The East Carolinian, April 20, 2004






4-15-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 79 Number 138
TUESDAY
April 20, 2004
Step show features Greeks' talent
1 li
For Greek Week, fraternity and sorority members show off their hard work and skills during a step show in Minges Coliseum. This was just one of
more than 10 events planned for the week-long celebration of Greek life.
Board selects media heads for 2004-05
Campus radio station
awaits new leadership
PETER KALAJIAN
STAFF WRITER
The student and faculty
Media Board met Thursday
In closed session to appoint
new leadership for the four
student media organizations at
ECU.
The nine-member board
interviewed applicants vying for
the position of editor-in-chief
of The East Carolinian, general
manager of both Kxpressions and
The Rebel and station manager
of WZMH.
"All the applicants were well-
qualified said Ian Baer, student
body president and chairman of
the Media Board.
"Everyone had good experi-
ence. The interview played a
role in our decision, but when
taking on a role in one of
these jobs, experience is key.
1 think we made the right deci-
sions
For the position of editor-in-
chief at TEC, two students, both
of whom currently hold positions
there, applied for the job to take
over when Michelle Mci eod,
the current editor, graduates
in May.
Tanesha Sistrunk, a second-
degree Art major and current
photo editor at TEC, was one of
the applicants.
"I want to continue the
growth of this paper. I want
ECU students to reconnect with
us said Sistrunk.
"Much of that contact has
been lost over the years. Reader-
ship is not as high as we would
like, and The East Carolinian
should give students the ability
to voice their opinions, I think
my management experience
and outgoing personality could
really help in this effort
Running against Sistrunk
was Amanda Lingerfelt, junior
communication major and cur-
rent features editor at TEC.
"We've built a strong foun-
dation at TEC over the last year
said lingerfelt.
"I would continue to
improve on that foundation.
Staff training and organization
are extremely important to me,
and getting more students to
read the paper should be our
ALEXANDER
ultimate goal
After the Interview process,
the Board offered the position
of TEC's editor-in-chief to Lin-
gerfelt. She will assume her mu
position at the end of the spring
semester.
Media Board members
redacted Michael Ashby, the cur-
rent general manager ot Expres-
sions, the on-campus minority
magazine to the managerial
post.
"With Expressions, we hope
to always be presenting new
LINGERFELT
information to our readers, and
I would really like to incorporate-
more minority perspectives said
Ashby.
"We want a mosaic ol this
campus represented, not just two
or three groups. That is probably
my main focus with the paper
Jason Alexander, senior
communication major, was also
reconfirmed to continue his
position as general manager of
the yearly ECU literary journal,
The Rebel
And although the Media
ASHBY
Board interviewed several
applicants for the station
manager of the student radio
station, WZMB, the board
failed to elect a person to the
position.
Citing the need for more
time to consider the applicants,
board members will make their
final decision Tuesday, April
27, at their weekly meeting in
Mcndcnhall.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcaroliman. com.
Masked gunman robs 10th Street Krispy Kreme
Hundreds stolen,
employee unharmed
KEITH S. BYERS
STAFF WRITER
A gunman wearing a ski
mask entered the back door
of Krispy Kreme Doughnuts
early Monday morning, fired
a shot into the floor and
escaped with about K00.
According to police reports,
the man wasdescribed asblackand
carrying a revolver. I le entered the
store around 1:50 a.m fired one
shot and demanded
the employee give him
cash.
A more specific physical
description was unavailable at
presstime.
Christopher I'avon, 17,
said his father, Jorge Pavon,
Krispy Kreme's assistant manager,
told him the man made oil
with about $600,
Christopher said the
perpertrator came through
the backdoor and said, "Gimme
all your cash
Christopher said his father
was cleaning the floor at the
time.
Jorge I'avon would not
comment on the incident
Market Manager for Krispy
Kreme Amanda i'illey said
the store hasn't had any
problems with robberies in the
past.
"This is the first time
this has happened said
i'illey.
Greenville police offi-
cers "are a strong presence"
at Krispy Kreme, according to
lil ley.
She said that there are usually
two or three employees working
at most times
Til ley declined to give
specific details about the
robbery but said the matter
is being investigated by
the Greenville Police Depart-
ment.
"We are working with police
to make sure our customers
are safe i'illey said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Krispy Kreme was robbed
early Monday morning.
International
Fest returns
to Greenville
Event features tastes,
sounds, sights of
foreign cultures
DANIEL SHUMAN
STAFF WRITER
The smell of Japanese yaki-
tori chicken and spicy Mexi-
can tamales mixed with salsa
music transformed Town
Commons from a sedate,
river-side park into a busy,
international hub Saturday
afternoon
Bright sun and tempera-1
tures near 80 degrees brought
the crowds out for Greenville's
International Fest.
Walkways overflowing
with people were difficult to
navigate. Luckily, there was room
to stretch out in the grass in
front of the amphitheater and
listen to Jamaican story tellers or
the mariachi band.
Local businesses, such as
Swiss Chalet and El Ranchlto,
brought food to the event, which
seemed to be one of the biggest
draws among the crowd.
"I just wanted to see what
kind of countries' foods they
would have said Greenville
resident Rosemary Winn.
Other visitors were pulled
in when they heard about the
event in local media.
"I heard about it on the radio,
and my friend invited me so
I thought I would come said
Diane Nelson, another local
resident.
Crafts such as handmade
Argentinean tables, chairs, figu-
rines and other ethnic goods,
such as Jamaican shirts, were
available for purchase.
Kids could participate in the
action with a children's origami
booth setup to teach them the
decorative paper art form.
This is the first time in two
years the International festival
has livened up downtown.
The celebration of the
area's international diver-
sity disappeared after 2001,
when a lack of funding prevented
it from happening in 2002 and
2003,
But this year, with grants
from organizations like Uptown
Greenville, Pitt County and
ECU united to make sure the
festival's absence did not continue-
to three years.
"The city was the primary
sponsor in previous years and
really did not have the money
to do it, but they have since
received the money, and it was
budgeted out for them to
have the festival this year said
Bill Mallett, international student
adviser at the International
I louse
ECU had a hand in the orga-
nization and funding of the
event, and Mallet said Pat Dunn,
Ph.D a Greenville city council
menibcr-at-large and faculty
member in ECU's Department
of Health Education, played
an integral role in bringing
it about.
There were also a number of
campus organizations that got
involved.
"II' Student Union brought
in a Caribbean steel drum band
International Affairs helped out
sponsoring, but we consid-
ered it a whole ECU effort
Mallett said.
He said that the German
Club and Chinese Student
Association were involved. The
Education Club and School
of Social Work showed up
to highlight education and
social work around the
globe.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Sexual Assualt Awareness
throughout April
, Thirty-six percent of women injured during a rape require medical attention; 25 - 45 percent of rape survivors suffer
" from nnn-genituI trauma.
-O Close to 40 percent of sexual assault survivors ohtain STDs.
Forecast TEC REQUIRED
READING
Online
Partly Cloudy
High of 86
Visit www.theeastcarollnlan.com to
read about Pfc. Keith Maupln, being
held captive in Iraq
NeWS page A2
TheSGAmaybeabletogiveoutonly
$145,000 to student organizations In
2004-05.
Features
page B1
�Friends the number one sitcom for
young adulis lor the past live years Is
calling It quits on Thursday, May 6.
SpOrtS page B5
Alter an amazing weekend ol play, ECUS
Pirates moved up six spots to number
nine In the national rankings
Illusionist Craig Karges will
read minds, bend spoons and
make tables float In Hendrtx
Theatre tonight at 8pm





PAGF A2
4-20-04
NEWS
ERIN RICKERT
News Editor
HOLLY O'NEAL
Assistant News Editor
news@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
Technology Presentation
A presentation on WebCT Vista 3 0 will be held today from 9 am. -10 am
in the MSC Multipurpose Room
Integration Discussion
In celebration ol the 50th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education
decision, historian David Dennard. Ph.D political analyst Tinsley
Yarborough. Ph D and attorney Robert White will discuss the historical
political and legal landscapes of the state before and after the decision
The discussion will be today at 3 p.m in 221 Mendenhall
Augustine Lecture
Meredith J Gill, assistant professor of art history at Notre Dame University
will lecture on "Augustine's Renaissance" Wednesday at 4:30 p.m. in
1032 Bate
Oratorical Exhibition
The School of Communication sponsors an oratorical exhibition Thursday
at 6:30 p.m in Wright Auditorium featuring the best speakers in COMM
2410 and 2420
Co-ops and Internships Workshop
The Office of Student Professional Development offers a workshop
Thursday from 2 pm -3 pm in 1012 Bate to assist students looking for
co-op and internship opportunities.
Physics Colloquim
C Ruth Kempf. PhD. physics professor, will speak on nuclear security
in Russia and give an overview of ECU'S Center for Security Studies
and Research Friday at 3:15 pm in E-213 Howell Refreshments will be
served at 3 p.m.
Technology and Teaching
3D visualization in classrooms will be discussed at "Conversations about
Teaching with Technology" Friday from 230 pm. - 4:30 p.m. in 307 Science
and Technology Building
Education Graduate Fair
The College of Education will hold a graduate program fair Saturday from
9 am. - noon in the Speight Building. Information will be available lor
students who wish to pursue a graduate degree for work in educational
settings or obtain alternative licensure Registration and reception begin
at 8 45 am
Dive for a Cure
SCUBA divers from ECU will raise money for the American Cancer Society
Saturday from 9 a m - 9 p m at Minges Coliseum pool Games and events
will be provided All certified divers can participate Contact Jamie LeLiever
at 327-3391 for more information
Dances of Universal Peace
The Dances of Universal Peace - sacred dances that honor the world s
spiritual traditions through song, gentle dance and contemplation - will
be Saturday from 4 p m. - 6 p.m in 244 MSC
Deadline
Monday. April 26 is the last day to submit grade replacement requests
Classes End
Monday. Apnl 26 is the lasl day of classes
Medical Mind
The medical class of 2004 presents its play. 'The Medical Mind Monday
April 26 and Tuesday April 27. at 7 pm in Brody Auditorium
Teaching Awards
The eighth annual Teaching Awards Ceremony is Tuesday April 27 at 11
am in the MSC Great Room A reception hosted by interim Chancellor
William Shelton will follow Contact the Faculty Senate office at 328-6537
for more information.
Reading Day
Tuesday. April 27 is reading day
Regular exams
Regular exams begin Wednesday Apnl 28 and end Wednesday. May 5
at 10 am
Graduation
Commencement is Saturday. May 8 in WiHiams Arena at Minges Coliseum
The morning ceremony begins at 930 am The afternoon ceremony
begins at 1 30 pm Register on OneStop
Chemistry Placement Test
The chemistry placement test will be Monday, May 17 from 10 am. -11
a.m and 2 pm - 3 pm in 00309 Science and Technology Building
Students must arrive 10 minutes prior to testing and bnng a No 2 pencil
and a nonprogrammable calculator
Paper Person
The student at the top of today's paper is Pamela Johnson, senior English
major
News Briefs
Local
Duke looking (or ways to get
students to sleep more
DURHAM (AP) - Duke University is
trying to come up with a way to help
sleep-deprived college students
who survive on a mix of caffeine,
adrenaline and ambition
The school is eliminating 8 a.m.
classes because so few students
are interested in taking them and
is considering new orientation
programs this fall that would help
freshmen understand the importance
of sleep.
Lack of sleep among college
students is an old problem, but one
that appears to be getting worse,
according to some national surveys.
College students sleep an average
of six to seven hours a night, down
from seven to seven and a half
in the 1980s Last month, college
administrators gathered at the
University of Michigan for a national
conference on sleep, stress,
depression and college students
Sleep deprivation can hurt academic
performance and increase stress
levels
Busload of NC teenagers
overturns In France
PARIS (AP) - A bus carrying a group
of teenage soccer players from North
Carolina overturned in a ditch east of
Paris on Sunday, killing at least one
person and seriously injuring three
others, officials said
The roads were wet from overnight
rain, but authorities in the Seine-
et-Marne region said it was no!
immediately clear why the tour bus
carrying about 34 people - including
two drivers - fell over along a curve
in a highway near Mitry-Mory, east
of Paris
Thirteen-year-old Matt Helms died,
and at least two of his teammates
suffered serious injuries. Norih
Carolina soccer officials said
Sunday
Helms coach. Ray Colley. recalled
meeting the then-ten-year-old at a
team tryout
'I can remember going home lo my
wife and saying. That goalkeeper can
really play Colley said from the Helms
family home in Jacksonville, NC
Helms, who excelled at shot blocking.
played year-round for the OCSA
Coastal Crew out of Jacksonville,
Colley said
Colley said the teenager had been
hand-picked as one of only two
goalies for a statewide "Olympics
Development" team, sponsored by
the North Carolina Youth Soccer
Association
He said the youths had been in
Europe over the past 10 days for
a series of matches and were on
their way to the airport when the
bus overturned French officials said
excessive speed may have played a
part in the accident
National
Without high-profile violence,
some fear school safety
getting short shrift
DENVER (AP) - When 16-year-old
Sean Fitzpatrick walked into his
Spokane Wash. high school last fall
and fired a shot into a classroom wall,
authorities quickly responded
School officials evacuated 2,000
students and within 15 minutes of
the first 911 call, a SWAT team had
contained the teenager inside a
chemistry lab
Although the Spokane school was
well-prepared, experts warned as
the five-year anniversary of the
Columbine High School massacre
approached Tuesday that the focus
on school security has declined.
Ridge forms task force to
bolster security for attractive
terrorist targets
WASHINGTON (AP) - With an eye on a
large number of symbolic gatherings,
Homeland Security Secretary Tom
Ridge is forming a new government
task lorce to better coordinate public
and private security - and hopefully
prevent the next terrorist attack.
Beginning with the dedication of
the new World War II Memorial In
Washington over the Memorial Day
weekend, Ridge said high-profile
public events this year may be
attractive targets for al-Qaida and
like-minded terrorist groups.
"We are rich with opportunities this
year for terrorists to shake our will
Ridge said in a telephone interview
Sunday
"The message is that Homeland
Security doesn't wait to raise the
threat level in order to make us safer
and more secure
"We are going to increase our
vigilance he said later
World
Appeals bench reduces
sentence in only Balkan
genocide conviction
THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) - The
UN. war crimes tribunal reduced the
prison sentence of a Bosnian Serb
general convicted of genocide by 11
years to 35 years in a decision that
could influence future cases.
Radislav Krstic, 56. was sentenced in
August 2001 to 46 years in prison for
playing a pivotal role in the slaughter
of at least 7,500 Bosnian Muslim
men in the UN -protected zone of
Srebrenica during one blood-soaked
week in July 1995
So far the only Balkan war criminal
convicted of genocide, he appealed
in November on several grounds,
asking in particular that the court
clarify its definition of genocide
The appeals chamber, whose
decision is final, overturned Krstic's
conviction as a "principle perpetrator"
of genocide and lowered his prison
term after determining that he
was guilty of "aiding and abetting
genocide a lesser crime that was not
included in his original Indictment.
Israel says It will invests tens
of millions of dollars in West
Bank settlements
JERUSALEM (AP) - Israel will invest
tens of millions of dollars In West
Bank settlements even as it pulls
out of the Gaza Strip and a few
other settlements, Finance Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu said Monday.
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has
proposed removing all settlements in
Gaza, as well as four in the West Bank,
and rapidly completing a separation
barrier Israel is building in the West
Bank.
Palestinians fear the move will
strengthen Israel's hold over the rest
of the West Bank, which they want as
part of a future state.
Netanyahu announced his support
for Sharon's plan Sunday, giving
it a crucial boost in an upcoming
referendum among the 200,000
members of Sharon's hard-line
Ukud party
ECU professors, attorney examine
'separate but equal' court decision
Discussion honors
50th anniversary of
desegregation
MIKE WIGGINS
STAFF WRITER
In honor of the Supreme
( ourt decision that ruled against
"separate but equal ECU
has invited community mem-
bers to speak on the judgment's
effect on the country.
David Dennard, Tin-
sley Yarborough and
attorney Robert White
will be demonstrating
the significance of the
decision made in the Hmwn V.
Board of Education case on May
17, I9S4.
I he case began with
a lawsuit filed by the
Brown family when its daughter
was denied admission to a white
elementary school. The
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People took this on, along with
similar arguments across the
country.
The 1954 ruling made equal education accessible to all.
The cases were argued
in December of 1952 by
Thurgood Marshall, head of the
NAACP.
I he decision affected more
than those who were directly
involved.
Its results had wide-
ranging social, political,
educational and historical
results.
Panel members will
talk about how the decision
affected the children involved.
segregation, advantages
and disadvantages of deseg-
regated- schools and the
similarities concerning other
cases.
Ihev will also
examine how Brown v.
BomdofEdut atum affects today's
society.
Yokima Cure ton, director
of communication for the Col-
lege of Education, said one of
the event's organizers
said it's our academic commu-
nity's responsibility to embrace
diversity.
"We are the voice of
the future, and it is very
important that students
attend so we can open their
eyes said Cureton.
Dennard and Yarborough
will speak about the line of
events that led up to Hmwn v.
Hoard of Education, includ-
ing preceding court cases and
politics.
"Tangible or intangible,
segregation was a power-
ful thing back in the fifties,
regarding every aspect of soci-
ety.
With schools and educa-
tion being the primary cause
for concern throughout this
era, this court case was definitely-
one of the most important said
Yarborough.
"The presentation defi-
nitely pertains to all, and stu-
dents, among faculty and staff,
are highly encouraged to
attend
The discussion will be today
at 3 p.m. in 221 Mendenhall,
and there is no cost.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeas tCarolinian, com.
SGA may have to reconsider funding
Senators await
administrators'
decision
STEPHEN RICE
STAFF WRITER
Due to budget con-
straints, student Government
Usoiialion may be able to give
out only 14S,000 to student
organizations for 2004-05, even
though .17S,00(I was
requested.
Eight-two organizations
asked for S(,A lunds this
year - thirty more than last
year
lane Ferguson, adviser to
SGA, (old the Senate there may
need to Ik- adjustments to the
funding process.
Since the Board of
Governors ruled that stu-
dent fees be reduced by
$4, there are fewer SGA
funds this vear than in the
ist.
Ferguson did not know
exactly where the budget would
be cut.
However, she said the
student fee for SGA may be
reduced.
The SGA passed all the
funding requests in a blanket
amendment.
Administrators will meet
today to decide where the cut
in student fees yvili be. This
could aftect the amount of
money that SGA will be able to
give to organizations.
In light of this, the
SGA senators met to discuss funding for student clubs last night in Mendenhall.
Senate added a stipulation to
its funding approvals
so they can be modified
(tending the administrative deci-
sion.
The SGA vas also asked to
Consider funding a new child
i a re i enter.
Nancy I.ee, Child Develop-
ment and Family Relations
professor, spoke to the Senate
about ECU'S need for such a
center.
She saut the i iiiid iare center
would benefit lxth students and
staff.
I.ee said that the facil-
ity COUld haC I potential
capacity for 130 children and
be open from 6:4S a.m. to
6:15 pm.
She said the hours WOUM be
modified as necessary to best
accommodate users.
The childcare center was
unanimously endorsed by the
Faculty Senate and approved
by Interim Chancellor William
Shelton
However, no funding
has been set aside for the
project.
The building would ini-
tially cost about 11.3 million.
I.ee came to the Senate to request
a J2 student fee.
The fee would pro-
vlde$S0,000 for the project.
In other business, Elections
Chair April Paul spoke to the
Senate about the March elec-
tions.
She said I ho election com-
mittee was making changes to
requite greater accountability
for candidates or campaign
workers who break election
rules.
Paul said establishing this
precedent would protect the
elections' integrity.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.





