
loud and a lot.
Wanting to be more like them, she
signed up for a class on how to
let loose more contagious giggles.
Ayotte had no idea what she was
in for. What she got was three
hours of heavy breathing, face-
making and, of course, laughing
with Dr. Madan Kataria, a
famous Mumbai physician with a
global following.
Kataria's teachings have inspired
people to form clubs and follow
his lead In search of the incredible
release of unstoppable laughter.
"I train people to laugh without
humour or jokes. Jokes are
intellectual. Not everyone gets it.
We laugh at nothing as a form of
exercise said Kataria, who's making
a rare tour of Canada, training people
to be laughter coaches
Woman gives herself C-section
CHICAGO (AP) - A woman in Mexico
cut open her own womb with a knife
and delivered a healthy baby boy
in her rural home when problems
developed during labor, doctors
report in a medical journal.
The woman and her son, her ninth
child, both survived despite an eight-
hour car ride to the nearest hospital
and a wait of several hours once
she got there, said co-author Dr.
Rafael Valle, a Northwestern
University obstetrician who learned
about the case from a colleague
"She was asked, 'Why did you
do that? Do you know you could
have died?' She said. 'Yes, but I
wanted to save my baby Valle said
Wednesday. He added: "This is
heroic to me
HUGE ICE CREAM BAR!
SGA
from page A1
SPECTRUM
TEC is now hiring staff writers. Apply at our office located
on the 2nd floor of the Student Publications Building.
� Experience required
� Must have a 2.0 GPA
ui�
improving on the foundation we
have built this year
As the new council
took their oaths of office,
Shannon O'Donnell was
officially sworn in as stu-
dent body president, David
Herndon as vice president,
Jackie l.ambertsen as sec-
retary and Brad (ireaver as
Treasurer.
Once they swore to
uphold the duties and respon-
sibilities of their respecti
ve positions, all four members
of the new executive board
officially began their tenures
in office.
"One person can make a
difference, but it takes a team
to change the world said
O'Donnell after her team was
sworn in.
Lach branch of student gov-
ernment-executive, judicial and
legislative - was also awarded.
Benjamin Wyche, president
of the SGA Senate for the last
two years, said, " this has been
one of the most active and
productive years I've seen since
I've served. I feel like I left the
Senate in better shape than I
found it
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeas tcarolinian. com.
When you're
cruising the
information
highway,
pull off on
our new exit
.Vi-1 i I
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Application Fee:
-Required
Security Deposit:
-Required
Pets accepted with
non-refundable fee.
Unit Sizes:
2 bedroom 112 bath townhouse
approx. 1050 square feet
3 bedroom 112 bath townhouse
approx. 1350 square feet
3 bedroom 1 12 townhouse
Individual bedroom lease
Swimming Pool � Fitness Equipment � Tennis Courts
� Private Patios � Walk-in Closets � WasherDryer
Connections � On-site Management
24 hour Emergency Maintenance � Dishwasher �
Self-Cleaning Oven � Frost Free Refrigerator � Central
HeatAir Conditioning � B-Ball Court
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Wireless Internet � Basic Cable, Water & Sewer
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252-752-0277 � 1806 E 1st St. Located 4 blocks from ECU campus � www.wilsonacres.com
CORRECTION
IT. My I id" ad insert has a misprint on
(page 9. Third paragraph, (irsi -tentence of
I"Kcpmdut live Racism" should read "Despite
l.l.urns (Inn Mnrgan-I Sanger was not a rac-
liu or -ui ami-Semite, the tact remains that
IMil ojK-iih welcomed the Mitral elements
lot' hothinlo the Nrth control inmcmciit
jtacz'Api
Mn
igratttlations, Graduate
?rrything the "soon-to-be graduate" needs is available through ECU-Dowdy Student Stores. The official
liversity commencement announcements arc now in stock. Yon may also order personalized announcements,
ou notes, and othcfaduation item through, the ECU-Dowdy Student Store, located in the Wright
An extensive line ol diploma frames and die official East Carolina Unjeqaj
also be found at the Dowdv Student Store. You're almost there.
Ci
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� you make this a time vou'Il always remember.
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PAGE A
PAGEA6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
4-22-04
The spacecraft Soyuz filled in for the US. Columbia shuttle.
Russian spacecraft clocks
with international station
KOROIYOV, Russia (AP) � A
Russian spacecraft delivered a
Russian-American-Dutch crew
to the international space sta-
tion on Wednesday, as U.S.
and Russian space officials on
the ground squabbled over the
conditions for future missions.
The Soyuz TMA-4, working
on autopilot, docked with the ISS
three minutes ahead of schedule
at 9:01 local time, approximately
two days after blasting off on a
rocket from Russia's Baikonur
cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
Carrying three astronauts, it was
the third Russian spacecraft to
fill in for the U.S. space shuttle,
which has been suspended since
the Columbia disaster.
Less than 90 minutes after
docking, the crew slowly floated
into the hatch, shook hands
with the current occupants
and spoke with Russian, U.S.
and European space officials
at Russian Mission Control in
Korolyov, outside Moscow via a
television hookup.
"So far it was excellent,
it was fantastic said Dutch
astronaut Andre Kuipers. "We
are looking forward to starting
the program
Russian commander Cen-
nady I'adalka and American
flight engineer Michael Hncke's
mission will be to maintain the
orbital outpost, whose assem-
bly has been on hold since the
February 20TO disaster. Kutpen
is going on a nine-day mission
to conduct experiments for the
European Space Agency.
flight engineers monitoring
the docking at Russian Mission
Control broke into applause as a
camera affixed to the spacecraft
showed the successful docking.
"I would like to thank the
Russian space Agency for again
providing an excellent launch,
an excellent ride and an excel-
lent dm king as We Continue 111 is
great friendship and journey
together. We appreciate every-
thing that has been done I red
dregorv, deputv administrator of
NASA, said after the spacecraft
had reached the station.
His comments appeared to
be an attempt to answer Russia's
increasingly frequent com-
plaints that its efforts to keep
the space station manned at the
expense of its own programs arc
underappreciated.
Since Columbia disintegrated
while returning to Karth on Feb.
1, 2003, the U.S. manned space
program has been on hold, leav-
ing Russia's non-reusable Soyu
capsules as the only means for
getting crew to and from the
station. Russia's unmanned
Progress spaceships also ferry
supplies to the ISS.
Russia wants to extend the
crews' missions from six months
to a year; that way, it could sell
more seals on the two Soyu
spacecraft it has funding to
build each year to high-paying
"space tourists
Gregory said Wednesday
that it would be "premature" to
extend the missions beginning
with the next expedition, which
is scheduled to be launched to
the ISS in October, but that
NASA had not ruled an extension
in the future.
"We would like to delay any
further discussions on this until
we (U.S. space shuttles) return
to flight, which would be sched-
uled for next March, when we
can assure that all the operating
systems, life support systems, are
operating Gregory said.
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K- for
jL Snowboarding
Never Summer
686
Cold As Ice
Quicksilver
Roxy
Burton
K-2
Columbia
Bonfire
North Face
Salomon
GORDON'S
golf, ski, & snowboarding
207 E. Arlington Blvd. � 756-1003
Monday-Satuclay
9am-7pm
Sunday
Ipm-Spm
GRILL
500 E. 10th St. � 830 9333
Wing Planer
8 wings, French Fries, Celery Sticks,
Blue Cheese or Ranch Dressing
$3.99
10 Student Discount
with your ECU ID
OPEN LATE
Open until 2:30am Sun-Wed � Open until 3:30am Thur-Sot
- Serving the ECU community since 7993 -
Store your
stuff todav!
A
T
DISCOUNT RATES
5x10 -332.66 $22.00
with ECU ID
6x10 $36.88 $24.00
with ECU ID
10x10 $42.88 S38.00
with ECU W
Other saies watt at decant rates
Rates Subject to Chang's
Signatue tenant lesponsble tor payment
Mini
Storage 7572471
I08 Rivet Bluff lid
taoss from Trade MafkelABC
Store on E.1 Oth St.
solving today's and
tomorrow's medical mysteries
Does finding solutions to problems intrigue you?
Do you wish to help save lives?
Do you desire guaranteed employment opportunities?
Do you like biology and chemistry and laboratory work?
If so, CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE is the career for you! Join
over one half million laboratory practitioners in the US who are
proud of their many roles in healthcare, research and industry.
6Tj
School of Allied Health Sciences
Dept. of Clinical Laboratory Science
Belk Building, Room 308
252.328.4426
www.ecu.educlsc
Celebrating National Medical Laboratory Week
April 18-24,2004
i
JoiHtkbFttHattfte'
flapvoaf festival J
j2 V'K 25-25. Lr
Sponsored By:

CITY HOTEL WITN7
A BISTRO
V i un Irti Mr uunt vuf rsu �m
0I SoomSt �'ProgressEnenjy
Thursday. April 22nd
Michael s Amusements on the Midway - One Price Ride Night 500PM -11 00PM
Buy a $12 00 wristband and nde all the rides as often as you like.
FREE Gospel Concert in the Gazebo 6 00PM � 9 00PM
Friday, April 23
Food Concessions on and around Town Commons 12:00Noon � 9:00PM
Arts� Crafts and Commercial Vendors around Town Common 3O0PM � 9:00 PM
Michaels Amusements 3.00 PM � 11:00PM
Opening Ceremonies in the Gazebo 5:30PM with WITNs Amanda Ross
FBEE Concert � Victoi Hudson � m the Gazebo 6:30PM
Saturday. April 24th
Food Concessions, Arts & Crafts and Commercial Vendors 9:00AM - 9:00PM
FREE Classic Car Show 10 00AM - 4 00PM
FREE Entertainment m the Gazebo 10.30AM - 6.30PM
FREE Kids CoolFest - Activities. Pony Rides 11 00AM - 5:00PM
Michaels Amusements on the Midway 11 00AM � 11 00PM
Dogwood Blues" Blues, Ribs & Brews
Gates 6:30PM. Music 7:00PM
Featuring: Nappy Brown with Skeeter
Brandon, Armand & Bluesology,
Randy Friel & the Horns.
J 10,00 Admission ton 12 4 up
LfL, FREE Fireworks by the woild renowned ZambeHi
P Fireworks International 9 00PM at Ihe concert venue
Sunday. April 25th
5 00PM
Food concessions. Arts. S Crafts and Commercial Vendors t 00PM
FREE Kids Coolfest Activities Pony Rides 1 00PM � 5,00PM
Michaels Amusements on ihe Midway 1 00PM - 5 00PM
'Sunday Afternoon Beach Music Festival
Gates 12:30PM. Music 1:00PM
Featuring: General Johnson
& The Chairmen of the Board
With their guests The Coastline Band and
The Main Event
SIO.00tdmhjtionaott limoo.
� Ho cinym rood, Mnmori. ccxHen or backpmck, permrtKO in Ihe concert venue
food end Sever eoes ttncludina Uell Bmrjgnl mut mude me venue� Heesomble Coil!






PAGE A7
4-22-04
ITES
122.00
1 ECU ID
$24.00
i ECU ID
538.00
I ECU ID
!x paynwil
H
U
kelABC
SI
i
nd
ries
THE EAST CAROIINIAN � NFWS
4-22-04
RIGHTHERE
RIGHTNOW
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
Program
Time
May 25 Softball Registration Meeting
May 25 5-on-5 Basketball Registration Meeting
May 26 Tennis Singles Registration
June 28 Softball Registration Meeting
June 28 5-on 5 Basketball Registration Meeting
July 1 Racquetball Singles Registration
ADVENTURE
Trip
4pm
4:30pm
10am-5pm
4pm
4:30pm
10am-5pm
Location
SRC 202
SRC 202
SRC 128
SRC 202
SRC 202
SRC 128
Pre-Trip Cost
May 22 Sea Kayak Day Trip Bear Island 518 $3040
June 6 Coastal Ecology Day Hike Bear Island 61 $2030
June 19 Sea Kayak Shackleford Island 615 $3040
July 10 Climbing Day Trip Pilot Mtn. 76 $3545
July 17 Sea Kayaking Goose Creek 713 $2535
FITNESS
Program
I Join
ho are
U
:e
eek
I
Ml
5
Fitness AreaWeight Room Orientations
Fitness Area Orientations are always available and FREE of charge.
Call 328-6387 to schedule your appointment todayl
Summer Personal Training Packages
Sessions are by appointment and no more than one hour in duration.
1 session $25 8 sessions $125
2 sessions $45 12 sessions $160
4 sessions $75 16 sessions $175
Partner Training
Share a Personal Trainer by working with a friend or partner of a similar fitness level
and with similar goals This offer is available on packages of 8, 12 and )6.
W-
8 sessions
12 sessions
)6 sessions
$65
$80
$95
Smart Start
1 Fitness Assessment 1 Personal Training Fitness Success for $30
FREE Body Fat Analysis
Date: Wednesday, July 14
Time: 4:00-5:30 PM
Cost: FREE
Location: SRC 211 (wear shorts)
LIFESTYLE ENHANCEMENT
Employee Health and Fitness Day
Date: May 5
Time: Wednesday, 12:00-1:00 PM
Cost: FREE
Location: Meet at SRC Rotunda
nergy
Hatha Yoga: Body, Breath and Spirit
Program Dates: Session I: May 19 -June 16 (5 sessions)
Session II: June 30-July 28 (5 sessions)
Time: Wednesdays, 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM
Registration: begins May 3
Cost: $30.00 mem$45.00 non-mem
Location: SRC 239
Instructor: Diane deGroot, MS, RYT
Goal Setting!
Date: Thursday, June 10
Time: 12:05-12:50 PM
Cost: FREE
Location: SRC 239
Instructor: Suzanne McDonald, MA, HFI
Era
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
www.recserv.ecu.edu
252.328.6387