4 20 04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
NPR correspondent highlights justice in segregation case
Speaker urges ECU
students to become
more politically active
JOSH SLONE
STAFF WRITER
A respected author,
journalist and political analyst
encouraged students to tol low t he
example of "ultimate frat boy
turned social activist Supreme
Court Justice I hurgood
Marshall In a lecture last
week.
National Public Radio
Senior Correspondent Juan
Williams spoke about Marshall
and his significance in the
Hrown v. Hoard of Educa-
tion decision, which led
to the desegregation of
schools.
Turner said Marshall served
as one of the Supreme Court
justices when the Hrown v. Hoard
of Education decision was made
on May 17, 1954.
Williams' lecture focused
on Marshall's key role in
establishing equality among
minorities In the United
States.
Williams said Marshall
has often been depicted as a
"prankster" who.had no real
role in the Supreme Court
other than being the first African-
American justice, in order
to make the president at the
time of his appointment look
good.
During the lecture, Wil-
liams spoke about Marshall's
transition from a young, bright
college student interested
In partying to a scholar
interested in social
justice.
In the midst of Marshall's
junior year in college, Mar-
shall began writing opinions
and articles focusing on
political and racial issues in the
school newspaper, Williams
said.
"I think you could see
Marshall's growth Williams
said.
"You could see that he's
opening his eyes, you could
see that he's coming to
understand his power to
make a difference on very
difficult issues - Issues that he
preferred not to see for a
time
Williams said he wishes
more college-aged students
would open their eyes as
well.
I.at ban Turner, direc-
tor of Intercultural Student
Affairs, said Williams spoke to
more than 200 people, about
two thirds of which were stu-
dents.
Williams said, televi-
sion inhibits young people's
development of a political
mind.
He pointed out that cer-
tain shows like "Seinfeld
"Friends" and "The O.C
all have characters concerned
only with themselves and
other members of their
clique, while they are never
concerned with political
issues.
Shows such as these
invite cynicism and skepti-
cism about those who talk
of political issues, and In
the process degrades
political activism said
Williams.
Williams encouraged stu-
dents to become politically
active.
The challenge is in
your face, though many
choose to close their eyes and
ignore it, he said.
"Open your eyes and
put your hands in the clay,
and begin to shape the future
of this country take the risk of
standing up and speaking out
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Juan Williams speaks to students about political activism.
Bush bemoans pullOUt Of Kerry criticizes Bush's ability to
Spanish troops from Iraq build international relationships
WASHINGTON (AP) �
President Bush scolded Spain's
new prime minister Monday
tor his swift withdrawal
of troops from Iraq and told him
to avoid actions that givu "false-
comfort to terrorists or enemies
of freedom in Iraq
Hush expressed his views
in a five-minute telephone
call with Prime Minister Jose
Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, who
on Sunday ordered
the 1,300 troops
to ret urn honieas soon as possible.
Zapatero placed the call
to Bush and the president
"expressed his regret to Presi-
dent Zapatero about the deci-
sion to abruptly announce the
pullout of Spanish troops from
Iraq White House press secre-
tary Scott McClellan said.
"The president urged that the
Spanish withdrawal take place
in a coordinated manner that
Bush scolded Spain's new prime
minister for taking troops out of Iraq
does not put at risk other coali-
tion forces in Iraq McClellan
said.
"The president stressed
the importance of carefully
considering future actions to
avoid giving false comfort to
terrorists or enemies of freedom
in Iraq McClellan said.
Separately, Sen. John
Kerry, the presumptive Demo-
cratic nominee for president,
also deplored Spain's move.
"I regret Prime Min-
ister Zapateros decision
Kerry said.
"Spain and all the world
have an interest in rebuilding
an Iraq that is not a haven for
terrorists and a failed state. I had
hoped the prime minister
would have reconsidered his
position, and I hope that in the
days ahead the United States
and the world can work with
him to find a way to keep Spain
engaged in
the efforts in
Iraq
"Rather than
losing partners,
I believe its criti-
cal that we find
new coalition part-
ners to share the
burden in Iraq
Kerry said.
"We need
to offer to
share responsi-
bilities with the
United Nations,
NATO and others,
so they will
work with us in
Iraq to achieve
security, stability,
and freedom
Zapatero issued
the recall on Sunday
just hours after his
government was
sworn in. He said
there was no sign
the United States would meet
his demand for United Nations
control of the postwar occu-
pation - his ultimatum
for keeping troops there.
Zapatero's Socialist party
won the March 14 general
election amid allegations that
outgoing Prime Minister Jose
Maria Aznar, by backing the
war in Iraq, had provoked
commuter-train terrorist
bombings that killed 191
people three days before the
vote.
Though Zapatero, a 43-year-
old lawyer and career politi-
cian, had promised to remove
Spanish troops, his immediate
action was a setback for the
United States, which has been
eager to portray the effort in
Iraq as an international cause
even though it is dominated
by its 130,000 American
troops.
Spain's foreign minister,
Miguel Moratinos Moratinos,
is to travel to Washington
to discuss the dispute with
Secretary of State Colin Powell.
He was scheduled to leave Tues-
day.
McClellan refused to
characterize the tone of the
two leaders' exchange, but
Bush's words were
unusually sharp by any
standard.
Asked if the discussion
was chilly or businesslike,
McClellan said, "No, look, I
think we've made it very clear
we'll continue to work with
Spain in the war on terrorism.
Obviously the president
expressed his regret at the
abrupt decision to withdraw.
But the coalition in Iraq Is Strong,
We appreciate recent
statements by many of the
coalition nations expressing
theft solidarity and
resolve
PALM BEACH, Fla.
(AP) � Democratic
presidential candidate
John Kerry on Monday
ele
Clean
M .�-� . m
� � � � - �
�� I mm .�
criticized President
Bush's efforts to build
international relations
and cont i nued to ca 11 for
bringing more countries
Into the effort to stabilize
Iraq.
"Every president
of the last century did
a better job than this
president" in building
relationships with other
nations, Kerry said
during a breakfast where
he raised $250,000 for
his campaign.
"1 know I can make Amer-
ica stronger, safer and more
secure
One of Kerry's former rivals
for the nomination, Sen. Joe
l.ieberman, D-Conn joined
Kerry for a rally at Palm Beach
before Kerry t(X)k his campaign
to Atlanta, l.ieberman is likely to
play an important role in Kerry's
bid to win the state that decided
the 2000 election for Hush,
largely because he has a strong
following In Florida's Jewish
community.
Kerry, who contended he
had a "100 percent record" in
support of Israel, said he would
end what he called a "sweetheart
relationship" thai allows money
to flow from Arab countries to
terrorists.
"We need a president who's
prepared to stand up and lead the
world to a more responsible place
to create an entity to make peace
within the Middle Last he said.
During a noisy rally before
Presidential hopeful John Kerry jscritiaal of Bush's foreign policy.
tial.
thousands of students at the
University of Miami on Sunday,
Kerry accused Bush of misleading
not only the country but "even
members of his own administra-
tion about what he was planning
to do in Iraq
"The American people, with
respect to issues of war and twace,
are owed the truth, the whole
truth and nothing but the truth
he said.
Kerry sat for a one-hour inter-
view on NBC's "Meet the Press
where he repeated his pledge to
create 10 million jobs and cut the
deficit in half within four years
if he wins the White House. He
conceded that soaring deficits
might make him scale back some
proposals.
In the interview, Kerry said
Hush "misled America" by rush-
ing to war. lie pledged to build
an international coalition while
continuing to prosecute the war
- increasing troop levels if needeil
- because stability in Iraq is essen-
The problems in Iraq are
only part of a foreign policy by
Bush that has left the nation
isolated, Kerry said.
"I think this administration
has proven, Irankly, stunningly
Ineffective In diplomacy he
said.
Kerry cited Bush's policy
change on Israel last week in
which he endorsed a plan by
Prime Minister Ariel Sharon
to hold on to lands seized in
the 1967 Middie last War.
"There were Arab leaders that
were taken by surprise by
this announcement Kerry
said, although he also said he
endorsed the move.
"I will immediately reach
out to other nations in a very
different way from this admin-
istration he said.
"Within weeks of being
inaugurated I will return to the
U.N. and I will rejoin the com-
munity of nations
Application Fee:
-Required
Security Deposit:
-Required
Pets accepted with
non-refundable fee.
Unit Sizes:
2 bedroom 112 bath townhouse
approx. 1050 square feet
3 bedroom 112 bath townhouse
approx. 1350 square feet
3 bedroom 1 12 townhouse
Individual bedroom lease
Swimming Pool � Fitness Equipment � Tennis Courts
� Private Patios � Walk-in Closets � WasherDryer
Connections � On-site Management
24 hour Emergency Maintenance � Dishwasher �
Self-Cleaning Oven � Frost Free Refrigerator � Central
HeatAir Conditioning � B-Ball Court
Billiards Table � Ceiling Fans � 24 hour On-Site Laundry
Facilities � Clubhouse � FREE Broadband High Speed
Wireless Internet � Basic Cable, Water &Sewer
Additional Security Lighting & Exterior Doors Have
Deadbolts � ECU Bus Service Available
�Convenient to several shopping plazas.restaurants and
entertainment
252-752-0277 � 1806 E 1st St. Located 4 blocks from ECU campus � www.wilsonacres.com
Being struck by lightning is ran1.
I laving a disability is not One in five
Americana will acquire a disability in
his m her lifetime. Pf4M support
the work o( Easter Seals.
AM
VreiUiitif oiution
ln,ui, tnv,t.
T M e most dangerol
Sanimals m the forest ;
; don't live there
Wl�(lltrlllir.llMl f , JX;





.
PAG ??
4-20-04
NEWS
ERIN RICKERT
News Editor
HOLLY O'NEAL
Assistant News Editor
news@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
Technology Presentation
A presentation on WebCT Vista 3 0 will be held today from 9 am. -10 am
in the MSC Multipurpose Room
Integration Discussion
In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education
decision, historian David Dennard. Ph.D political analyst Tinsley
Yarborough. Ph D and attorney Robert White will discuss the historical,
political and legal landscapes of the state before and after the decision
The discussion will be today at 3 p.m. in 221 Mendenhall
Augustine Lecture
Meredith J Gill, assistant professor of art history at Notre Dame University,
will lecture on "Augustine's Renaissance" Wednesday at 4:30 p.m. in
1032 Bate.
Oratorical Exhibition
The School of Communication sponsors an oratorical exhibition Thursday
at 6:30 pm in Wright Auditorium featuring the best speakers in COMM
2410 and 2420.
Co-ops and Internships Workshop
The Office of Student Professional Development offers a workshop
Thursday from 2 pm - 3 p.m. in 1012 Bate to assist students looking for
co-op and internship opportunities.
Physics Colloquim
C Ruth Kempf, Ph.D physics professor, will speak on nuclear security
in Russia and give an overview of ECU'S Center for Security Studies
and Research Friday at 3:15 pm in E-213 Howell Refreshments will be
served at 3 p.m.
Technology and Teaching
3D visualization in classrooms will be discussed at "Conversations about
Teaching with Technology" Friday from 230 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. in 307 Science
and Technology Building
Education Graduate Fair
The College of Education will hold a graduate program fair Saturday from
9 am. - noon in the Speight Building. Information will be available for
students who wish to pursue a graduate degree for work in educational
settings or obtain alternative licensure Registration and reception begin
at 8 45 am
Dive for a Cure
SCUBA divers from ECU will raise money for the American Cancer Society
Saturday from 9am - 9 p m at Minges Coliseum pool Games and events
will be provided All certified divers can participate Contact Jamie LeUever
at 327-3391 for more information
Dances of Universal Peace
The Dances of Universal Peace - sacred dances that honor the world's
spiritual traditions through song, gentle dance and contemplation - will
be Saturday from 4 p.m. - 6 pm in 244 MSC
Deadline
Monday, April 26 is the last day to submit grade replacement requests
Classes End
Monday, April 26 is the last day of classes
Medical Mind
The medical class of 2004 presents its play. 'The Medical Mind Monday.
April 26 and Tuesday. April 27. at 7 p.m. in Brody Auditorium.
Teaching Awards
The eighth annual Teaching Awards Ceremony is Tuesday. April 27 at 11
am in the MSC Great Room A reception hosted by interim Chancellor
William Shelton will follow Contact the Faculty Senate office at 328-6537
for more information
Reading Day
Tuesday. April 27 is reading day
Regular exams
Regular exams begin Wednesday, April 28 and end Wednesday. May 5
at 10 am
Graduation
Commencement is Saturday, May 8 in Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum
The morning ceremony begins at 9:30 am The afternoon ceremony
begins at 130 pm Register on OneStop
Chemistry Placement Test
The chemistry placement test will be Monday, May 17 from 10 a.m. -11
a.m. and 2 pm - 3 pm in 00309 Science and Technology Building
Students must arnve 10 minutes prior to testing and bring a No 2 pencil
and a nonprogrammable calculator
Paper Person
The student at the top of today's paper is Pamela Johnson, senior English
major
News Briefs
Local
Duke looking for ways to get
students to sleep more
DURHAM (AP) - Duke University is
trying to come up with a way to help
sleep-deprived college students
who survive on a mix of caffeine,
adrenaline and ambition.
The school is eliminating 8 am
classes because so few students
are interested in taking them and
is considering new orientation
programs this fall that would help
freshmen understand the importance
of sleep.
Lack of sleep among college
students is an old problem, but one
that appears to be getting worse,
according to some national surveys.
College students sleep an average
of six to seven hours a night, down
from seven to seven and a half
in the 1980s. Last month, college
administrators gathered at the
University of Michigan for a national
conference on sleep, stress,
depression and college students
Sleep deprivation can hurt academic
performance and incease stress
levels
Busload of NC teenagers
overturns In France
PARIS (AD - A bus carrying a group
of teenage soccer players from North
Carolina overturned in a ditch east of
Paris on Sunday, killing at least one
person and seriously injuring three
others, officials said
The roads were wet from overnight
rain, but authorities in the Seine-
et-Marne region said it was not
immediately clear why the tour bus.
carrying about 34 people - including
two drivers - fell over along a curve
in a highway near Mitry-Mory, east
of Paris
Thirteen-year-old Matt Helms died.
and at least two of his teammates
suffered serious injuries. North
Carolina soccer officials said
Sunday
Helms' coach. Ray Colley. recalled
meeting the then-ten-year-old at a
team tryoul
"I can remember going home to my
wife and saying. That goalkeeper can
really play Colley said from the Helms
family home in Jacksonville. NC
Helms, who excelled at shot blocking.
played year-round for the OCSA
Coastal Crew out of Jacksonville,
Colley said
Colley said the teenager had been
hand-picked as one of only two
goalies for a statewide "Olympics
Development" team, sponsored by
the North Carolina Youth Soccer
Association
He said the youths had been in
Europe over the past 10 days for
a series of matches and were on
their way to the airport when the
bus overturned French officials said
excessive speed may have played a
part in the accident
National
Without high-profile violence,
some fear school safety
getting short shrlfl
DENVER (AP) - When 16-year-old
Sean Fitzpatrick walked into his
Spokane. Wash. high school last fall
and fired a shot Into a classroom wall,
authorities quickly responded.
School officials evacuated 2,000
students and within 15 minutes of
the firsl 911 call, a SWAT team had
contained the teenager inside a
chemistry lab.
Although the Spokane school was
well-prepared, experts warned as
the five-year anniversary of the
Columbine High School massacre
approached Tuesday that the focus
on school security has declined.
Ridge forms task force to
bolster security for attractive
terrorist targets
WASHINGTON (AP) - With an eye on a
large number of symbolic gatherings,
Homeland Security Secretary Tom
Ridge is forming a new government
task force to better coordinate public
and private security - and hopefully
prevent the next terrorist attack.
Beginning with the dedication of
the new World War II Memorial In
Washington over the Memorial Day
weekend, Ridge said high-profile
public events this year may be
attractive targets for al-Qaida and
like-minded terrorist groups
"We are rich with opportunities this
year for terrorists to shake our will
Ridge said in a telephone interview
Sunday
"The message is that Homeland
Security doesn't wait to raise the
threat level in order to make us safer
and more secure
"We are going to increase our
vigilance he said later.
World
Appeals bench reduces
sentence in only Balkan
genocide conviction
THE HAGUE. Netherlands (AP) - The
UN. war crimes tribunal reduced the
prison sentence of a Bosnian Serb
general convicted of genocide by 11
years to 35 years in a decision that
could influence future cases.
Radislav Krstic, 56. was sentenced in
August 2001 to 46 years In prison for
playing a pivotal role in the slaughter
of at least 7,500 Bosnian Muslim
men in the UN-protected zone of
Srebrenica during one blood-soaked
week in July 1995
So far the only Balkan war criminal
convicted of genocide, he appealed
in November on several grounds,
asking in particular that the court
clarify its definition of genocide
The appeals chamber, whose
decision is final, overturned Krstic's
conviction as a "principle perpetrator"
of genocide and lowered his prison
term after determining that he
was guilty of "aiding and abetting
genocide a lesser crime that was not
included in his original Indictment.
Israel says It will invests tens
of millions of dollars in West
Bank settlements
JERUSALEM (AP) - Israel will Invest
tens of millions of dollars In West
Bank settlements even as it pulls
out of the Gaza Strip and a few
other settlements, Finance Minister
Benjamin Netanyahu said Monday.
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has
proposed removing all settlements in
Gaza, as well as four in the West Bank,
and rapidly completing a separation
barrier Israel Is building in the West
Bank.
Palestinians fear the move will
strengthen Israel's hold over the rest
of the West Bank, which they want as
part of a future state.
Netanyahu announced his support
for Sharon's plan Sunday, giving
it a crucial boost in an upcoming
referendum among the 200,000
members of Sharon's hard-line
Ukud party.
ECU professors, attorney examine
'separate but equal' court decision
Discussion honors
50th anniversary of
desegregation
MIKE WIGGINS
STAtF WRITER
In honor of the Supreme
( ourt decision, that ruled against
"separate but equal ECU
has invited community mem-
bers to speak on the judgment's
effect on the country.
David Dennard, Tin-
sley Yarborough and
attorney Robert White
will be demonstrating
the significance of the
decision made In the Hiown v.
Board of Education case on May
17, 1954.
The case began with
a lawsuit filed by the
Brown family when its daughter
was denied admission to a white
elementary school. The
National Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People took this on, along with
similar arguments across the
country.
The 1954 ruling made equal education accessible to all.
I he cases were argued
In December of 1952 by
Thurgood Marshall, head ot the
NAACI
The decision affected more
than those who were directly
involved.
Its results had wide-
ranging social, political,
educational and historical
results.
Panel members will
talk about how the decision
affected the children involved,
segregation, advantages
and disadvantages of deseg-
regated- schools and the
similarities concerning other
uses.
I'hey will also
examine how Brown v.
Board ofEducation affects today's
society.
Yokima Cureton, director
of communication for the i ol-
lege ol Education, said one of
the event's organizers
said it's our academic commu-
nity's responsibility to embrace
diversity.
"We arc the voice of
the future, and it is very
important that students
attend so we can open their
eyes said Cureton.
Dennard and Yarborough
will speak about the line of
events that led up to Brown v.
Hoard of Education, includ-
ing preceding court cases and
politics.
"Tangible or intangible,
segregation was a power-
ful thing back in the fifties,
regarding every aspect of soci-
ety.
With schools and educa-
tion being the primary cause
for concern throughout this
era, this court case was definitely-
one of the most important said
Yarborough.
"The presentation defi-
nitely pertains to all, and stu-
dents, among faculty and staff,
are highly encouraged to
attend
The discussion will be today
at 3 p.m. in 221 Mendenhall,
and there is no cost.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
SGA may have to reconsider funding
Senators await
administrators'
decision
STEPHEN RICE
STAFF WRITER
Due to budget con-
straints, Student Government
Association may be able to give
out only S 145,000 to student
organizations for 2004-05, even
though $375,000 was
requested.
tig lit-two organizations
asked for SGA funds this
year - thirty more than last
year.
Jane Ferguson, adviser to
SGA, told the Senate there may
need to be adjustments to the
funding process
Since the Board of
Governors ruled that stu-
dent fees be reduced by
$4, there are fewer SGA
funds this year than in the
past.
Ferguson did not know
evii tly where the budget would
be cut.
However, she said the
student fee for SCIA may be
reduced.
The SGA passed all the
funding requests in a blanket
amendment.
Administrators will meet
today to decide where the cut
in student fees will be. This
could affect the amount ot
money that SGA will be able to
give to organizations.
In light of this, the
SGA senators met to discuss funding for student clubs last night in Mendenhall.
Senate added a stipulation to
its funding approvals
so they can be modified
pending the administrative deci-
sion.
The SGA was also asked to
consider funding I new child
care center.
Nancy l.ee, Child Develop-
ment and Family Relations
professor, spoke to the Senate
about ECU'S need lor such a
center.
Shi- said tile i liild care enter
would benefit both students and
staff.
l.ee said that the facil-
ity could have a potential
capacity for I o children and
be open from 6:45 a.m. to
6:15 pm.
She said the hours would be
modified as necessary to best
accommodate users.
The childcare center was
unanimously endorsed by the
Faculty Senate and approved
by Interim Chancellor William
Shelton.
However, no funding
has been set aside for the
pto)ect
The building would ini-
tially cost about $1.3 million,
l.ee came to the Senate to request
a $2 student fee.
The fee would pro-
Vide$50,000 for the project.
In other business, Flections
Chair April Paul spoke to the
Senate about the March elec-
tions.
She said the election com-
mittee was making changes to
require greater accountability
for candidates or campaign
workers who break election
rules.
Paul said establishing this
precedent would protect the
elections' integrity.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.





4 20 04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
NPR correspondent highlights justice in segregation case
Speaker urges ECU
students to become
more politically active
JOSH SLONE
STAFF WRITER
A respected author,
journalist and political analyst
encou raged students to fol low the
example of "ultimate f rat boy
turned social activist Supreme
Court Justice Thurgood
Marshall in a lecture last
week.
National Public Radio
Senior Correspondent Juan
Williams spoke about Marshall
and his significance in the
Hrown v. Hoard of Educa-
tion decision, which led
to the desegregation of
schools.
Turner said Marshall served
as one of the Supreme Court
justices when the Hrown v. Hoard
of Education decision was made
on May 17, 19S4.
Williams' lecture focused
on Marshall's key role in
establishing equality among
minorities in the United
States.
Williams said Marshall
has often been depicted as a
"prankster" who .had no real
role in the Supreme Court
other than being the first African-
American justice, in order
to make the president at the
time of his appointment look
good.
During the lecture, Wil-
liams spoke about Marshall's
transition from a young, bright
college student interested
in partying to a scholar
interested in social
justice.
In the midst of Marshall's
junior year in college, Mar-
shall began writing opinions
and articles focusing on
political and racial issues in the
school newspaper, Williams
said.
"I think you could see
Marshall's growth Williams
said.
"You could see that he's
opening his eyes, you could
see that he's coming to
understand his power to
make a difference on very
difficult issues - issues that he
preferred not to see for a
time
Williams said he wishes
more college-aged students
would open their eyes as
well.
I.athan Turner, direc-
tor of Intercultural Student
Affairs, said Williams spoke to
more than 200 people, about
two thirds of which were stu-
dents.
Williams said, televi-
sion inhibits young people's
development of a political
mind.
He pointed out that cer-
tain shows like "Seinfeld
"Friends" and "The O.C
all have characters concerned
only with themselves and
other members of their
clique, while they are never
concerned with political
issues.
Shows such as these
Invite cynicism and skepti-
cism about those who talk
of political issues, and In
the process degrades
political activism said
Williams.
Williams encouraged stu-
dents to become politically
active.
The challenge is in
your face, though many
choose to close their eyes and
ignore it, he said.
"Open your eyes and
put your hands in the clay,
and begin to shape the future
ofthis country take the risk of
standing up and speaking out
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeaitcarolinian.com.
Bush bemoans pullout of
Spanish troops from Iraq
WASHINGTON (AP) �
President Hush scolded Spain's
new prime minister Monday
for his swift withdrawal
of troops from Iraq and told him
to avoid actions that giva "false
comfort to terrorists or enemies
of freedom in Iraq
Bush expressed his views
in a five-minute telephone
call with Prime Minister Jose
Luis Rodriguez Zapatero, who
on Sunday ordered
the 1,300 troops
to ret urn home as soon as possible.
Zapatero placed the call
to Bush and the president
"expressed his regret to Presi-
dent Zapatero about the deci-
sion to abruptly announce the
pullout of Spanish troops from
Iraq White House press secre-
tary Scott McClellan said.
"The president urged thai the
Spanish withdrawal take place
in a coordinated manner that
Bush scolded Spain's new prime
minister for taking troops out of Iraq
does not put at risk other coali-
tion forces in Iraq McClellan
said.
"The president stressed
the importance of carefully
considering future actions to
avoid giving false comfort to
terrorists or enemies of freedom
in Iraq McClellan said.
Separately, Sen. John
Kerry, the presumptive Demo-
cratic nominee for president,
also deplored Spain's move.
"I regret Prime Min-
ister Zapateros decision
Kerry said.
"Spain and all the world
have an interest in rebuilding
an Iraq that is not a haven for
terrorists and a failed slate. I had
hoped the prime minister
would have reconsidered his
position, and I hope that in the
days ahead the United States
and the world can work with
him to find a way to keep Spain
engaged in
the efforts in
Iraq
"Rather than
losing partners,
1 believe its criti-
cal that we find
new coalition part-
ners to share the
burden in Iraq
Kerry said.
"We need
to offer to
share responsi-
bilities with the
United Nations,
NATO and others,
so they will
work with us in
Iraq to achieve
security, stability,
and freedom
Zapatero issued
the recall on Sunday
just hours after his
government was
sworn in. He said
there was no sign
the United States would meel
his demand for United Nations
control of Ihe postwar occu-
pation - his ultimatum
for keeping troops there.
Zapatcro's Socialist party
won the March 14 general
election amid allegations that
outgoing Prime Minister Jose
Maria Anar, by backing the
war in Iraq, had provoked
commuter-train terrorist
bombings that killed 191
people three days before the
vote.
Though Zapatero, a 43-year-
old lawyer and career politi-
cian, had promised to remove
Spanish troops, his immediate
action was a setback for the
United States, which has been
eager to portray the effort in
Iraq as an international cause
even though it is dominated
by its 130,000 American
troops.
Spain's foreign minister,
Miguel Moratinos Moratinos,
is to travel to Washington
to discuss the dispute with
Secretary of State Colin Powell.
He was scheduled to leave Tues-
day.
McClellan refused to
characterize the tone of the
two leaders' exchange, but
Hush's words were
unusually sharp by any
standard.
Asked if the discussion
was chilly or businesslike,
McClellan said, "No, look, I
think we've made it very clear
we'll continue to work with
Spain in the war on terrorism.
Obviously the president
expressed his regret at the
abrupt decision to withdraw.
Rut the coalition in Iraq is strong.
We appreciate recent
statements by many of the
coalition nations expressing
thefr solidarity and
resolve
Juan Williams speaks to students about political activism
Kerry criticizes Bush's ability to
build international relationships
PA1.M BEACH, Ma.
(AP) � Democratic
presidential candidate
John Kerry on Monday
efpir ��

��
"rl
criticized President
Bush's efforts to build
international relations
and continued to call for
bringing more countries
Into the effort to stabilize
Iraq.
"Every president
of the last century did
a better job than this
president" in building
relationships with other
nations, Kerry said
during a breakfast where
he raised $2.so,ooo for Presidential hopeful John Kerrvjscritfoalof Bush's foreign policy,
his campaign.
"I know I can make Amer-
ica stronger, safer and more
secure
One of Kerry's former rivals
for the nomination, Sen. Joe
l.ieberman, D-Conn joined
Kerry for a rally at Palm Beach
before Kerry ttxk his campaign
to Atlanta, l.ieberman is likely to
play an important role in Kerry's
bid to win the state that decided
the 2000 election for Bush,
largely because he has a strong
following in Florida's Jewish
community.
Kerry, who contended he
had a "100 percent record" in
support of Israel, said he would
end what he called a "sweetheart
relationship" that allows money
to flow from Arab countries to
terrorists.
"We need a president who's
prepared tostand up and lead the
world t( i a im ire responsible place
to create an entity to make peace
within the Middle East he said.
During a noisy rally In'fore
thousands of students at the
University of Miami on Sunday,
Kerry accused Bush of misleading
not only the country but "even
members of his own administra-
tion about what he was planning
to do in Iraq
"The American people, with
respect to issues of war and peace,
are owed the truth, the whole
Iruth and nothing but the truth
he said.
Kerry sat for a one-hour inter-
view on NBC's "Meet the Press
where he repeated his pledge to
create 10 million jobs and cut the
deficit in half within four years
if he wins the White House. He
conceded that soaring deficits
mlghl make him scale back some
proposals.
In the interview, Kerry said
Bush "misled America" by rush-
ing to war. lie pledged to build
an international coalition while
continuing to prosecute the war
- increasing troop levels if needed
- because stability in Iraq is essen-
tial.
The problems In Iraq are
only part of a foreign policy by
Bush that has left Ihe nation
isolated, Kerry said.
"I think this administration
has proven, frankly, stunningly
ineffective in diplomacy he
said.
Kerry cited Bush's policy
change on Israel last week in
which he endorsed a plan by
Prime Minister Ariel Sharon
to hold on to lands seized in
the 1967 Middle Past War.
"There were Arab leaders that
were taken by surprise by
this announcement Kerry
said, although he also said he
endorsed the move.
"I will immediately reach
out to other nations in a very
different way from this admin-
istration he said
"Within weeks of being
inaugurated I will return to the
U.N. and I will rejoin the com-
munity of nations.
Application Fee:
-Required
Security Deposit:
-Required
Pets accepted with
non-refundable fee.
Unit Sizes:
2 bedroom 1 12 bath townhouse
approx. 1050 square feet
3 bedroom 1 12 bath townhouse
approx. 1350 square feet
3 bedroom 1 12 townhouse
Individual bedroom lease
Swimming Pool � Fitness Equipment � Tennis Courts
� Private Patios � Walk-in Closets � WasherDryer
Connections � On-site Management
24 hour Emergency Maintenance � Dishwasher �
Self-Cleaning Oven � Frost Free Refrigerator � Central
HeatAir Conditioning � B-Ball Court
Billiards Table � Ceiling Fans � 24 hour On-Site Laundry
Facilities � Clubhouse � FREE Broadband High Speed
Wireless Internet � Basic Cable, Water &Sewer
Additional Security Lighting & Exterior Doors Have
Deadbolts � ECU Bus Service Available
�Convenient to several shopping plazas,restaurants and
entertainment
252-752-0277 � 1806 E 1st St. � Located 4 blocks from ECU campus � www.wilsonacres.com
Hi-ing" struck by lightning is rare.
I laving a disability is not. One in five
Americana will acquire a disability in
his or her lifetime. Ple.isr support
the work of Easter Seals
(rrutint otulii'n
,ltii.in, fttv
M
� The most dangerous
f animais m the forest :
.don't live there