PAGE A8
'tec
4-22-04
CLASSIFIEDS
TO PLACE AN AD
Come by The East Carolinian office
on the second floor of the Student Publications Building
(above the cashiers office)
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
fCMfll
Melbourne Park upscale one
bedroom for rent Cathedral ceiling,
balcony, dishwasher, walk-in closet.
New, quiet neighborhood on
Wimbledon Drive. NO DEPOSIT,
April rent paid. (252)717-7173.
Sub-Lease Rent Apt Pirate's Cove,
$360 mo available NOW ury 31,
2004 Contact: Karen N. Lee, 919-
894-8348 or 919-207-0804
Blocks to ECU, 1,2,3 bedrooms, all
appliances, central heatAC, see
collegeuniversityrentals.com or call
321-4712.
For Rent- one bedroom apartment
available 5-11-04 $350month
includes cable, water, sewer. Close
to campus. Call 412-6116 or 714-
5113 for more information.
Now Preleasing for Fall Semester-
1,2 and 3 bedroom duplexes &
townhouses. College Towne Row,
Verdant Street, Cannon Court,
Cedar Court, Lewis Street and 2nd
Street. All units close to ECU. Pets
allowed in some units with fee. For
more information contact Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
Near ECU Si downtown- 3
blocks from ECU, 5 blocks from
downtown. 5 bedroom, 2 bath,
newly remodeled, nice & clean, all
appliances, 2 kitchens, central HVAC
downstairs and window AC upstairs.
$1325 month. 252-717-6551 Lease
to begin Aug. 2004
1, 2, 3, 4, 5 bedroom houses and
duplexes. Available Fall 2004. ALL
walking distance from ECU Call
531-5701
Female roommate wanted lo
sublease bedroom in four bedroom
four bathroom apartment in Pirate's
Cove for the summer andor next
year. One roommate is staying.
May pick other roommates or pot
luck. Summer rent is $360 and next
year's rent is $370. Please respond
as.a.p. Cara 252-413-6991 or cell
Wt-814-7748.
Apartment for rent in Wilson Acres
for $325 a month. You would take
over lease as soon as possible. Please
contact me at 919-389-8367.
Dockside Duplex 3 BDRM, 2 Bath. 1 -
unit available immediately, 1 building
w 2 units side by side- available
August 3, 2004. Cot 6 friends who
want to room? This is ideal! Call eff
@ 252-327-4433 WasherDryer
included, no pets.
Pirate's Cove, Available Now, Sublet
furnished apartment. Special Price:
$325 all included. Call now 919-
846-7360
3 bedroom house located 2 blocks
from ECU, 1211 Cotanche, nice,
clean, fenced backyard, available
now. Call 355-3248 or 355-7939.
Twin Oaks townhouse, 2 BR, 1 12
bath, end unit on ECU campus bus
route. Patio, pool, WD hook-up.
$575 per month. Call 864-346-5750
or 864-228-3667
Apartment Sublease tor summer
(une & July, May if possible). Pirate's
Cove, $360 per month, furnished,
includes all utilities except telephone.
Also, two basketball courts, two
computer labs, beach volleyball,
tanning beds, and game room.
Please call 252-725-3168
Pre-Register for spacious 2 and
3 bedroom townhouses. Full
basement, enclosed patio WD hook-
up, no pets. 752-7738 daytime 7:30
to 4:30.
Near ECU & downtown- 12 block
from ECU, 2 blocks from downtown.
4 bedrooms, 2 bath, very large 2
story house, very nice, central HVAC,
all appliances $1400 month. 252-
717-6551. Lease to begin Aug. 2004
(possibly sooner)
Looking for a Summer Apartment?
Subleasing a Master Bedroom in a 3
bedroom, 3 bathroom apartment at
Riverwalk. Rent is $351, but willing to
be flexible and lower price by helping
with payment. Please call Karri at
(252)531-5162 for details.
3 bd 6t 1 ba Duplex for rent Located
on Stancil and close to campus
Features include kitchen appliances
including new w�her and dryer,
and fenced backyard. Pets OK with
negotiable fee. $660.00 per month.
752-6859
Immaculate TownHouse, 2 BR, 2
BA, Safe neighborhood in G'ville,
convenient, all appliances, no pets,
pool, tennis, fenced patio, $700mo.
919-734-4267: Day and 919-735-
8106: Night.
Three bedroom duplex for rent near
ECU. Available immediately. Rent
$618- Call 752-6276.
Two BR one bath recently renovated
duplex beside Town Commons 111B
and 113 Molly Street. Central heat
air. Easy walk to ECU. $425month.
258-6776.
417 W 3rd Street, 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
dining room, living room, w garage,
washerdryer included, available 8
104, no pets, $650 mo excellent
condition, 2 blocks from campus, call
252-327-4433
Wyndham Circle Duplex 2 BD 2
BA Available une 1st and Aug. 1st,
$625 00 month, newly decorated,
cathedral ceilings, nice landlord,
good parking, call fast 321-4802.
Houses and apartments for rent near
campus. 3, 4, and 5 bedroom houses
available 1 bedroom apartments
available. Call (252)353-5107.
Room for rent at Pirate's Cove
tor summer vacation May, une,
July. $360mo. Rent all inclusive
Please contact Nikki for more info.
at anytime 252-329-0614, leave
message.
Spacious two-bedroom duplex
with large living room and eat-in
kitchen with washer and dryer.
Duplex includes large deck and off
street parking. Water and sewer
included in rent. $475 per month.
Available August 1st Call 752-5536
for appointment.
need a male of female to sublease a
room in Sterling Manor for May, une,
and July. Pay $S32 4 13 utilities for
whole summer. Only pay half May
and une, July is already paid for.
Private bathroom and big closet,
washer and dryer, furnished. Will
be living with two guys, neat and
non-smokers. Call Chris for more
info. Apt. 252-551-6725 or Cell
919-749-3889.
Near ECU & downtown- 12 block
from ECU, 2 blocks from downtown.
3 bedroom, 2 12 bath, new carpet,
central HVAC, all appliances, $875
month. 252-717-6551. Lease to
begin Aug. 2004.
For rent: Upscale 3 BR3 Bath Near
campus, only if you like the BEST!
Call 252-561-7368 or 561-7679 or
dayle@bellsouth.net
Pirate's Cove Apartment sub-lease
available for une and July, only $250
per month! Call Matt is interested
732-718 9375.
Anyone looking to move into Pirate's
Cove now please contact Brenda at
704202 2775 or 252-885-0097
Rent includes everything, $360
month, available now or May 1st.
Apt. for rent starting in Fall semester.
2 bedroom S 1 bath, 12 block from
ECU and 2 blocks from downtown,
all appliances, central HVAC, nice &i
clean $625mdhth. Calf'252-717-
6557.
Nil e Duplex, 2 bedroom c onvenient
to ECU, $595month, available une
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Birth related
6 Hefner or Grant
10 Blow one's own
horn
14 Make amends
15 Ersatz butter
16 Lounge around
17 Executive ability
19 Klempereror
Preminger
20 Sea eagle
21 Cirrus drink
22 Peter Weller
movie
24 Cancun snooze
26 Uncanny
27 Pause mark
29Dogstar
33 Appendectomy
reminder
36 Campbell of the
NFL
38 Tempest
39 Vaulted need
40 Sikkim antelope
42 Wander
43 Declares frankly
45 Audible breath
46 European
volcano
47 Sewing tool
49 Honshu port
51 Pro driver
53 Opportune
57 "West Side Story"
song
60 Accomplished
61 Come to regret
62 Serb or Croat
63 In the open air
66 Assistant
67 Home of the first
(amity
68 Jockey Arcaro
69 Leo's comment
70 Earthly seven
71 Feats
DOWN
1 Identifies
2 Video-game
company
3 British weight
4 Santa winds
5 Smooth, even
style in music
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All -igr.il marvtd
6 Habitat
7 Mod ending?
8 Art category
9 Masseur's liquid
10 Circulatory
system
11 U.mil.grp.
12 Choir member
13 Soggy food
18 '50s crooner
23 Bikini tops
25 Vodka and
orange juice
26 Battle hand
28 Murray and West
30 Chimney deposit
31 Persia, now
32 Thompson of
�Peter's Fnends"
33 Team of oxen
34 Small inlet
35 Soothing plant
37 Cabin matenal
41 Suppose that
44 Smelting waste
48 Canyon
comebacks
Solutions
sc3aaSV3S1V0b
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50 Joshed
52 Practice piece
54 Wear away
55 Gruesome
56 Affirmatives
57 Russian ruler
58 Miscellany
59 Nothing in
Granada
60 Adams and
Rickles
64 Sn Lankan
export
65 Keatsian work
1st, pets OK w deposit, fenced
backyard. Call 355-3248
Great Placel Walk to campus and
bars. 2 bedroom, newly renovated,
located on Holly Street off 1st
street. CHEAP! CHEAP! $425 a
month. Available NOWI Call
258-6776
Now Preleasing For Fall Semester-
1,2 and 3 bedrooms. All units
close to ECU. Cypress Gardens,
lasmine Gardens, Peony Gardens,
Gladiolus Garden, Wesley
Commons North, Park Village,
Cotanche Street, Beech Street
Villas and Woodcliff. Water and
sewer included with some units.
Pets allowed in some units with
fee. For more information contact
Wainright Property Management
756-6209.
pinebrookapt. 758-4015- 1&2BR
apts, dishwasher, GD, central air
& heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or 12
month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, & cable.
2013-A Dockside at River Dr. 2
bedroom- 2 bath. Available June
1st, rent $600month. NO PETS!
Call 252-355-6339.
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015-1 & 2 BR
apts, dishwasher, GD, central air
Si heat, pool, ECU bus iine, 9 or 12
month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, & cable.
Dapper
Dan's
18 yr. old male seeking male
roommate for 2 bedroom
apartment. 12mo. lease starts
next Aug. @ RiverPointe Village,
all-inclusive, furnished $450mo.
Quiet, studious, non-smoker, non-
drinker, no pets. 919-608-2514 or
bab0824@mail.ecu.edu
Next school year Aug. 2004-Aug
2005, Pirate's Cove $370month,
everything included, 3 Christian
roommates. Contact Brandon at
329-9174 or 919-270-6683
Roommate needed for summer
and fall. 2 blocks from campus.
$242 per month plus half utilities
2 BD 1 BA serious inquires only.
Call 758-4774, leave message.
Two Rooms for rent, furnished or
unfurnished, $275 a month not
including utilities, phone, cable,
close to campus. Call 329-0761
fOR SALE
For sale: 5 piece sectional sofa,
includes two recliners, one pullout
bed, neutral color, good condition.
$250orOBO. 756-0723.
washerdryer for sale $200.00
for both. Call 412-7051. Ask for
Jessica.
Matching CouchLoveseat $375,
end tables $75, entertainment
center $40, desk $60, bookshelf
$15, full size bed with boxspring
$90, dishet $30, potspans $50.
Sell by May 8th 353-0029.
Aquarium stand $25, wi ker
bookshelf $25, corner desk &
executive chair $85 each or $150
for both, foton w mattress $75.
Call 321-9787.
Do you surf? Or are you a poser?
Come check our 3 surfboards
in excellent condition. 6'0 C,
6'0 Surf Prescription, 5'9 Round
Nose Fish. Try a surf shop and get
burned on their used prices. Come
check them out. Good prices! 252-
258-6151.
Yard Sale: Sat. April 24 at 6:00am
(Rain Date, May 1st) Items for
the whole family and all ages!
Portable basketball goal, clothes,
household items and appliances,
etc. You name it, we got it!
HELP UJiTEE)
Food Delivery Drivers wanted for
Restaurant Runners. Part-time
positions (6-12hr. including
tips.) Perfect for college students!
Some lunch time (11a-2pm) M-F
availability required. 2-way radios
allow you to be anywhere in
Greenville when not on a delivery.
Reliable transportation a must and
knowledge of Greenville streets
advantageous. Call 756-5527 or
check out our website a www.r
estaurantrunners.com. Sorry no
dorm students.
need a Summer ob?- The ECU
Teletund is hiring students to
contact alumni and parents for
the ECU Annual Fund. $6.25 plus
cash bonuses. Make your own
schedule. If interested, visit our
website at www.ecu.edutelefund
Retro and Vintage Clothiri
Handmade Silver
Jewelry & More.
Our New
Silver Jewelry
has come in!
SOI Dickinson Vve.
752-1750
LEARN TO SKYDIVE
Carolina Sky Sports
1-800-SKYDIVE
www.carolinaskysports.com
and click on OBS.
Tutornanny needed- for ages 12,
11, ft 7, minimum 3.0 GPA, strong
in math skills, non-smoker, reliable
vehicle, good driving record, flexible
hours, some cooking. Call 752-1572
for interview.
Spanish-speaking childcare needed
for 3-year-old boy. Native speaker
preferred. References required. Will
need transportation to Farmville.
20 hoursweek starting in May. Call
753-6357.
Lifeguards, pool managers, coaches in
Greenville, Farmville, Wilson, Atlantic
Beach. Call Bob Wendling 714-0576.
Lifeguards and swim instructors
needed. Call 355-5009. Summer
only!
Wanted- Nanny to keep two children
in our home; references required; 8-6
during summer months, 12-6 during
school; call 752-6933 and leave
message.
Loving babysitter needed for infant
boy Monday-Friday, 8:30a.ml:
00p.m. all summer. Hours beyond
summer more flexible. $6.50hour.
Non-smoker, reliable car, references.
Please leave message, 329-0101.
Work Hard! Play Hard! Change
Lives! Girls resident camp looking
for counselors, lifeguards, wranglers,
boating staff, crafts, nature, unit
leaders, business manager, and health
supervisor. $200-$350week! May 22-
August 1. Free Housing! 1-800-672-
2148 x 410 or keyauwee@aol.com.
www.tarheeltriad.org for an online
application.
Female dancers wanted for spring
summer night club, 9 p.m 2 a.m
not nude or topless dancing. Must be
at least 18 yrs. old. Call 347-9770 or
341-8270.
Lifeguards needed. Myrtle Beach
now and summer. Good pay Si
conditions. Call 843-448-9122 or
email ehuggins@sc.rr.com.
Nashville based Southwestern Co
looking for two more ECU students to
work in sales and management training
program this summer Must have 2.8
GPA, be willing to work hard, and
travel out west for the summer. Avg.
student makes $2,132month. Call
919-749-5002.
Wanted! Reliable, honest, energetic
people to monitor crops. From May
through August, 2004. We train!
Must have own dependable vehicle.
Learn to ID insects, weeds and
other field conditions. No Nights.
Hourly pay mileage. Must be 19
or have 1 year of college. Mail or fax
resume with cover letter and work
experience to : MCSI, POB 370, Cove
City, NC 28523 Fax: 252-637-2125
mmclawhorn@mcsiag.com
Ming Dynasty waitstaff needed. Come
apply in person. Located East 10th
Street, Rivergate Shopping Center.
Summer work $12.25 guarantee
appointment. Flexible schedules,
great resume experience. No
experience needed. Salesservice.
Conditions apply. Call 353-6860.
workforstudents.com
Finally! Earn $5 in lOminseach week@
brandport.com! Watch ads, earn cash
Free registration.
OTHER
Full Time Students Stop wasting your
Time and Talents on PT Jobs with bad
hrs. & pay LOOK! For 1 weekend
a month the National Guard wants
i HELP
� WANTED
��M Reliable, honest, energetic
'35 isB people to monitor crops,
a� U rioni May through August
Qi W 2004 We train! Musi
t3 OW have own dependable
m H vehicle. Learn to 10
;y K insects, weeds, and other
� R- field conditions. No nights.
ft r; Hourly pay � mileage.
" R Must be 19 or have one
S m year of college. Mall or
3E B fax resume with cover
;� �� letter and work experi-
O X. "wCltyNC. 28523
SZ E H� 25237 2125
FREE
� of ptxr maintenance response
� of unreluined phone calls
� ofnoiss neighbors
of Crawl) crilleis
� nl high tmliiN bills
� of ECU parking hassles
� of ungrateful landlords
� of unanswered qucsiions
� of high rents
� of grumpj personnel
� of unfulfilled promises
� of units thai were not cleaned
� of walls that were never painted
� of appliances that don'I work
Wyndham Court &
Kastgatc Village Apts.
32(10 F Mosclcy Dr.
561-RENT or 531-9011
wwsi.pinnaelcpropertj
nutnagi'ineiit.com
MONITORED NKJUTI.Y BY SECURITY
SUMMER
WORK
� Great Pay
� Great Experience ,
� Close To Campus
� No Canvassing
� No Cold Calling
� Sales Service
� Conditions Apply
Call Now: 353-6860
Apply Online
www.worksforstudents.coni
you to go to college, FREE TUITION!
Learn a job skill & stay a student!
FT students get over $800mo in
Education Benefits & PAY for more
info. CALL 252-916 9073 or visit
www.l -800-GO-GAURD.com
Belly Dance for Fun & Fitness! Spring
classes (April-une) start Tuesday. For
women of all ages. Ten students per
class. To register call Donna 355-
5150.
flflflflCEIHEflTS
Come Join us for the April 23 contra
dance! Beginners lesson: 7:30; dance:
8:00 - 10:30. Band: Global Village
Garage Band; caller: ECU'S own Gerry
Prokopowicz. No experience needed;
we'll teach you as we go along! Come
alone or bring a friend! $3 (students)
$5 (FASG members) $8 (general).
Co-sponsors: ECU Folk and Country
Dancers (752-7350) and Folk Arts
Society of Greenville (795-4980).
www.geocities.comecufolkand
countrydancers Location: Willis
Bldg 1st and Reade Sts downtown.
An alcohol and smoke-free event.
MOT IF YOU
HAVEN'T TOLD
YOUR FAMILY.
www.shareyouriifs org
1-800-35S-SHARE
E
n on Ogto t r�L� DonWur
The ECU Student Media Board has
extended the deadline for
applications for the position of
GENERAL MANAGER,
WZMB 91.3 FM
for the 2004-05 academic year.
Applications are available in the Media Board office.
The deadline for submitting an application is
TUESDAY, APRIL 27 AT 4 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
4-22 04
At