PAGEA4
tec
OPINION
Michelle A. McLeod
Editor-in-chief
editor� theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
4-20-04
Erin Rickert
News Editor
Amanda Ungerfelt
Features Editor
Ryan Downey
Sports Editor
Meghann Roark
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
Holly O'Neal
Asst News Editor
John Bream
Asst. Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Asst. Sports Editor
Daniel Roy
Production Manager
Amanda Vanness
Asst. Photo Editor
252.328.6366
252.328.6558
252.328.2000
Our View
The league
needs to
come up
with a solid
stand on
what will be
done about
entry into the
draft. If that
means they
stand by the
current rule
and emphati-
cally declare
it as non-
negotiable,
so be it.
Maurice Clarett - and any other underclass-
man, for that matter - has been denied entry
into this weekend's NFL draft. The second U.S.
Circuit Court of Appeals made the decision to
put a hold on a lower court's decision to allow
the entry from almost two months ago.
The question of eligibility has been hotly
debated. The most relevant question is if the
NFL is favored in the end with the eligibility
issue, what are they going to do about the
rule in place? What if they lose?
What makes the decision a difficult one
and solutions somewhat scarce is that kids
coming out of high school or with less than
two years experience playing college football
are not physically ready for the NFL. But that
won't hold up in court by any stretch
The way Clarett got into the league is ridicu-
lous and, in some aspects, low class. He is
not ready for the NFL, physically nor mentally,
and should have been forced to play another
year of college ball,
But what about someone like Southern Cal-
ifornia's Mike Williams, an absolute beast?
With his size and talent, he could have an
impact on the league and abuse veteran
cornerbacks in his rookie year.
Believe it.
Clarett, on the other hand, is out of shape,
hasn't played in over year and would play at
a position that takes the worst beating of any
other spot on the field. As a receiver, Williams
blocks on run plays and gets tackled only
when the ball is thrown his way. Clarett would
be hit on every single down that he plays.
The league needs to come up with a solid
stand on what will be done about entry into
the draft. If that means they stand by the
current rule and emphatically declare it as
non-negotiable, so be it.
In the event that they lose, a rule that players
must play at least two years of college football
should be placed in effect otherwise these
kids will get hurt - some of them seriously.
The NFL game is far too fast both physically
and mentally for 18-year-old kids coming
out of high school with no experience at the
next level.
The purpose of TEC's opinion pages is to invoke
conversation in ECU'S community. To respond to an
opinion on this page, please send your letter, with your contact
information for verification, to edilor �theeastcardinian.com.
wrr camws
Letters To The Editor
Serving ECU since 1925, The East Carolinian prints 9.000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular academic year
and 5,000 on Wednesdays during the summer "Our View" is the opin-
ion of the editorial board and is written by editorial board members.
7?ie East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor which are limited to
250 words (which may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and include
a telephone number Letters may be sent via e-mail to editor@theeast
carolmian.com or to 77ie East Carolinian. Student Publications Building,
Greenville. NC 27858-4353 Call 252-328-6366 for more information.
One copy of The East Carolinian is free, each additional copy is $1.
Dear Editor,
In response to last Tuesday's
"In My Opinion by Peter Kala-
jian, ECU Greeks were portrayed
as an elite, exclusionary group
who are throwing the balance of
student government completely
askew.
Creeks may, in fact, make
up 70 percent of SiA, but
instead of looking at this as an
"alarming" injustice, one should
take into consideration that
(ireeks seem to he the people on
campus most willing to put forth
time and effort into bettering ECU.
lake the last election, for
example. Both tickets running
were all (.reek ballots, if the
majority leels so misrepresented,
why have no independents (non-
Greek) taken the initiative to run
for a position If your point was to
make people aware that 10 percent
of the people (Greeks) should not
represent the entire student body's
wants, needs and ideals, I would
agree; hut through no fault of the
Oreek community, SGA happens
to lie predominantly Greek.
II the student population at
ECU is so unhappy with the rep-
resentation percentage you can't
complain about something you
aren't willing to do anything
about. Your belief may be that
the number of tireeks on SGA
is, as you say, ridiculous; I call
on all the independents, step up
and run for an office.
It may not have been your
intention to cast "character
dispersions" on (ireeks, but your
literary picture of (ireek Life did
just this. By paralleling SGA to
apartheid and implying that the
(ireek community lacks diver-
sity and portraying brothers and
sisters as dress-alike "ditzes" and
"meatheads" is unfair. There
are 1 IK Fraternities, 0 NPC
Sororities, 8 NPHC Sororities
and Fraternities, as well as
numerous other academic and
service (ireek organizations
made up of unique and diverse
individuals.
So Peter, if you feel the
representation of the student
population on SGA is unbal-
anced, I bppe to see your name
on a ballot sometime in the near
future.
Jordan Rutty
Alpha Xi Delta Sorority
ECU Student
Hear Editor.
I was greatly disturbed by the
inaccurate assumptions made
about the (ireek community in the
edition of The EM .iirotiiiiuii thai
was released on April Li.
The article I am referring in is
the article on the student Govern-
ment being dominated by Greeks
The Greeks do make up a large
part of our Student Government
Association. However, this docs no
harm to the rest ot the student pu-
lation. In X)int of fact, if it were not
for (ireeks, there would lie almost
IK) one involved in SGA. The Greek
community has every right to have
their representation in SGA because
they are the people who run for Office
and are v rccned on the senate.
As Go-chair of the internal allairs
committee, I can tell you that there
are over 3S seats open on the student
senate right now. Any one who
would like to join, Greek or not can
come by 25S Mendenhall and pick
up an application to be si reened lor
a position on the senate. If Greeks
are willing to take time out of their
lives and fill the void in SGA, then
they deserve to be the majority.
It is important to rememhei
that (ireeks are students, as well
We are not only in our Ir.ili rnitics
and sororities, hut we are also rep
resentattve ot many ciulis, groups
and majors throughout campus. I.
myself am not only Greek, but an
education major who is involved
with other student organizations
not Greek affiliated.
This is the case with the much
of the Greek community that is on
the senate. We have many different
majors and are in many different
groups,
Wayne Conner, our lit man ot
the vear for 20(M, Is the president'
and founder of the prelaw honors
organization here on campus. I his
is one ol many examples of how
Greeks help the entire student txidy
because we are not just Greek. We
have many interests and affilia-
tions, and many of us share the
common interest being active
within S(.A.
The next thing I would like to
(xiint nut is that Greeks lead the way
in diversity on this campus. The
National Panhcllcniconlerence,
National Pan-llellcnk oundl
and the Inlcrfraternityouncil are
great champions ot diversity on this
campus. We work in order to bring
many types ol people together in
order In help this school.
I ook around, we all know
people that are Greek. Do they all
look alike, dress alike and act
alike No! We are as diverse as
any group on campus and repre-
sent several aspects of student life.
I take it as an insult. The idea that
we could be compared to some-
thing as heinous as Apartheid is
the most absurd idea conceived
about our organizations.
I would also like to remind
evervone that the Greek system
is a group that gives greatly to
the rest of the community. If you
look at the paper at any lime, you
will see that t he Greeks are major
contributors to Philanthropy and
community service.
Pi Kappa Alpha has given over
123,000 dollars to the Ronald
McDonald house in the last year.
Zeta lau Alpha and Delta Sigma
Phi had a joint event that ben-
elited breast earner research and
the March of Dimes. Phi Kappa
Tau and I lelta Zeta hail an Easter
egg hunt at the Boys and (.iris
i lub last week.
Zeta Tau Alpha, Alpha Phi,
Alpha Phi Alpha and Sigma
Phi Epsilon joined together
lor a iaimed tood drive for the
homeless eatlicr this semester.
These are only a tew ol the
service-driven projects the (ireek
((immunity has led. I here are
14 (ireek organizations on this
campus; all of which give time and
money to letter the community.
Mr Kalajian, these remarks are
not intended lo lie attacking. I am
simply stating that if you wish to
write about the (Ireek system, you
should learn moreabOUl it.
I would like to extend you and
Invitation from the office of the
Interfiaterntrty ('ouncil io come
through our tall Rush. Added to
this personal invitation, all fees
that may apply will be waived
for you. I would like you to go
through intake with our NPHC
brothers so you can learn alxiut
them as well.
I understand the actions of
the creek System are often mis-
understood. In the future, if there
are airy questions or concerns that
may arise, I will be more than
willing to help. As a member of
my own brotherhood, president
ol llielnterfraternity Council and
a committee chair on the SGA, I
am more than willing to help any
way I can.
Terry Gore
Delta Sigma Phi I raternatv
ECU Student
Dear Editor,
I am writing in response to
a letter and an article published
April 13 both written by Peter
Kalajian.
firstly, I would like to cor-
rect a couple of misstatements
in the actual SGA article. The
measure to support televisions
in the dining halls did not pass
overwhelm i ugly as was character-
ized in the article. The resolution
of the Student Welfare Commit-
tee passed with a vote of 24-23,
hardly what 1 would say is over-
whelming.
Secondly, the bill introduced
to add an additional committee
to the Senate for graduate stu-
dents had absolutely nothing lo
do with the proposed GSAC funds
that will be rolled-back into Stu-
dent Government.
That arrangement has already
been panned out by the executive
boards of both GSAC and SGA.
that is actually for a one-year
trial, however the Senate bill
would be permanent, not for a
one-year trial as characterized
in the article. Perhaps, if the
writer would have concentrated
on obtaining facts to inform the
student body instead ol observing
the "composition" of the Senate,
these mistakes would not have
occurred.
I would like lo respond now
to the idea that Greeks are dis-
proportionately represented in
SGA, Greeks do make up a large
percentage of many leadership
organizations around campus.
The simple explanation for this
is that we are involved.
There are some 35 or more
seats currently open in the Stu-
dent Senate. Amazingly, neither
the article nor the editorial men-
tion this fact.
student Government is open
lo all students on campus and
allows them a great opportunity
to become involved. I also find il
very Interesting that people who
have never been involved in a fra-
ternity or sorority are the world's
foremost experts on what Greeks
are about.
True, there are many Greeks
who dress a certain way or who
have similar ideals, but does
this fact mean we should be
dismissed?
Regardless of what you have
been told, (ireeks perform vari-
ous types of philanthropy and
commifnity service not only
locally, but nationally.
We are the leaders of the
campus, not because it is handed
to us, but because we take the
initiative and go and work for it.
It is not only the responsibility
of an organization to come and
ask people to join, but it is the
responsibility of the individuals
themselves to become informed
and involved.
1 also apologize to the writer
for the apparel that he so elo-
quently described as being
"(ireek" wear.
I would suggest a strong
pair of sunglasses as to block
out such offensive things as
designer labels, Rainbow sandals
and Greek lettered shirts from hi.s
view. Thanks for buying into the
stereotype.
The simple fact is that Senate
elections are openly advertised lo
the campus at-large during the
fall semester, just as the executive
elections are during the spring
semester.
Also, the Screening and
Appointments Committee takes
applications all during the year
to till vacancies.
The president-elect of SGA
is currently accepting applica-
tions for her cabinet for next
year. I implore the writer of the
articles, and anyone who shares
his views to cowboy up and join
SGA, lo address your concern of
the "Greek" misrepresentation
and all the other more pressing
matters we handle on a daily
basis.
Joseph Payne
Phi Kappa Psi Eraternity
ECU Student
Dear Editor,
Thank you lor your inter-
est in helping us lo iiintinually
improve our options. Having a
balanced selection of all foods is
very important to our staff.
s vegetarian options are
increasing in demand, we are
making strides to ensure that
we have offerings that you can
select from. Vegetarian meals
cm he a very healthy selection,
as it can provide you with lots of
liber, vitamins, and minerals. By
substituting some of the meal in
your diet, you may also be reduc-
ing the amount ot saturated fat
that you take in.
Each day at lodd and
Mendenhall, we base a vegetarian
entree opt ion as well as a vegetar-
ian soup. Additionally, Ihere are
vegetables, grilled veggie burgers.
pasta and baked potatoes offered
each day.
The salad bar contains fresh
vegetables, hummus, beans.
heese and Iruit. At the deli, you
can Rnd various cheese and tush
vegetables to create a vegetarian
sandwich or sub. I he salad bar
would also have other great veg-
etables that you could top it with
I or those who prefer soy milk, it
is available upon request.
In another effort lo increase
vegetarian selections, we have
added a few options at the retail
locations. A new area in the
Croatan, the Wright Place, the
Spot and Pirate Market Is Nutri-
tion Nook, an area that contains
healthy selections such as fruit
cups, vegetable trays, yogurt,
sushi, various salads and bever-
ages. A new item that we have
just added is hummus that will
be served with pita wedges and
fresh fruit. This will be located
at the Spot, the Galley, and the
Wright Place. At the Spot and the
Galley, we also have bean burri-
tos with vegetarian retried beans,
vegetables, cheese and rice.
Pirate Market, the conve-
nience store, does have a wonder-
ful selection of organic and meat
free products. We have added var-
ious flavors of soy milk products,
as well as garden burgers. Next
year, when the new dining hall
is in operation, it too will have a
convenience store, very similar to
the one on College Hill.
Please also look for topics
of interest in the publication,
Healthy News Your Body Can
Use, which is sent out to residence
halls each fall and spring, as well
as in March for National Nutri-
tion Month. It is also available
at each of the Campus Dining
locations. In these publications,
I answer frequently asked ques-
tions from students. Please visit
our Campus Dining Web site,
where you can learn more about
programs and options offered.
During the summer, we will
expand the nutrition homepage
lo bring you other information.
You can also contact me
directly at 328-2632 if you have
questions. Again, thank you for
your input, and feel free to give us
your ideas or suggestions.
Robin High
Dining Nutrition Director





PAGE A5
4-20-04
CLASSIFIEDS
TO PLACE AN AD
Come by The East Carolinian office
on the second floor of the Student Publications Building
(above the cashiers office)
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
FORM
Block! to ECU, 1,2,3 bedrooms,
all appliances, central heatAC,
see collegeunlversltyrentals.co
m or call 321-4712
Student Special. Walk to class! 3 BR
1 BA Duplex. HW floors, WD, new
windows, pets ok wfee. Available
immediately, J650 a month. Call
252-341-8331.
For Rent- one bedroom apartment
available 5-11-04. J3S0month
includes cable, water, sewefc Close
to campus. Call 412-6116 or 714-
5113 for more information.
Apartment available for the summer.
Two bedroom 11 2 bath, $490 month
plus utilities, Eastbrook Apartments.
Call 752-9620
Apt. for rent starting in Fall semester.
2 bedroom Sr. 1 bath, 12 block from
ECU and 2 blocks from downtown,
all appliances, central HVAC, nice &
clean. S625month. Call 252-717-
6557.
Three bedroom duplex for rent near
ECU. Available immediately. Rent
J618-Call 752-6276.
Sub-Lease Rent Apt Pirate's Cove,
S360 mo available NOW uly 31,
2004. Contact: Karen N. Lee, 919-
894-8348 or 919-207-0804
417 W 3rd Street, 2 bedroom, 1 bath,
dining room, living room, w garage,
washerdryer included, available 8
104, no pets, J650 mo excellent
condition, 2 blocks from campus, call
252-327-4433
Anyone looking to move into Pirate's
Cove now please contact Brenda at
704-202-2775 or 252-885-0097.
Rent includes everything, $360
month, available now or May 1st.
need a male of female to sublease a
room in Sterling Manor for May, une,
and July. Pay $532 13 utilities for
whole summer. Only pay half May
and June, July is already paid for.
Private bathroom and big closet,
washer and dryer, furnished. Will
be living with two guys, neat and
non-smokers. Call Chris for more
info. Apt. 252-551-6725 or Cell
919-749-3889.
Female roommate wanted to
sublease bedroom in four bedroom
four bathroom apartment in Pirate's
Cove for the summer andor next
year. One roommate is staying.
May pick other roommates or pot
luck. Summer rent is $360 and next
year's rent is $370. Please respond
a.s.a.p. Cara 252-413-6991 or cell
301-814-7748.
Pirate's Cove, Available Now, Sublet
furnished apartment. Special Price:
$325 all included. Call now 919-
846-7360.
Near ECU & downtown- 12 block
from ECU, 2 blocks from downtown.
3 bedroom, 2 12 bath, new carpet,
central HVAC, all appliances, $875
month. 252-717-6551. Lease to
begin Aug. 2004.
Near ECU Si downtown- 12 block
from ECU, 2 blocks from downtown.
4 bedrooms, 2 bath, very large 2
story house, very nice, central HVAC,
all appliances. $1400 month. 252-
717- 6551. Lease to begin Aug. 2004
(possibly sooner)
Summer school students 2 BED 1
BATH, walk to ECU, rent $470mo
includes water and sewer. Available
May 16th through July 31st, can
renew for Fall Lease. Call Elisa 1-
252-412-2463
Melbourne Park upscale one
bedroom for rent. Cathedral ceiling,
balcony, dishwasher, walk-in closet.
New, quiet neighborhood on
Wimbledon Drive. NO DEPOSIT,
April rent paid. (252)717-7173.
For rent: Upscale 3 BR3 Bath Near
campus, only if you like the BEST!
Call 252-561-7368 or 561-7679 or
dayle@bellsouth.net
1, 2, 3, 4, 5 bedroom houses and
duplexes. Available Fall 2004. ALL
walking distance from ECU. Call
531-5701
Dockside Duplex 3 BDRM, 2 Bath. 1 -
unit available immediately, 1 building
w 2 units side by side- available
August 3, 2004. Cot 6 friends who
want to room? This is ideall Call Jeff
� 252-327-4433. WasherDryer
included, no pets.
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015- 1 & 2
BR apts, dishwasher, GD, central
air Si heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or
12 month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, & cable.
Twin Oaks townhouse, 2 BR, 1 12
bath, end unit on ECU campus bus
route. Patio, pool, WD hook-up.
$575 per month. Call 864-346-5750
or 864-228-3667.
pinebrook apt. 758-401S- 1&2 BR
apts, dishwasher, CD, central air
& heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or 12
month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, & cable.
Near ECU fit downtown- 3
blocks from ECU, 5 blocks from
downtown. 5 bedroom, 2 bath,
newly remodeled, nice St clean, all
appliances, 2 kitchens, central HVAC
downstairs and window AC upstairs.
$1325 month. 252-717-6551. Lease
to begin Aug. 2004
3 bd St 1 ba Duplex for rent. Located
on Stancil and close to campus.
Features include kitchen appliances
including new washer and dryer,
and fenced backyard. Pets OK with
negotiable fee. $660.00 per month.
752-6859
Apartment for rent in Wilson Acres
for $325 a month. You would take
over lease as soon as possible. Please
contact me at 919-389-8367.
Spacious two-bedroom duplex
with large living room and eat-in
kitchen with washer and dryer.
Duplex includes large deck and off
street parking. Water and sewer
included in rent. $475 per month.
Available August 1st. Call 752-5536
for appointment.
Pre-Register for spacious 2 and
3 bedroom townhouses. Full
basement, enclosed patio WD hook-
up, no pets. 752-7738 daytime 7:30
to 4:30.
Two BR one bath recently renovated
duplex beside Town Commons 111B
and 113 Holly Street. Central heat
air. Easy walk to ECU. $425month.
258-6776.
Room for rent at Pirate's Cove
for summer vacation May, June,
July. $360mo. Rent all inclusive.
Please contact Nikki for more info,
at anytime 252-329-0614, leave
message.
Houses and apartments for rent near
campus. 3 and 4 bedroom houses
available. 1 bedroom apartments
available. Call (252)353-5107.
Now Preleasing For Fall Semester-
1,2 and 3 bedrooms. All units close
to ECU. Cypress Gardens, asmine
Gardens, Peony Gardens, Gladiolus
Garden, Wesley Commons North,
Park Village, Cotanche Street, Beech
Street Villas and Woodcliff. Water and
sewer included with some units. Pets
allowed in some units with fee. For
mohe information contact Wainright,
Property Management 756-6209.
Now Preleasing for Fall Semester-
1,2 and 3 bedroom duplexes Si
townhouses. College Towne Row,
Verdant Street, Cannon Court,
Cedar Court, Lewis Street and 2nd
Street. All units close to ECU. Pets
allowed in some units with fee. For
more information contact Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
Crossword
ACROSS
1 taxis
5 Of digestion
11 Paulo
14 Oodles
15 Add to the beauty
of
16 Cowboy's
nickname
17"MyCous�iVinny"
Oscar winner
19 Black gold
20 Etchers
21 Capital on the
Red River
23 Vega's
constellation
24 Practice
25 Experts, briefly
29 Group of three
31 MartinWinger
movie
35 Lofty poem
38 Province on Lake
Erie
39 More luxurious
41 Absolutely!
42 Like some tires
44" Cane"
45 Toy on a string
46 Place position
49 Thwack
53 In a vertical line
54 Perfume sprayers
59 Meat cut
60 Real go-getter
62 Had lunch
63 Reluctant
64 Fastidious
65 Ballplayer
Williams
66 Former Egyptian
leader
67 Ms. Fitzgerald
12341 18I'67891011112'3
14'16
172419
20K?7282122
23 32333536
s2930
313437
.18441 43y40
4'��!484251
52465657
466'4950
53455IM
59
62631�
0566I67
0 Tribune Media Services. Inc
All righls reserved.
DOWN
1 Arrived
2 Dershowitz or
Greenspan
3 1976-80
Wimbledon
winner
4 Be up and about
5 Logger's tool
6 Join in
7 Proportionately
8 Allen and
Robbins
9 Stolen diamonds
10 City of northern
Mexico
11 Rock
12 Vowels
13 Eurasian
primrose
18 Actor Mineo
22 In addition
24 Spine datum
25 Stratagem
26 Clair or Coty
27 Trigger's lunch
28 Health haven
30 Tears
32 "Dr. Quinn,
Medicine
Woman" co-star
33 Evil spirit
34 Throw in one's
cards
35 Neighbor of
Indiana
36 Withhold
37 Therefore
40 Crafty
Solutions
V1i31"3B8VNa3J
1V3N3Sd3AV31V
tiaAViyH3DV3a1ti
sH371w0iV� ewn1d
1VMsiaN003S
0A0I00N0n
0N11V3sd13ss3A
ti1HSn1d01tiV1N0
1a0H11V dd0dV33
aV1y1His0dd
An3Nn1VHA
10NVHIsH3AVd0N3
!i013w0iVsidVn
Xi1H0iuH3101V
0VS01id3�s(1V0
43 Promotes
44 Family member
46 Jack of no-fat fame
47 Select few
48 To the third power
50 Of less quality
51 "Forever "
52 Bond
54 Gets older
55 Billy or Frank
56 Mr. Knievel
57 Kind of estate?
58 Madrid mile.
61 Ms. Gardner
18 yr. old male seeking male
roommate for 2 bedroom
apartment. 12mo. lease starts
next Aug. @ RiverPointe Village,
all-inclusive, furnished $450mo.
Quiet, studious, non-smoker, non-
drinker, no pets. 919-608-2514 or
bab0824@mail.ecu.edu
Two Rooms for rent, furnished or
unfurnished, $275 a month not
including utilities, phone, cable,
close to campus. Call 329-0761.
Roommate needed for summer
and fall. 2 blocks from campus.
$242 per month plus half utilities.
2 BD 1 BA serious inquires only.
Call 758-4774, leave message.
Next school year Aug. 2004-Aug.
2005, Pirate's Cove $370month,
everything included, 3 Christian
roommates. Contact Brandon
at 329-9174 or 919-270-6683
FOR SALE
Matching CouchLoveseat $375,
end tables $75, entertainment
center $40, desk $60, bookshelf
$15, full size bed with boxspring
$90, dishes $30, potspans $30.
Sell by May 8th. 353-0029.
Do you surf? Or are you a poser?
Come check our 3 surfboards
In excellent condition. 60 C,
6'0 Surf Prescription, 5'9 Round
Nose Fish. Try a surf shop and get
burned on their used prices. Come
check them out. Good prices! 252-
258-6151.
Matching couch and loveseat for
sale. $150 for both pieces. Must sell
by May 8th. Call 910-770-2909 or
email at agb0429@mail.ecu.edu
For sale: 5 piece sectional sofa,
includes two recliners, one pullout
bed, neutral color, good condition.
$250 or OBO. 756-0723.
HEP WDM
Wanted! Reliable, honest, energetic
people to monitor crops. From
May through August, 2004 We
train! Must have own dependable
vehicle. Learn to ID insects, weeds
and other field conditions. No
Nights. Hourly pay mileage.
Must be 19 or have 1 year of
college. Mail or fax resume with
cover letter and work experience
to : MCSI, POB 370, Cove City,
NC 28523 Fax: 252-637-2125
mmclawhorn@mcsiag.com
Tutornanny needed- for ages 12,
11, Si 7, minimum 3.0 GPA, strong
in math skills, non-smoker, reliable
vehicle, good driving record,
flexible hours, some cooking. Call
752-1572 for interview.
Food Delivery Drivers wanted for
Restaurant Runners. Part-time
positions (6-12hr. including
tips.) Perfect for college students!
Some lunch time (11a-2pm)
M-F availability required. 2-way
radios allow you to be anywhere
in Greenville when not on a delivery.
Reliable transportation a must and
knowledge of Greenville streets
advantageous. Call 756-5527 or check
out our website � www.restaurantrun
ners.com. Sorry no dorm students.
Lifeguards needed. Myrtle Beach
now and summer. Good pay Si
conditions. Call 843-448-9122 or
email ehuggins@sc.rr.com.
need a Summer Job?- The ECU
Telefund is hiring students to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU Annual
Fund $6.25 plus cash bonuses. Make
your own schedule. If interested, visit
our website at www.ecu.edutelefund
and click on JOBS.
Ming Dynasty waitstaff needed. Come
apply in person. Located East 10th
Street, Rivergate Shopping Center.
Loving babysitter needed for infant
boy. Monday-Friday, 8:30a.ml:
00p.m. all summer. Hours beyond
summer more flexible. $6.50hour.
Non-smoker, reliable car, references.
Please leave message, 329-0101.
Summer work $12.25 guarantee
appointment. Flexible schedules,
great resume experience. No
experience needed. Salesservice.
Conditions apply. Call 353 6860.
workforstudents.com
Spanish-speaking chlldcare
needed for 3-year-old boy.
Native speaker preferred.
References required. Will need
transportation to Farmville. 20
hoursweek starting In May. Call
753-6357.
Nashville based Southwestern Co
looking for two more ECU students to
work in sales and management training
program this summer. Must have 2.8
GPA, be willing to work hard, and
travel out west for the summer. Avg.
student makes $2,132month. Call
919-749-5002.
Child Care provider needed for two
boys, ages 10, 12 for the summer
months. Must be mature, dependable,
responsible. Great pay. References
required. Please call 756-8262.
Lifeguards and swim instructors
ned��Cal50�immeronM
MWWflLS
Congratulations Natalie Putnam on
being Kappa Delta's sister of the
week! We love you very much and
you're doing an excellent jobl
Congratulations Chi Phi on your
chartervejhesistersoflppaDelta!
HELP
tellable, honest, energetic
tuple to monitor crops.
rum May through August
004. We train! Must
lave own dependable
I vehicle. Learn to ID
I insects, weeds, and other
Held conditions. No nights.
Hourly pay?mileage.
Must be 19 or have one
year ot college. Mall or
lax resume with cover
letter and work experi-
ence to:
nest
POB 310
Cm CltyNC, 28573
fin-757-1
FREE
� of pcxr maintenance response
� of unreturned phone culls
� of noisy neighbors
�of crawl) critters
� of high utilit) bills
� of ECU parking hassles
� of ungrateful landlords
� of unanswered questions
� of high reins
� of grumpj personnel
� of unfulfilled promises
� of units that were not cleaned
� of walls that were never painted
� of appliances that don't work
Wyndham Court &
Kastgate Village Apts.
9200 F Mosclcy Dr.
1561-RENT or 531-9011
wwtt.pimiaclcprupert)
niunagcmcn t.coni
MONITORED NIGHTLY BY SECVMTY
OTHER
Full Time Students I! I Stop wasting your
Time and Talents on PT obs with bad
hrs. & payll! LOOK! For 1 weekend a
month the National Guard wants you
to go to college, FREE TUITION! Learn
a job skill & stay a student! FT students
get over $800mo in Education
Benefits & PAY for more info. CALL
252-916-9073 or visit www.1-800-
GO-GAURD.com
Belly Dance for Fun & Fitness! Spring
classes (April-June) start Tuesday. For
women of all ages. Ten students per
class. To register call Donna 355-5150.
SUMMER
WORK
� Great Pay
� Great Experience
� Close To Campus
� No Canvassing
� No Cold Calling
� Sales Service
� Conditions Apply
Call Now: 353-6860
Apply Online
www.worksforstudents.com
Ruthie from MTV's Real World Hawaii
has returned to ECU! April 20, 8:
00p.m. at enkins Auditorium. No
tickets necessary. Here is your chance
to see your favorite Filipina!
The ECU Student Media Board has
extended the deadline for
applications for the position of
GENERAL MANAGER,
WZMB 91.3 FM
for the 2004-05 academic year.
Applications are available in the Media Board office.
The deadline for submitting an application is
TUESDAY, APRII27 AT 4 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
�a

"Are you nuts � I ain't pullln' over so
you can use a Porta-JohnW
DITHERED TV?TS ��
Why people are superior to dogs.
4. x�t suft y k-is
we got the chairs.






PAGtA6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
4-20-04

J'ST SMLINGIMVERSITY
mam presents
COLLEGIATE RESIDENCES
(M
Rpfll Ufnrlri fi
Come meet the
Real World at Sterling Manor
April 27m 5-7 p.m.
3535 East 10th Street 252.758.5551 Greenville
After Parlu at Cabana's 9 - JIM
l�
Twos
SO Signup cost � $0 Deposit tj
X 1 f C Offer expires 42704
?IUU ReiUOrd if lease is complex inDOljS!
Laura F
roomm
c
m
Cartnu

Students





Two students race down the Hill in a cart meant for one. The racers were disqualified
Students push off their teammates from the top of College Hill as hard as they can.
iM�
Teams congratulate each other at the end of the race. A student pushes his teammate off at the start line.
Laura Pekarek, freshman business major, dukes it out with her
roommate in an inflatable boxing ring.
Sharice Wirks and Alex Thomas compete in an inflatable bungee cord sports
event, where the student who sticks the Velcro bean bag the farthest before
Students in the co-ed division prepare for their being snapped back by the bungee cord is the winner.
turn to race down the Hill.
Cart number seven finishes just ahead of cart number three.
Pitt. T
Co-ed teams are off and running at the start of the race.
iffany Curry, sophomore communication major, speeds down College Hill.
1 Students in the Campus Dining cart and the Healthy Pirates cart push off at the top of the r
The student in the Campus Dining cart nudges out the competition.





PAGi B
4 20 04
tMIIK fllflK M UP MEJM
4-2
FEATURES
AMANDA LINGERFELT
Features Editor
JOHN BREAM
Assistant Features Editor
features@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Did You Know?
Actress Jessica Lange (1949), singer Luther Vandross (1951) and actor
Shemar Moore (1970) all call today their birthday
This month is National Kite Month.
On this day in 1976, George Harrison sang the lumberjack song
with Monty Python
Announcements
The Rivals'
The ECULoessin Playhouse presents The Rivals' final performance today
in McGinnis Theatre. The show begins at 8 p.m Tickets can be purchased
by calling the ECU Central Ticket Office at 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
Don Giovanni
ECU Opera Theatre presents Don Giovanni today in the A J Fletcher Recital
Hall at 8 p m Tickets are $5 � $10
Illusionist
Illusionist Craig Karges will make tables float and read minds at 8 p m
tonight in Hendrix Theatre This event is free
Rims
The Student Union Films Committee presents The Fog of War on
Wednesday at 7 p.m Thursday at 9:30 p.m, Friday at 7 p.m. and midnight,
Saturday at 930 p.m. and Sunday at 7 p.m The Lord of the Rings: Return
ot the King is showing Wednesday at 930 p.m Thursday at 7 pm, Friday
at 9-30 pm, Saturday at 7 pm. and midnight and Sunday at 3 pm All
movies are free with a student ID and are located in the Hendrix Theatre
For more information, call 328-4700
Music Performance
The School of Music presents the Symphonic Wind Ensemble, the
Symphonic Band and the Concert Band conducted by Scott Carter and
Christopher Knighten at 8 p m on Wednesday. Apnl 21 in Wright Auditorium
This event is free
Barefoot on the Mall
The 25th Annual Barefoot on the Mall will be from 12 pm
Thursday. April 22 This event is free for students.
6 p.m. on
Art Exhibition
The 2004 School of Art Thesis Exhibition opening reception will be at 5
pm on Thursday April 22 in the Gray Gallery The exhibit runs through
May 22
Jazz Bones
The School of Music presents Jazz Bones directed by George Broussard
at 8 p m on Thursday. Apnl 22 in the A j Fletcher Recital Hall This event
is free
B-Boy Competition
The Student Union presents "Toe II Toe a b-boy competition, from 6 pm.
- 9 pm on Friday. April 23 in the Mendenhall Great Rooms This event is
Jazz Festival
The ECU Jazz Ensemble concert will perform in concert at 8 p m on Friday
Apnl 23 in the Greenville Convention Center Call 328-4788 for tickets
Jazz Festival
The School of Music presents a Guest Artist Concert by Billy Taylor at 8
p m on Saturday April 24 in the Greenville Convention Center Dinner and
concert packages are available - call 328-4788 for tickets
Music Performance
The Chamber Singers and the ECU Choral Scholars present Howell's
Requiem Lottis Crucifixus and other masterpieces at 3 pm on Sunday.
Apnl 25 at St Paul s Episcopal Church This event is free
New Releases
CDs
Underneath Limited Edition with Bonus DVD, Hanson
Musicohgy. Prince
Impossible Dream. Patty Gnffin
Miracle Mule Subdudes
Unbreakable (Import Scorpions
Hurt No More Mano Winans
Desensitized Drowning Pool
Hangover Music 6 Black Label Society
Rock Against Bush Vol 1 Various Artists
DVDs
Master and Commander - The Far Side ot the World
(Widescreen Special Two-Disc Set)
The Office - The Complete Second Series
Step Into Liquid
Sweeney Todd The Demon Barber Ot Fleet Street
The King of Queens - The Complete Second Season
The Haunted Mansion (Widescreen Edition)
Master and Commander - The Far Side ot the World (Full Screen Edition)
The Office - The Complete First and Second Series
Call Me Madam
Master and Commander � The Far Side ot the World
(Widescreen Edition)
flrewevv to season's
five hottest movies
MICAH MASSEI
SENIOR WRITER
With spring's arrival is an all new film
season jam-packed with exciting choices lor
filmgoers. Below is an analysis ol five tilms
sure to have an impact at the box office
Kill Bill Vol. 2 - Starring I'ma I'hiir-
man, Samuel I Jackson - Directed by
Qucntin larantino
The background: Alter raking in
nearly $70 million at the box office (domes-
tically), larantino's conclusion to a female
SSWsin's mission to kill all involved in an
earlier attempt on her life stars Thurman
(once again) as The Bride with new face
I.k kson as The Organ Player.
The bu: Tarantino has yet to make a
film that falters, and as exciting and com-
pletely original as Kill Hill Vol. I was, one can
only hope Vol. 2 achieves similar success.
Release date: April 16
Van Helslng- Starring Hugh Jackman,
Kate Beckinsale - Directed by Stephen
Sommers
The background: During the late I'M h
century, famed monster hunter Dr. Gabriel
.m Helslng (Jackman) heads to Europe
with sidekick Anna Valeriims (Beckinsale)
to battle Count Dracula, The Wolf Man and
Frankenstein's Monster.
The buz In a rather impressive move,
those at Universal Pictures have opted to
"cash-la" on one oi the more Interesting
horrorfantasy series ol years past by bring-
ing Win Helsing to the big screen this May.
Both Jackman and Beckinsale have proven
they can carry an actioncomic venture,
and Sommers has scored well with his The
Mummy trilogy expect a hit.
Release date: May 7
Troy - Starring Brad Pitt, I rk Bana
- Directed by Wolfgang Peterson
The background: An adaptation of
Homer s great epic, the film follows the siege
of Tro In the united (.reek forces with Pitt
as Achilles and Bana as Hector.
The buzz: You would think having Pitt's
name on a movie poster would guarantee
success, but in actuality, Pitt hasn't
solely headlined - with respect to
10-slar Morgan Freeman - a major block-
buster since IWS's .Sfh'fi. At the same time,
some of the projects he's been a part of
enjoyed what little success they achieved
only because Pitt was involved. Peterson is a
masterful filmmaker-who, unlike his peers,
tends to make action movies that "make you
think" and "have a brain Hopefully, with
Peterson behind the wheel, Pitt will use his
talents and not his face to occupy screen
time and this epic adaptation will succeed
admirably,
Release date: May 14
Shrek 2 - Starring Mike Meyers, Eddie
Murphy - Directed by Andrew Adamson,
Kelly Asbury and Conrad Vernon.
The background: Immediately picking
up from where Shrek left off, Shrek 2 finds
our strange but lovable hero journeying
with Princess Fiona alter their recent hon-
eymoon to the city of Far Far Away where
Shrek hopes to make a good impression
with Princess Fiona's parents. Don't worry.
Donkey returns, also
The buzz: Despite Spiderman 2 and
Uiirfiehlopening later this summer, Shrek 2
is arguably the most anticipated film release
of the year. The 22nd highest-grossing movie
of all-time, is there really any filmgoer
- young or old - who isn't looking forward
to seeing Shrek, Princess Fiona and especially
see PREVIEW page B3
"Friends" saying goodbye
After W years, show
be missed on 7V
LAURA KEELING
STAFF WRITER
The number one comedy
among 18 - 49 year-olds for live
years in a row, "Friends islinally
calling it quits. After 10 success-
ful yean, the phenomenon is sun
io in- misaed.
I be show, loved In1 main, will
air its final episode on Thursday,
Mac 6 a) 8 p.m. The lin.il show
will air lor two hours and unfold
the mysterious, anxiously awaited
ending.
Since its debul season In
l'�i(4. the show, created In M.irta
Kaufman and Davidrane, has
received many prestigious awards
and nominations.
These include 55 Emmy nomi-
nations, winning one in 2(M i tot
outstanding coined series, a
Si rein Actors Ciuild Award in
1996 tor outstanding ensemble
(R'rtormance in a corned series,
four Golden (ilobcs nominations
and tour PeoplesIk me Awards.
Many of the cast members
base built their aiting careers
due to the immense fame ol Hit
show lennifer niston. Rachel,
has starred in sin h films .is Pa turf
farfict tad Office Space. She is now
married to one ot the hottest men
in Hollywood, Brad I'm
Courtney Cox Arquette,
Monica, has starred in Hie Scream
movies, while Matthew Perry, who
plavs (handler, has bad leading
roles in Vnmi; Wijand Tin Whole
ni, Cards. Though thev are mar-
ried to each other on the show. In
real life, Courtney (ox Arquette
is married to the infamous David
Arquette and Pern is still single
but scan lung.
Lisa Kudrow, Phoebe, has
starred in makx liimssm hastony
.(� WiZWi's High School Reunion,
Ainilyc This and a new film with
Val Kilmer, Wonderland. Though
kudrow is ,i corny folk singer and
yogi instructor on the show, she
is a very talented actress that has
proven herself time and again with
major roles in several lilms.
Matt Lebianc, loey, has
starred inharilefs Angels and ml
in Space, lbs womanizing soap
opera actor image on the show
has made him one ot the favorite
characters among the friends.
Last, but not least, David
Schwimmei, Koss. has st.irred in
mam films and theatrical produc-
tions, some oi these Include The
r,illlHnci. Six Days Sevai Nfcfrtsand
Kissing ,i hull.
I lie question at hand that has
gone unanswered is, if this show
is so popular, then why is it going
oil ol the air?
The) have nowhere else to
go said Kim Curll, freshman
music therapy major.
s tor many shows, there is
only so much that can hapH'n to
one partii ular group ol X'ople As
a result ol this, mam shows will
s.iillv come to an end no matter
how popular they are or how big
the ratings
However, that doesn't mean
I here won't be big surprises for
the ending.
"I hope that (handler and
Monica get a baby said Amy
ll.inii .isth . freshman psychology
major
I hough there are many hopes
tor the outcome of "Friends the
biggest hope that the show might
return lor another season will
certainly not come true. After
an extremely successful and
long run. the show will pull the
plug and become a landmark loi
shows to come.
This writer can be contacted at
feotures@theeastcarolinian.com.
Who is your favorite
"Friend?"
JOANNA KING
SOPHOMORE ELEMENTARY
EDUCATION MAJOR
"I don t have a favorite. I love them
all Without any of them, the show
would not be the same
I
NEHA PATEL
FRESHMAN NURSING
MAJOR
'Rachel She has a great sense
of style, and I love her personality.
She plays her role well and her
hair is awesome
STEPHANIE AEVANS
SENIOR HEALTH EDUCATION
AND PROMOTION MAJOR
"Phoebe She is a unique
individual who is random in her
thoughts"
LEIGH ATCHESON
SOPHOMORE BIOLOGY
MAJOR
"Joey because he is so stupid
but always seems to have a
good time"
U