4-22-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A9
At least 68 people dead in suicide bombing
BASRA, Iraq (API � Suicide
attackers unleashed car bomb-
ings against police buildings in
Iraq's biggest Shiite city Wednes-
day morning, striking rush-hour
crowds and killing at least 68
people, including 16 children
incinerated in their school
buses. Iraqi leaders blamed
al-Qaida militants.
The attacks, which wounded
about 200 people, 168 critically,
marked a revival of devastating
suicide bombings, which U.S.
officials blame on foreign mili-
tants and which had not been
seen during this month's wide-
spread battles with homegrown
guerrillas across Iraq.
In Fallujah, the bloodiest
battlefield in April, an agree-
ment aimed at bringing peace
to the city ran into trouble
Wednesday. Insurgents attacked
Marines, prompting fighting
that killed 20guerrillas. Marines
said most weapons turned in by
residents were unusable, under-
mining a crucial attempt at
disarming fighters.
About 350 miles to the south,
in Basra, bombers struck at 7
a.m just as the city's main street
market, near one of the targeted
police stations, was opening for
the day. Shoppers were headed to
the stalls of vegetables and other
goods, and children were passing
on their way to school.
The attackers detonated four
cars packed with missiles and
TNT in front of three police sta-
tions one of them next to Basra's
main street market and a police
academy. An hour later another
car bomb went off outside the
police academy in Zubair, a
suburb of mainly Shiite Basra.
Police discovered two other
car bombs before they were
detonated and arrested three
men in the vehicles, said Gov.
Wael Abdul-l.atif, who blamed
the attacks on al-Qaida.
The blast in front of the
Saudia police station wrecked
and charred vehicles, including
school buses taking kinder-
gartners and girls ages 10-15
to school.
Dead children, burned
beyond recognition, were pulled
from the wreckage. One body,
black as carbon but apparently
an adut, was taken, away in, a .
pickup truck.
An Associated Press reporter
counted the bodies of 10 kin-
dergartners and six older girls at
Basra's Teaching Hospital, where
the morgue was full and corpses
were left in the halls.
Nine of the dead and 36
of the wounded were police,
Abdul-Latif said.
President Bush condemned
the suicide attacks in Basra and
in the Saudi capital, Riyadh,
where a car bomb blasted
national police headquarters,
killing at least nine people and
wounding 125.
"They attacked today in
Basra. Killed innocent Iraqis.
They attacked today in Riyadh
They attack all the time. They'd
like to attack us again, by the
way he said.
There was no indication
of a connection between the
two attacks.
The last major suicide attack
in Iraq also targeted Shiites: Sui-
cide bombers detonated explo-
sives strapped to their bodies
among thousands of pilgrims
at holy shrines in Karbala and
Baghdad on March 2. At least
181 people were killed.
U.S. officials said they
believed those attacks were
planned by Abu Musab al-Zar-
qaqi, a Jordanian linked to al-
Qaida who they say intends a
campaign of spectacular attacks
to spark a civil war between
Iraq's Shiite Muslim majority
and Sunni minority.
But since the start of April,
attention has shifted to Iraqi
insurgents, with U.S. troops
besieging the Sunni stronghold
of Fallujah and a radical Shiite
militia launching a revolt in the
south. Those two fronts plus a
flare-up of insurgent violence
around Baghdad and across
the country have stretched U.S.
forces in Iraq.
Maj. Gen. Martin Dempsey,
commander of the Army's 1st
Armored Division, suggested the
bombings were timed to coincide
with the relative quiet over the
past few days.
"If I were them (the attack-
ers), I think 1 would probably
want to stay in the news. And
the way you stay in the news is
space (attacks) out, you conduct
attacks sequentially, not simul-
taneously" with other violence,
he told AP.
Throughout the month, U.S.
Suicide bombers attacked Iraq's largest Shite city, striking rush hour traffic, killing 68 people and injuring more than 200.
coalition officials have warned
that sudden terror attacks
remained a threat, and security
was increased during Shiite reli-
gious ceremonies in Karbala on
April 11.
U.S. officials and military
commanders say foreign Islamic
militants are among the fighters
they seek to uproot from lallujah
and they have suggested al-Zar-
qawi could be in the city.
But the relationship between
Iraqi insurgents and foreign
militants has remained unclear.
While Washington contends
Iraq is a center of the war on
terror, U.S. forces have captured
few foreigners among hundreds
of Iraqi insurgents. Al-Zarqawi
complained of poor coopera-
tion with Sunni guerrilla in a
letter to al-Qaida leaders that the
U.S. military said it intercepted
in January.
Wednesday's was the bloodi-
est attack in Basra, a city in Iraq's
far south that has seen little
insurgent violence.
The blast outside the Saudia
station heavily damaged its fas-
cade and left a crater six feet deep
and nine feet wide. When British
troops in charge of Basra showed
up to help, angry Iraqis blocked
their way, blaming the British for
failing to secure the city.
Iraqi Interior Minister Samir
Shaker Mahmoud al-Sumeidi
said the Basra attack resembled
the March 2 suicide bombings
and Feb. 1 bombings in lrbil
that killed 109 people.
"Today, we all have lost
children who are part of Iraq's
future which the terrorists want
to destroy. The Iraqi govern-
ment confirms its resolu-
tion on defeating this cancer
which is called resistance
al-Sumeidi said.
Four British soldiers were
wounded in the police academy
blasts, two of them seriously, the
British Ministry of Defense said.
Britain has about 8,700 soldiers
in Iraq.
British Prime Minister Tony
Blair told the House of Commons
the attackers were "desperate"
terrorists who "were prepared to
attack literally the most defense-
less people they can find, simply
to cause chaos
In Fallujah, the four-hour
battle cast a shadow over an
agreement reached by nego-
tiators aimed at bringing
peace to the city 35 miles west
of Baghdad.
The fighting began with an
ambush by 13 insurgents on
Marines, who called In Cobra
gunships that killed 10 of
the attackers, Marine Lt. Col.
Brennan Byrne said. Nearly
three doen insurgents then
joined a running battle with
Marines that ended with wai-
planes dropped two 500-pound
bombs. Ten more insurgents
were killed, Byrne said.
"I think that is being thought
of as a major breach Byrne said
of the battle.
The U.S. military has warned
that major fighting could resume
in Fallujah if the agreement
fails. City leaders negotiated
the deal with U.S. officials, but
the Americans say much hinges
on whether the guerrillas
comply.
As a result of the failure
to disarm, Marines halted
the return of families to Fal-
lujah. Commanders did not
ay how many weapon wete
turned in but said almost all
were unusable.
- i R V-i - V
llni
Univ
Unvot
ECUGreenville Dances of Universal Peace
Sunaatjj April 2tn
4:00 - 6xOO PM, Mendenhall 244
Parking available in Mendenhall lot
FREE - ALL ARE WELCOME - FREE
Sacred singing with simple, heart-felt movement
-No experience or special abilities needed.
Trained leader presents complete instructions.
Live music provided.
FREE REFRESHMENTS
Sponsored by the Office of Adult 6t Commuter Student Services
Debi Niswander DUPT-reg@cox.net 756-6088 (9am-9pm)
Dances of Universal Peace web site is
http:www.dancesofuniversalpeace.orgmain.html