EJK
4 20 04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � f LATUHLS
PAGE B3
Eastbrook & Village Green
Apartments
Karges hypnotizes campus
We have what you need at a price you can afford
Live Off CampUS and still have
$$$$ in your Pocket!
n
-1, 2 & 3 bedroom apartment homes priced just rig
with a variety of floorplans 7 conveniant locations!
-FREE cable tv & water!
-3 swimming pools & ECU bus service!
-24-hr. maintenance & 24-hr. laundry facilities!
-Small pets are welcome, too!
-Best of all, our values ranee from
$350 to $595 PER APARTMENT, NOT PER PERSON
favorite
Call or visit us today & ask about
MOVE-IN DEALS! PRE-LEASING
NOW FOR SUMMER & FALL 2004
204 Eastbrook Dr.
(Off Greenville Blvd behind Pizza Inn, 2 stop lights from 10th St.)
752-5100 evbg@nowait.net
www.eastbrookvillagegreen.com
Mentalist visits ECU tonight
KIMBERLY WRIGHT
STAFF WRITER
The Idea of being under someone's mystical
power seems childlike. In reality, however, many
adults are infatuated with the thought of being
hypnotized.
Hypnotism is actually a growing entertainment
source lor adults. It is everywhere- on TV, commer-
cials, magazine ads and amusement parks. We've
all seen the magic shows in which entertainers
control the audience members with mysterious
powers and never really know how they were
controlled.
today, trained professionals are skilled in the
art of hypnotism and wowing audiences world-
wide. Being hypnotized is a state of mind that
unlocks the unconscious and gives control to the
hypnotist.
II you have never seen this type of show, you
can see it at the llcndrix Theatre Tuesday, April
19 .it B p.m.raig Karges, a well-known mentalist,
will be performing on the behalf of the Student
Union Spectrum Committee.
"( ralg Karges is a great entertainer - he capti-
vates audiences and leaves students spellbound. No
one will be disappointed viewing the show said
Stephen Gray, director of student activities.
Karges is a mentalist who broke into the enter-
tainment industry because of his uncle who was
also in the industry and inspired him.
Craig Karges presents a performance that
includes levitating tallies and blinding himself
with S0-cent pieces while quoting license numbers
of audience members as well as birth dates.
That is just the beginning of the level of amaze-
ment hepresents. Karges was recently awarded l.nter-
tainerof the Year lor the eighth consecutive time.
"I have never been to a show like that, and I
look forward to It said C.larisa Opeda, freshman
business major.
The show is filled with amazement and is
meant to reach into the world of the unknown to
keep audiences guessing.
Many think hypnotism is lake, but it really
depends on what you believe in and if you can
Mentalist Craig Karges performs tonight.
handle being amazed by what you see.
At this performance, students and audience
members can expect to see a highly skilled men-
talist - not hypnotist - perform.
So will people be hypnotized? that is left to be
seen at the performance.
I he show is well-known to ECU and has
enjoyed a great rate ol attendance.
"I have seen people get hypnotized before for
all kinds of reasons sui h as to quit smoking or for
pure fun to see if it's real, but I am still not sure il
ii isn't, since I have never been before said Krystal
Wilkins, freshman undecided major.
To receive further informal ion about the show,
you can contact the Student Union Spectrum Com-
mittee at 328-4715 or stop by 236 Mendenhall
Student Center.
This writer can be contacted at
leatures@theeastcarolinian.com.
Preview
from page B2
Donkey yuk it up onscreen one
more time
Release date: May 21
The Day After Tomorrow
- Starring Dennis Ou.iid. Sela
Ward - Directed by Itland
Emmerich
The background: Clima-
tologist lack Hall (Quald) tries to
figure out a way to save the world
from abrupt global warming, lie
ventures to New York to be with
his family, which has been taken
over by a new Ice Age.
The buzz: The trailer looks
amazing and the cast is respect-
able, but director Roland Emm-
erich has been 111 this situation
before, sometimes he hits (Inde-
pendence Day) and sometimes he
misses (Godzilla) hopefully he
hits the mark with what could be
the surprise money-maker.
Release date: May 28
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
TEC is now hiring staff writers. Apply at our office located
on the 2nd floor of the Student Publications Building.
MENTARY
AJOR
I love them
n, the show
same
RSING
ireat sense
aersonallty.
ell and her
ANS
UCATION
MAJOR
unique
iom In her
so stupid
o have a
ALTERNATIVE MUSIC.
ALTERNATIVE ENERGY.
ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE.
NOW THERE'S AN ALTERNATIVE
FOR A CAREER IN NURSING.
United States Air Force R0TC students who enter into a nursing career have advancement
opportunities typically not lound in the civilian world. In fact, from your first day on the job,
you'll have already advanced to a commissioned officer From there you'll be furthering your career
with valuable leadership skills, training and the chance to further your education. We even offer
qualified individuals the chance to earn scholarships worth up to $15,000 per academic year.
AFR0TC.COM � 1-866-tAFROTC
C AMPUS�POINTE
Community amenities
� spacious clubhouse with fitness center
� comfortable lounge with large flat
screen TV & Playstation
�game room with billiards, air hockey ft
foosbalt
� computer media center
� swimming pool with hot tub
� beach volleyball
�on ECU bus route
Apartment features:
�fully equipped kitchens
(i.e. dishwashers, microwave ft disposal)
� private bedrooms & private baths
� washer & dryer included
�high-speed internet access included
�cable TV included
�individual 10 and 12 month lease avail-
able
� all utilities included except phone setvice
'S5mo electricity allowance 2bd. apt.)
'(SI05mn Blaciricity allowance 3hd. apt.)
The way college life should
2 and 3 Bedroom Apartments
Visit our leasing office at
2230 NE Greenville Blvd.
252.758.6766
www.campus-pointe.com
campuspointe.ecuipickeringandco.com
Conveniently located near the
intersection of 10th and
Greenville Boulevard.
U





�.
PAGEB4
lit LAS1 CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
4-20-04
There arc some things money can't buy
yOUr health. Share it so other can live and grow.
Donating plasma is a safe and easy way to help others and
earn extra cash about150mo Everyone deserves a chance. -
i New donors earn $90 in the first 4 donations
DO Biologicals of Greenville
2727 E. 10th St 757-017
"Good Money for a Good Deed'
o
lilt
TWEXTX JMMXAR ft
University Terrace
3 Bedroom 3 Bath Condominiums
Pinnacle Property management of NC, INC.
104 D Wyndham Circlf FAX: 561-7881
Telephone: (252) 561 7679 (252) 531-9011
email: imnni i mi.mi � mpi i iim
Monthly Rent : $900
Security Deposit : $500
�Kitchen Appliances w
dishwasher and disposal
�Full size laundry room
with hookups
�Internet capability in
each bedroom
�On ECU Bus route
�5 blocks from ECU
� 1230 Sq. Eeet
� Large Closets
�Energy efficient
�Central Heat&AC
�Sorry, No pets allowed.
(i JIn�� ii hhiiiiu'iiIfnititniti.ii'duiiK ii-Jain ft
, v 7.
wl
Comfortable 1&2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Units
Free Water & Sewer � Economical Utilities � Refrigerator & Stove
Each Unit has a Patio or Balcony � WasherDryer Connections � Mini Blinds
Deadbolt Locks & Hall Closets � Dishwashers Available
Pets Allowed with Fee � Energy Efficient
Bike Racks � On ECU Bus Route
Wesley Commons
uOlltn. Apartment Community
Office Hours:
Mon-Fri
Sal
9am-5pm
9am-2pm
P� Property Management -106 Browrtea Dr, Suite A � Greenvie. NC 27858
252.758.1921 ext 30
BRASSWOOQ
AND
WHITEBRIDGE
APARTMENTS
Brand
New
Irasswood II
n
FREE HIGH SPEED WIRELESS INTERNET SERVICE
QUIET � PROMPT MAINTENANCE � SMALL PET WITH FEE
ALL NEW TENANTS WHO SIGN UP IN MARCH CAN
ENTER THE DRAWING TO WIN A NEW COMPUTER!
GREAT VALUE & GREAT SERVICE
LAW ENFORCEMENT DISCOUNTS
PHONE: 355-4499 � www.brasswood.com � brasswoodeearthlink.net
School of Music presents
Billy Taylor Jazz Festival
Second annual festival
helps celebrate
Jazz History Month
STEPHANIE BRINCEFIELO
STAFF WRITER
The Billy Taylor Festival is set
to celebrate Jazz History Month
April 22 - 24. This festival is in
honor of one of jazz's all time
greats, Billy Taylor.
A living jaz legend who grew
up in Greenville, Taylor has lent
his name to the festival because
of the strength of the jazz
studies program at ECU'S School
of Music.
"When I think Jazz, I think
Count Basie, Dizzy Gillespie,
Duke Ellington and Billy Taylor
said Michael Crane, director of
communication.
"He's the last living jazz
legend, and when he talks jazz,
he talks firsthand about the
people you hear performing on
the radio or learned about in jazz
history class
Since last year's performance,
Taylor has earned an honorary
doctorate from ECU when he
was the commencement speaker
last December.
"The Billy Taylor Festival
allows students to celebrate
America's true classical music.
You can't get this kind of quality
and these kinds of performances
anywhere else except from the
arts at ECU Crane said.
The second annual festival
includes concerts and clinics and
will feature Bob Mintzer and the
Yellow Jackets.
Mintzer has recorded II Big
Band CDs for the DMI' label
and been nominated for five
Grammy's. His talents include
performing as a tenor and
soprano saxophonist and
playing the flute and clarinet As
a composer, arranger and educa-
tor, Mintzer encompasses many
abilities that could label him a
musical genius. In 2002, Mintzer
won a Grammy tor the Bob Mint-
zer Big Band recording, "Homage
to Count Basie
The Yellow Jackets were
nominated this year for
contemporary jazz album of the
year due to their work on Ttme
Squared. Although they did not
win, they hold two previous
Grammies and over a dozen
nominations.
The Billy Taylor Festival will
offer many different opportuni-
ties for students to become aware
of jazz music and its history.
This writer can be contacted at
leatures@theeastcarolinian.com

Event Info
Thursday, April 22
4 p.m. - Workshop, Big Band
Critique with ECU Jazz Ensembles
A and B, Fletcher Recital Hall.
Free
8 p.m. - Concert 1: Jazz Bones,
Fletcher Recital Hall. Free
10 p.m. - IAJE Jam Session,
ECU combos at Glennon's In the
Greenville Hilton, set 1. Free
11:30 p.m. - IAJE Jam Session,
ECU combos at Glennon's In the
Greenville Hilton, set 2. Free
Friday, April 23
7 p.m. - Concert 2: ECU Jazz
Ensemble A with special guest
soloists In the Greenville Conven-
tion CenterHilton
Saturday, April 24
8 p.m. - Concert 3: 2004 Billy
Taylor Jazz Festival Gala Con-
cert (dinnershow) featuring
Bob Mintzer, Russell Ferrante
and Marcus Baylor (The Yellow
Jackets) Greenville Convention
CenterHilton Inn
Ticket Information: 1-800- ECU-
ARTS 1328-4788) or buy tickets
online. Prices $5 - $30. $5 for
students.
SELL THE
BOOKS.
WE'LL HANDLE
THE REST
Once finals are over, books are the last things you want to cart home. But your stereo,
CDs, clothes, computer, TV, microwave, kayak? Leave them to The UPS Store. We'll
carefully pack them and ship them home. Whether home's across the state, across the
nation, or across the ocean. There - who said you didn't learn anything this semester?
The UPS Store
Formerly Mail Boxes Etc.
(next to McAlister's)
740 SE Greenville Blvd.
252-321-6021
Jody Chaffee, Owner
Offering new low rates
direct from UPS
DO THE MATH AND SAVE OR NOT
Those "all Inclusive" Apts
$385-325 per monthperson
3 or 4 bedrooms
Roommate matchingjust like the
dorms
Computer room onsite
Fitness center
Utilities includedusually only a
limited allowance

Cable included
$357 average rental price
per person per month
Eastgate Village
$237.50 per person
2 bedroom apts.
YOU pick your roommmate
You probably already own a computer
Multi-millionrec. center on campus
paid for by your ECU tuition
energy efficient- average utility bill
is only $90 6 '

FREE cable as of 8104
282.50 average rental price
per person per month
Total savings1788 per year
Coming Soon! Free Cable &
Discounted Wireless Broadband
Office located at: 3200-F Moseley Drive call: 561 -RENT
Now leasing for Spring and Fall 2004





4-20-04
jnts
tS
Info
!2
�hop, Big Band
Jazz Ensembles
er Recital Hall
1: Jazz Bones,
lall. Free
Jam Session,
3lennon's In the
set 1. Free
E Jam Session,
3lenn6n's In the
set 2. Free
rt 2: ECU Jazz
i special guest
jenville Conven-
t 3: 2004 Billy
Jval Gala Con-
ow) featuring
issell Ferrante
lor (The Yellow
Hie Convention
n: 1-800- ECU-
or buy tickets
i - $30. $5 for
PAGE B5
4 20 04
r stereo,
i. We'll
cross the
jmester?
OT
jmputer
campus
r bill
SPORTS
RYAN DOWNEY
Sports Editor
TONY ZOPPO
Assistant Sports Editor
sports@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
ECU'S Beiton Rivers To Transfer
ECU sophomore Beiton Rivers has indicated he will leave the Pirate
basketball program, confirmed Head Coach Bill Hernon on Monday,
"Beiton has decided to leave and pursue other options said Herrion "We
wish him nothing but the best of luck Rivers, a 6-foot-1 guard from Atlanta,
Ga played in 53 games the last two seasons and averaged 8.4 points per
game during his two-year stint He led ECU in three-pointers made both
seasons. Rivers didn't indicate what school he will transfer to.
Sports Briefs
�NT
South Korea's soccer coach resigns
Humberto Coelho resigned Monday as South Korea's soccer coach
following a string of poor performances. The Portuguese-born Coelho
and the Korea Football Association agreed last week to end his contract
and he announced that decision Monday, association spokesman Song
Ki-ryong said. Coelho took over in March 2003 from Guus Hiddink, the
Dutchman who led South Korea's run to the 2002 World Cup semifinals
South Korean tans were angered by Asian Cup qualifying losses last year
to Vietnam and Oman, and the criticism mounted when the team tied the
Maldives in a World Cup qualifier on March 31.
Adu scores first professional goal
Freddy Adu's first professional goal didn't help DC United win The 14-
year old, who joined Major League Soccer this season, scored in the 75th
minute of Saturday's 3-2 loss to the MetroStars. Adu, the youngest player in
a major U.S. pro league in more than a century, did not start but replaced
Alecko Eskandarian in the 541h minute Adu thrilled the crowd of 31,149
when he sneaked behind two defenders to take a crossing pass from
Joshua Gros and knocked a sliding, left-footed shot past Jonny Walker.
Adu was surprised by the warm reception he received from the Giants
Stadium crowd Reserve forward Fabian Taylor scored two goals in a 13-
minute span of the second half for the MetroStars. Taylor, who joined the
MetroStarsJast month after playing four years in Jamaica, entered the game
after haiftime and outscored Adu In the 50th minute, MetroStars midfielder
Mark List made a cross from 25 yards out to Taylor, who first attempted a
header that was stopped with a diving save by Doug Warren. Taylor kicked
home the rebound, however, for an unassisted goal that tied the game at
1. Seven minutes later, the MetroStars went up 2-1 when John Wolyniec
headed home his second goal of the season. In the 63rd minute, 17-year-
old Eddie Gaven eluded two defenders to push the ball ahead to Taylor,
whose left-footed shot trickled past Warren for a 3-1 lead.
Urlacher and Bears won't exactly be Lovie-dovie
Chicago Bears middle linebacker Brian Urlacher expects his team to
employ a more aggressive defensive approach under new coach Lovie
Smith. Chicago's goal is to improve on an NFC-worst 20 forced turnovers
last season. Smith, the defensive coordinator for a St. Louis team that
finished with a league-high 46 lakeaways last season, has brought a new
style to Chicago, asking linemen and linebackers to move upfield faster.
Some of the team's practice rules have also changed The ball is always
live so players can get used to causing turnovers. A simple incomplete
pass during minicamp scrimmages results in what looks like a fumble
return. Also, defensive players constantly emphasize grabbing for the ball.
If a player drops a sure interception, he must do 10 push-ups. Urlacher,
who experienced that punishment after dropping one himself, is enjoying
his team's new philosophy.
Berlin solidifies role as Miami QB
Brock Berlin solidified his job as Miami's starting quarterback. The senior
completed 11 of 15 passes for 185 yards and threw a perfect 59-yard pass
down the sideline for a touchdown in Saturday's annual spring game.
Berlin, who transferred to Miami after spending two years at Florida, was
inconsistent in his first season as the replacement for Dorsey, a two-time
Heisman Trophy finalist He threw 17 interceptions, fumbled three times and
lost twice in November Berlin threw ust 12 touchdown passes and led
the offense to its second-lowest scoring average in two decades. He was
benched tor one game after losing to Virginia Tech and Tennessee.
Nebraska QB throws four TDs in spring game
Bill Callahan showed he's serious about overhauling Nebraska s offense
Joe Dailey had 16 passing attempts in the first quarter of the Cornhuskers'
Red-White intrasquad game Saturday in front of a spring game record crowd
of 61,417. Callahan's West Coast offense is quite a change for a team that
averaged 15 attempts per game last season. Dailey finished 29 of 49 tor
241 yards and a spring game-record four touchdowns in the Red squad's
35-6 victory. Callahan said Dailey made major strides in learning the offense
during the 15 spring practices Dailey hopes his spring performance carries
over to camp, when junior-college transfer Jordan Adams is expected to
challenge for the starter's job. Dailey and the first-string players on the
Red offense piled up 354 yards against a White defense that had only six
scholarship players. The Red defense was made up of first-unit players
going against a squad of offensive reserves The Reds went three plays and
out on the opening series, with Dailey throwing three incomplete passes.
Fans used to seeing the l-back run between tackles on first down cheered
when Dailey missed tight end Matt Herian on a deep pass on the first play.
Eleven Red receivers caught passes, led by Pilkington's six receptions for
61 yards. The Red squad passed on 49 of its 73 plays (67.1 percent).
Penn State suspends two DLs
Two Penn State football players have been suspended through the summer
for their involvement in a fight at the university's ice rink in February
Quarterback Michael Robinson, who needed 24 stitches after the fight,
will remain on the team. The involvement of defensive linemen Ed Johnson
and Matthew Rice was "more aggressive and potentially more harmful" than
Robinson during the fight, Penn State coach Joe Paterno said in a statement
released Friday. Paterno described Robinson's participation in the fight as
"disappointing" and said the quarterback would be on probationary status,
but remain on the team and be able to practice Rice started eight games
last season, finishing with 32 tackles and one sack. Johnson started three
games and had 26 tackles. No criminal charges have been filed in the fight,
and the university's Judicial Affairs office is investigating.
Pirates put up record numbers
Trevor Lawhorn and the Pirates batted .455 collectively against Cincinnati last weekend. The highest run output in a three-game
series before the 60 runs that ECU put up against the Bearcats was in Charlotte earlier this season (45 total runs).
ECU moves up to
No. 9 in national polls
BRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
The Pirate baseball team
picked up three more wins, and
yet another series sweep over
conference foe Cincinnati last
weekend. Just when you thought
the No. 14 ranked Pirate baseball
squad had maxect out on their
offensive potential with the
embarrassment they served up
to the 49ers of Charlotte two
weeks back, ECU put on another
air show as they rang up football
like scores winning 15-13, 32-14
and 13-7.
Try these numbers on for size:
60 runs, 65 hits and 15 home
runs. Numbers such as these
would normally reflect a solid
seven or eight game winning
streak, but rfct for these Pirates.
To them, itwas just another
three games of feasting on the
opponent's pitching.
Surprisingly enough, the
Pirates faced a significant deficit f
see BASEBALL page B6 ECU will travel to Raleigh t-his week to face NC State.

Baseball
Rk.TeamW-lW
1.Texas36-51
2.Stanford29-52
3.Rice30-73
4.Miami28-84
5.Long Beach State26-95
6.Mississippi31-68
7.Louisiana State28-107
8,Notre Dame30-59
9.ECU31-6IS
10South Carolina26-106
11.Southern Miss29-812
12.Wichita State23-711
13.Oklahoma25-1313
14.Auburn26-1216
15.Virginia32-723
16.UC Irvine23-1013
17.Texas ASM32-1113
18.Tulane26-1210
ill.Oral Roberts31-724
2ftArkansas25-1321
21.Tennessee29-917
22Nebraska26-919
23,Central Florida32-8NR
21Vanderbilt26-1022
25North Carolina27-1020
Dropped Out: Florida State (251
Lady Pirates win three games on road
ECU Softball 41-14-1
with weekend wins
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
STAFF WRITER
Coming off of a series loss to
South Florida, the Lady Pirates
looked to get back on track with
wins on the road. F.CU's softball
team traveled to Virginia to face
Liberty and James Madison in
two separate doubleheaders over
the weekend.
Although a sweep of both did
not take place, the Lady Pirates
did come out of the weekend with
three victories, improving their
overall record to 41-14-1.
ECU opened play on Satur-
day in game one of their double-
header against Liberty. The lead
changed hands three times in
the seventh inning contest with
Liberty coming out on top 6-5
despite a valiant effort by ECU.
The Lady Pirates did not stay
down for long as the team was
able to rebound from their previ-
ous loss by defeating Liberty in
the second game, 17-11.
ECU'S sophomore catcher
Kristajessup led the team in hit-
ting, going 5-for-S at the plate.
Lady Pirates' pitcher Brently
Bridgeforlh improved her record
to 15-4 with the victory.
On Sunday, ECU added two
more wins lo their record as they
swept James Madison in a double-
header, 3-1 and l-O. g
ECU'S freshman pitcher Keli g
Harrell pitched a complete game �
and improved her record to 12-4 g
as the Lady Pirates defeated JMU
in the first game.
The spotlight of the second
JMU game went to ECU's junior
pitcher Maggie Lingo, who
pitched a complete game and
no-hitter. Lingo had no strike-
outs and walked two in her 14th
win this season.
The Lady Pirates broke the 40-win mark last weekend.
This week, ECU will try to
add on to their three-game win-
ning streak with a victory over
in-state rival North Carolina.
The Lady Pirates will open
play this Wednesday in Chapel
Hill at 3 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at
sporti@theeastcarolinian.com.
Sura's quest for
piece of NBA
history denied
Triple-double stripped
from Atlanta player
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Rob Sura and the Atlanta
Hawks had a commanding
lead over the New Jersey Nets
129-107 with just seconds
remaining on Monday, April
12. Although this blowout
victory was a story in itself,
it was not the one that made
headlines that evening.
Coming into the game
with the Nets, Sura had
already notched back-to-back
triple-doubles, a feat rarely
accomplished by any one
player more than once or
twice a season. It has been
seven years since anyone had
back-to-back-to-back triple-
doubles. On this wild Monday
night, however, the streak
almost ended. .
The Florida State grad
see SURA page B6
ECU'S Willis receives WNBA tryout
Former ECU women's basketball standout Court-
ney Willis has been invited to participate in the 2004
Los Angeles Sparks Invitational Tryouts on April 19
- 20 inside Cersten Pavilion.
Willis, a native of Fayelteville, N.C will
participate in a two-day tryout at Loyola
Marymount University in hopes of landing a spot
on the two-time WNliA Champions roster.
As a senior, the 6-2 center, led the Lady Pirates
to back-to-back Conference USA Tournament
appearances and became the first Lady Pirate in
school history to earn first-team All C-USA honors.
She averaged 18.6 points and 10.0 rebounds a
contest, and recorded 14 double-doubles on her way
to becoming the 18th Lady Pirate to record 1,000
points in a career.
Willis scored 1,374 career points in 102 career
games and collected 22 career double-doubles,
67 double digit point games, and 22 double digit
rebound games. She sits fifth all-time on the Lady
Pirates' career scoring charts, ranks ninth in career
scoring average (13.5), and fourth In career field goal
accuracy (.512).
"I am very excited for the opportunity that
Courtney has to be invited to several WNBA camps
and especially with LA said ECU Head women's
basketball Coach Sharon Baldwin-lener.
"It is a great reflection on the quality ot players
in C-USA and a great example how our program is jj
improving and starting to gel some respect through-1
out the country. I am very happy for Courtney and it J.
is a tribute to how much she has improved and how g.
hard she has worked in the last couple of years
The Los Angeles Sparks will begin the 2004
season on May 22 when they travel lo Seattle,
Washington to take on the Storm.
Willis was outstanding for the
scoring more than 18 points
ECU last season,
per game.





PA(, B6
I HE LAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
420-04
Six players receive basketball honors
Six players took home six
team awards at the 2004 ECU
lldskethall Awards llanquet at
the Murphy Center on Sunday-
night.
Sen lot Derrick Wiley was
named the Pirates' Most Valu-
ahle Player. Wile) led ECU In
scoring for a second consecutive
season, averaging 14.H points per
game, and ranked among the
c iinference USA leaders in both
scoring and rebounding. As a
senior, Wiley led ECU in scoring
16 times, scored 20 points in a
game seven times, and registered
five double-doubles I In I ictin
sive Player of the Award went to
junior Moussa Badiane. Il.uli.ini'
broke his own icbool tingle
Misnn KCOrd tor bkx ks bj swat-
ling 92 shots tins past season,
besting his previous mark of 87,
which he set as a freshman. He
completed his third season with
239 career blocks to become just
the fourth player in CUSA his-
tory to amass over 2oo career
rejections.
The Spirit Hustle Award was
green to senior I rrovl King. King
led the Pirates in rebounding
lor a fourth consecutive season,
averaging 8.3 rebounds per game
throughout his career, lie is one
of 12 players in school hlstorj
to record over 1,000 points and
.soo rebounds during bis career
and ended his career as the
school's second all-time lead-
ing refoounder with 937 career
boards.
All three of I U's freshman
were recognized with an award.
The Most unproved Player Award
werri to Frank Robinson, who
made all 10 ol bis starts during
the season during the final II
games. Japlict Mi Neil was given
the Doug and Linda liyrd Sixth
Man Award after leading II I m
assists (97) and steals 116). Mike
C ook also received his (USA
All-Freshman team award.
Senior Gabriel Mikulas, an
honor roll student, was also rec-
ognised for having the team's
highest grade point average and
will receive- bis degree in May.
Despite suffering a career
ending injury in practice on
January 14, he holds the El U
career record lor free throws
made (381) and ranks 16th on
the school's career scoring list
with 1,086 points.
Three seniors and three freshman received awards for ECU.
Report news students need to know, qq
Accepting applications lor STAFF WRITERS
Learn investigative reporting skills
Must have at least a 2.0 GPA P
Appry at ou o�ce kxattd on the 2nd Door of me Student Pubttcaoons Budding, w cafl 328-6366.
Students, it suss here:
I Two ways to always have money
' 1.Donate Plasma
I 2.Never spend any
II Mutino M.i-ni is (n cas va thai
ltiouafHKii -iluJcnlv earn cUra nhHR-
I.iikI help aWWfiVW
$Ncash total in the lit .i tour dtmumxiv
. I -llli tip U) SI' It .Hill tJolMllllL I'l.tMM.i
I rcyulurty Call Ml
IK I WUt0Hk
2'27 .lOihMivct 7S7 0171
Prelvnant?
Call 757-0003 or
1-800-395-HELP
Alt services are free of charge
Carolina Pregnancy Center
WF $�A Member of Care Net Offering
� FlS Pirxtuincy tests
� titfurnuiliim on tntr choices
Lim. k� ('onfideittial preRiujilcy counseling
� PnpKmty support services
limited Medical Services
t -SariflH45 Johns Hopkins 1 )i Suite It
(Across from Slanton Square 1
www.rarolinaprrgruinc.vcenter.or(!
Greenville's Best Pizza Since 1991
?
siKi:t:r
pizzi:m
I, � I I � V I I l I H C
SPECIALS
Mon SI.00 Domestic Bottles
Tues Mug Nile
Wed SI.00 Domestic Bottles
S2.00 Import Bottles
$1.50 11use Highballs
Hun S2.00 Import Bottles
Now serving
Late Nite Breakfast
Tue-Sai lam-4am
ol 5th I
AAA
SECURITY SELF STORAGE
Student
10th St
Special
5" HWY33
AAA
East on 10th St
3 5 Miles past
Greenville Blvd. on left
fi v-5-i Fi10th StHighway 33 Greenville
252-752-BOLl (2654)
Computer
Headaches?
it
Intrex has a full line-up
of high performance
customized desktop
computers t Notebooks
Intrex has
your fix.