PAGEA10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
4-22-04
V LEASING'FO FALI 04! HURRY- LIMITED AVAILABILITY
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Village Apaktmemts
Welcome to River Pointe Village Apartments the new student community that is all about students!
Conveniently located adjacent to the East Carolina University Campus, River Pointe Village's fully
furnished apartments feature all the comforts a student needs to feel at home when you're studying
and when you're not! Our all-inclusive rent means your electricity, water, cable and internet access
are all in one easy payment! We feature a study lab with internet access, full-size washers &. dryers, a
fitness center, basketball & volleyball courts, a swimming pool, tanning beds and much more! Plus
we're located on the ECU shuttle route! Call or visit us online for more information!
Community Amenities
� A vaulted living room and reception area
� All-incluSive rent (electricity, water, cable 6 Internet access)
� A fully furnished model unit
� Tanning beds
� A multi-purpose game & recreational room
� A fully equipped fitness room
HF3
Unit Features:
� High-tech, 247 internet accessible
study hall area
� Pool and courtyard patio area
� Basketball and volleyball courts
� Designated parking per unit
� Located on the ECU shuttle route
2 Bedroom � 923 sqft 3 Bedroom � 1,225 sqft 4 Bedroom � 1,385 sqft
Ambling Management company
PnurtuioNAixv Managed By:
� Fully furnished floorplans
� Large balcony wlocking storage
� Broadband internet and cable
connections in every bedroom
� Full-size washer and dryer
� Ceiling fans
� Built-in study areas
� Private bathrooms
� Much more!
www.riverpointevillage.com (252.) 758-800.2
Community amenities
CAMPISCBPOIRTE
2 and 3 Bedroom Apartments
Visit our leasing office at
2230 NE Greenville Blvd.
252.758.6766
www.campus-pointe.com
campuspointe.ecu@pickeringandco.com
Conveniently located near the intersection
of 10th and Greenville Boulevard.
�spacious clubhouse with fitness center
� comfortable lounge with large flat
screen TV & Playstation
� game room with billiards, air hockey &
foosball
� computer media center
� swimming pool with hot tub
�beach volleyball
� on ECU bus route
Apartment features:
� fully equipped kitchens
(i.e. dishwashers, microwave & disposal)
� private bedrooms & private baths
� washer & dryer included
�high-speed internet access included
�cable TV included
� individual 10 and 12 month lease available
� all utilities included except phone service
($75mo electricity allowance 2bd. apt.)
($105mo electricity allowance 3bd. apt.
Thursday,
K
Saturday. 1
CCan
Sunday, fi
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PAGEB1
422 04
FEATURES
AMANDA LINGERFELT
Features Editor
JOHN BREAM
Assistant Features Editor
features@theeastcarolinian.com
�252.328.6366
Did You Know?
- Actor Jack Nicholson (1937) and singer Peter Frampton (1950) both call
today their birthday.
- This month is Prevention of Animal Cruelty Month.
- Today is National Teach Children to Save Day and Take Our Sons and
Daughters to Work Day
- On this day in 1978. The Blues Brothers (Dan Akroyd and John Belushi)
made their first appearance on "Saturday Night Live
Announcements
Films
The Student Union Films Committee presents The Fog of War tonight at
9:30 p.m Friday at 7 p.m. and midnight, Saturday at 9:30 p.m. and Sunday
at 7 p.m. The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King is showing tonight at
7 p.m Friday at 9:30 p.m Saturday at 7 p.m and midnight and Sunday at
3 p.m. All movies are free with a student ID and are located in the Hendrix
Theatre. For more information, call 328-4700.
Dance Tryouts
The ECU Pure Gold Dance Team will hold spring tryouts Saturday, April 24
and Sunday. April 25 in Christenbury Gym Please stop by 311 Ward Sports
Medicine Building tor registration information Registration deadline is today
at 5 p m For additional information, please email lytlec@mail.ecu.edu.
Barefoot on the Mall
The 25th Annual Barefoot on the Mall will be from noon �
central campus. This event is free for students.
6 p.m. today on
Art Exhibition
The 2004 School of Art Thesis Exhibition opening reception will be at
5 p.m today in the Gray Gallery. The exhibit runs through May 22.
Jazz Bones
The School of Music presents Jazz Bones directed by George Broussard
at 8 p.m today in the A. J Fletcher Recital Halt This event is free.
B-Boy Competition
The Student Union presents "Toe II Toe a b-boy competition, from 6 p.m.
- 9 p.m. on Friday. April 23 in the Mendenhall Great Rooms. This event is
free.
Jazz Festival
The ECU Jazz Ensemble concert will perform at 8 p.m, on Friday, April 23
in the Greenville Convention Center. Call 328-4788 for tickets.
Jazz Festival
The School of Music presents a Guest Artist Concert by Billy Taylor at
8 p.m on Saturday, April 24 in the Greenville Convention Center. Dinner and
concert packages are available. Call 328-4788 for tickets.
Greenville Live
A.J. McMurphy's
1914 Timbury Drive 355-7956
Saturday, April 24,9 p.m.
Travis Proctor
Chef's 505
505 Red Banks Road
355-7505
Wednesday, April 28,730 p.m.
ECU jazz (acuity and students
Christy's Euro Pub
301 S Jarvis St 758-2774
Tuesday, April 27.10 pm.
Open mic night
City Hotel and Bistro
203 S.W. Greenville Blvd.
355-8300
Wednesday. April 28, 7 p.m.
Coastline Band
Corrigan's
122 E. Fifth St. 758-3114
Friday, April 23,10 p.m.
Live music
Saturday. April 24,10 p.m
Live music
Courtyard Tavern
703 S.E Greenville Blvd.
321-0202
Sunday, April 25,7 p m.
Spare Change
El Ranchito
315 E Tenth St.
561-7336
Thursday, April 22, 7 p.m
Mariachi Band
Ham's
701 Evans St 830-2739
Thursday, April 22,10 p.m.
Karaoke
Saturday. April 24,10 p.m.
CC and the Riders
Sunday. April 25,10 pm
Open mic night
Mesh Cafe
1011-A Red Banks Road
321-MESH
Thursday, April 22,9 p.m.
Johnny Dollar
Friday, April 23,9 p.m.
Comedy
Saturday. April 24,9 p.m
Deejay
Peasants
110 E. Fourth St. 752-5855
Thursday. April 22,9 p.m
Uoyd Dobler Effect
Friday, April 23,9 p.m.
Delta Nove
Saturday, April 24,9 p.m.
Field Trip
Tuesday, April 27,9 p.m.
New August with Kate McNally
Wednesday, April 28,9 p.m.
Open Mic Night
Player's Choice
Community Square, Memorial
Drive 355-4149
Thursday, April 22,10 p.m.
Karaoke
Saturday, April 24,10 p.m.
Powerstroke
Players Retreat
1631 Pactolus Road
758-6856
Thursday, April 22,7 p.m
Karaoke
Saturday, April 24,9 p.m
Fat Baby
Professor 000018
605 Greenville Blvd
355-2946
Saturday. April 24,9:30 p.m.
Karaoke
Wimple's Steam Bar
206 Main St Winterville
355-4220
Friday, April 23,7:30 p.m.
Live Music
Saturday, April 24. 7:30 p.m.
Live Music
Exposing sexism i
American societ
in
ety
One writer's journey
into world of
false advertising
TONY ZOPPO
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
Sir Francis Bacon once said,
"There is no excellent beauty that
hath not some strangeness in the
proportion
Bacon recognized what
beauty really is. However, accord-
ing to American society - specifi-
cally the media and advert
Bacon is way off his rockef
Advertising began
route to create self-cons;
customers of some way,
or form. This has gem-rat'
extreme problem for womenl
believe they are missing qualit
that advertising focuses fc
fixing.
Personal advertising started
to become prevalent in the
1920s.
"You
c a n
hardly
glance
out the
window,
much
less walk
in town,
but that
some
inquir-
ing eye
searches
you and
your skin. This is the beauty
contest of life read one such ad
for Camay soap.
"The beauty contest of life"
hardly stops at just soap.
For another example,
take a look at the ad pictured
in this article portraying
what ads have always shown
- women improving every
aspect of their bodies, whether
it's abs or thighs, breasts or but-
tocks.
the am
cal harm tlfis iniai
women is s
"Becaus
centrate o
bodily parl
free of self-
author Sus
book, Fern
"She i
and neve
unending
for perfect appearance
In 1984!((im(iir iiiaj!
du,rtmljB sut
�rcent
rimed th
ily one-t
iere found
eight.
Notonl
tising affec
ally, but it
physically.
As ma
females I
are sufferii
bulimia
the point
lion.
ECU'S
Karen Wa
getting awa
against wc
and in
ness educa
cal, emoti
and intell
feels th
wellne
met as
exposj
sure
won
realm.
ling
ct-)
net,
at Wei l
lvolve
tit on �
fa
eneral. Well- pr
Sis with physi- ca
cial, spiritual pe
health. Warren
men's overall arl
Continue to plum- fei
are constantly 78
his type of pres- ne.
merit a's "perfect
ismg affects every
fiat vour sense
of your place in the world
is altered enormously said
Warren.
"If you don't feel as if you
can belong and be accepted by
a society that worships this thin
image, then I believe it has a
great impact on your health in
all aspects
Warren also said that even
with the increased aware-
ness Americans have of such
advertising, it still poses a large
problem.
"I think it advertising has
gotten so much worse, just in my
me I've seen it get worse
said.
J that the sad truth is
s. What works is what
itl.irtutur JOinl bei ause people
(NJthlay attention
thenTsWyeSgping to
ep using sexuBJIty itradver-
sing and that istjimpiy our
ciety J
H recently polled 40 women,
16-60, from ECU, UNC-
I Hill and Wake Forest, as
a few high schools in the
area.
in I he poll was an open-
jon, and I went on to
articipants nine dif-
tisements involving
rtain roles.
ng question for the
id, "Do you feel that
JefTsociety and the media
rwhelming amount of
n women to be physi-
' t?" -a complete 100
ered "Yes
isement in this
lot of negative
the women as
gave them a
t their own
(tent were
heHr-TtVis image
body image;
offended b
see SEXISM page B2
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i
The average woman sees 400 to 600 advertisements per day, and by the time she is 17 years old, she has received over 250,000
commercial messages through the media. �.
-Only 9 percent of commercials have a direct statement about beauty, but-many more Implicitly emphasize the Importance ol
beauty - particularly those that target women and girls.
�One study ol Saturday morning toy commercials found that 50 percent of commercials aimed at girls spoke about physical
attractiveness, while none of the commercials aimed at boys referred to appearance.
Other studies found 50 percent of advertisements In teen girl magazines and 56 percent of television commercials
aimed at female viewers used beauty as a product appeal.
�Today's fashion models weigh 23 percent less than the average female
�A young woman between the ages of 18-34 has a seven percent chance of being as slim as a catwalk model
and a one percent chance of being as thin as a supermodel.
The diet industry alone generates $33 billion In revenue
In a sample of Stanford undergraduate and graduate students, 68 percent felt worse about their own
appearance after looking through women's magazines.
�75 percent of "normal" weight women think they are overweight and 90 percent of women
overestimate their body size.
Information courtesy of Medlascope.com
Old 'junk' can be worth thousands
Antiques Show features
appraisals, craftsmen
JOHN BREAM
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
Have you ever been channel
surfing and somehow found
yourself watching "Antiques
Roadshow?"
This popular PBS show
features appraisers who travel
the country and allow people
to bring out their "junk" to
find out if it's worth anything.
Often, these appraisers inform
the owners that their junk is
worth several thousand dollars.
This weekend at the Greenville
Convention Center, that lucky
person could be you.
The ECU Art Enthusiasts
and Cox Communications are
sponsoring the fourth annual
Antiques Show and Sale this
weekend.
This year, the event features
an appraisal fair on Sunday, April
2.S from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. during
which you can have your trea-
sures verbally appraised for just
$11) per item.
If an immediate appraisal
is not available, the appraisers
will scan the item and have an
appraisal from an expert the
same day.
"This would be the Sunday
part of 'Antiques Roadshow
You could just come out and
see what items are worth. On
Sunday, kids in the School of
Communication will be lilming
individual appraisals to produce
a documentary, which will be on
the public access channel and
repeated often said I ranceine
Rees, publicity
chairman of
the show.
Proceeds
from the event
will be donated
to scholarship
funds for the
ECU School o
Art.
"To our
knowledge, this
may be the larg-
est single event
and fundrais-
ing activity for
a scholarship
program Rees
said.
In addition,
an antique
show and sale
will be held on
Saturday, April
24 from 9 a.m.
- 5 p.m. and I
Sunday from
10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
A variety of dealers will be offer-
ing goods such as silver holloware
and flatware, fine china and por-
celain, elegant glassware, vintage
linens and clothing, prints and
maps from the 17th - 19th cen-
turies, fine furniture, primitives,
Persian and Oriental rugs, estate
jewelry, folk art and jewelry.
A silent auction will also
be held in conjunction with
the show. A large 1930s walnut
flat-topped desk, a room-size
Persian rug and a $300 personal
assistant are among the items up
lor grabs.
Throughout both days, Greg
Barton of Lancaster, S.C. will
be on hand to make repairs
on chipped glass and crystal
Antique appraisals will be available at the Antiques Show this weekend.
items. Classical cahinetmakci
Paul Gianino of Greenville will
discuss and demonstrate tools,
techniques and finishes used in
making and restoring furniture
of the period.
A brunch featuring nation-
ally noted quilt maker Jeananne
Wright of Colorado will be held
Saturday at 11 a.m. During this
time, Wright will deliver a lecture
tilled "Gather Up the fragments:
Civil War Era Quilts
Tickets for the brunch are
$37.50, but ECU students can
get a $10 discount by purchas-
ing tickets at the Central Ticket
Office or Gray Gallery.
General public tickets are
$5 per day or $7.S() for a two-
day pass and can be purchased
at the Convention Center, E u
students can purchase a one day
p.iss tor s.i and a two-day pass
for $.S.
"When I go to antique shows
I always see students, 20-some-
things, and they may not be
looking lor the same things I
am, hut they are there. Collect-
ing antiques is a hobby that goes
across Income levels and age
Rees said.
"I think it would be a wonder-
:ui experience, a learning experi-
ence and a great way to spend a
weekend day
This writer can be contacted at
leatures@theeastcaroiinian.com





PAGEB2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � TEATURES
4-22-04
Quick Picks: Film Review
Whole Ten Yards'is
pathetic remake of
only modest film
MCAHMASSEI
SENIOR WRITER
When you have seen a lot of
movies. It's hard to simply gen-
erate a list of your favorite (and
most disliked) film selections of
the year.
While Charlie Kaufman and
Michel Gondry's Etenul Sunshine
of the Spotless Mind is easi ly one of
the best films of the year, iioward
Deutch's The Whole Ten Yards is
the kind of rare film that makes
you question ever returning to
the theater again.
Bruce "can you say Die Hani
41" Willis and Matthew "that
dude from 'Friends Perry return
in this unpleasant sequel to
20OO's modest - not blockbuster,
not major hit, but modest - The
Whole Nine Yards.
Though one could entertain
the question "did we not do all
we could do with the first Yards
movie?" a sequel was, in fact,
made in this "sequel-crazy"
society where even modest hits
are generating unnecessary
follow-ups.
Rather than attempting
to expand on the original
installment's basic premise or
possibly explore another side of
these obviously one-dimensional
characters, The Whole leu Yunls
finds Jimmy "the Tulip" Tudeski
(Willis) now living in Mexico
married to Jill (Amanda feet),
who was (.) Oseransky's (Perry)
receptionist in the first film.
l.azlo Gogolak (Pollack) is the
mob-boss father of Janni Gogolak
(also played by Pollack), who was
killed in the first film by Jimmy
and Oz. In The Whole Ten Yards,
l.azlo attempts to track down
the men who killed his son,
thus allowing Jimmy and Oz to
reunite for the sad, pathetic film
that I am now reviewing.
Of course, the reunion allows
for the sort of go-for-broke prat-
falls Perry seems to think he is
good at, and madness and hilar-
ity ensue.
Determining why the film
is so bad is like questioning
the number of stars that make
up the sky there are so many
flaws, one could never fully come
up with an accurate answer. Is
it the lifeless performances? Ves.
Is it the cereal-box character
names? Yes.
Is it the belief shared by those
involved that making an unnec-
essary sequel to a modest success,
with no story or true direction
but with a certainty that people
would pay to see it and they could
make a quick million make it
bad? Yes, yes and yes.
It's one thing when a
bad film The Fast and the
Furious, Scooby-Doo) scores
high at the box office and
their eventual sequels haunt
theaters in no time, let's face it,
Hollywood is only making what
the people apparently want.
Garbage like The Whole Ten
Yards is coming from bad original
films audiences didn't even really
cherish with their wallets in the
I i rst place. Cou Id we be faci ng t he
likes of Freddy vs. lason again or
Dawn of the Dead 2: Return of the
Dead in the next few months?
One can only hope not.
Bottom line: Making OtgH
look like The lindfather, there are
countless reasons why seeing The
Whole Ten Yanls is a waste of time
and money, but there are count-
less reasons why seeing oth-r
(great) films would not be.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
iruce Willis reprises his role
from The Whole Nine Yards.

Film Info

Album Info
Rim: The Whole Ten Yards'
Starring: Bruce Willis, Matthew
Perry, Amanda Peel Kevin Pol-
lack
Release Date: April 9,2004.
Sexism
from page B1
is by far the most typical kind
of advertising that women are
bombarded by every day.
The advertisement that serves
as a backdrop for this article fea-
tures a woman as a wind-up doll
with a fur coat on and the caption
reads, "How to wind up a doll for
Christmas
Four-fifths of the women
polled found this ad offensive.
Most of the women that voted
offensive were largely affronted
by this image, commenting on
how it made women look like
mindless creatures for simply
material gains.
An ad that many from the
polling field were familiar with is
an advertisement for the Calvin
Klein cologne, One.
This image drew an inter-
esting response as only 21 out
of 40 were offended, particu-
larly because of three distinct
aspects - the near nudity, the
fact that the man's hand is half-
way down the woman's pants
and that she is being used as
simply an object to sell the
product, an image often found
in advertising.
However, most of the females
that weren't offended com-
mented that the effect Of the ad
was downplayed because CK is a
popular brand and is known (or
racy advertising.
The advertisement that
drew, by leaps and bounds,
the most negative feedback
was the Fomofill ad (see front
page). Kvery single woman
polled stated that the ad offended
her.
It is clear that society is con-
sumed by the image of a woman
modeled by perfection.
The question I beg to ask
is this - What's so great about
perfection?
Perfection is flawed. Perfec-
tion is not genuine nor is it ideal.
Perfection is certainly not beauty.
Imperfection, meanwhile, is
honest and real - imperfection
is beauty.
Beauty is that woman in
your life with the wide hips, ath-
letically built legs, pores, a loud

laugh and a stubborn will.
Within the very heart of love
and beauty, two things that go
hand-in-hand, lies imperfec-
tion.
You don't find
the perfect person and then fall
in love with her, nor do you see
her as physically perfect and thus
label her beautiful.
Beauty is in the eye of
the beholder, and it is not all
that our society makes it out
to be,
Beauty is not about perfei t ion
- it's about seeing an imperfect
person perfectly.
This writer can be contacted at
leatures@theeastcarolinian.com.
Quick Picks: Album Review
Petey Pablo returns
with second album
LAURA PEKAREK
STAFF WRITER
Eastern North Carolina
native Petey Pablo Is at It
again. With the southern anthem
"Raise lip" from his tirst album
Diary of a Sinner: 1st Entry still
ringing in his ears, Petey Pablo's
sophomore project hit stores
April 20 and tans will definitely
have their thirst quenched with
Still Writing In My Diary: 2nd
Entry.
Pablo became interested in
music at an early age as he sang
and acted in church and school
plays. Upon his introduction
to rap music In junior high
school, he quickly switched his
career aspirations from singer to
rapper.
His charismatic voice,
excellent breath control and
ability to match the energy
of any beat put before him,
Pablo has not only given Jive
Records a reputation for deliv-
ering boy-band frenzy, but also
bringing a down-home southern
flavor to hip-hop.
"I go everywhere on the
album. I talk about everything.
You ain't gonna hear no bling
blingin that I killed 15,000
people, or how much my car cost
or how many cars I got - cause
that ain't rap. I only write what I
feel, what I believe, what I have
done or what I want to do
Pablo states on his homepage.
"Everything is real. As wild
as some stuff may sound in
my rhymes, either I've done
it, thought about doing it, is
gon' do it or I been through
it in some shape, form or fash-
ion
He definitely has taken
that to heart on his second
album. Working with produc-
ers like Timbaland, Mannie
Fresh, Scott Storch and Kanye
West, how could the album not
cover vast sides of any spectrum?
Title: 'Still Writing In My Diary:
2nd Entry"
Artist Petey Pablo
Release Date: April 20,2004.
The first single off the highly
anticipated follow-up to his sur-
prisingly successful first album
is a racy hit "Freek-A-l,eek He's
not specially known for rapping
about lavish lifestyles, but on
this particular song, he lets his
rambunctious side run free.
Pablo collaborates with
Missy Elliot on this album,
once again achieving musical
genius on a track called "Break
Me Off later on the CD, the
North Carolina native peppers
a club hit by working on a track
with l.il Jon called "U Don't
Want Dat which promises
to be "a club-banger fo sho
Pablo also joins forces with Bubba
Sparxxx, TQ, Baby and G-Unit's
Young Buck.
Bottom Line: After a three-
year wait, it's obvious that Petey
Pablo was holding out until the
album was perfect. His confes-
sionals in this diary are meant
to just hit play.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
mm
mm�
Lr SUNDAY, APRIL 25,2004 � 8 PM
fw MINGES GOUSEUM � DOORS OPEN AT 7PM � TICKETS:15, $20, $25 - $30 AT THE DOOR
For ticket Info, visit www.ecuarts.xm
V
Visit the
- Hj Road Trip Rest Stop
Sunday, April 25 " Mlnges Coliseum (Rain: Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium) � 4PM - 8PM
featuring: MUSIC, VOTER REGISTRATION,
GAMES & GIVEAWAYS!
� � �- �.
�. �- .�
�i i In association with:
M�;
ROYAL
ELASTICS 0Whe

,MDfJ-
Wd PtMn w- W3M CS C CTTl
Locally sponsored by the IECU Student Union

PAGE






4-22-04
wiew
i Info
In My Diary:
i
11 20,2004.
f the highly
jp to his sur-
I first album
-l,eek He's
n for rapping
yles, but on
I, he lets his
un free,
irates with
his album,
ing musical
ailed "Break
the CD, the
live peppers
ig on a track
d "U Don't
h promises
ger fo sho
s with Bubba
ind G-Unit's
fter a three-
is that Petey
ut until the
His confes-
y are meant
ontacted at
olinian.com.
PAGE B3
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FFATURFS
4-22-04

S

When you're
cruising the
information
highway,
pull off on
our new exit
www.theedstcarolJnJan.com





PA6EB4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
4-22-04
PAGE B5
AFFORDABILITY
CONVENIENCE
WYNDHAM COURT
2 Bedroom And 1 Bath Apartment.
5 Blocks From ECU.
Energy Efficient.
Kitchen Appliances.
Washer & Dryer Hookups.
Central Air & Heat.
On ECU Bus Route.
Pets OK With Deposit.
EASTGATE VILLAGE
2 Bedroom And 1 Bath Apartment.
Fully Equipped Kitchens.
Washer & Dryer Hookups.
Central Air & Heat.
On ECU Bus Route.
24 Hour Emergency Maintenance.
Pets OK With Deposit
Nightly security patrols.
BRADFORD CREEK
3 Bedroom And 2.5 Bath Duplexes.
Country Club Living Without The Price.
On Bradford Creek Golf Course.
Approximately 1350 Sq.ft.
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Fully Equipped Kitchens.
Washer & Dryer.
Pets OK With Deposit.
.
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DOCKSIDE DUPLEXES
3 Bedroom And 2.5 Bath.
6 Blocks From ECU.
Approximately 1350 Sq.ft.
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Pets OK With Deposit.
3200-F Moseley Drive
Greenville, NC 27858
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Convenient To ECU, Pitt Community Collese & The Medical District
35





1-22-04
PAG! B5
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PAGL Bfi
ill! I AS I CAROLINIAN � fLATURES
4 22 04
Names in the News
British Empire by Queen Elizabeth,
in recognition of his contribution to
the Brit film industry
The maharajah of American indie
flicks Pulp Fiction). Weinstein
is infamous in the industry for
bad behavior, including displays
of physical violence and verbal
Intimidation of subordinates and
movie "talent Across the pond.
Weinstein has cofunded many Brit
films with his brother. Bob, including
Shakespeare in Love and Stephen
Rears' funkaliciousty twisted thriller
Dirty Pretty Things
"My life and my career have been
greatty influenced and enriched by
(KRT)-Vince Neil's troubles are
multiplying Earlier this month, the
big-haired former Motley Crue
singer pleaded no contest to a
misdemeanor charge of battery for
beating up a former prostitute at the
Moonlite Bunny Ranch, a Nevada
brothel Now she's suing him
Andrea "TrixXxie Blue" Terry, who filed
in Las Vegas, is seeking unspecified
damages of at least $20,000 for lost
wages and other costs stemming
from the July 10.2003, incident She
contends Neil grabbed her by the
neck, pushed her against a window,
and pulled her to the floor after
she and another prostitute refused
to have sex with him until he paid
$4,000 for each woman.
Terry's suit also accuses the brothel's
owner, Dennis Hot. of negligence,
asserting he didn't call police For his
part, Hof says Terry's a gold digger
who made up the story. He told the
Las Vegas Sun that he invited Neil to
the Bunny Ranch to sign autographs
after playing a show with Poison in
Reno "We don't charge celebrities;
we pay the girls ourselves Hof
said.
Neil would not comment on the
suit.
A ROYAL HONOR
Guess when it comes to British
Royalty, there really is no accounting
for taste Portly Hollywood producer
Harvey Weinstein was named a
commander of the Order of the
to do more leisurely things: "There's
no shortage of things to do when I'm
not working, and working deprives
me of the many things I love to do
MOCKING "IDOL"
What do you get when you cross
Chuck Barris with the Marquis de
Side? The WB's "Superstar USA
The new reality show, billed as a
parody of Fox's "American Idol
is a search for America's least
talented singer Like Barris' 70s
lowbrow classic, "The Gong
Show; it'll have performances by
real stinkers. Heres the sadistic twist
Contestants don I know they re on
the show for being awful They think
they are the most talented!
Mike Fleiss, the virtuoso behind
"The Bachelor beams about his
new baby
'The fact that we are able
to perpetrate a hoax of this
magnitude with thousands of
people for more than a month is
absolutely incredible he said
Not necessarily - we can
think of a few politicians
who ve managed to pull it off
The show will premiere May 17.
SELL THE
BOOKS.
WE'LL HANDLE
THE REST
Once finals are over, books are the last things you want to cart home. But your stereo,
CDs clothes, computer, TV, microwave, kayak? Leave them to The UPS Store. Well
carefully pack them and ship them home. Whether home's across the state, across the
nation, or across the ocean. There - who said you didnt learn anything this semester?
The UPS Store
Formerly Mail Boxes Etc.
(next to McAlister's)
740 SE Greenville Blvd.
252321-6021
Jody Chaffee, Owner
Offering new low rates
direct from UPS
great British filmmakers and authors,
and so I am especially honored and
humbled to be receiving the CBE
Weinstein said. The Miramax chief
will receive his honor at a ceremony
in the coming months.
SHORT HANGS IT UP
Bobby Short, who's been fine-tuning
his nightclub act at Manhattan's Cafe
Cartyle for 36 years, will end his run
come New Year's Eve
The 76-year-old Short, who once told
a reporter, "There's something rather
vulgar, I suppose, about somebody
80 years old singing for a living
says he won't leave showbiz for
good: "I'm not retiring I Intend to
keep on working But the drill of five
nights a week for 20 weeks at a time
is something that no longer appeals
to me
Short will still tour, but says he wants
BABS GOES PLATINUM
In news meant to humble those fools
who dare mock Barbara Streisand
(including yours truly), comes
word that Babs' 60th album. The
Movie Album, has gone platinum (that
is. it sold more than one mil). This is
Ihe 30th record by the indomitable
superstar to earn that distinction
$ a onflLyearrease irrmay & get one month FREE!
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Student Stores
Wright Building � 398 - 6731
www.studcntstores.ccu.edu
Wright Place (back dining area)
Mon April 86 - Thurs April 298:00 �m to 7:00 pm
Fri April 308:00 am to 5:00 pm
Sat May 111:00 am to 3:00 pm
Mon May 3 - Wed May 58:00 am to 7:00 pm
fijim Hill. Soeioht & Mendenhall
(aeroM from Financial Aid)
Mon April 86 - Fri April 308:30 am to 5:00 pm
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LAW ENFORCEMENT DISCOUNTS
PHONE: 355-4499 � www.brassvvood.com � brass wood " earthlink.net
Attention ECU Students!
Would you like to earn $7,700 for completing 900 Service hours?
ECU Project HEART currently has
positions open for students and you
are encouraged to apply.
Project HEART Members tutor at-risk
teens in eastern North Carolina.
Members receive a stipend of $5,398.
Members who complete their
service contract are eligible for
a $2,363 Education Award.
Influence the future with Project HEART
Contact: Dr. Betty G. Beacham, Director
AmeriCorps Recruitment Office
209 E. 3rd Street, Bldg. 165, Room 104A Greenville, NC 27858
Telephone: 328-4357 Email: beachamb@mail.ecu.edu
Boutique
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4-22-04
I ML LAST CAROLINIAN � I LATURLS
PAGE B
Cinema Scene
Student Union Films
Free with ECU One Card.
Lord of the Rings: Return of the
King - starring Elijah Wood. Sean
Aston and Ian McKellen. The final
chapter in The Lord of the Flings
trilogy continues the odyssey of
Frodo and his Fellowship, and the
ultimate fate of the One Ring. Rated:
PG-13.
The Fog of War - starring Robert
McNamara, Fidel Castro and Barry
Goldwater. Former Secretary of
Defense during the JFK and LBJ
administrations, Robert McNamara,
was one of the key figures in the
Vietnam War. This documentary is
built around 20 hours of interviews
and additional archival footage of
Mr. McNamara, who later became
president of the World Bank and
broadened his global influence.
Rated: PG-13
Carmlke 12
13 Going on 30 - starring Jennifer
Garner and Mark Ruffalo. On the
eve of her 13th birthday, all Jenna
Rink (Garner) wants is to be pretty
and popular. After a humiliating
experience with the coolest kids in
school, Jenna makes a desperate
wish for a new life. Miraculously, her
wish comes true, but with one catch
she's only five days away from her
30th birthday. Rated: PG-13.
The Alamo - starring Dennis
Quaid, Jason Patric and Billy Bob
Thornton. Disney's retell of the 1836
battle where 300 American troops
held the San Antonio fort against the
Mexican forces under General Santa
Ana. Rated: PG-13
Connie and Carla - starring
David Duchovny and Nia Vardalos.
Two Chicago dinner theater
singers witness a mob hit and
find themselves on the lam. They
decide to hide out in the one city
they figure no one would suspect
to find a couple of cultured girls
- Los Angeles. Disguised as
singing and dancing drag queens,
they unexpectedly become a hit
sensation. Rated: PG-13.
Ella Enchanted - starring Anne
Hathaway and Hugh Dancy This
family film tells the story of Ella, who's
blessedcursed at birth with the gift
of obedience. However, many people
take advantage of her. and while on
a journey to cure her problem, finds
a prince with whom she falls in love.
Rated: PG.
The Girl Next Door - starring Elisha
Cuthbert and Timothy Olyphant A
straight-arrow high school senior
falls in love with the perfect "girl next
door only to discover she is a former
pom star Rated: R.
Hellboy - starring Ron Perlman and
Selma Blair. Born in the flames of hell
and brought to Earth to perpetrate
evil, Hellboy (Perlman) was rescued
from sinister forces by Dr. Broom,
who raised him to be a hero Rated:
PG-13
Home on the Range - starring
Judi Dench, Cuba Gooding Jr
and Randy Quaid A group of cows
learn that their owner must pay a
$1,000 mortgage on the farm or she
will be forced to sell. The animals
band together with the lady's horse
to come up with the money Their
plan is to collect the bounty on
a no-good bandit who's on the
run. Rated; PG.
Johnson Family Vacation
- starring Cedric the Entertainer.
Vanessa Williams and Bow Wow
The head of the Johnson family
hits the highway with his brother,
separated wife and three children
on a trip to Missouri to make the
Johnson family reunion. Along
the way. they share a few
colorful and comical adventures.
Rated: PG-13.
Kill Bill Vol. 2 - starring Uma
Thurman. Daryl Hannah and
David Carradine The concluding act of
Quentin Tarantino's Kill Bill series finds
The Bride (Thurman) continuing
to seek vengeance against her
employer and once fellow hit
men who shot her and left her
for dead on her wedding day
This time, her nemeses
include Bud (Michael Madsen)
and Elle Driver (Hannah)
Rated: R.
Man on Fire - starring Denzel
Washington, Dakota Fanning and
Christopher Walken An American
ex-soldier (Washington) lives out his
days in Mexico An old friend by the
name of Reyburn (Walken) persuades
the ex-soldier to protect a child, Pinta
Ballello (Fanning), whose parents are
threatened by a rash of kidnappings.
Rated: R.
The Prince and Me - starring Julia
Stiles and Luke Mably. The story of
a female student at a Midwestern
university who has the dubious
fortune to fall in love with a European
prince spending the semester there
incognito. However, the prince is
forced to choose between love and
royalty Rated: PG.
The Passion of The Christ - starring
James Caviezel, Monica Bellucci,
Maia Morgenstern. Story of the last
12 hours of Jesus Christ's life, as told
by director Mel Gibson
The Punlsher - starring John
Travolta. Thomas Jane and Laura
Elena Harring. FBI undercover
agent Frank Castle's (Jane) world
is shaken to its core by a nightmare
he has longed feared: his family is
executed as a repercussion from his
final assignment. With unparalleled
intensity, ferocious intelligence and
fearless actions. Castle seeks to
punish the murderers, and their kind
Rated: R.
Scooby Doo 2: Monsters
Unleashed - starring Sarah
Walking Tall - starring The Rock
and Johnny Knoxville Retired
soldier Chris Vaughn returns
to his hometown only to find
that his high school rival has
shut down local industry and
turned the town into a hotspot
for crime and drugs Vaughn
becomes sheriff of the town and
begins solving its problems Rated:
PG-13.
The Whole Ten Yards - starring
Michelle Gellar and Freddie
Prinze Jr The gang is back
at it again doing battle with
villains such as The Rerodactyl Ghost.
The Black Knight Ghost and The
10,000 Volt Ghost in order to save
the city of Coolsville. Raled: PG
Bruce Willis and Matthew Perry
Sequel to The Whole Nine Yards,
Oz and Jimmy (Perry and Willis)
re-team to fight Lazlo
Gogolak, younger brother
of the first film's villain, who
is seeking revenge. After
Oz's wife is kidnapped, Oz and
Jimmy endure many comical
escapades to save her Rated:
PG-13.
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years of bard work and achievement.
Mahogany bead frame
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See our display of frames at ECV-Dowdy Student Stores.
Student Stores
Wright BiriWing � 328-6731
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PAGLB8
,ST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
4 22 04
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Familiar faces populate pilot
sitcom shows bidding for fall
(KRT)� It's the reality shows
that arc bunching up at the top
of the ratings. But networks con-
tinue to show hope lor scripted
shows - especially at this time
of year.
Pilot episodes for more than
100 proposed new series are being
completed this month as part of
the annual effort that will result
in rosters of new fall shows.
Only about a third of them
will make it; a few others may be
held for midseason replacements.
Ml the others will disappear.
And while some new shows
are a lock for the fall, including a
fourth version of "Law ft Older
a third "CSI set in New York;
and the "friends" spin-off "Joey
lure's a look at some other pilots
that may or may not fly into fall
schedules;
Actors new to series TV: g
Macaulay Culkin is featured in -
a proposed NBC comedy about
a brother and sister reunited
gftei growing up in different
foster homes. Jeff Cioldblum is a
financial consultant in therapy,
also for NBC. Lewis Black of "The
Dally Show" stars as a high school
principal in a proposed ABC
sitcom. Chris O'Donnell stars in
the CBS comedy "The Amazing
Westerbergs Ricki Lake stars as
a single mom who runs a bar in
a new project from the creators
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Marissa Jaret Winokur, the
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on Broadway, will join French
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A more visible British adapta-
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Steve Carell of "The Daily Show"
is in the version by NBC, who
fumbled the Americanization of
"Coupling" last season.
Nick Lachey and Jessica Simp-
son, whose variety show drew
11.4 million viewers Sunday, star
in separate ABC projects. He's in
"Hot Mamma starring Glna
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she's in an unfitted sitcom about
a pop star turned TV newsmaga-
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Odd jobs: Besides "Hot
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Another rising business in
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The Wll. A drama about nannies
in upscale New York, "Gramercy
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and Milo Ventimiglia.
NBC's proposed "D.O.T.S
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a major airport.
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SPORTS
RYAN DOWNEY
Sports Editor
TONY Z0PP0
Assistant Sports Editor
sports@theeastcarolinlan.com
252.328.6366
Sports Briefs
ECU geared up for Penn Relays
Coming off two events in which they qualified for the NCAA regional in,
the ECU Pirates men are preparing to head to Philadelphia, Pa. in order
to participate in the Penn Relays. At their last event, the Sea Ray Relays
in Knoxville, Term, the Pirates 4X400 meter relay team posted a NCAA
Regional qualifying time of 3:09.53, good enough for a fifth place finish at
that event. Ron Pollard's sixth place finish (51.70) in the 400 meter hurdles
also earned him a NCAA bid. Eric Frasure's first place finish in the hammer
throw (53 25m) and second place finish in the discus throw (45.73m) were
among some of the other highlights for the Pirates at the Sea Ray Relays
ECU will look to improve upon these stats at this weekend's upcoming
Penn Relays
Hart signs national letter of intent with ECU
ECU men's basketball coach Bill Herrion announced that Jonathan Hart
(6 foot - 6 forward) has signed a national letter of intent with the Pirates for
the 2004-05 season Tuesday A product of Abraham Clark High School
in Roselle, N.J Hart averaged 25 points. 14 rebounds and 6.5 assists per
game to lead his team to its third consecutive appearance in the state
championship game Hart was a part of back-to-back state championship
teams during his sophomore and junior seasons, leading his team to a
50-6 record Hart earned conference player of the year accolades this past
season and was a three-time all-conference selection. He is one of just
seven players to score over 1,000 points in Clark High history
Former Pirate Tracy gets call to big leagues
Former ECU infielder Chad Tracy was called up from Triple-A Tucson early
Wednesday morning and will make his major league debut as a member
of the Arizona Diamondbacks when he joins the team in Milwaukee later
today. Tracy received the call-up after Arizona placed second baseman
Roberto Alomar on the 15-day disabled list Tuesday night. Alomar sustained
a broken hand in the D-Backs 4-2 loss to the Brewers last night. Through
12 games at Triple-A Tucson this season. Tracy was batting .400 with a
pair of home runs and 11 RBIs After being selected in the seventh round of
the 2001 MLB Amateur Draft as a junior, Tracy decided to forego hi9 senior
season. He compiled a career minor league average of .333 in 326 games
played with 22 home runs and 195 RBIs through his first three seasons
of professional baseball. Tracy ranks among the top 10 in school history
in batting average (339), hits (154), doubles (48) and RBIs (154). He was a
two-time NCAA All-Regional player and a first-team All-Colonial Athletic
Association selection as a junior in 2001.
76ers hire former Celtics coach
The 76ers hired Jim O'Brien as coach Tuesday, handing the former Boston
Celtics coach a team that could be on the verge of a major rebuilding
project O'Brien replaces Chris Ford, who was promoted from assistant on
an interim basis after Randy Ayers was fired on Feb. 10. O'Brien stepped
down as coach of the Celtics on Jan. 27 after clashing with Danny Ainge,
the team's executive director of basketball operations. O'Brien was 139-
119 with the Celtics and led them to the Eastern Conference finals and
semifinals the last two seasons He'll be the third coach to lead the Sixers
since Hall of Famer Larry Brown stepped down last May Brown, who spent
six seasons in Philadelphia, coaches the Detroit Pistons. Ayers, an assistant
under Brown with the Sixers, was fired after posting a 21-31 record. Ford,
who had several run-ins with All-Star guard Allen Iverson, led Philadelphia
to a 12-18 record, and the team missed the playoffs for the first time since
the 1997-98 season
Lakers hit with another injury
Slava Medvedenko is the latest player to go down, straining his right Achilles
tendon late in the second quarter of Monday night's 98-84 victory over
the Rockets and sitting out the second half With Horace Grant sidelined
due to an injured hip. Medvedenko has become an important part of the
Lakers' rotation, backing up Shaquille O'Neal at center and Karl Malone al
power forward Fortunately, the Lakers have a 2-0 lead over the Rockets
and some time off. When winning the first two games of a playoff series.
Jackson-coached teams have a 20-8 record in the third game. O'Neal
picked up his fourth foul early in the third quarter of a tie game Monday
night, but Jackson left him in the game. Had Medvedenko been available,
the coach said O'Neal would have come out Medevendko wasn't, however,
so O'Neal stayed in The strategy worked as the Lakers established a 10-
point lead entering the fourth quarter and weren t challenged after that.
Neither team practiced Tuesday, but the Lakers' training room was awfully
crowded as Medvedenko. Derek Fisher, Rick Fox and Devean George
came in for treatment.
Judge tosses evidence from weapons expert
Jurors in the Jayson Williams manslaughter trial should disregard the results
of two tests performed by a state police weapons expert on the former NBA
star s shotgun, the judge ruled Tuesday. The decision was a victory for the
defense, who argued that the tests were not scientific because they could
not be replicated The ruling could make it harder for the prosecution to
deflect the defense theory that the shotgun misfired, killing a hired driver
as Williams was handling the weapon Superior Court Judge Edward M.
Coleman ruled after the jury heard more testimony from the expert, Detective
Sgt. James Ryan. He had told the jury in March that the shotgun could not
be made to misfire, and repeated that assertion on Monday. In the two
tests at issue, Ryan said he was able to induce Williams' shotgun to fire
by lightly pulling the trigger back while closing the shotgun. One test was
done with a deliberate closing, the other by snapping the weapon closed,
as witnesses said Williams did.
Clarett turns to Supreme Court, Williams files suit
Maurice Clarett filed an emergency appeal with the US Supreme Court
on Tuesday to try to force his way into this weekend's NFL draft. Clarett's
attorney, Alan Milstein. asked for a stay of a decision by the 2nd U.S. Circuit
Court of Appeals preventing the former Ohio State tailback from entering
the draft Monday's decision put on hold a lower-court ruling that said the
NFL can't force players to wait three years after high school before turning
pro. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg will handle the case The NFL said Clarett
has little chance of success at the Supreme Court. On Monday. Southern
California sophomore receiver Mike Williams filed his own lawsuit in federal
court in Manhattan, saying the NFL had issued conflicting statements about
eligibility for the draft, thus causing him to sacrifice his college career.
ECU to host Cardinals
The C-USA Co-Hitter of the week, Jaime Paige, will look to lead the Pirates at the plate against Louisville Cardinals
Pirates look to continue
stellar conference play
BRANDON HUGHES
SENIOR WRITER
One of college baseball's best
offensive lineups has propelled
the Pirates (31-6, 12-3) into the
top 10 rankings for the first time
this season. Their aluminum bats
bombed the Cincinnati Bearcats
into oblivion during the three-
game sweep last weekend as ECU
plated 60 runs in I h ree ga mcs. The
Pirates even set a Conference USA
record in the second game with
runs scored (32) and RBIs (32).
The Louisville Cardinals
(20-16, 8-7) should pose a
stiffer challenge in the weekend
series approaching. Louisville
manhandled Evansville 12-3
Tuesday night and seem to have
put a losing streak, where they
won just once in six games,
behind them. The C-USA battle
should make lor an interesting
series beginning Friday night in
Greenville.
Offense
With an average pitching
staff, the Cards have had to
make a difference at the plate
this season to post their win-
ning record. Most of the lineup
has the ability to take one deep,
especially senior outfielder Mark
Jurich. Jurich leads the team in
batting average (.349), hits (53),
doubles (12), homeruns H) and
RBIs (35).
Freshman Daniel Burton is
Zurich's cohort patrolling the
outfield, but has done plenty
of damage at the plate as well.
Burton is hitting .343 on the
season with 10 doubles and 22
RBIs.
Sophomore infielder Nick
Haley is the catalyst that gets
everything going lor this team.
Haley is hitting .338 and boasts
see BASEBALL page C2
Roundball Challenge to be held Friday night
ACC and ECU look to
raise money for Jimmy V
RYAN DOWNEY
SPORTS EDITOR
ECU will play host to an
event to help find a cure for
cancer Friday.
The event. The
ACC Seniors vs. Pirates
All-Stars Roundball Challenge,
will put ECU seniors and selected
alumni against a team of ACC
stars including Marcus Melvin
and Scooter Sherill of NC State.
Part of the proceeds from the
game, which tips off at 7 p.m
will go to the Jimmy V founda-
tion, which was started in the
name of former NC State coach
Jim Valvano.
The foundation is one of
many across the country working
to help find a cure for cancer.
Eroyl Bing, who lost
his grandmother to cancer,
thinks the game wltl give
ECU fans a chance to see what
ECU might have done against
ACC competition had it been in
the league.
"I think we have a good
chance. We are smaller up front
but we have some bigger guards
said senior Kroyl Bing.
"I'm excited. It's a chance to
play against a lot of ACC seniors.
It's a chance to get a good game
gong up and down for 40 min-
utes. It should be a lot of fun
This game, though, is about
a lot more than a basketball
competition.
According to Keith Peaden,
who is organizing the event,
games like this are held all over
Basketball
BING
the country and are very impor-
tant to the Jimmy V Foundation
as a means of lundraising.
"Themost important thing is
this is for charily Bing said.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
ecu au-STwa
Vinny Sharp
lestor Lyons
Brandon Hawkins
Eroyl Blny
Garrett Blackwelder
Shawn Moore
Travis Holcomb-Faye
Derrick Wiley
ACC PLAYERS
Marcus Melvin
Jamar Smith
Todd Billet
Chris Hobbs
Scooter Sherrlll
Alan Williams
Oamien Price
Jonathan Miller
Phillip McLamb
Pirate programs provide athletic year to forget
Both the football and men's basketball programs had frustrating seasons as they played respective 1-11 and 13-14 records
Baseball team is lone
source of optimism
ERIC QILMORE
STAFF WRITFR
The 2003-04 academic school
year is on the brink ol an end. The
end of the year always marks bit-
tersweet times where students are
caught between reminiscing and
anxiously awaiting the future.
The same goes for athletics.
The tone was set more than
a year and a half ago when
it became apparent that the
football coach and athletic
director could not lorgc a work-
ing relationship. Steve Logan
chose to resign among heat Irom
ex-Chancellor William Muse.
Mike llamrick saw his time was
limited and bolted for UNt.V.
This is all old news, but it
was 'imply foreshadowing as
to how this athletic year would
turn out.
When the authoritative Molly
Broad, director of the University
System in North Carolina, asked
lor Muse's resignation, it was
imminent that no one outside
the ECU family wanted our dear
Pirates to succeed.
Muse wanted to better ECU
athletics by contacting the
once-expanding ACC and, more
importantly, lobby to be included
in the Big East. With Muse gone
and no leadership at the AI) spot,
ECU failed to better itself in
conference affiliation.
ECU is now stuck playing
in a conference with little to no
rivalries and looming travel
expenses. The alumni do not
get excited about playing the
likes of Tulsa, Rice and Southern
Methodist.
However, the Pirates never
had anything come easy in
either athletics or politics. The
Students, alumni, boosters and
administration are going to have
to unite together in having a
chip on their shoulder. ECU has
lo showinference USA and the
rest ol the stale thai i( is not ,i
second tier or mid-major athUlk
program. This can only be done
by two ways, recruiting the best
players possible and more impor-
tantly, winning.
Let's break down the major
spoils in reminisce and look to
in the future:
loot ball
The tone of the football
season was set in a 40-3 loss on
the road on national television.
John Thompson, brought in
Irom the University ol Florida,
promised the boosters a new
blitzing defensive siheme and
an electric offense, lie produced
neither. What transpired was
the worst record in ECU football
)
history and a game versus archri-
val Southern Miss that produced
just 24,175 fans, Only the depart-
ing senior iiass ol the student
body has experienced a winning
season.
I honipson will need the
team to Improve much more in
his second year. A new high-
octane offense has been promised
once again with tin1 addition of
Offensive coordinator Noah
Brtndise. crr Idora has had his
defensive scheme in for over a year
now, so the "learning curve" can
no longer be an excuse.
1 hompson appears to be
on the right path with the
addition ol a lull class ol recruits.
The l I coach signed the
most recruits Irom lloriila ol
the non-Florida si hools, i he
incoming r� mils will play a big
part in next year's system.
see YEAR page C7





PA6EC2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORFS
4-22 04
Softball prepares for St. Louis
Lady Pirates return to
conference play Friday
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
STAFF WRITER
ECU'S softball team will
finish off their nine-game road
trip when they travel to Missouri
to face St. l.ouis in a three-game
series this weekend. The series
will bring the Lady Pirates back
into conference play after a
six-game break.
In the team's only other
meeting, fcCU swept the Billikens
last year to close out the season.
The Lad)' Pirates currently have
a 5-10 conference record and will
be looking to repeat last year's
performance against St. Louis
when they play again this week-
end.
St. Louis is currently in last
place in Conference USA with a
1-14 record and is on a five-game
losing streak.
Despite the Billikens' record,
ECU Head Coach Traces Kee is
well aware that this team will be
unlike the non-conference game
they have played this year.
"The conference is a phenom -
enal softball conference filled
with competition said Kee.
"It is very difficult to dupli-
cate this in non-conference
games
The Lady Pirates are cur-
rently in sixth place in confer-
ence standings and will need
to maintain their position
in hopes of getting into the C-
USA Tournament at the end of
the season. The tournament has
been a target for the team this
entire year.
"We all want to make it to
the conference tournament said
Kch tlarrell. freshman pitcher.
- nut's ultimately everyone's
goal on this team
With wins against St.
Louis, the I idy Pirates will
maintain their conference
standings and gain the confi-
dence they mod when they con-
tinue conference plaj, against
Southern Miss the following
weekend
The Lad) Pi rates open play
with Si. I Ottis In a doubleheader
on Saturday at 2 p.m. Play will
conclude on Sunday when the
Lady Pirates wrap up their series
at I p ni.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcorolinian. com.
Baseball
from page C1
an outstanding on-base percent-
age of .451. The second baseman
has struck out just six times in
over 150 at-bats. Haley leads the
team In walks (26) and stolen
bases(5).
Pitching
Louisville's pitching staff
nil twen i�ptctarne tri XfWJ, rr
don't expect the Pirates to be set-
ting any more offensive records
this weekend. Sophomore Brian
Halford is the ace of the bullpen
with a team-low 3.72 ERA. Half-
ord has started just one game, but
his 5-2 record might encourage
Louisville coaches to give him
the hall against the Pirates,
Mike risdale, lustin valdes
and HI Rosenberg are the pri-
mary i'ardinal starters risdale
leads the trio with an IK of 4.59
and aides has a record oi 4-3.
Opponents are hitting over
.300 on all three, but their solid
stitKet iut-tn�watV ratifs tw-tj vs Veep
runners off the base paths
Jaime Paige named C-USA
Co-Hitter of the Week
Paige's record-setting game
againstnuinnati earned him
Co-Hitter oi the Week in the
conference. Paige was 7-for-8 in
game two and set a school and C-
USA game record for hits (7) and
doubles (4). Paige batted .588 110-
lor-17) during the series. Paige is
hatting . 106on the season lor the
Pirates and leads the team in runs
scored (38) and walks (27) from
his leadoft spot.
Paige shared the honor with
t'AB ftrrt baseman Hanlrl Hill.
Mill led the Blaers to two wins
over nationally ranked Tulane.
Hill hatted .421 (8-for-19) in
four games last week with three
homers and 10 RBIs.
This writer can be contacted at
sport s@theeas tcarolinian. com.
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PAGE C3
THF FAST CAROIINIAN � SPORTS
4-??-04
4-22 04
SUNDAY, APRIL 25,2004 � 8 PM
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PAGEC4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
4-22-04
PAGE Cf
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PAG1 C5
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
4-22-04






THF FAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
4-22-04






4-22-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE C
Women's soccer competes
in annual alumni scrimmage
Academic Senate vote could lead to
end of football at San Jose State
Men's game to be
played afterward
ROBERT LEONARD
STAFF WRITER
The women's soccer team
has had an incredihle spring.
After almost an unblem-
ished record and less than
five goals allowed all season,
the team will finish with its
annual alumni game this Sat-
urday at 1 p.m. The men will
take the field at 3 p.m. for their
alumni game.
The game will feature some
famous names in ECU women's
soccer history. All three seniors
from the fall season's squad will
be in action, along with play-
ers such as Jill Davis and Dana
Derbin. The alumni will take on
the current women's team.
The women's soccer pro-
gram was started in 1994
when some players such as
llcne More (now Vazquez) and
Jamie Miller approached the
university about starting a
team.
The school originally
only had women's soccer
as a club sport, but these
players were able to get the
program rolling.
Head Coach Rob Donnen-
wirth thinks the alumni game
is a fun way to finish the spring
season.
"The players look forward
to competing with some older
players said Donnenwirth.
"Some of the girls on
the alumni team are former
teammates with my players
Despite it being an exhibi-
tion, Donnenwirth will cheer
on his girls.
"I have to root for my team
Donnenwirth said.
"We just want a competi-
tive game and hope no one
gets hurt
The game will be the
highlight of a weekend full
of activities for all the former
soccer players that will
conclude Saturday evening.
The writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Armstrong: Tour de France is entire focus
SJSU won just three games during the 2003-04 season.
AI') � Lance Armstrong
Isn't getting too worked up
about another chance at Olym-
pic gold.
Maybe that's because the
Athens Games are just three
weeks after he envisions himself
coasting down the Champs-Ely-
sees with a record-setting victory
in the Tour de France.
"That's what I wake up think-
ing about every day said Arm-
strong, who is competing this
week in another tour, the Tour
de Georgia.
Nothing not even the Olym-
pics can deter his focus from
winning a sixth straight lour
de France, something no other
cyclist has done. When the sub-
jects shifts to Greece, the tone of
indifference is unmistakable.
"No disrespect to the
Olympics, but I'm focused on
winning the lour de France
Armstrong said Monday. "I'm
committed to the Olympics,
I guess. But to be honest, all
the work 1 do on a daily basis
is geared toward the Tour de
France
Armstrong hasn't had nearly
the success in the Olympics that
he's had in cycling's biggest
event. He competed in the last
three Summer Games Barcelona,
Atlanta and Sydney but has only
a bronze medal to show for it.
"1 he Olympics would be a
highlight he conceded. "I've
always left disappointed. I would
like to go back and fix the things
that I thought I should have done
better before
For now, Armstrong is taking
part in a major American race for
the first time since 1998. He'll
lead the U.S. Postal Service team
at the Tour de Georgia, a six-day,
seven-stage event that begins
Tuesday in the central Georgia
city of Macon.
Looking fit and relaxed,
Armstrong strolled into a hotel
ballroom to discuss the quest
that drives his life. He's still upset
about the way he won his lillh
straight Tour a tumultuous three
weeks in which he overcame
crashes, illness, hard-charging
rivals and just plain bad luck,
seeming to win through shear
willpower.
(KRT) � In a move that
could threaten San Jose State
University's 110-year-old
football tradition, the Academic
Senate voted by secret ballot
Monday to limit funding for
sports teams and recommended
withdrawing from Division I-A
and the Western Athletic Confer-
ence altogether.
The action is meant to send a
strongsignal to the new university
president, who could be named
as soon as Tuesday, that in light
budget times, academics take
priority over football. However,
presidents have ignored faculty
recommendations on athletic
funding before, most recently
in 1993.
"We're not opposed to loot-
ball per se, but Division l-A has
costs we can't afford said James
Brent, the political science pro-
fessor who pushed Division l-A
withdrawal through on a 21-11
vote. He conceded that drop-
ping out of Division l-A "prob-
ably means having to get rid of
football
Although the senate vote
is only symbolic, Brent said he
hopes will counter what the
president will hear from a group
of very loud boosters who don't
have the best interests of the
university as a whole at heart
The Academic Senate, a
group of faculty, students, stall
and administrators that advises
the president also voted to put
the question of withdrawing
From Division l-A and the WAG
before the entire faculty in a
referendum later this term.
The vote is the first formal
faculty recommendation to
emerge from a year-long debate
over athletics funding that has
healed up as budgets have tight-
ened, and the football program
has struggled to fill seats and
win games.
Both candidates who are
finalists for the university
presidency spoke out last week
against taking quick action
on the football question and
pointed to the beneficial
relationships that intercollegiate
athletics bring the university.
Proponents of withdrawing
: argued that tew students attend
games. And despite publicity
about needing to boost atten-
dance to meet NCAA guidelines
to stay in Division l-A, the uni-
versity barely made the required
IS,(KlO average attendance per
game last year. Private fund-
raising to support the program
also is down, they said.
A referendum, like the senate
vote, would be advisory only. But
it could put political pressure on
a new president as the university
gears up for some of the worst
budget reductions in decades.
The Senate proposal calls for
a cap on the amount of general
fund dollars used for athletics,
and suggests that any savings
be transferred to academic pro-
grams. General fund money now
accounts for 58 percent of the
$11.8 million athletic budget.
Year
from page C1
Two 1,000-yard rushers
will share the backfield with
Marvin Townes and a return-
ing Art Brown. James Pinkney is
emerging as the starter at quar-
terback.
Chris Moore, one of the
nation's leading tacklers, will
return and anchor the defense. A
core of returning veteran players
and a softer schedule should pro-
vide ECU opportunities to win.
The future for FCU football
has no place to go but up.
Basketball
With five seniors, Bill Herrion
was expecting a big year on the
hardwood. The slogan for the year
was "The Time is Now
Unfortunately for Herrion,
it looks like "the time" is longer
down the road.
Despite a mishap on the road
versus George Mason, ECU was
cruising into a nationally televised
game versus nationally ranked
D)uisville. Pivotal frontcourt player
Gabriel Mikulas broke his arm and
the Pirates never recovered. Der-
rick Wiley took erratic shots m the �
Pirates lost heartbreaker after heart-
breaker before making a late surge
to the conference tournament.
With the recent loss of Belton
Rivers, six players are leaving the
program. The paper-thin roster
will have to rely heavily on new-
comers again next season. Joining
the talented current Ireshman class
will be three newcomers that have
a I ready signed a nd more may be on
the way. ECU will only have two
players next year that are ixist their
sophomore season.
With patience, thefuturecan he
bright for ECU basketball.
File Minges Maniacs have cre-
ated an atmosphere that is becom-
ing renowited. Mike Cook hai a
chance to rewrite the ECU record
Ixxiks and Herrion received a one-
year contract extension. I he "time"
is very �x)n.
Baseball
Fhe baseball season is not over,
but ECU has arguably the best base-
ball team in sch(xl history. Second-
year coach Randy Mazey has done
an incredible job in handling one
of the most potent offenses in the
nation.
Fhe No. 9 ranked Piratesare tied
lor tirst in the conference and just
scored 60 runs i n a th rec-game series.
They are on a mission to Omaha, NF.
ami theollege World Series. Any-
thing less would be considered an
extreme disappointment.
On a 35-man roster, only
four will graduate this year. The
Lawhorn twins of Trevor and Daryl
will return next season and ECU
will oen up a newly renovated
stadium in 2005. The baseball
team is a team that all other ECU
sxrts should aspire to he - Ihe sky
is the limit.
Other Sports
ECU struggled mightily in
most of their non-mainstream
sX)rts. However, there were a few
bright spots.
Diane Parker of the
swimming team was voted
C-USA Swimmer of the Year.
Fhe women's basketball team
had their best start tn over
20 years and Courtney Willis
wrote her name in the ECU
record Ixxjks.
The women's soccer team
completed a very successful spring.
Jeanne Millican remained the class
of the women's golf team. The track
team had numerous NCAA qualify-
ing times.
1 Vspitc the obvious exceptions
and the baseball team, the 2003-
2004 year was a trying time for
ECU athletics.
With the announcement of
a new chancellor and an athletic
director pending,
ECU will have
new blood. The new
admtnlitratlon will have to mark a
new era in the constant struggle for
consistency and legitimacy in ECU
athletics. Luckily for them, they will
not reminisce. Fhey will only look
to the future.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeas t Carolinian, com.
Clip and save this information � Write these dates on your calendar!
2004-2005 PARKING PERMITS
All vehicle registration will be completed on-line.
Register by July 16th to have your permit mailed home.
VEHICLE REGISTRATION & PERMIT SALES FOR 2004 - 2005 ACADEMIC YEAR
� Parking Permit sales for current permit holders in zones A1, A2, A3 and B2 will be APRIL 19-30, 2004. If you have one of these permits, it
is imperative that you make your decision to retain your current zone status and complete the on-line vehicle registration before 5:00 p.m.
on April 30th. If your current zone permit is not repurchased by this date you will forfeit your current zone permit and will be required to
reapply.
� On May 3, 2004, available permits remaining after the April 19-30, 2004 registration for zones A1, A2, A3 and B2, will be offered to facul-
tystaff and students on the current waiting lists. Permits will be offered in sequential order until zones are filled to maximum capacity.
� On May 10, 2004, the ECU OneStop Vehicle Registration will open for ALL permit applications to include B1, B3, C and D zones, and zones
listed above. Applicants will be assigned permits based upon availability or will be placed on the appropriate waiting list.
If there are no spaces in the desired zone, you may add your name to the zone waiting list.
Maps showing the parking zones are posted at www.ecu.eduparking.
HOW TO REGISTER:
1. Gather information needed for the registration process including:
� vehicle make, model, license plate number
� insurance company name, policy holder's name, policy number
� housing information if living on campus next year
� credit card information if paying by Visa or Mastercard
Be sure you have all of this information because once you begin the on-line process you
will need to finish completing the form in order to purchase your parking permit.
2. Go on-line to ECU OneStop: onestop.ecu.edu, login with your ECU user ID and pass-
word. Click on Vehicle Registration listed under Security and Transportation.
3. Complete the on-line form. If you are paying by check, be sure to print out the e-mail
verification you receive and SEND IT WITH YOUR CHECK to the parking office.
Parking and Transportation Services
305 E. Tenth Street � Greenville NC 27858
kotM 252.328.6294
imwhsity www.ecu.eduparking
IMPORTANT SUMMER
PARKING INFORMATION
Students who currently hold 2003-2004, Freshman
(D Zone) permits may use any B2 or C Zone park-
ing areas for the first summer session, through
June 30. Students who currently have a D Zone
permit but will be living on College Hill during first
summer session must contact Parking &
Transportation Services to have their permit vali-
dated for A2 Zone parking.
If you do not have a current ECU parking permit,
you may purchase a summer session permit from
the Parking & Transportation Office located at 305
E 10th Street during regular business hours.
Permits for 1st session ONLY are $20. Permits for
2nd session ONLY are $20. Permits for BOTH 1 st
and 2nd sessions are $30.00
For more information on summer session parking
and the parking program, visit our web site at
www.ecu.eduparking. If you have questions,
contact our office at (252) 328-6294.





PAGEC8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
4-22-04
You will soon receiVe
lots of money.
Get more cash for your books at U.B.E. buyback.
U.B.E. Uptown Greenville � 516 South Cotanche St.
Monday & Tuesday, April 26 & 27
9:00am to 6:00pm
Wednesday & Thursday, April 28 & 29
9:00am. to 7:00pm
Friday, April 30
9:00am to 6:00pm
Saturday, May 1
10:00am to 5:00pm
Monday - Wednesday, May 3 - 5
9:00am. to 7:00pm
U.B.E. BOOK BUYBACK.
The most you've gotten from your books all semester.
Uptown Greenville 516 South Cotanche Street www.ubeinc.com
runumbefS
58-p
6 1 6
U.B.E. Remote Book Buyback at the Alpha Phi House
(Bottom of College Hill) Just jog down to Alpha Phi and trade those books for cold cash!
Monday, April 26
9:00am to 5:00pm
Wednesday - Friday, April 28 - 30
9:00am. to 5:00pm
Monday - Wednesday, May 3 - 5
9:00am to 5:00pm.


Title
The East Carolinian, April 22, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 22, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1731
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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