Repairs. Upgrades,
Networking. Internet:
your complete
computer solution1

Hundreds of Parts in Stock
motherboards, CPUs, drives,
modems, mice, video, sound
cards, networking supplies.
cases, multimedia, speakers.
cables, adapters A much more!
local service Custom Systems
Repans Parts Upgrades Internet
3160-D Evans Road
Lynncroft Shopping Center
next to BEST BUY
(252) 321-1200
INTR�X
Computers Mode Simple
Ato op�v � HaJtV Cry, Chsfm
fri buurmst unc� l MS'
www.intrex.com
War up, Chill out"
Afeartu Sandwiches!
�eliciou Scups!
freshlu "Tossed Salads!
�ypr�ssc �rinWs!
Sails, r�reas w-
fastri
nes!
516 Greenville Blvd. SE
pho� - 317-8787
F� - 317-8786
MonThurs 6;30AM-9PM
FriSat 6:30am-10pm
Sunday 7:30M-9fM
free JSael 11 Save 31.00
With Hiirlwvcif
in BspnssoDdnfc
If Drink, or
Hot Chocolate
gfj
I Vll.lllr I1
On any
Sandwich.
Salad or
"You Pick Two'
�t) ; J Vil�l i t.icviiulk Kwcii Hunl �ni.fi�h
� ; VaM Sanaa 40MM
KPRESSJ0HS
ROMANCING YOUR ADDICTIONS
TOBACCO ACCESSORIES � ADULT NOVELTIES
EXOTIC CIGARETTES � T-SHIRTS
DANCEWEAR LINGERIE
Rolling Papers � Glass Pipes � Loose Tobacco
Stickers � Blow-up Friends & Farm Animals � Incense
Body Piercing & Jewelry � Detox Solutions � Candles
Hair Dye � Adult Videos � Black Lights
Whipcream � Gag Gifts
and a Bunch of Other Cool Stuff
Big 420 Sale!
April 20
20 OFFEVERYTHING!
y�
205 E. 5th Street
GREENVILLE
(252) 758-6685
www.smiledamnit.com
www.partytikehell.com
GRILL
500 E. 10th St. � 830-9333
Wing Platter
8 wings, French Fries, Celery Sticks,
Blue Cheese or Ranch Dressing
$3.99
10 Student Discount
with your ECU ID
OPEN LATE
Open until 2:30om Sun-Wed Open until 3:3Qqm Thur-Sot
Serving the ECU community since 1993 -
w
Jouvikfiruvetk
3Farmviffc .
tJWood festival J
CITV HOTEL WITNrt7
A BISTRO
QNCNG
�'Progress Energy
Thursday. April 22nd
Michael's Amusements on Ihe Midway - One Price Ride Night 5:00PM -11:00PM
Buy a $12 00 wristband and tide all the rides as often as you like.
FHEE Gospel Concert m the Gazebo 6:00PM - 9:00PM
Friday. April 23ti
Food Concessions on and around Town Commons 12 OONoon � 9:00PM
Arts 8 Crafts and Commercial Vendors around Town Common 3:00PM � 9:00 PM
Michaels Amusements 3:00 PM � 11 00PM
Opening Ceremonies m the Gazebo 5.30PM with WITNs Amanda Ross
FREE Concert - Victor Hudson � in Ihe Gazebo 6:30PM
Saturday. April 24th
Food Concessions, Arts S Crafts and Commercial Vendors 9:00AM � 9 00PM
FREE Classic Car Show 10:00AM � 4:00PM
FREE Entertainment m the Gazebo 10.30AM � 6.30PM
FREE Kids CoolFest � Activities. Pony Rides 11:00AM � 5 00PM
Michaels Amusements on the Midway 11 00AM -11:00PM
"Dogwood Blues" Bluet, Ribs & Brews
Gates 6:30PM, Music 7:00PM
Featuring: Nappy Brown with Skeeter
Brandon, Armand ft Bluesology,
Randy Friel & the Horns.
sfo.oo Admlnktn ays 12a up.
,&. FREE Fireworks by the world renowned Zambelli
w Fireworks International 9 00PM at the concert venue
Sunday. Aprii 25'h
Food concessions, Arts, & Cralts and Commercial Vendors 1:00PM - 5 00PM
FREE Kk) s Cooflesl - Activities. Pony Rides 1 00PM � 5:00PM
Michaels Amusements on the Midway 1:00PM � 5.00PM
'Sunday Afternoon Beach Music Festival
Gates 12:30PM, Music 1:00PM
Featuring: General Johnson
& The Chairmen of the Board
With their guests The Coastline Band and
The Main Event
510 00 tdmlulon agu 12 8, up
� No any, loot. SSMSJBS coohn a PxkpKkt ptrmlttM In �� conewt nnut
Food ma b�mw (including Mtft Bnnan) .��( ,�� m, �,�, � RMKnMf Cw,






4 20 04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
To wait or not to wait, that is the question
University Suites Apartments
New Student Community
Now leasing for fall 2004!
Why Settle for
-0�l�-L
.��� ill 3SF1
HA1.LQNY
Third Floor Plan
A
v
o
"1 Oilitl
II 41U10
i u '��-��
I ivisn: ROOM
Second Floor Plan
limited patio
space when
you can have
spacious
indoor and
outdoor living!
� Townhome Style-
No one above or below you
� 3 bedroombath
� Maximum Privacy-
Only one bedroom per floor!
� Parking at your front door
� Extra large brick patio
� FREE Tanning, Pool, Clubhouse
� Unlike anything else!
� Close to campus
�Ar-
Stop by today and see how
University Suites offers you more!
University Suites � 551-3800
(KIU) � An NFI. career is the reward for college
greatness. Hut when's the best time to cash in?
Does a blue-chip prospect wait until his
eligibility expires and possibly risk injury that
could crash his draft stock? Or does he leave after
his junior season and start cashing checks instead
of attending class?
Several All-Americas decided to leave early for
the 2004 draft, including Arkansas offensive tackle
Shawn Andrews, Pitt wide receiver l.arry Fitzgerald
and Southern CaJ pass rusher Kenechi Udee. All
project as first-round draft picks.
Smart decisions, right?
When faced with the same decisions a year
ago, another offensive tackle (Robert Gallery of
Iowa), wide receiver (Roy Williams of Texas) and
pass rusher (Will Smith of Ohio State) elected to
stay in school.
All projected as first-rounders then. Hut by
staying, all improved their draft stock. Gallery and
Williams rank among the top five players in this
draft, and Smith is a top-rated pass rusher.
Ole Miss quarterback Kli Manning also elected
to stay in school in 2003. He would have been
another first-round pick last April.
But by slaying on campus, Manning has taken
a quantum leap up Ihe board, lie projects as the
first pick of the 2004 draft, which would place him
in a select fraternity that doesn't even include his
brother I'eyton, who went second overall lo the
Indianapolis Colts in the 1998 draft.
Playing a senior season allowed lli to throw 441
more passes in his college career. That gave him 441
more exposures to coverages and blites. Experi-
ence makes a quarterback great and Manning is a
Smith is projected as a top pick this weekend.
step closer to. greatness now than if he had come
out after the 2002 season.
"I didn't play as well as I wanted my junior
year Manning explained. "We struggled as a team,
and there were a lot of things 1 wanted to improve
on in my game.
"I also wanted to experience a senior season,
be a captain, leave with the guys I came in with,
and try to end on a good note. We did, having
a 10-win season, going to (he Cotton Rowl and
winning. I definitely made the right decision not
coming out
Manning also used bis senior year to
establish himself as the greatest quarterback in
school history Those 441 extra passes allowed him
to become just the fifth quarterback In SEC history
to throw for 10,000 yards. He left Mississippi with
45 school records.
Located at the corner ot Arlington Blvd. and Evans Street -
behind the Amoco Gas Station � www.universitysuitcs.net
Attention ECU Students!
Would you like to earn $7,700 for completing 900 Service hours?
ECU Project HEART currently has
positions open for students and you
are encouraged to apply.
Project HEART Members tutor at-risk
teens in eastern North Carolina.
Members receive a stipend off $5,398.
Members who complete their
service contract are eligible for
a $2,363 Education Award.
Influence the future with Project HEART
Contact: Dr. Betty G. Baacham, Director
AmeriCorps Recruitment Office
209 E. 3rd Street, Bldg. 165, Room 104A Greenville, NC 27858
Telephone: 328-4357 Email: beachamb@mail.ecu.edu
Going Home For The SummerP
lei us
store your
sniff for
1-888-776-PODS
www.PODS uM.com
If you are going to
be living somewhere
else we will bring
your POO to your new
address. Don t make
exam time more
stressful - let us take
the headache out of
moving. We come to
you. Call us today at
688-776-PODS
I)





PAGEB8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
4-20-04
Baseball
from page B5
Sura
from page B5
in each of the three games start-
ing with game one. In whkh
the Pirates had to fight back on
numerous occasions.
Facing a struggling Cincin-
nati club, the Pirates put up
three early runs and it looked
as if they had already set the
tone for the series. However,
the Bearcats made some noise
of their own as they chased ECU
starter Creg Bunn after a nine-
run fourth that gave Cincinnati
a sieahle lead. Bunn, who was an
unblemished 6-0 heading into
game one, was roughed up for
eight runs off of 10 hits in only
.1.1 innings of work, and was in
Ksition to lose his first decision
of the year.
"We just couldn't get an out
said Head Coach Randy Mazey.
"It seemed like everything
they did that inning went their
way. They would try to bunt and
would bunt it over our pitcher's
head. Or they'd hit a grounder
and it would bounce off our
pitcher
The Pirates clawed back in
the top of the fifth with three
runs to cut the deficit to three,
highlighted by Trevor Lawhorn's
three-run homer, his 17th of the
season.
ECU's new found momentum
quickly switched sides again as
the Bearcats got all three of those
runs back plus one in theirhalves
of the fifth and sixth innings to
give them a 13-6 lead with only
nine outs to pull off the improb-
able upset.
The Pirates took a chunk out
of the Bearcat advantage with
three more runs in the top of
the seventh off of a Ryan Nor-
wood two run homer and a John
Poppert RBI single up the middle,
inching to within 13-9.
After Cincy went down in
order in the home half of the
seventh, ECU scored again
when Ryan Jones sent his 12th
homerun of the season over the
center field wall to make the score
13-10.
When the top of the ninth
rolled around, the Pirates needed
three runs to at least give them-
selves a chance to play extra
innings. Darryl Iawhorn doubled
to begin the inning, but after two
straight groundouts, ECU's nine-
g.ime winning streak was in seri-
ous jeopardy.
Brett Lindgren's first plate
appearance of the game was
a good one, as he singled in
Lawhorn, bringing Jamie Paige
- who represented the tying run
- to the plate. After Paige singled
and put runners on first and
second, Jones slapped a two-run
double down the left field line,
knotting the score at 13-13. The
Pirates tacked on two more in
the ninth and held on to win
the wild contest 15-13.
"A game like that shows the
character of your team said
Maey.
"We were down 13-6 at one
time, but I don't think there was
anyone in the dugout that had
any doubts about whether we'd
come back
T. l.awhorn led the way at
the plate for the Pirates, homer-
ing twice and going 3-for-5 with
five RBIs and four runs scored.
Jones was 3-for-6 with three RHIs
and three runs scored. �
In game two, Cincinnati
proved that the way they roughed
up Bunn in game one was no
fluke as they poured on six
first-inning runs against Brody
Taylor, putting the Pirates in yet
another hole.
Unfortunately for the
Bearcats, the lirst inning would
be Hie only time the Pirates
would be held scoreless for the
rest of the game as they piled on a
team and Conference USA record
32 runs in the last eight innings
of the contest. ECU won going
away 32-14. The Pirates also had
an RBI for every run scored in the
contest, which is another team
and C-USA record. ECU also set
some team school records for at
bats (58) and hits (34).
Jamie Paige's individual
onslaught at the plate with seven
hits and four doubles was good
for two team and C-USA records
for hits and doubles in a single
game. The senior outfielder also
posted five RBIs and four runs
scored.
Billy Richardson, who has
taken heat from critics about his
ability to produce in the line-up,
had a breakout day with six hits,
six RBIs and four runs scored.
One of the hits happened to
be Richardson's first home run
of tne season, a two-run job to
right-center field.
Other Pirate players had
great performances as well. Ryan
Jones was 3-for-5 with a pair of
homers, six RBIs and four runs
scored. Mark Minicozzi was a
perfect 4-for-4 on the day with
a school record five runs scored
and an RBI.
John Poppert was 4-for-6
with a home run, an RBI and
four runs scored. Brian Cavana-
ugh homered for the first time
this season and was 2-for-2 at
the plate with two RBIs and two
runs scored. Mike Grace also
homered for the third time this
season.
"I know we're swinging the
bats real well right now, but you
can't anticipate a day like that
said Mazey.
"I think It was just a combi-
nation of things. We're swinging
the bats good, and we got into
their bullpen, which is not their
strength. Plus, the wind was
blowing out. It's beyond com-
prehension
Game three finally looked
like the game where the Bearcats
would steal one from the Pirates
as they rode a 3-1 lead and the
arm of junk pitcher Aaron Moll
into the fifth. The buck stopped
there as the Pirates put the
finishing touches on the series
with an eight run inning that
included three two-run home
runs, leading to a 13-7 victory.
With two outs in the inning,
T. l.awhorn doubled clown the
left field line, plating Poppert
and Richardson, who both had
reached on hits. Drew Costanzo,
the very next batter, homered
to right field. After a single by
Norwood, Darryl, T. Lawhorn's
other half, blasted a two-run
shot to right.
Moll, who had silenced the
potent Pirate bats from game
one and two, surrendered one
more two-run bomb when John
Poppert homered to left-center,
bringing home himself and
Minicozzi, who had been walked.
When the dust finally cleared,
the score was 9-3 in favor of the
Pirates, who had rallied in a big
way once again.
T. Lawhorn led the way once
again for the Pirates as he went
2-for-4 with his 18th home run
of the season to go along with
five RBIs and two runs scored.
Ryan Jones also homered in the
contest, his 15th of the year.
The Pirates improve to 31-6
overall and 12-3 in C-USA on the
season. Southern Miss stumbled
in the series finale against Mem-
phis, which allowed ECU to move
into a tie for first place in the C-
USA standings after completing
the sweep of Cincinnati.
The Pirates hit the road again
on Wednesday for a 7 p.m. game
with in-state rival NC State.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
dished out 11 assists to go along
with his 22 points against the
Nets. Sura also boarded nine
rebounds and with just seconds
remaining, he saw his oppor-
tunity to jump into the record
books.
He took that opportunity.
Sura, encouraged by his team-
mates, purposely missed a lay-up
and grabbed his own rebound,
securing his tenth on the nigh!
and locking down his place in
NBA history, right?
Wrong. Less than 24 hours
later, the league office ruled that
Sura's field goal attempt was an
intentional miss and did not
reward him with the field goal
attempt in his stat sheet. I here-
fore, with no field goal attempt,
there can be no relwund.
This is where the problems
lie witn me.
Understanding that a field
goal attempt and a free throw
attempt are different, I tried to
take a look at this situation from
the league's perspective. II did not
take long before I was appalled at
the decision. How can the NBA
input a rule in some areas of the
game and not others?
When a player stands at the
free throw line and purposely
misses a free throw so that the
other team does not have chance
to hurry the ball up the court for
the final shot, what do you call
that? What do you call that, NBA
league office?
Do you wipe away the free
throw attempt by the player
because the player did not make
an attempt to score the ball? Does
that also take away the rebound
from the player that grabbed the
board?
If the NBA wants to start
making judgment calls on one
part of the game, they need to
start making judgment calls on
all parts of the game.
Let's put this in perspective
using other sports as well. For
us football fans out there, we all
know that when Michael Strahan
had his chance to set the single-
season sack record in 2002, Brett
Favre did a miserable job of acting
as if Strahan actually sacked him
to the ground.
Favre practically laid on the
ground and waited for Strahan to
touch him and break the record.
No judgment calls there from
the NFL and he sits alone in the
record books.
What about when a quarter-
back intentionally knees the ball?
He is not making an attempt at
making some sort of play for posi-
tive yards, so why should the NFL
allow that to hapcn? They allow
it to happen because it is part of
the game.
Should an intentional walk in
baseball not be counted after all
because the pitcher did not make
an attempt to get the batter out?
Why doesn't the major league
look into this? It is part of the
game, that's why.
I here are loo many situa-
tions in the sports world were
intentional instances take place.
Players intentionally do things
during game's to make the oppo-
sition angry with them. Pitchers
intentionally throw at batters to
back them off of the plate.
What about the intentional
foul in basketball? One player
louls another player with the
"Intent" of possibly hurting that
player. Should we start making
judgment calls on all ol this?
The answer is no because if each
league took it upon themselves
to evaluate situations like this
daily, it would turn the sports
world upside down until we had
no sports world.
Hob Sura intentionally took
his shot at the record books.
For those of you who think
what the NBA did was right,
ask yourself this: If I was in
Sura's position and was being
c'Kgcd on by my teammates,
would I have done it?
Maybe by some chance your
answer was no. Think about
something that means a lot to
you and would mean a lot to
you it you were to accomplish it,
then tell yourself that you would
not do something as simple as
what Bob Sura did to acquire
this goal.
Bob Sura took his chance at
something that really meant a lot
to him in an attempt to fulfill his
noal of entering the NBA record
books.
Sura said he had no intention
to make a mockery of the sport
and to take any attention away
from the win over the Nets and
apologized for the action if it
offended anybody.
The NBA needs to apologize
to Sura. He did what most all of
us would have done put in the
same situation.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Si. James United Methodist Church
SPRING FLING
CICANTIC8SO
FAMILY YARD SALE
Saturday, April 24th, 2004
2000 East Sixth Street
RAIN OR SHINE
� Good Food �
Inexpensive Furniture
Cheap Clothes �
I HI- FUN BfcGINS AT 5:30 AM WBREAKFAST
YARD SALE 6:30 A.M.
BAKE SALE AND BAZAAR 8:00 A.M.
BAR B Q CHICKEN LUNCH 11:00 A.M. TILL 1:00 P.M
LIVE AUCTION s:oo-UNTIL, DINNER AVAILABLE!
imilyl 1 fun filled day of bargain hunting toi "� - lumitui
. 'i mo't Din I forget I I ungry I o1
� ' 4foi directors 01 .
$10 Discount
for Summer
Storage
KASTGATE MINI STORAGE
3201 Moseley Dr. (Off E. 10th Street)
752-6900
CAROLINA MINI STORAGE
.1275 1-andmark St.
(Behind City Bistro)
355-3000
solving today's and
tomorrow's medical mysteries
Does finding solutions to problems Intrigue you?
Do you wish to help save lives?
Do you desire guaranteed employment opportunities?
Do you like biology and chemistry and laboratory work?
If so, CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE is the career for you! Join
over one half million laboratory practitioners in the US who are
proud of their many roles In healthcare, research and industry.
m
School of Allied Health Sciences
Dept. of Clinical Laboratory Science
Belk Building, Room 308
252.328.4426
www.ecu.educlsc
Celebrating National Medical Laboratory Week
April 18-24, 2004
onajyearrease iirWay & get one month FREE!
Newly Remodeled Kitchens & Bathrooms!
Free Cable! Located near Campus & Downtown!


Title
The East Carolinian, April 20, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 20, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1729
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy