The East Carolinian, March 2, 2004






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 79 Number 123
TUESDAY
March 2, 2004
Snow showers catch students by surprise
ECU students head through campus using their hoods and umbrellas to protect them from the
afternoon snow storm that hit Greenville last Thursday.
Meryl Gwinn, freshman health major, began class at 8 a.m. Thursday morning when the sun was still shining. Gwinn found herself stuck in the middle of a snow storm, still in her sandals by
early afternoon. This was the case for many ECU students, who were seen braving the cokl in shorts, sweatshirts and sandals.
Filing for SGA executive Students' diet a concern in March
office lasts until Friday
Elections will take
place later this month
JOSH SLONE
STAFF WRITER
Each year, ECU students are
given the opportunity to run
for student body president, vice
president,
secretary
and trea-
i surer.
Yester-
day, SGA
began accepting applications
from students who want to
run for an executive office in
2004.
SGA will accept applica-
tions from qualified students
until Friday, March 5 at S p.m.
Filing began in mid-February
last year but has been scheduled for
later this year to allow the SGA and
candidates more time to prepare.
In order to run for student
body president, vice president or
treasurer, applicants must be full-
time students who have success-
fully completed at least 48 credit
hours, haave attended ECU for at
least two consecutive semesters
and are currently in good stand-
ing, with at least a 2.0 Gl'A.
To qualify for student body
secretary, the applicant must
be a full-time student who has
successfully completed 16 credit
hours and is in good standing
with at least a2.0GPA.
Phis year, SGA hopes to
receive more applications than
usual to give students a larger
candidate selection.
"Each year, we usually receive
about 15 or so applicants said
Krista Wilhelm, SGA executive
administrative assistant.
On Monday, March 8, the SGA
will hold a Compulsory Meeting
in 221 Mendenhall at 8 p.m.
where all candidates and tickets
will be announced. Following
the meeting, election campaign-
ing will open up to give all can-
didates an equal opportunity to
begin their campaigning.
Running on a ticket com-
bined with other students tends
to be beneficial.
"You already know the people
that you are running with and
you have all four executive posi-
tions covered and don't have to
worry about being with people
that you don't know said Stefanie
Swaney, SGA chairperson of the
Rules and Judiciary Committee.
Funding isalsoeasier with four
people as a whole, said Swaney.
SG A members said they hope for
a much larger voter response from
students than in previous years.
According to Wilhelm, only
15 percent of the ECU student
body voted last spring.
"Last year was the largest
voter turnout we've ever had
Wilhelm said.
Wilhelm said she believes
the reason for this is because last
year was also the first year online
voting was used.
Voting will be held on March
Nutrition month events
encourage students to
"Eat Smart, Stay Healthy"
Shannon O'Donnell, senior
political science major, files
for executive office Monday.
f) Filing Info
For more Information, contact
the SGA office at 328-4726.
If you would like to fill out an
application for an executive
office, stop by the SGA office
In 255 Mendenhall.
:K)and 31 from 9 a.m5 p.m. and
will take place online again. Every
student is encouraged to vote.
SGA's job is to serve the stu-
dent body so students should
definitely vote for those who will
be serving them Wilhelm said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
ZACK HILL
STAFF WRITER
The average diet for most col -
lege students consists of leftover
pizza, Ramen noodles and maca-
roni and cheese.
During March, the Ameri-
can Dietetic Association and
F.CU's Healthy Lifestyles Team
I will provide events to improve
� students' knowledge about their
nutrition and encourage them to
develop a healthier diet.
The theme for this year's
i National Nutrition Month is "Eat
Smart, Stay Healthy Although
this seems like simple advice, it
proves to be a hard mantra for
most college students to follow.
"College is one of the most
challenging times to eat well
said Karen Warren, director of
Wellness Education.
Students usually lack the
money and time to buy and
prepare foods that constitute a
healthy diet. A little planning
can go a long way in allowing
a student to eat healthily and
inexpensively, Warren said.
Students should make a list of
meal ideas at the beginning of the
week, then go shopping to get the
foods they will need, instead of
spending $S for a fast food meal
every day.
Warren said although the
planning and the trip to the
grocery store may take more
time, the net benefit would be a
healthier diet and more money
0
Nutrition Events
March 1-8
Body Image and Eating Disorders
Week will run March 1-6. Body
Image Art Displays will be shown
at Mendenhall Student Center,
and several presentations on
healthy body images will take
place.
March 3 An "All Foods Fit Dinner
will be served from 4:30 p.m.
- 8 pin. in Todd and Mendenhall
Dining Halls.
Karen Warren, director of Well-
ness Education, will present
"When Your Eating Gets Out of
Whack: Finding Normal Warren
will discuss how students can
still maintain a regular and
healthy diet In college.
March 4 From 11 am. - 2 p.m,
Todd and Mendenhall Dining
Halls will be serving exotic fruits
and smoothies. Students can
come by and try fruit they may
not nonnally eat for free and reg-
ister to win prizes.
March 9 ECU will celebrate
"Breakfast for Champions Day
Healthy breakfast foods will be
saved.
She also said students may
want to incorporate a wider
variety of foods into their diet.
Not only will this provide a
wider range of essential nutri-
ents, it may also prevent students
from becoming bored with their
meals.
Robin High, nutrition direc-
tor for Aramark Food Services,
served In the dining halls.
There will be free diabetes
education and screenings
offered at Mendenhall Student
Center and Wright Plaza.
March 10 Robin High, nutrition
director for Aramark Food Ser-
vices, will make a presentation
concerning eating on a budget
at 5:30 p.m. In Student Health
Services. No registration Is nec-
essary.
March 12 Students can stop
by the Multi-purpose room
downstairs In Mendenhall from
11:30 am-1:30 p.m. to try
some All Foods Fit International
Recipes.
March 31 For students
interested In preparing their
own healthy meals, chefs will
be on-hand at Todd and
Mendenhall Dining Halls
beginning at 4:30 p.m. to
give cooking demonstrations.
Healthy foods will be served
at the dining halls. Students
can also play Nutrition Jeopardy
and win prizes.
said students should make sure
to start off the day with a healthy
breakfast.
High said many college
students often overlook eating
breakfast, but a good breakfast
helps improve concentration
and boosts energy.
The fatigue many students
see NUTRITION page A2
Nutrition Awareness
throughout March
-O National Nutrition Month was started in 1973 as National Nutrition Week. Ft was extended to a month in 1980.
-O The average American drinks 50 gallons of soft drinks a year.
Forecast tec required
READING
Partly Cloudy
High of 76
Visit wwwtheeastcaroliiilaricom to read
more about the last minute rales tor
votes before Super Tuesday.
page A2
The Math Department hek) a lecture that
helped students discover what a math
degree could do for them.
Features
page 81
The Academy Awards are a time tor the
stars to shine TEC takes a look at the
evening's fashion winners and losers.
Sports p$e Be
The Diamond Pirates were the big
wtnners of the Keftti Leclair invitational,
gMng them four consecutive wins
Dotft target to stop into Dowdy
Student Stores fwlree birthday
cake from 11 am -1 pm in
honor of children's author Dr.
Sobs' 100th birthday.





PAGE A2
3-2-04
NEWS
ERIN RICKERT
News Editor
HOLLY O'NEAL
Assistant News Editor
news@theeastcarolinian.com
" 252.328.6366
Announcements
Coffee and Careers
Career Services offers a professional correspondence workshop today
from 8:30 am - 9:15 am in the Student Professional Development
Office
Information Location Workshop
Joyner Library's Government Documents and Microforms Department
will offer the third and final workshop in collecting government
information today from 2 pm - 245 pm in 1021 Joyner.
The workshop focuses on federal bills, laws and regulations and is open
to the ECU community with no advance registration required
Honorary Lecture
T. A. Shippey, professor of English at Saint Louis University will speak on
Tolkien. Wagner and the rediscovery of the north tonight at 7:30 p.m. in
Bate 1032 The lecture will honor distinguished professor C W Sullivan
III. and a reception will Immediately follow.
Dr. Seuss Celebration
In honor of children's author Dr Seuss 100th birthday. Dowdy Student
Stores will have free birthday cake today from 11 am. - 1 pm. in the
Tradebooks Department
Coffee and Careers
Career Services offers an interview workshop Wednesday from
830 a m. - 9:15 am in the Student Professional Development Office
Sophomore Survey
Students who have completed 45-60 credit hours, 30 from ECU,
must take the Sophomore Survey before pre-registering for summer
or fall 2004 semesters
The survey will be available on OneStop beginning Wednesday
Information Technology Seminar
John Mullen, vice president of sales for Dell's higher education sector
will speak on the impact of emerging technology on education
Wednesday from 2 p m. - 3 p m in 221 Mendenhall
Deadline
The deadline for early registration for graduate student research
is Wednesday Contact Katrina Searcey, graduate programs
coordinator, at 744-2808 for more information.
SGA Officer Filing
Filing for Student Government Association 2004-05 president,
vice president, treasurer and secretary continues through Friday
Forms are available inside Mendenhall For more information,
call 328-4726
Art Lecture
The Painting Guild will sponsor a lecture by Sigmund Abeles. professor
Emeritus from the University of New Hampshire Abeles works in
pastels oils and graphic media and focuses on the expressive and
psychological aspects of the human figure The lecture is Thursday
at 530 p m in Speight Auditorium
English TAG Lecture
Biodun Jeyifo. English professor at Cornell University, will speak at
the annual English TAG Lecture Thursday at 7 pm in 1031 Bate
Jeyifos lecture is titled "On Being Anglophone.Now Meditations
on Globalization. Language and Desire" A reception will follow the
lecture
Coffee and Careers
Career Services offers a job search workshop Thursday from
8:30 am -915 am in the Student Professional Development Office
Carter Center Internships
Peter Mather, director of educational programs for The Carter Center in
Atlanta, Ga. will hold an information session on internship opportunities
Friday in 221 Mendenhall from 10 30 a m - noon
The session is open to all faculty and students who are interested in
international development and humanitarian issues
SRC Family Fun Day
The Department of Recreational Services and the Office
for Adult and Community Students will co-sponsor Family Fun Day on
Saturday from 10 am. - 3 pm in the SRC
Events will include group fitness sports, a climbing wall, bowling, a movie
and arts and crafts There is no cost for students, spouses and dependent
children of students above age six
Chancellor's Leadership Conference
Interim Chancellor William Shellon and other notable speakers
will give informative workshops and seminars to help improve
organizations and their leaders Saturday from 9 am4 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student leaders and campus organizations are invited
Paper Person
The student featured at the top of today's paper is Jordana Cogle. senior
nursing major
News Briefs
Local
Duke approves policy to
govern ethical Investment
DURHAM (AP) - Duke University has
decided on a way to use its billions
of dollars of investments to influence
social issues
An investment policy approved
Saturday allows the university to
use letters to management, proxy
votes or shareholder resolutions to
put pressure on corporations linked
to concerns about human rights or
worker safety.
If the company fails to respond. Duke's
trustees could order divestment of
the stocks. Duke has a $3 billion
endowment, the 16th-largest in the
nation in 2003, according to the
National Association of College ana
University Business Officers.
Duke leaders began looking into the
policy in the fall of 2002 after students
in political science questioned
whether the university would divest
investments tied to slavery in Sudan
if the school held any
Duracell cleanup costs rising as
company removes contaminants
LEXINGTON (AP) - The discovery
of more contaminated soil and
sediment than anticipated around
the Duracell battery plant has added
about $400,000 to the cost of the
environmental cleanup, according to
a company official.
But he said it also validates the
company's decision to send the
materials to landfills rather than
treating them and leaving them
onsite
"We would have had a mountain out
there 35 feet tall, so I'm very pleased
we were able to come up with this
as a final solution said Victor Miles,
environmental affairs manager for
Duracell.
"It would probably have been called
Mount Victor he added
Duracell estimated last month that
it has removed or will remove about
10.000 tons of mercury-contaminated
soil classified as hazardous and about
37,000 tons of mercury-contaminated
soil classified as nonhazardous from
the former Plant 2 building site and a
nearby stream
National
Search suspended for 18 missing
after tanker explosion
PORTSMOUTH, Va. (AP) - The Coast
Guard on Sunday night suspended
the search for 18 crew members
missing from an ethanol-laden
tanker that exploded in the Atlantic
Ocean, and were unsure whether
search efforts would resume Monday
morning
The Coast Guard will decide whether
to continue the search after a crew
flies over the area Monday morning,
Chief Warrant Officer Gene Maestas
said
"Realistically, the longer the search
goes on, the less likely it is that we
will find anyone who is still alive Rear
Adm Sally Bnce-0 Hara, commander
of the Coast Guard's 5th District, said
at a news briefing earlier Sunday
The Bow Mariner, a tanker carrying
35 million gallons of ethanol,
exploded and sank Saturday night
about 50 miles off Virginia's Eastern
Shore Three men died and six were
rescued
Two-day hearing opens
Monday to decide numerous
Bryant trial issues
EAGLE, Colo (AP) - The woman
who accused Kobe Bryant of rape
told police she had consensual sex
with someone else two days before
her encounter with the NBA star, but
whether jurors will be allowed to hear
that is part of the extensive agenda for
a heanng this week.
Before such information can be
presented to the jury at Bryant's
assault trial, the state's rape-shield
law requires that Bryant's attorneys
prove to the judge in a closed-door
hearing that the woman's prior sexual
information is relevant.
The woman is scheduled to testify
behind closed doors Tuesday She
and Bryant will be in court together
for the first time since the Los Angeles
Lakers guard was arrested in July
World
EU starts imposing sanctions on
U.S. goods over tax break dispute
BRUSSELS, Belgium (AP) - The
European Union on Monday started
imposing millions of dollars in
sanctions on American goods but
said it would stop the measure
immediately if the U.S. Congress
repeals its export tax break
legislation.
The U S legislation was ruled illegal
by the World Trade Organization two
years ago and it authorized the EU to
impose sanctions last year.
"The U.S. has not brought its
legislation in line with WTO rules. We
are therefore left with no choice but to
impose countermeasures EU Trade
Commissioner Pascal Lamy said in
a statement
Although the WTO has
authorized $4 billion in sanctions
the biggest amount ever the
EU is taking a graduated
approach, hoping to pressure the
U.S. Congress to change the
Foreign Sales Corporation
legislation while limiting the impact
on European companies and
consumers.
If the sanctions run on,
they would cost U.S. Industry
some $300 million this year and
about double ' that next
year, the EU said
Kuwait agrees to export
Iraqi oil from its ports
KUWAIT CITY (AP) - Kuwait has
agreed to export Iraqi oil from its
ports, the first such deal between
the neighboring nations since the fall
of Saddam Hussein, a senior official
said Sunday.
The state-owned Kuwait
News Agency quoted Issa al-
Aoun, the undersecretary of
the Energy Ministry, as saying
Kuwaiti oil officials and a visiting
delegation of their Iraqi
peers have formed a team to
study the technical requirements
needed for transporting Iraqi oil
to Kuwait, including pipelines and
pumping stations.
Al-Aoun said new piers will be built
(or the project He did not provide
any dates.
The two nations have not had
ties since Saddam invaded Kuwait
and occupied it for seven months
until it was liberated in the 1991
Gulf War.
Conference inspires change in SGA
Restructuring of
funding decisions will
speed up processes
HOLLY O'NEAL
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
New ideas tor Student
Government Association ser-
vices and organizations are
in consideration after eight
SGA members attended the
Convention tor Student Gov-
ernment Associations in Texas
last week.
Attendees participated in
workshops, listened to speak-
ers and exchanged Information
with other Student governments
from across the country.
They learned about other
students' approai lies to campus
diversity, state budget, univer-
sity tuition conflicts) subcom-
mittee creation, community
involvement and underclassmen
mentoring programs.
Participants presented
their experiences to the senate
Monday night and proposed
how to localize some of the
information to address ECU's
needs.
Joseph Payne, student body
treasurer, said the SGA will make
"small-scale changes" to increase
student involvement and
provide better student services
and fair funding.
A mentoring program that
would inform freshmen of the
functions of student organiza-
tions, including SGA, is in the
works.
A similar program
is aimed at new SGA members
and would pair them with
more experienced senators and
executives.
"One of the most impor-
tant things we learned at
COSGA about student organi-
zations is that they are always
evolving, and it is necessary
to change with them said
Payne.
A change in appropriations
handling was introduced in the
meeting.
lengthy appropriations
decisions in this year's Stu-
dent Government Association
senate led to the treat ion of a
new position designed to expe-
dite funding distribution.
JullanneCorinne Blackburn,
senior art education major,
was announced as the
executive assistant to the trea-
surer.
Blackburn, who has worked
on the Senate Appropriations
Committee since last fall,
will assist Payne in review-
ing the funding applications
organizations complete to
receive money troni the SGA.
To further accelerate the pro-
cess, organizations requesting
funds will now have to attend
a workshop educating them
on SGA appropriations and
proper responses on the
application, which is 20 pages
long and "confusing Payne
said.
In the past, the appropria-
tions committee wasted time
reviewing requests with incom-
plete information, Blackburn
said.
The new system intends to
reduce application errors by
stopping them before the) ir
made, resulting in entire
applications being resubmit-
ted.
"We're bringing informa-
tion to them instead of them
bringing information to us
Payne Kfid
In old business, Student
Body President Ian Baer updated
the senate on the Students'
Day to protest ECU'S proposed
tuition increase.
The trip to the Board of
Governor's office in Chapel
Hill takes place during
spring break, but Baer encour-
aged students to make an effort
to attend
In new business, a resolution
to lengthen the Pirate Market's
hours on-weekends passed,
with some concern expressed for
Staffing needs and welfare.
A bill to create a dead-
line lor ordering SGA senate
T-shirts was met wit hquestiomof
appropriateness.
I In- vote was tabled to the
next meeting.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Math degrees can lead to Nutrition
great career opportunities
from page A1
Lecturers help students
choose correct major
MICHAEL JACOBS
STAFF WRITER
Math, a difficult subject
for some college students, can
lead to great career opportuni-
ties.
The Mathematics Department
held a lecture Friday afternoon to
discuss career opportunities for
math majors.
three speakers with
mathematical backgrounds
spoke about how their field of
Study gave them advantages in
the professional world.
The speakers all stressed how
mathematics covers ah science
and technology. Without it, there-
would be no computers, Internet
or medicine.
Gwcn Underwood, a 200
ECU alumna, used her math
degree and the Internet to linil a
job working tor the Department
of Navv Warfare oil ice in Panama
i its. I la.
"If you are looking for math
jobs, the Internet is a great tool
said Underwood.
Underwood said she
wanted a job that showed
bow math is applicable to real
life. She said her math degree
helped push her resume to the top
of the employers' lists.
The mystery guest at the lec-
ture was Kverelt Cameron, Ph.D
ECU alumnus and former math
major.
After a short time as a math
teacher, Gameron decided to go
back and get his bachelor's degree
in mathematics,
lie returned to teaching
feel during the clay that uiisa
them to nap in class or noi prepare
well for tests can lx- avoided by not
missing the morning meal I sen it
a full course breakfast isn't available,
sludentscan eat truitssm li as apples
or oranges on the go.
I he goals of Nutrition Month
are moderation, variety and balance.
Students should moderate their
intake of foods with added sugars,
fat or sodium. They may also want
h add variety to their diet to increase
nutrition as well as avoid repetition
and try to balance all aspects of their
diet to ensure proper nutrition.
"Having fun while learning
new healthy habits is one of the
messages we are trying to promote.
Nutritious foods can lie delicious
said High.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeaslcaroiinian.com.
The highest employer of
people with math degrees is
the U.S. Government.
middle school math but decided
il was not the career for him.
( ameron went back to school
to become a dentist, which was
allowed by his undergraduate
degree.
A degree in math, and you
are wide open to go where you
Want said Gameron.
He now practices dentistry in
Atlantic Beach.
"Take your knowledge, get
your degree, and jobs will be
there (ameron said.
There are many jobs
out there for individuals with
math degrees - every job uses
math
The single highest employer
of people with math degrees
is the U.S. government.
Internal Revenue Services
and the general accounting
office are examples of govern-
mental institutions that need
people with mathematical hack-
grounds.
This writer can be contacted at
news@lheeastcarolinian.com.
Report news students need to know, 'tec
Accepting applications for STAFF WRITERS iflH
� Learn investigative reporting skills �
� Must have at least a 2.0 GPA H
Appfy .it uur utBce tocatecl on ttie 2nd Boor of ttw Student Publications BuHdlnu. a call 32B-6366
ATTENTION ALL
Sororities, Fraternities, Organizations, Clubs
and interested individuals!
Sign Up Today
Pick your own project or volunteer for an area
targeted by Neighborhood Services.
Call the Neighborhood Services Office to register!
329-4110 or www.greenvillenc.gov
Saturday. March 20th through
Saturday, March 27th
The City will provide your group or
organization with disposable gloves, vests, and
trash baas PLUS, information on seoaratina
recyclables, vegetation
and just plain JUNK!
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Influences on domestic violence examined
Prevention, environment
hip-hop music addressed
STEPHEN RICE
STAK- WHIIL-H
Members of the Institute
on Domestic Violence In the
African American Community
steering committee came to
ECU to present research In a
Town Hall meeting attended by
local politicians and university
administration
After the ECU gospel choir
sang "Lift Every Voice and
Sing Mildred Council, a local
councilwoman, presented a proc-
lamation from Greenville Mayor
Don Parrott, designating Feb. 26
as Domestic Violence Awareness
Day in Greenville.
Several speakers presented
findings on the influences and
impact or. domestic violence, spe-
cifically In the African American
community.
Esther.). Jenkins, Ph.D. and
professor Oi psychology at Chi-
cago State University, spoke on
prevention and treatment of
domestic violence.
"There is a wide variation in
how people respond to violence
said Jenkins.
Jenkins mentioned reactions
to domestic violence, such as
post-traumatic stress disorder,
anxiety and substance abuse.
Jenkins said people might
also respond to abuse by regres-
sive behavior, particularly in
children.
she also spoke of the cumu-
lative nature of risk factors,
including neighborhood and
family support, the actual event
witnessed and the resiliency of
the individual.
More risks compound the
negative responses, Jenkins said.
William Oliver, Ph.D
criminologist at the University
ol Indiana-Hloomington, and
Charles Pinckney, professor of
psychology at St. Augustine
University in Raleigh, were also
speakers at the event.
Both Pinckney and Oliver
Esther J. Jenkins. Ph.D speaks on the prevention of community
violence at the Town Meeting last Thursday.
spoke about the influence of
gangster rap in the African Amer-
ican community, particularly in
rural southern regions
"In hip-hop culture, man-
hood is defined by being hard
negativity is re-enforced as the
norm said Oliver.
"In these songs you have
the sexual objectification ol
women
Oliver questioned bow long
ewisfa rappers would last if they
spoke of women in derogatory
terms.
Oliver said young black men
are �'manifesting self-hatred"
by conforming to the gangster
image.
Pinckney also spoke on gang-
ster rap, but his discussion was
more focused on behavior.
see VIOLENCE page A5
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Late Nite Breakfast
Tue-Sat lam-4am
(lorner of 5th & (lotant he
252-752-BOL1 (2654)
THIS WEEK AT THE MOVIES.
American Splendor
WED. 7 PM
THURS. 9:30 PM
FRI. 7 PM & MIDNIGHT
SAT. 9:30 PM
SUN. 7 PM
catch her if you can.
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Scary Movie 3
WED. 9:30 PM
THURS. 7 PM
FRI. 9:30 PM
SAT. 7 PM & MIDNIGHT
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March 2nd- Bingo 7:30PM MSC Multipurpose Room
March 5th- Jazz at Nioht 8PM MSC Great Rooms
Pirate
UNDERGROUND
March 4th- Swash Improv group (comedy) 8-10PM
March 6th- Kellin Watson (Women's History Month Concert) 9-11PM
Def Poetry is Monday,
March 8th! Get your
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For more info call 328-4715





PAGE A4
SI
OPINION
Michelle A. McLeod
Editor-in-chief
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
3-2-04
Erin Rickert
News Editor
Amanda Ungerfelt
Features Editor
Ryan Downey
Sports Editor
Meghann Roark
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Holly O'Neal
Asst. News Editor
John Bream
Asst. Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Asst. Sports Editor
Mike Mashburn
Web Editor
Daniel Roy
Production Manager
Newsroom252.328.6366
Fax252.328.6558
Advertising252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, The East Carolinian prints 9.000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular academic year
and 5,000 on Wednesdays during the summer "Our View" is the opin-
ion of the editorial board and is written by editorial board members.
The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor which are limited to
250 words (which may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and include
a telephone number. Letters may be sent via e-mail to editor@theeast
Carolinian com or to The East Carolinian. Student Publications Buildinc,
Greenville. NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more information.
One copy of The East Carolinian is free, each additional copy is $1
Our View
Twenty-
something's
are the
policy
makers of
tomorrow,
and we
should not
leave the
decisions
that will
affect our
lives to those
of yesterday.
Does anyone know why the leading issue
in the 2004 presidential campaign is gay
marriage?
This country has more to worry about
than homosexuals wanting to join in holy
matrimony.
What about jobs? There have been millions
of jobs lost within the last three years and the
situation isn't getting much better.
Organizations like NAFTA and WTO are adding
to the problem - sucking out whatever life is
left in the job market and sending the work to
other countries At this point, the state of our
economy should be the primary concern.
Health care and the environment are also on
the list of important issues presently missing
in action on the presidential campaign.
Health insurance has been one of this country's
most explosive and expensive topics for years.
As of late, its presence seems to have disap-
peared from the radar.
Environmental issues have probably taken the
most noticeable plummet on the importance
scale.
At the rate this country is going, we won't
decide to take environmental concerns
seriously until species diversity is a myth and
there's no more oxygen to breathe.
Before we listen to 'W talk about Mars
expeditions, let's worry about improving our
planet first.
We re the people who are going to decide this
election. Twenty-somethings are the policy
makers of tomorrow, and we should not leave
the decisions that will affect our lives to those
of yesterday.
But before we take the helm, and begin shap-
ing public policy, we need to force the current
policy makers to address the issues that des-
perately need their attention.
You can do this by registering to vote today. It's
not just our right, it's our responsibility.
The purpose of TEC's opinion pages is to invoke
conversation in ECU'S community. To respond to an
opinion on this page, please send your letter, with your contact
inforrriation for verification, to editor@theeastcarolinian.com.
In My Opinion
In My Opinion
Bush gets serious ! Defining a marriage
Amendment to ban
gay marriage is
discrimination
PETER KALAJIAN
STAFF WRITER
I he new Webster's Col-
legiate Dictionary defines
discrimination as "unfair
treatment of a person or
group on the basis of preju-
dice" and "treatment or
consideration based �n class
or category as opposed to
individual merit; partiality
or prejudice
When President George
W. Hush decided to
make what he thinks the
Constitution of the United
States should say about
gay marriage a serious
i ampaign issue, be was choos-
ing to travel a path not trod in
our government since 1919.
Back then, it was called
the Volstead Act and it
prohibited the sale and
manufacture of alcoholic
beverages in the U.S.
Better known as Prohibi-
tion, the Volstead Act gave
hirth to one of the worst
crime sprees in American
history and as a result
of public outcry was
swiftly repealed 10 years
later,
You may be asking your-
self, what does Prohibi-
tion have to do with gay
marriage
II Hush is successful in
amending the Constitu-
tion to define marriage
as an act between a
man and a woman - which
is exactly what he has
proposed in a While House
document submitted to
Congress this week - he will
succeed in passing the first
Constitutional A mend men t
since 1919 which actually
takes rights away from
Americans.
Not allowing gay
people to marry simply
because they are gay is exactly
the same as not allowing black
people to vote simply bet ause
they are black.
lor many people, includ-
ing the president, gay
marriage is being
exained holh through a
lens of Christianity and
morality.
While both are inter-
esting topics in them-
selves, neither has any real
bearing on the issue at
hand.
II you are a person of
faith and believe homosexu-
ality is .1 sin in accordant c
with biblical Scripture, that's
your right.
You i an feel tree to lie as
disgusted and offended as
you want.
You're guaranteed thai
right as an American and
it is protected under the
first Amendment of the Con-
stitution
You can go on talk shows
and espouse the evils of
homosexuality and even write
yourongressman to demand
that the laws about gay mar-
riage he changed immediately
to reflect your personal reli-
gious beliefs Again, that's
your right
However, gay people have
rights, too.
They pay taxes and they
hold public office. They
contribute to our society just
like everyone else and they
should be entitled to their
rights as afforded them in
the Constitution. 1 might be
able to further understand
the outcry against gay mar-
riage if I could see some harm
in it.
Conservatives have
been screaming from the
right about the sanctity of
the family and the inher-
ent Instability in gay
relationships, espe-
cially when they involve
children.
The fact remains, how-
ever, that far more damage
is done to our society
as a whole when SO per-
cent of all heterosexual
marriages end in failure.
Fifty percent.
Fully one-half of couples
in this country who take
those most solemn of civil
or religious vows end up
abandoning them.
If anything in the marital
tradition needs to change, It's
that unhappy little statistic.
In the end, I feel the
issue is legal, not religious
or moral.
The personal opinion of
George W. Bush is not rel-
evant to the topic.
As an elected official
of the government and
public servant, Bush has
an obligation to fulfill his
duties to the American
people impartially and with-
out bias.
Bush doesn't support the
gay community and that's
OK.
lie isn't required to.
However, when I he
President of the United
States starts considering legal
issues which involve
the rights of American
Citizens as dictated by
the Constitution on the
basis of his personal,
religious and moral beliefs,
he is fundamentally
iolat i ng t he sanctity of
that great document ami
doing a disservice to the
people ol this nation.
Bush is trying to impose
his narrow view of the
world on the American
people, and I, tor one, am
resisting.
I suggest you do the
same. When the issue ol gay-
marriage is brought before
the Supreme Court, as il is
bound to be, I have every
confidence that they will
decide in favor of life,
liberty and the pursuit of
happiness
Whose job is it?
AMANDA VANNESS
ASSISTANT PHOTO EDITOR
"Why do you look at the
speck of sawdust in your
brother's eye and pay no atten-
tion to the plank in your own
eye?"
This passage, from the
Gospel of St. Matthew, was
used by President George W.
Bush to explain that we are
all sinners and we shouldn't
"ostracize" gays.
If we are not to ostracize
homosexuals, then why not
let them get married? By not
allowing a marriage between
two people, we are ostracizing
them.
Bush continues to quote
the Bible when referring to the
homosexual marriage debate. If
we are not to judge, then why
are we judging homosexuals
and telling them they aren't
allowed to marry the one he or
she loves?
We are not God, only God
can judge, and lie will judge us
when it is time.
Also, Americans have the
freedom to decide their reli-
gious beliefs, if any, so why do
we keep referring to marriage in
a Christian way?
If two women are in love,
let them be united, if two men
are in love, let them be united.
America allows heterosexuals to
marry - we are all sinners - so
why not let homosexuals unite
in marriage?
The Bible also says thai
women arc property to their
husbands and women today
are free and independent. We
have to overcome this harrier.
Homosexuals are a part of our
society, so why are we still iso-
lating them?
In the 1960s, African
Americans were segregated
from whites, but after years of
struggles and fights, segregation
was banned. We overcame that
hurdle, so now it's time lo jump
another.
Bush wants to make a Con-
stitutional amendment that
defines marriage as "a union
between a man and a woman
The Constitution was written
many years ago.
If they did not state in the
Constitution that marriage
should be strictly between
a man and a woman, then
how can we go and make the
changes now?
Who is Bush to go and
decide what a marriage should
be defined as?
Vice-President Dick Cheney
has a different view on the sub-
ject than Bush. During a debate,
(Iheney was asked if homosexu-
als should have all the consti-
tutional rights enjoyed by each
American citizen.
"People should be free to
enter into any kind of relation-
ship they want to enter into
said Cheney.
"It's really no one else's
business, in terms ol trying to
regulate or prohibit behavior in
I hat regard
Cheney's daughter is a les-
bian. I agree with Cheney. It
is no one else's business what
type of relationship a person
is in, heterosexual or homo-
sexual.
We cannot stop what hap-
pens behind closed doors.
Homosexuals are still going to
hi' homosexuals no matter how
we define marriage.
We should let them enjoy
marriage and let God judge in
the end.
7 just hope I don't wake up and find out it
has all been a dream
Sofia Coppola
After finding out she was the first American female
director nominated for an Academy Award for her
movie "Lost in Translation





3204
M AST CAROLINIAN � NLWS
PAGE A5
Need extra cash but not an extra job?
Can't study on
on empty wallet"
Find out how thousands of students save
lives and earn extra cash by donating
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Violence
from page A3
"More white people buy
rap music than black people
but disproportionately black
youth act out what they hear in
terms of violence said I'inck-
ncy.
I'inckney highlighted a tele-
vision show he founded called
"Youth Clicks which targets
inner-city youth to address the
issues of hip-hop, drug use,
dating and violence.
Joyce G. Dickerson, Ph.D. and
sociologist from North Carolina
A Si T State University, spoke on
domestic violence, specifically
college campuses and in rela-
tionships.
She reported that 25 to 30
percent of high school or col-
lege students have experienced
violence in an intimate relation-
ship.
Dickerson said more than
500,000 college students who
are victims of rape, sexual
assault, robbery, simple or aggra-
vated assault are nowhere near
all the cases because embarrass-
ment or mistrust of authorities
prevents other students from
reporting.
Beth Ritchie, Ph.D. and
criminal justice professor from
the University of Illinois-Chi-
cago, spoke on how domestic
violence contributes to higher
incarceration rates for women in
African American communities.
The panelists concluded
with a question and answer
session and a presentation
to members of the steering
committee.
IDVAAC was organized in
1993 to provide an avenue for
people in the African American
community to raise aware-
ness of domestic violence,
increase community conscious-
ness in the African American
community and to further
scholarships in the area of Afri-
can American violence.
This writer can be contacted at
news@eastcarolinian.com.
Super Tuesday voting begins
2004
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going to
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udge in
f �
Ui$H ondyfekf lease inllay & get one month FREE!
Newly Remodeled Kitchens & Bathrooms!
Free Cable! Located near Campus & Downtown!
BALTIMORE (AP) � On thi-
eve of the biggest primary day
In the Democratic race, front-
runner John Kerry on Monday
stuck to
criticiz-
ing Presi-
dent Bush
while a
lingering rival, John Edwards,
tried to persuade Super
Tuesday voters he still has the
best chance to win
the presidency.
"There's a better way to
make America safe than
this president has chosen
Kerry said in Baltimore
before traveling to Ohio
and Georgia, just two
of the states he hopes to win in
a Super Tuesday sweep.
"This president has, in fact,
created terrorists where they
did not exist
Edwards was campaign-
ing in Ohio and Georgia on
Monday, but even his own sup-
porters say the odds are long
that he will win enough votes
Tuesday to stay in the race
until March9 when four South-
ern states vote. With Kerry
leading in polls in all 10 Super
Tuesday states, in many cases
by commanding margins, the
Edwards campaign seemed
near its end.
"At some point I've got to
start getting more delegates
or I'm not going to be the
nominee Edwards told
reporters.
"There's no question that
national momentum has an
impact on these races
Past Super Tuesday winne
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He declined to say how
many states he would need to
win Tuesday, instead promis-
ing to stay in the race until he
is nominated.
In a speech to supporters
at the University of Toledo,
Edwards criticized "that
crowd of insiders in Wash-
ington" and repeated that he
is the candidate best able to
defeat Bush in the general
election.
"This is the guy who is
actually beating Bush in polls
all across right America right
now Edwards said, not
mentioning that Kerry was
doing even better in polls
asking Americans for whom
they would vote if the general
election were held now.
Regardless of whether
Kerry still faces a challenge
alter Tuesday, the general
election begins in earnest
this week. Bush's re-elec-
tion steps up a notch with
the premiere of a multi-
million-dollar ad cam-
paign on Thursday.
"1 need your help Kerry
told several hundred people
at Baltimore's Morgan State
University. "Send him back to
Texas
Of the 10 contests sched-
uled on Tuesday, Edwards has
virtually ceded the four New
England states to Kerry and
stands little chance of victory
in the biggest battlegrounds,
New York and California,
or in Maryland. That leaves
Georgia, Ohio and Minnesota
as his targets.
HEY SENIORS
9
3 YOU HAVE QUESTIONS
iHpi itHp "��MR H
We have
utit
;male
rher
mJ00 if
Come to the SENIOR'S Elit
Panel Discussion with
ECU Alumni
"What I Wish I'd Known as a Senio
March 10,4:00-6:00 pm
244 Mendenhall Student Center





R&fil At,
3-2-04
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FOR
Early Birds get best homo,
blocks to ECU, 1,2,3,4 bedrooms,
all appliances, central heatac,
see collegeunlversltyrentals.co
m or call 321 4712.
Wyndham Circle Duplex 2 BD 2
BA Available June 1st and Aug. 1st,
$625.00 month, newly decorated,
cathedral ceilings, nice landlord,
good parking, call fast 321-4802.
Apartment at Pirate's Cove for rent.
$3607month now until July 31st.
Contact Brenda at 704-202-2775
pinebrook apt. 758-4015- 1&2 BR
apts, dishwasher, CD, central air
Si heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or 12
month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, Si cable.
Three bedroom duplex available
une 1 Newly renovated older
home walking distance to campus
utilities cable high-speed internet
included Large rooms washerdryer
on premises Call Mike 439-0285
5 bedroom House 12 block
from campus and 2 blocks from
downtown, $1500.00 403 S arvis
St Available May 1st Sign a lease
now for May to secure your house
for next year 252-341 8331
Pinebrook Apt 758-4015- 1 Si 2
BR apts, dishwasher, GD, central
air & heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or
12 month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, 6i cable.
Above BW-3 Apartments for rent. 2
and 3 bedroom Available une, July,
and August Call 252-725-5458 or
329-8738.
3 BR house, walk to ECU, pets
negotiable. $750.00mo. Available
Immediately. 355-3248 or 355-
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For rent: Upscale 3 BR- 3 Bath Near
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Call 252-561-7368 or 561-7679 or
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Tired of sharing a room and want
to walk to umpus? Male roommate
needed! Available August. Bedroom
with house privileges, free parking,
walk to campus. Contact Newman
Center, 953 East 10th St. - 757-
1991.
Private bedroombath share
kitchen, laundry room, living room
Patio, shed outside. Furnished or
unfurnished bedroom $330mo.
Plus 13 utilities. CALL 757-497-
2856.
For Sale
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Moving sale! Complete bedroom
set, entertainment center, dinette,
bakers rack, jewelry. Please call 341-
0360 leave a message with contact
information. Serious inquires only.
HELP iiro
Part-time Network Technician
needed immediately. Local internet
and cable TV company seeks highly
motivated technician. Please call
540-200-0100.
Make money taking Online Surveys.
Earn S10-J125 for surveys. Earn
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Up to $500Wk processing mail. Get
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Now hiring bar and wait staff. You
must be available M-F for some
lunch shifts as well as nights and
weekends. Apply after 2:00pm at
Professor O'Cools.
Are you looking for the experience of
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Motor Scooters. Make BIG $$$
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Looking for a babysitter? Well you're
in luck! 19 year old child life majoi
looking to watch your kids while
you are out! Responsible, have
experience. Call 252-328-8603.
Part time cook primarily nights
and weekends. Apply in person at
Professor O'Cools after 2:00pm.
Looking for five ECU students to work
with 40 UNC students out west this
summer. Challenging work but great
resume experience Avg. student
makes $2,312month. Call 1-888-
478-5330 for details.
Cypress Glen Retirement Community
Dining Services is accepting
applications for part time wait staff
(11 am to 2 pm and 4 pm to 7 pm)
If you are looking for a job with
flexible hours in a good professional
atmosphere, apply now. 100 Hickory
Street, Greenville, NC. EOE
Inbound call Center Agents Needed.
Must type 30 wpm, excellent verbal
skills required. Hiring tor 2nd shift fk
weekends, 15-30 hoursweek. Fax
resume to 353-7125 to apply.
Day Camp counselors and
supervisors, tennis and swim
instructors- June 7- July 31. Assistant
pool managers and lifeguards
needed for City Pool late May- July.
Most jobs 30 hrs. per week. $6.25 to
$10.00 per hour. Contact 329-4542
for further information Apply at City
of Greenville before April 16- Human
Resources, 201 Martin Luther King
r. Dr P.O. box 7207, Greenville, NC
27858-7207.
Bartender Trainees needed $250
a day potential, local positions 1 -
800-293 3985 ext. 306
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Collection ot
actors
5 Roe source
9 Enticements
14 Killer whale
15 Unadulterated
16 Legal
17 Ground grain
18 In a childish
manner
20 Sell
22 Gin flavor
23 Form datum
24 Up to
26 Bunch of hairs
28 Yothers and
Louise
30 Mini-purse
34 Mala Har, e.g.
37 Space telescope
honoree
39 Cornda shouts
41 Rice dish
42 Writer Bellow
43 Pitcher's
precision
46 Comic Skelton
47 Twin city
48 Plains people
50 Spunk
52 The Blue
Danube'
composer
56 Lotting tennis shot
59 On the bnny
61 Bay of
62 Chloroformed
state
65 Accomplice
66 Saki's real name
67 Cash drawer
68 Seedy bar
69 The Maltese
Falcon" co-star
70 Corridor
71 Internet patron
DOWN
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4 Speak to while
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10 Michael Jordan's
nickname
11 Chills
12 Mosaic piece
13 Charon's nver
19 Lawn game
21 Gannon College
site
25 Greeted and
escorted
27 Places to bathe
29 Delta deposits
31 Ski tow
32 Bit ol evidence
33 Embraced
34 Weepy gasps
35 Plan of land
36 Sharp, shnll bark
38 Nostnl
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44 Museum manager
45 Tackle-box item
Solutions
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51 Gear feature
53 Jamaican fruits
54 Medicinal
ointment
55 Sneakier
56 Tibetan holy man
57 Burden
58 Stooped
60 Gobi location
63 Letters m theater
lobbies
64 Ailing
Congratulations Vanessa Anthony
on being Kappa Delta's sister ot the
week! We loveyoul
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1 weekend a month the National
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FREE TUITION! Learn a job skill
& stay a student! FT Students
get over $800MO in Education
Benefits & PAY lor more info call
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800-GO-GUARD.com
ill Spring Break Vacations! Cancun,
lamaica Acapulco, Bahamas, &
Florida. Best parties, Best Hotels,
Best Prices! Group Discounts,
Congratulations to April Stevens,
Ambassador of the month for February!
Thank you for the time and effort you
put in to planning Inductions!
Children of ECU Faculty (active or
retired) are invited to apply for the
ECU Retired Faculty Association
Undergraduate Scholarship. The
amount of the award for the 2004
2005 academic year will be $1600
($800semester). The scholarship will
be renewed through the recipient's
senior year (not to exceed a total of
eight semesters) assuming that the
recipient is in good standing and
maintains at least a 3.0 GPA. After the
20042005 academic year, the annual
scholarship award amount may vary
depending upon the amount ot
funds available In this endowed
scholarship. The scholarship shall
be made available to children of
active or retired ECU faculty who
have been accepted for admission
or who are currently enrolled as
full-time undergraduate students
at ECU. Students must be pursuing
their first undergraduate degree &
have projected or actual collegiate
GPA of at least 3.0. Application
deadline is April 9, 2004. For
application materials & additional
information, contact Mrs. Vicky
Morris, University Development,
ECU, 2200 S. Charles Blvd Greenville
Center, Suite 1100, Greenville, NC
27858. Phone: 328-9573 & e-mail:
morrisv@mail.ecu.edu.
Filmsanimations needed to submit
by April 9th to the Blumoon
Film Festival, Max length 20
minutes, website to submit HTTP:
personal.ecu.eduCD102S. Event
is April 16th.
BEBB9 not enough ART .N OUR SCHOOL
NO WONDER PEOPLE THINK
CARAYAGGI0
IS A GUY ON THE SOPRANOS.
ART. ASK FOH MORE.
ECU
TRANSIT
Currently hiring bus drivers
Extremely flexible work hows Apply at
Vnvwtnmsiteciierju. Questions? contact
any Transit Manager at 3284724.
SPRING
BREAK
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�Organ concert (12:00 - 12:15 p.m.)
�Devotion (12:15-12:30 p.m.)
�Lunch in the Fellowship Hall (12:30 -1:00 p.m.)
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TEC wishes
students a safe
and fun
Spring Break!
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accessories & wore
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Spring Break 2004
Sandcastle Resorts, Myrtle freach
srx Welcome
Students!
1-866-857-4061
Toll Free
Call us or visit our web site at
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� indoor swimming pool NEAR EVERYTHING!
� outdoor swimming pools jgL
� lazy river hot tubs,
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TOBACCO ACCESSORIES � ADULT NOVELTIES
EXOTIC CIGARETTES � T-SHIRTS
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Rolling Papers � Glass Pipes � Loose Tobacco
Stickers � Blow-up Friends & Farm Animals � Incense
Body Piercing & Jewelry � Detox Solutions � Candles
Hair Dye � Adult Videos � Black Lights
Whipcream � Gag Gifts
and a Bunch of Other Cool Stuff
15th Anniversary Sale
March 14-16
Up To 40 Off Everything
205 E. 5th Street
GREENVILLE
(252) 758-6685
www.smiledamnit.com
www.partylikehell.com
PAGE B1
Fl
Did V
- Children's bo
singer Karer
all call today t
- This month is
- Today is Peac
- On this d;
nationwide ro,
Annoi
The Student Unic
in the Mendenha
The Student Un
Wednesday at 7
Saturday at 9:30
Wednesday at 9:
at 7 p.m. and mi
student ID and a
call 328-4700
Ara Gregorian's s
March 3 in the A.
The 2004 Schoi
will be held at 5
through April 17
The Student Uni
Group at 8 p.m.
event is free for s
The School of Mu
Wllma Jensen, a i
9 p.m. on Friday. ?
St. This event is I
Organist membe
The Student Unit
the Mendenhall (
Ara Gregorian, vii
present music by
March 5 in the A.
The School of Iy
Saturday, March I
New!
Best of Hoof
Mori
Ce
In Thi
f
Srai
TheN
Loone
TV Thi
The second par!
tonight
"Ste
This new ABC ser
horror novelist SI
Danish minisenei
was destroyed in
laborers Later, a
Hospital" airs at S
"Charlie:
Time magazine fill
filmmaker Charlie
family and colleai
Marceau and Ro
Match 3 on TCM.
TheScl-RChann
Mad House" mov
vampire, a Wiccai
The contestants
evaluation of their
Mad House" airs





PAGE B1
� MSI AM, ��.
:s
3204
FEATURES
AMANDA LINGERFELT
Features Editor
JOHN BREAM
Assistant Features Editor
features@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Did You Know?
Children's book author Dr Seuss (1904), singer Eddie Money (1949).
singer Karen Carpenter (1950) and rocker Jon Bon Jovi (1962)
all call today their birthday.
This month is International Listening Awareness Month.
Today is Peace Corps Day.
On this day in 1925, the United States adopted the
nationwide road numbering system and U.S. shield markers.
Announcements
Bingo
The Student Union Spectrum Committee presents Bingo at 7:30 p.m. today
in the Mendenhall Multi-purpose room. This event is free to students
Films
The Student Union Films Committee presents American Splendor on
Wednesday at 7 p.m Thursday at 9:30 p.m Friday at 7 p.m. and midnight,
Saturday at 9:30 p.m and Sunday at 7 p.m. Scary Movie 3 is showing
Wednesday at 9:30 p.m Thursday at 7 p.m Friday at 9:30 p.m Saturday
at 7 p.m. and midnight and Sunday at 3 p.m. All movies are free with a
student ID and are located in the Hendrix Theatre. For more information,
call 328-4700
Recital Concert
Ara Gregorian's students will perform in a recital at 7 p.m. on Wednesday,
March 3 in the A. J. Fletcher Music Recital Hall. This event is free.
Art Awards Ceremony
The 2004 School of Art Undergraduate Exhibition Awards Ceremony
will be held at 5 p.m. today in Speight Auditorium. The exhibition will run
through April 17
Swash Improv
The Student Union presents a performance by the ECU Swash Improv
Group at 8 p.m. on Thursday, March 4 in the Pirate Underground. This
event is free for students.
Organ Class
The School of Music presents Master Class with a Master Teacher featuring
Wllma Jensen, a distinguished guest organist. The event runs from 9 a.m. -
9 p.m. on Friday, March 5 at St. Paul's Episcopal Church on 401 East Fourth
St. This event is free to students and Eastern Carolina American Guild of
Organist members Others should call 328-1261 for ticket information.
Jazz at Night
The Student Union presents Jazz at Night at 8 p.m. on Friday. March 5 in
the Mendenhall Great Room.
Musical Performance
Ara Gregorian, violin, Paul Tardiff, piano and Christopher Grymes, clarinet,
present music by Bach, Stravinsky, Janacek and Franck at 8 p.m. on Friday,
March 5 in the A.J Fletcher Music Recital Hall. Tickets are $5
Early Music Ensemble
The School of Music presents an Early Music Ensemble at 8 p.m. on
Saturday, March 6 in St Paul's Episcopal Church. This event is free.
New Releases
CDs
Best ol Hootie & The Blowfish 1993-2003. Hootie & The Blowfish
Spend My Time, Clint Black
Monolithic Baby (Bonus DVD), Monster Magnet
Cee-Lo Green Is the Sou Machine, Cee-Lo
Tha Down Low, Various Artists
In This Skin (Collector's Edition), Jessica Simpson
Hidalgo (Score). James Newton Howard
DVDs
Stargate SG-1 Season 6 Boxed Set
School of Rock (Widescreen Edition)
Starsky & Hutch � The Complete First Season
The Nightmare Before Christmas (Special Edition)
Gods and Generals
Looney Tunes - Back in Action (Widescreen Edition)
An Affair to Remember
TV This Week
"Forever Eden"
The second part of FOX'S new mysterious reality show airs at 9 p.m.
tonight
"Stephen King's Kingdom Hospital"
This new ABC series was developed especially for television by best-selling
horror novelist Stephen King and is based on director Lars Von Trier's
Danish minisenes "Riget" ("The Kingdom"). In 1869, the Gates Falls Mills
was destroyed in a spectacular fire, trapping and killing scores of child
laborers Later, a hospital was built on the site of the disaster "Kingdom
Hospital" airs at 9 p.m on Wednesday. March 3 on ABC
"Charlie: The Life and Art of Charlie Chaplin"
Time magazine film critic Richard Schickel examines the career of legendary
filmmaker Charlie Chaplin. Included are interviews with Chaplin's friends,
family and colleagues - plus fans like Woody Allen, Johnny Depp, Marcel
Marceau and Robert Downey Jr. "Charlie" airs at 8 p.m on Wednesday.
March 3 on TCM.
"Mad Mad House"
The Sci-Fi Channel jumps into reality television with this new series. "Mad
Mad House" moves 10 everyday people into a house with five "Alts a
vampire, a Wiccan, a naturist, a modern primitive and a voodoo priestess.
The contestants will compete for $100,000 based on the Alts' constant
evaluation of their openness to and tolerance of alternative lifestyles. "Mad
Mad House" airs at 9 p.m. on Thursday. March 4 on the Sci-Fi Channel
Sfotd- aitine at" Odcaw-
Best Actress nominee Naomi Watts looks stunning in a
Versace gown while Heath Ledger looks scruffy in Gucci.
Charlize Theron's Gucci dress
was a hit on the red carpet.
Ceremony produces
memorable fashion
AMANDA LINGERFELT
FEATURES EDITOR
The red carpet was awash in a
sea ofcolor during Sunday night's
Academy Awards Ceremony.
Stars were quick to drop the
standard of hl.uk that typically
comes from a formal event,
while leaning toward brighter
colors like blue, red and green.
However, llesh-tones like beige
and tan seemed to be the most
popular.
ISest Actress winner Charlize
I heron wore a headed tan (iuc.ci
dress paired with a set ot 46-
diamond Chopard earrings that
complemented her golden com-
plexion and platinum hair.
Naomi Watts, Best Actress
nominee, also sported flesh-
tones in a tan Versace dress
adorned with large, teardrop
Shaped crystals. Best Supporting
Actress nominee Patricia ('lark-
son, singer Alison Krauss and
Julia Roberts followed the flesh-
tone pattern, each working it to
her own advantage.
Supporting Actress nominee
Marcia Gay Harden donned a
bright blue maternity dress with
a medieval-inspired updo. Best
Original Song winner Annit
Lennox also wore blue - a form-
fitting pale-blue satin dress
which transformed her into a
glam goddess. Jamie Ice Curtis
chose a strapless blue chiffon
dress by Moniquc l.huillier that
showed her sexy side.
Catherine Zeta Jones wore
a red scoop-necked vintage
Versace dress which offered a
nice contrast to her dark hair.
Best Supporting Actress nomi-
nee Shohreh Aghdashloo also
looked beautiful in a red headed
gown designed by a woman in
her home country, Iran.
White was also a popular
choice that worked for many
women like a circular cut-out
dress worn hy Diane lane and
a deep v-necked gown worn hy
Angelina Jolie. Best Supporting
Actress winner Uenee Xellweg-
ger also succeeded with a white
strapless Carolina llerrera gown
with a long train.
Both Nicole Kidman and
Scarlett lohansson chose green
dresses. Although Kidman's pale
green Channel dress took over 40
hours to make, the dress received
mixed reviews, some stating that
the color washed out her skin.
Some stars decided to stick
see FASHION page B2
Renee Zellwegger's white
gown was designed to look
like fashion from early films.
X
Uma Thurman's gown was a
disappointment to critics
The only award Diane Keaton
took home Sunday night was
for worst dressed.
And the winners are
Best Picture Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King'
Achievement in Directing Peter Jackson for Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King'
Best Actor in a Leading Role Sean Penn for Mystic River'
. Best Supporting Actor Tint Rohbins for 'Mystic River'
Best Actress in a Leading Role Charlize Theron for 'Monster'
Best Supporting Actress Renee Zellweger for 'Cold Mountain'
Best Original Score Lord of the. Rings: The Return of the King'
Original Song "Into the West from 'The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King'
O
Total Counts
Lord of the Rings: The
Return of the King
11 awards
Master & Commander: The
Far Side of the World
Two awards
Mystic River
Two awards
Lost in Translation
One award
Cold Mountain
One award
J.R.R. Tolkien lecturer comes to campus
Shippey speaks on
lord of the Rings'
LAURA KEELING
STAFF WRITER
If you are interested in
J.R.R. Tolkien's literary work
such as The Hobbli and
The Lord of the Rings
trilogy, you will he
interested in a guest speaker that
is coming to ECU today.
In his lecture, "Both Kings
are Round and There's an
end of it! Tolkien, Wagner
and the Rediscovery of
the North Tom Shippey
will be discussing his
thoughts on how the works
of Tolkien have changed the
literary world and modified
fantasy literature forever.
Shippey is one of the
world's greatest Tolkien scholars
He has done research and writ-
ten several hooks on this world-
renowned author. Some ol the
booksShippev has written include
The Road to Middle Earth, J.R.R.
Tblklen: Author of the Century and
Beowulf. The Critical Heritage, not
to mention several articles about
Tolkien's fiction.
Shippey has been featured
in manv documentaries,
including the extra DVD disc
for the movie, Lord of the Rings:
I lie Fellowship of the Ring, and
almost every other Tolkien
documentary to date.
"I think that this is a rare
opportunity to hear the lust
Tolkien scholar in the world
said Dr. C.W. Sullivan III,
English professor.
Shippey's visit will
he in honor of Sullivan after
he was named Distinguished
Professor of Art and Science
hy the College ol Arts and Sci-
ences during the tall 2003 con-
vocation.
"Shippey and I are both
Interested in Tolkien, have
known each other tor years
and he Is a really good speaker
said Sullivan.
Shippey is a graduate of
Queen's College and Cam-
bridge. His honors include an
award of a fellowship at
St. John's College in Oxford,
a concurrent lectureship at
the University of Oxford
Shippey is tilehair ot Eng-
lish I anguage and Medieval
I Iterature at the University
ol I eeds and the recipient of the
Waller . Ong, S.J. and endowed
chair at St. Louis Univer-
sity. He was also a visiting
pmirssnr at the University of
lexas at Austin and Harvard.
A medievalist and expert
in the field ot English, Shippey
continues to share his
knowledge hy lecturing and
teaching the works of the
medieval time and literature.
He is also ,n editor of Stud-
ies in Medievalism, an annual
committed to modern
images of the medieval, and
co-editor of Medievalism in the
Modem World.
He currently teaches
undergraduate courses in the
area of "Arthurian 1 iterature"
and "Literature of the Vikings
Mis extensive work with design-
ing and leaching interdisci-
plinary courses in the field of
Medieval Literature has led to a
program that offers a graduate
certificate in Medieval Litera-
ture.
This amazing man will he a
sure attraction lor many students
at ECU.
"Anyone that is inter-
ested in the I oul of the
Kiiis movies, the works of
Icilkien and fantasy literature
Sullivan said when asked what
kind ol person might enjoy this
lecture.
This writer can be contacted at
fcatarcs@theeastcarolinian.com.
Tom Shippey lectures today.
Event Info
'Both Rings are Round and
There's an end of Itl Tolkien,
Wagner, and the Rediscovery of
the North'
Lecture by Tom Shippey
Today at 7:30 p.m.
1032 Bate
Reception to follow





RAG B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
3-2-04
PAGF
Horoscopes
Aries (March 20-Aprll 1B) Delayed
business permissions may soon
arrive Expect advancement to
come in the form ot divided protects,
last-minute promotions or unusual
work partnerships Thursday through
Sunday also accent new friendships
and complex group activities Avoid
competing schedules, it possible, and
expect minor jealousies
Taurus (April 19-May 19). Family
ultimatums or rare home proposals
may be accented Carefully resolve
all outstanding legal documents
Friday through Sunday, powerful
dream experiences may bring new
awareness Areas affected are trusted
friendships, romantic triangles or
family expectations
Gemini (May 20-Juoe 20). Ongoing
financial and business questions
will soon be settled After Friday,
however, carefully study taxation
and spending records. Wednesday
through Saturday also highlight
senous family discussions or revised
romantic promises Emotions may be
high Take lime to clearly explain your
needs
Cancer (June 21-July 21). Before
Wednesday, watch for loved ones
to adopt new attitudes or revise
unrealistic schedules Use this time
to establish romantic expectations
Thursday through Saturday, pay
attention to new debts or sudden
financial changes Delayed
payments will not work to your
advantage Remain determined to
settle outstanding accounts.
Leo (July 22-Aug. 22). Family
proposals or revised home plans will
soon prove rewarding Wednesday
through Saturday also accent
improved relations and renewed
trust between friends Stay firmly
dedicated to the present and expect
recent disputes or power struggles to
steadily fade
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 21).
Respond quickly to all job offers
or business proposals. Virgos
born after 1972 should also pay
attention to the hearth sciences or
community services industries Later
this week, romantic proposals will
be reversed. Don't be dismayed;
renewed passion will soon become
a top priority
Libra (Sept. 22-Ocl 22). Over the
next eight days, loved ones may
neglect established home duties or
discuss stressful family gatherings
Expect tension between siblings,
complex schedules or financial
obligations to be permanently
resolved After Friday, some Librans
may also encounter a rare social
invitation or sudden romantic
proposal If so, remain quietly
reserved New relationships may be
difficult to initiate
Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21). Public
images, social reputation and revised
business roles are on the agenda
Expect temporary job promotions
and fast career proposals. Later this
week, someone close may ask for
special advice Marital discord, social
triangles and romantic trust may be
key concerns. Remain diplomatic
Passions may be high
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 20).
Social communications and business
messages may be controversial
over the next eight days Complex
personality clashes may soon be
revealed Thursday through Sunday,
dream activity, sudden impressions
and quick insights are highlighted
A troubled relationship may soon be
revealed as unproductive or outdated
Stay focused on trust.
Capricorn (Dec. 21-Jan. 19).
Workplace romance and social
complications may be draining
over the next few days. Before
next week, loved ones may feel a
strong urge to publicly defend their
ideas. Wednesday through Sunday
also accent new financial or legal
deadlines Stay alert
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) Early
this week, friendship and romance
become top priorities After Tuesday,
expect loved ones to confidently
state their intentions or long-term
plans. Friday through Sunday, family
members or trusted friends may
request clarification Group plans,
daily activities and social loyalties
are accented
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 19). Subtle
comments may reveal important
information Expect loved ones to
gently request family improvements
or express a need for change Some
Pisceans, especially those born after
1974, will encounter a complex or
mildly unethical romantic proposal. If
so, remain quietly dislaiti At present,
new relationships will take extra time
to become reliable
If your birthday is this week
Find creative ways to involve
new friends, family members and
romantic partners in social activities
Group awareness and common
goals will bring added strength to
long-term relationships. Over the
next five weeks, respond quickly to
all invitations, proposals or social
requests By late July, a new career
path may be made available. Later
this summer, romantic passions
intensify. Expect potential lovers or
new friends to compete for your
time, attention and loyalty.
Fashion
from page B1
with black. Susan Saradon's
black Gucci dress flattered her
figure while l.iv Tyler's Given-
chy Couture creation did noth-
ing for her.
(Inly two actresses seemed to
defy the standards of style this
year. The usually stylish lima
Ihurman paired t gold bolero
jacket and a blue sash with a
white chiffon layered gown that
looked like it came from Grand-
ma's dining room table.
In typical Diane Keaton
style, the Bett Actress nominee
sported an Annie Hull inspired
Ralph Lauren suit complete
with a black bowler hat, black
gloves and a polka-dotted tie
and handkerchief. It was hard
for (ashionista Joan Rivers to
keep her mouth shut as Keaton
walked by.
Although the men were all
dressed in similar tuxes, a few
took risks and really stood out.
Best Supporting Actor nomi-
nee Djimun llounsou looked
extremely attractive in a black
Gucci suit paired with a light
blue tie. Jude law, nominated for
Best Actor, gave the red carpet a
retro feel with a three-piece navy
blue Dunhill tux. Heath Ledger's
look was disappointing. He wore
a black, Gucci tux paired with
F.lvis style sunglasses and an
unshaven face.
Although color worked for
some men, Best Director nomi-
nee Glint Eastwood should have
just stuck to a white shirt, rather
than his black tux paired with
a green satin shirt and black
bowtie.
This writer can be contacted at
features�theeostcarolinian.com.
College
1 DAY ONLY!
Wednesday, March 3
Students, Faculty & Staff
Receive a
Discount
15 off Ladies' Dresses & Suits
10 off Home Items
on EVERYTHING YOU BUY
on College Day
To receive your discount, simply present
your college LD. to a sales associate.
�Normal exclusions apply. See ad for details.
'deludes "incredible Value' items, ill Dot Cteiunce items, Bonus BuysItems. Doortiusten. Ruts, Prior Sales. Shoes. Cosmetics. Fragrances Beauty Salon Products and Services,
intimate Apparel, Ml Electrics. 'Value Dresses. Gift Cards, fine Jewelry Special Event Merchandise. Tine Jewelry Clearance Merchandise, Lladm Porcelain, AS Clad, Arthur Court. Calphaton.
Chaps Ralph Lauren Collections. Chnstoptret Radfco. Club Libby Lu, Demdaco, Denby. Department , All Watches. FAO Schwau, Farther Out Shop. Fui Salon Services, Godlva. Kines.
Hart Schaflner A Man. Henctets, Homedrcs, Karen Kane. Kate Spade. Donald I Pliner Cole Haan. Kosta Boda. LaurenRalph Lauren, Lewi's, Martsa Christina, Marquis' by Watertord,
Iain's Jockey. Men's Gold loe. Nautrca Collections. Ortefors. Portmetrion. Ralph laurenPoto. Sharper Image Signd Olsen, St. John. Susan Bristol. Swarovski Jewelry, lommy Banana,
VJIIaroy & Boch and Watertord May not be used in conjunction with any other coupon Win w discount otter Associates not eligible for Fine Jewelry dracouat.
The
Treasure
Chest
��
The I iijMiiihest i- .i monthly writs devoted to the common challenge that college students face ihruughoat the
year. II is written by the (enter for Counseling and Student Development located at.(16 Wright Building. For further
information, please contact the (eater at 328-6661.
Spring break is almost here, and it's time to start preparing for your big trip. Spring break is a time to welcome warm
weather after a long, cold w inter and to enjoy a stress release after midterms as you ready yourself for completing the semester.
Following arc sonic tips on how to have a sate spring break that you can enjoy and relish in the midst of Finals Week
Before yoa leave:
Avoid crash diets healthy weight loss comes from eating healthy, regular meals and snacks and exercising not fasting!
Secure sour room apartment lock up and leave a vague phone message so you don't advertise your absence
Pack thoroughly sunscreen, condoms, passportdriver's license, other identification, contraceptives, necessary medication.
and cell phone lor emergencies
Prepare our tar road safety check, all necessary maps, spare lire, gas can and other road safely equipment
Set I budget set a dollar mount you want to spend for the whole trip, bring backup funds for emergencies, bring money in
MkioH lorms leash, traveler's checks, credit cards. ATM card), and don't keep your money all in one place
Confirm sou reservations before you leave
On your way there:
(iet enough rest make sure sou have a good night's sleep before setting out
Rotate driven, and take breaks lake turns while y mi travel
Don take chances drive defensively, obey traffic signs and signals, and watch your speed so that you can arrive safely
IXi not transport illegal dnigs
Once you're there:
Alcohol safety
Avoid dehydration drink plenty of watct while in the sun and limit alcohol use
I .u ,i meal before drinking to slow the absorption of alcohol
Pace yourself drink no more than one drink per hour
Designate a sober driver or take a cab
21 is the legal drinking age in all states
Selling or serving alcohol to a minor is a serious otlcnse in all states
Under 21, all states are "zero tolerance" (no alcohol in system when driving I
Mod Males have a .08 BAC level if over 21
Watch out for your friends
Reduce your risk lor sexual assault
Always watch your drink even non-alcoholic beverage can be drugged
Slav in control limit ulcohol and drug use
Use the buddy system stay with liicnds while drinking and on the way home
Oon't go or let a friend go with someone you've just met
Have a cell phone in case of emergency
If the ��thinkable happen:
If you have been raped
IX�n't shower
Tell someone friend, family, or the police
lio to the nearesi emergency room and gel a medical evaluation Ihey will also ofTer counselors for support
Alcohol poisoning symptoms.
Person is unconscious or semi-conscious and cannot be awakened or aroused
Person has cold, clammy, pale, or bluish skin
Breathing is slow or irregular
Person vomits while sleeping or passed out and doesn't awake after vomiting
If a person has any one ollhcse symptoms, he or she is siilfcring from acute alcohol intoxication and you should:
I il I III LP�call someone who can assisi.
2.NOT IT.AVI I III PERSON Al ONI -turn him or her on their side to prevent them from choking in case or
vomiting.
He better safe than sorry if you are unsure of what to do.
TAKE CARE OF YOURSELVES AND EACH OTHER. AND HAVE A GREAT SPRING BREAK!
ECU HEALTHY LIFESTYLES TEAM
cost of trying to look tike Pamela Anderson:
Hair extensions: $900
Breast Implants: $3,000-10,000
Liposuction: $2,000-7,500
Cost of accepting and loving
yourself just as you are: Priceless
BODY IMAGE & EATING DISORDER
AWARENESS WEEK � MARCH 1-5
i





3-2-04
ay
UY
ducts and Services.
Arthur Court. Calpfiabr.
ices, Godivi, Hmes.
rquis" by Watwlord,
iry. Tommy Bihinj,
PAGF B3
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
3-2-04
I
LEDONIA WRIGHT CULTURAL CENTER DAY
Friday, March 5, 2004
Hendrix Theater, 3:00 p.m.
Pre-event Reception beginning at 1 p.m. under the tent
(alternate site: Mendenhall Student Center)
Featured Guest: Ms. Susan L. Taylor, Editorial Director
Essence Magazine
Tickets available at ECU Central Ticket Office; call 328-4788
Other Celebration events to include:
Special Art showing by ECU Alum David Byer-Tyre
Thursday, March 4, 2004; LWCC Gallery
The LW Essay Contest Recognition, March 5
The S.O.U.L.S. Memorial Award Recognition, March 5
Other special announcements
For additional information, contact the LWCC at 328-1680
www.ecu.edulwcc
son:
!
senior
portraits
Make This Feeling Last
're only a college senior once-capture
moment with a Jostens senior portrait.
We'll PROVIDE the cap, gown, and dress shell
your sitting
Sitting fee FREE with the purchase of an ECU
ring at the event!
en

East Carolina University
alumni association
jtWf Konild E Dowdy
Student Stores
Dates: March 3-4
Time: 11:00-6:00
Place: Mendenhall Student Center
Sitting Fee: $20.00
www.jostens.com
r6yye&e
CO






PAGEB4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
3 204
3-2-04
Tips for surviving on a college budget
f
Tips to help you spend
less while saving more
LISA TUMBARELLO
STAFF WRITER
Before we entered college to
experience the "best time of our
life we heard warnings from
family and friends about the
dangers of spending too much
money and falling into debt.
Some college-bound students
obeyed these warnings. Others
disregarded them and quickly
watched their bank accounts
and wallets thin out.
Simple bargain hunting can
save students large amounts
of money in the long run.
Learning how to look for and
act on bargains will keep more
of your money in the bank and
save you the embarrassment of
going broke and having to phone
the folks for more money. Prove
your money management and
responsibility with three simple
tips of bargain hunting:
Bargain Hunting Tip 1:
Shop around. Every Sunday,
new advertisements for local
Greenville stores compete to
have the best sales on their
merchandise. Stores like CVS,
Eckerd, Target, Wal-Mart and
Best Buy all have sales to offer
you bigger savings on things
you want and need.
Shopping these ads will
allow you to compare deals on
products and ensure that you
receive the best deal. Often,
stores will match the prices of
other competitors in order to
keep your business.
"I like shopping at
Sam's Club. They offer me
low prices and I can buy
inbulksaidTaftLove,sophomore
communication major.
Bargain Hunting Tip 2:
Clip coupons. Along with the
Sunday advertisements come
the coupon books. You can
find coupons for food, makeup,
medications and toiletries
- things that everyone needs.
Add these extra savings on top
of the good prices that you found
shopping around and you have
already saved yourself a few more
dollars that can be put toward
other luxuries.
Bargain Hunting Tip i:
Get textbooks online. Every
semester students pack into the
Student Stores looking to get the
best deal on textbooks. Even if
you are lucky enough to get all
of your books at the "used" price,
often you still wind up paying
$300-$500 for a semester's worth
of books. How about exploring
the online world of textbook
shopping? It's simple, fast and
cheaper.
"I'm sick of buying books at
the Student Store because they
are too expensive, and they
never have what I need said
Chris Myers, sophomore com-
munication major.
Many sites are devoted to
buying and selling college text-
books. For those skeptical of
buying online, start out small
with just one or two books.
Another key aspect to saving
is calculating exactly how and
where you spend your money.
Being organized and putting
your expenses down on paper
is an eye opener for students as
consumers. Once you assess your
money situation, you can more
efficiently budget your money.
Creating a monthly budget is
great for students. Adding up all
of the expenses you have going
out (car payments, rent, gas,
food, etc.) and then factoring
see MONEY page 85
?
Ways To Save
In Greenville
Stores to save at In Greenville:
Wal-Mart
Sam's Club
Dollar Tree
Ross
TJMaxx
Shop for textbooks online:
wwwlialf.com
www.textbuyer.com
www2wapbooks.com
www.ecampus.com
www.coHegesmarts.com
NO SKIMPING
NO LACK OF COVERAGE

(p
B
Ai
Incoi
�Put your needs before your
wants If you just go buy
anything you want, you run
out of money"
1000 Local Anytime Minutes for just $39.95mo
Egg � Includes Nationwide Long Distance
I �� � Free Roadside Assistance for 1 month
Aik about
� 7pm Nights & Weekends
� -
"Don't get sucked into Pirate
Club, you pay $25 and get
nothing Shop at Wal-mart
and eat on campus. Use the
transfl system'
awn �� in
-ire
US. Cellular
1-888-BUY-USCC � GETUSC.COM






3-2-04
3-2-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE B5
SGA
SPRING ELECTIONS
Names in the News
FILING FOR
EXECUTIVE OFFICE
(President, Vice President, Treasurer, and Secretary)
Begins Monday, March 1 at 9:00 AM
Ends Friday, March 5 at 5:00 PM
Any applications turned in after the deadline will be disqualified.
Incomplete applications will not be officially stamped until completed.
"There is a mandatory Compulsory Meeting scheduled for
ALL candidates on Monday, March 8 at 8:00 pm.
University Suites Apartments
Michael Jackson's been acting weird
again. The embattled King of Pop
I was pulled
over by cops
in Glenwood
Springs.
Colo after
shopping at
a Wal-Mart
a ski
I mask.
A store employee gave police a
description of the masked stranger's
vehicle. Cops then pulled Jackson
over and asked him to remove the
mask "There were no problems
police Lt. Bill Kimminau said. Jackson
spokeswoman Raymone Bain called
the incident a trifle
But it gets a little odder Syndicated
TV show "Extra" reports that in
Aspen, a few miles east of Glenwood
Springs, locals have seen Jackson in
full ski-mask strolling the streets with
an unidentified boy
His rep says the Gloved One is on
vacation in Colorado with his family,
but some tabloids suggest Jackson
entered drug rehab to treat an
addiction to painkillers According
to the BBC. Jackson calls the story
"simply another of a litany of false
rumors
BROWN SENTENCED
Has-been pop star Bobby Brown
was sentenced Friday in an Atlanta
court to 601-
days in ail
for violating
his parole,
stemming
from a 961
drunken-
driving
charge.
Since he was put on probalion.
Brown, 35, has been accused of five
violations, including a December
misdemeanor battery charge for
allegedly hitting his wife, divas diva
Whitney Houston He's scheduled
to appear May 5 in a Fulton County
court on that charge
Brown (aced a f 20-day sentence, but
got it reduced because he cleaned
up his act on some charges: He
paid a $105 fee. and completed
counseling and community service
MONEY TALKS
Martin Bashir, who scorched the
ratings last year with his frightening
t e 11 - a 11
documentary
"Living With
Michael
Jackson
might be
heading to
our shores.
According to the Hollywood
Reporter, the controversial British
interviewer, who got Princess Diana
to spill the beans about her bad
marriage in a '95 report, is talking
to ABC about pining its news team
Industry insiders say the network is
offering Bashir a cool $1 million. No
comments from network brass
Money
from page B4
in how much money you have
coming in is often a good indi-
cator of whether you are living
within your means.
However, for many students
the problem is living outside of
their means. Students have a
lot more money going out than
coming in. Solution: In addition
to bargain hunting for all your
needs, get a job.
Greenville is a flourishing
town with many opportunities
for students to work. For those
who don't have ,i car, I11 otters
mam obs thai don't require
traveling.
"The good thing about
working.on campus is that you
actually wind up making more
money because they don't take
out as many taxes. On lop ol
that, it s also .i great experience
said Jamie Mauldin, junior
communication major.
lor students who are really
looking lor a price break, one
job that lulfills many needs is
becoming a Resident Adviser.
Being an RA not only offers
great communication and
leadership skills but also
provides free room and
board, a meal plan and SSii a
month.
Everyone loves to have
a little extra dough in their
wallets, but it's up to you to make
sure it stays there.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
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$357 average rental price
per person per month
Eastgate Village
$237.50 per person
2 bedroom apts.
YOU pick your roommmate
You probably already own a computer
Multi-millionrec. center on campus
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energy efficient- average utility bill
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cable is $40 with Cox cablevision
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Total savings1308 per year
Coming Soon! Free Cable &
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Office located at: 3200-F Moseley Drive call: 561 -RENT
Now leasing for Spring and Fall 2004





Pirates sweep weekend
sports Keith Leclair Invitational
RYAN DOWNEY
Sports Editor
TONY ZOPPO
Assistant Sports Editor
sports@iheeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
Spring Break Trip
The Adventure Program is organizing a multi-element trip to the Florida
Everglades Sea Kayak trip Registration deadline is Wednesday. March
3 Pre-trip meeting is Thursday. March 4. The trip should include Hiking.
Kayaking, Climbing and Canoeing
Self Defense Fitness Class
Self Defense fitness classes will be held March 24 - April 14 from
8 p m - 9 p m The program offers students a chance to learn self-defense
techniques in a progressive (raining system thai allows them to avoid
confrontation and defend themselves as the situation dictates The program
will cover basic personal protection theories, as well as some of the more
recent philosophies of self-defense
Sports Briefs
Swimming takes second at C-USA meet
Both ECU'S men and women swimming teams finished second at the
Conference USA Women's Swimming and Diving Championship and
Mens Invitational on Saturday at the the University of Houston's Campus
Recreation & Wellness Center Natatorium On the womens side, the Lady
Pirates finished behind league champion TCU. while the ECU men also
came in second-best to the Homed Frogs ECU'S Diane Parker was named
Swimmer of the Meet for the second consecutive year Individually on
Saturday. ECUS Holly Williams picked up a second-place finish (2:03.86)
in the 200 backstroke Kale Gordon placed third in the 200 fly (2:0333).
On the men s side. ECU'S Casey Cronin finished in second place (2:04.85)
in the 200 breaststroke
Softball beats George Mason in Dixie Classic
Junior college transfer Shirley Burleson hit a grand slam home run to cap
off a six-run fourth inning to propel ECU over George Mason, 9-2, at the
Dixie Classic on Sunday Down 2-1 entering the bottom of the fourth, ECU
(11-2-1) put its first three runners on base to set the stage for Burleson
After Mandi Nichols led off the inning with a single, Krista Jessup and Lara
Brickhouse were issued consecutive base-on-balls Burleson followed
with her first career home run to give the Pirates a 5-2 advantage. Krislen
Johnson later doubled home Lacassa Hill, who singled following Burleson s
grand slam. Two more free passes loaded the bases again, and Andiey
Acosta drew the Pirates fifth walk of the inning to plate Ihe sixth run of
the inning ECU added two more runs in the sixth as Danyele Hill singled
home a run and Leigh Savoy scored on a groundout by Acosta Christine
Shendan and Johnson each collected a pair of hits as the Pirates pounded
out 10 hits in all Brentley Bridgeforth picked up the victory allowing two
runs on nine hits
Pirate Netters beat Charlotte 4-1
ECUs men's tennis team beat Charlotte 4-1 to wrap up play in the
Conference USA Shoolout being held this weekend in Fort Worth, Texas,
and New Orleans The Pirates, who beat Marquette on Friday before being
bumped lo the losers bracket by No 56 Louisville on Saturday, improve to
7-2 on the season Charlotte falls to 3-7 ECU clinched the win by taking
victories in four of Ihe top five singles flights Charl Meyer. Paulo Baumer,
Darren Mansell and Mark Gellard all claimed wins (See chart al bottom).
Woods wins tourney
Tiger Woods went 25 holes before he finally took the lead Sunday, then
roared past Davis Love III with key putts to win the Match Play Championship
for the second straight year. 3 and 2 Woods won for the 40th time on
the PGA Tour in just his 149th start, the quickest anyone has reached
lhal milestone Jack Nicklaus played 221 events before he won his 40th
tournament Woods earned $1 2 million, the biggest prize to date on the
PGA Tour, and reminded everyone who's No 1 in the world and who s Ihe
best when the world gets together
Hornish beats Spider-Man
The IRL season opener turned into a Penske shootout, with newcomer
Sam Hornish passing teammate Helio Castroneves on Ihe last lap to win
Sunday's Toyota Indy 300 The Toyota-powered Marlboro Team Penske
cars dominated early, but slipped back into the pack as accidents and pit
stops shuffled the 19-car field several times
Score Summaries
C-USA Women's and Men's
Swimming and Diving Championship
Houston, Texas
Women's Team Scores
1 TCU 772
2 ECU 578
3 Houston 538
4 Cincinnati 520
5 Tulane 486
6 Louisville 347
7 Saint Louis 292
Men's Team Scores
1 TCU 896
2 ECU 711
3 Louisville 648 50
4 Cincinnati 494.50
5 Saint Louis 374
Tennis: ECU (7-2) 4, Charlotte (3-7) 1
SINGLES
1 Charl Meyer
2 Paulo Baumer
3 Mario Santoso
4 Darren Mansell
(ECU) def Arturo Aguirre
(ECU) def Jonathan Clark
(CHAR) def Felipe Fonseca
(ECU) def Dorian Host
(CHAR) 7-5,6-3
(CHAR) 7-5,6-2
(ECU) 7-5,6-2
(CHAR) 6-4.6-7, 7-5
5 Mark Gellard (ECU) def Zvi Lantsberg (CHAR) 6-4,2-6,6-0
The Diamond Pirates had plenty to celebrate at home plate this weekend as the team tallied eight home runs in four games.
Team improves to 12-0
after weekend's play
BRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
After getting zero respect in
Baseball America's must recent
top 2S poll despite opening the
season h-o, the ECU baseball
team went into the weekend
with something to prove to its
critics. The message was simple;
They arc for real.
iiii opening the yeai against
the likes of I'M Vsheville and
Delaware, the Pirates welcomed
a tough Georgia Southern team
and the No. ii ranked Clemson
tigers Into town.
Needless to say, the only team
thai left the field happy was the
team that didn't leave town.
ECU rolled to lour tonsec u-
tive wins in a matter ot two days,
pushing their undefeated mark to
12-0.
ECU made quick work ol tin
Georgia Southern Eagles in game
one as they cruised to a 7-1 win
to set Ihe slage for the nightcap
showdown with Clemson.
Ryan Jones led the Pirates
with three hits and lour Kill's. The
Kill tame in the late stages ot the
game as lours blasted a two-run
homer to right in the seventh
and followed it with a two-run
doublets left in the ninth to seal
the deal.
Ryan Norwood added two
hits and llnan Cavanaugh col-
lected his first hit ol the season,
which turned out to be a two-run
triple in the ninth in a pinch-hit
effort lor Drewoslano
Brody Taylor was Ihe man
on Ihe mound as he S( allered
five hits and two walks oer
seven and two-thirds scoreless
innings
s Ihe sun set on Harrington
held, Ihe lans poured into Ihe
stadium lo support the Pirates
ECU pitching continued to baffle opposing hitters, putting the team ERA at 1.55 for the year.
against highly touted Clemson
in game two of ECU'S day one
double-header. The Pirates used
their outstanding home-field
advantage to pull out a 3-2,
eleven-inning thriller against
the nationally ranked I igers.
t oaching decision in the
bottom of the lllh by coach
Randy Mazey turned out to lie
the difference in the game.
Cavanaugh, who had a
pinch-hit triple in game one loi
CoStanzO, walked to the plate
with Ihe score knotted at two,
Mazey decided to reverse his
game one instinct and allow
( ostanzo to return the favor lor
avanaugh in a pinch-hitting
substitution.
I he count quickly ran to full
on the junior college transfer,
selling up Ihe heroics.
On the next pitch,ostano
blasted Patrick Hogan's offering
into "Ihe fungle As the crowd
exploded, the first-year I'irate
got mobbed al home plate by his
eistatic teammates.
the home run marked Ihe
first tor CostanzO as a I'irate.
"It feels real good said
CostanzO,
"l' e been wailing lor one.
Hut lor it to win the game is
even better
Mazey talked about his deci-
sion to pinch-hitostano in the
last inning.
"Coing into the season, we
thought he'd lie one ol our best
hitters said Mazey.
Hi oil lo ,i slow start so we
gave him the game ofl ai;aiiisl ,i
lefty. We wailed until Ihe sltua
lion was right, and be stepped
up huge
1(1 was also aided in their
winning effort with solo home
runs from Mark Mlnicozzi and
Norwood in the fifth and seventh
innings respectively.
Mike I lye came on in relief of
iireg Itunn in Ihe si.slh to earn
Hie win. Dye pitched live and
two-thirds innings, allowing
only three bits while striking
out nine.
Ihe freshman still has yet to
surrender a run this season.
Game three for ECU on
Sunday was a rematch of the
nightcap on Saturday as Clemson
and ECU battled again.
Clemson. coming oil of a 9-0
shutout of Georgia Southern in
the early game, looked to carry
the offensive explosion into the
.name with Ihe Pirates.
However, il looked as if the
Tigers had left the offense behind
from the game with the Fagles
as the Pirates pulled out another
hard-fought victory, 6-4.
Three consecutive hits to
start the third inning allowed
see BASEBALL page S8
Pirate seniors bid farewell with win
6 Gerard Galindo (ECU) vs Stuart Lynas
(CHAR) DNF
DOUBLES
FonsecaGellard
(ECU) vs AguirreLantsberg (CHAR) DNF
ECU defeats USF 69-
60 in last home game
BRANDON HUGHES
SENIOR WRITER
i rroyl Fling, Gabriel Mikulas,
Dei lie k U ile � I ukr Mac kay and
Carth Grindle) were all honored
before their last home game as
a I'irate on Saturday afternoon.
I ac b stood before I be home
crowd, relishing the spotlight
amid cheers and applause and
reminisi ing about their colle
giaie caieer. However, there was
still Ihe game .it band alter Ihe
tearful farewells, and the Pirates
needed a win ovet South I lorida
in order to contend lor thai final
spoi in the onference USA tour-
nament
I reshman Mike i look joined
the tour seniors on the Hour
to start Ihe game as Mikulas
wall bed from the bein h, still
not recovered from a season-
ending aim injury. Ihe Pirates
Were expet ted to be on fire with
emotions running high, but it
was the Hulls who sprinted out
lo an early 12-S lead
I i i responded and both
teams traded baskets until
midway through the second
half the Pirates then went on
a run and never looked back on
their way to a 69 oil u lory. I he
win improved ECU'S conference
record lo 4-10 in C-USA and
moved them into llth place in
Ihe standings. Head Coach Kill
llernon's three-game winning
streak has the Pirates right where
they want lobe heading into the
last week ol the regular season.
I hey must visit Marquette and
Southern Miss and control their
own destiny in order to receive a
i -USA tourney bid and a possible
Nil invite.
" I his was a great win and a
really solid effort from our basket-
ball team. Hut this is how we have
been playing foi the last month
and a hall lo two months said
I lemon after the game.
"I think that we are e,ci-
IniK belter and we're starting
to understand how to handle
late game situations heller, lor
a while, we have been playing
With a lot more leads lb,in WC
have ever had here at l.( 11 and
partli ularlv iii i ISA
The seniors contributed
immediately as Wiley hit a
lumpei ust Iii seconds into the
contest and Mackay quickly fol-
lowed with a three-pointer, i si
then countered with the tandem
ol Bradley Mosefy and terrain e
I eather, I he duo scored ihe Hulls'
lirst 12 points ol the game and
finished with 20 and It points
respei lively.
After that explosive run,
the Pirates settled down and
clawed their way back into the
contest the Iwo squads played
the remainder ol the first hall
ncc k-and-nci k, with III
bidding a slim 37-14 lead at
see BASKETBALL page B8 ECU'S Badiane throws down a monster dunk the second half





PAGE B7
III! LASI CAROLINIAN 'SPORTS
Swimming places second
ECU'S men's and women's swimmers took second place at the C-USA meet in Houston,
Texas last weekend. Both teams finished behind Texas Christian University's men's and
women's squads. Complete scores can be found on Page B6.
TCU was one of many mid-major teams who felt they deserved a BCS bowl bid last season.
BCS to offer fifth game, add conferences
MIAMI BEACH, Ha. (KRT) �
The Bowl Championship Series
intends to add a fifth game
beginning in the 2006 season,
and there will be increased access
and better revenue distribution
for the conferences that have not
been a part of the group.
The conferences not
previously part of the BCS will
become part of it under the new
framework, and those schools,
based on merit and performance,
will have guaranteed bowl slots
through championships or
ranking, probably no lower than
No. 12 in the BCS rankings.
"The Coalition for
Athletics Reform went out of
business today said Scott Cowen
of Tulane University, spokesman
for the coalition institutions.
"We are all part of one side
whether we call it the BCS, the
ABC or the XYZ. We have to
eliminate branding among all
schools in Division I-A
David I'rohnmayer, presi-
dent of the University of Oregon
and spokesman for the BCS
Presidential Oversight Commit-
tee, and Myles Brand, president
of the NCAA, joined Cowen
in making the announcement
after a six-hour meeting, the
third between the groups over
nine months.
"Every Division l-A institu-
tion is a BCS institution said
Frohnmayer.
"In the very real sense
that it will have an equal
opportunity based on its merit
and competitiveness to
participate at the very highest
level in one of the BCS games.
The idea of BCS vs. non-BCS
institutions will become an
artifact of history
Orlando, Jacksonville,
Atlanta, Houston, Dallas, San
Antonio and San Diego are
expected to have interest in the
fifth BCS game, but according to
Frohnmayer, it could also be a
new bowl game.
"We are envisioning a bowl
of equal stature I'rohnmayer
said.
"In terms of payout
(currently $17 million),
participation in the champion-
ship rotation and accessibility
The six conferences (Big fast,
ACC, SEC, Big Ten, Big 12 anil
Pac-10) in the BCS will retain
automatic berths. The five
conferences (Conference
USA, WAC, MAC, Moun-
tain West and Sun Belt)
not in the BCS and Notre Dame
combined will gain at least one
automatic berth, said a source
familiar with the negotiations.
"When you increase the
number of bowls, you increase
the number of access points
where institutions can be
included Irohnmayersaid.
"The consequence of the
new framework is that it will
double, perhaps even triple, the
accessibility of the institutions
not currently in the BCS
The traditional bowl
alignments (Big Ten and Pac-10
to Rose Bowl, Big East and ACC
to Orange Bowl, Big 12 to fiesta
Bowl and SEC to Sugar Bowl) will
be maintained. This season's BCS
title game will be in the Orange
Bowl on Ian. 4, 2005.
If under the new framework,
Cowen said, in four of the last
six years a member of a (oalition
conference would have played
in a BCS bowlThe average
ranking of the teams playing will
be increased Cowen said.
"This underscores the fact
there will be no (diluting) of the
quality of teams playing, even
though more of our teams will
be involved
The former non-BCS school
will receive a significant increase
in revenues, but the formula has
not been finalized.
"We are confident there will
be a significant increase for the
institutions not currently in the
BCS I'rohnmayer said.
We have an idea about the
percentage increase, but based on
thu yield we aren't sure what the
exact increase will be for each
conference
The institutions rejected
the idea of a college
playoff based on the idea that it
would move college sports
much closer to a professional
model than it needs to be
Get
caught
reading, d
ECU claims men's 4x400
relay title at C-USA meet
HOUSTON, Texas � ECU's
men's 4x4()0-meter relay
team claimed a Conference
USA gold medal to highlight
Saturday's action for the Pirates
at the 2004 C-USA Indoor
track and field Championships.
The ECU men finished eighth
in the team standings while the
l.ady Pirates placed ninth.
The Pirates' 4x400
squad, comprised of Michael
Hillian, B.J. Henderson,
DeAndre flyman and Darrus
Cofield, out-distanced the
competition with a time of 3:
IS.16, less than a second sh) i i .
school record.
Also scoring lor the I'n.ih s
on Saturday were Daman us
l;o, who placed third in thi
60-meter dash (6.74): Cofield,
who was seventh in tin- 400
(49.40); and Ricardo Bell I I
54.20) and Vance Stephenson
(1:56.61), who placed third and
fifth, respet lively, In the 800.
After an encouraging
start on Friday saw tin- I ad)
Pirates move into fifth place,
Saturday brought usl two
scoring performances for I
lar.i DeBrielle finished fourth
in the finals ol the 800 at 2:
i 49 .mi.i i olleen Mi Ginn
plai ed second in the high jump,
mat hlng hei own school remrd
b) i learing 5 feel 8 ln lies.
The University ol Houston
hosted th. meet .it the Veoman
I ieidhouse.
Houston's men's team
captured their second straight
. USA Indoor title while f t
i I urn. .1 the women's i n� n,
Next up lor l I is Hie I (.
Indooihampionshtps, to l
held in Boston next weekend.
Track Results
ECU WOMEN COMPLETE RESULTS:3. Llndsey Rosales11-11.75 13.65mlDarrus Cofield49.19 Iprelims)
60 Meters3. Tammie Mentzel11-1175(3.65(111Michael Hillian49.37 Iprelims)
Oarneshea Jones7.95 (prelimsl6. Kinsey Batts11-5.75 3.50mlBJ Henderson49.48 (prelimsl
Kelsey Walker8.16 (prelimsl17. Nicole Marchewka10-01305ml800 Meters
60-Meter HurdlesLong Jump3. Ricardo Bell1:54.20
Nicole Callaham9.41 (prelimsl3. Alisha Hopkins18-7.75 5.68ml5. Vance Stephenson1:56.61
200 Meters Oarneshea Jones Kelsey Walker24. Jenee Moore16-1015.13m)Ricardo Bell1:56.37 Iprelims)
25.82 Iprellmsl 27.23 Iprelims)Shot Put 23. Emily Thompson35-2 (10.72mlVance Stephenson Trent Fuchs Kyle Yunaska1:56.88 Iprellmsl 1:5982 Iprellmsl 2.05.42 Iprelims)
800 MetersWeight ThrowMile 10. Krislian Jorgensen
4. Tara DeBrlelle Tara DeBrlelle2:17.49 2:15.49 Iprellmsl14 Jessica Georglo (13.99m)45-10 754:27.47
Lauren Miller2:27.99 (prelimsl15. Emily Thompson44-4.25113.52ml3.000 Meters
Brie Berkowltz2:28.69 Iprellmsl19. Chelsea Salisbury40-0.5112.20m)9. Cralg Schmidi8:50.17
MilePentathlon5.000 Meters
16. Rehekah Bishop5:17.4612. Sharon Hellig2713 points15. Stephen Tausend16:06.78
3,000 Meters4x400 Relay
10. Johanna Allen10:14.53ECU MEN COMPLETE RESULTS:1. Hillian. Henderson3:15.16
5,000 Meters60 MetersHyman, Colield
9. Johanna Allen17.51.903. Damarcus Fox6.74Distance Medley Relay
Damarcus Fox6.78 (prelimsl4. Jorgensen. Walls10:22.63
4x400 Relay 11. Moore. Jones.4:04.4960-Meter HurdlesStephenson. Schmidt
Hopkins, BaptlsieHector Cotto8.35 Iprellmsllong Jump
Ronnie Pollard8.42 Iprellmsl11. Renaldo Isaac21-11.75 (6.70ml
Distance Medley Relay
6. DeBrlelle. Baptiste12:23.68200 MetersShot Put
Bishop, CollinsDeAndre Hyman22 46 Iprelims)9. Eric Frasure48-3.25 11471ml
High Jump400 MetersWeight Throw
2. Colleen McGinn5-8 (1.73ml7. Darrus Cofield49.402. Eric Frasure57-0 117.37m)
9. Michael Hillian49,847 Mayso Porch47-10.5 (14.59ml
Pole Vault
TEC is now hiring staff writers. Apply at our office located
on the 2nd floor of the Student
� Experience required
� Must have a 2.0 GPA
Publications Building.
Attention ECU
Sophomores
(Students who have completed 45-60 credit hours)
If at least 30 of your credit hours were
completed at ECU (not counting Math 0001
or 0045), you are required to complete the
Sophomore Survey
before you can pre-register for either Summer or
Fall 2004 courses. When you submit your survey
responses, a "tag" is removed from your records
so that you can pre-register. Registration staff can
verify that your responses were received and that the
tag was removed.
You can complete the form beginning March 3 by
going to the ECU "One-Stop" web site, entering your
ECU Exchange email userid and password to sign
on, and clicking on "Sophomore Survey" in the box
labeled "Surveys Messages will also be sent to your
ECU email account with links to the "One-Stop
You can also access the "One-Stop" from:
ECU on-line kiosks at Memlenhull St mien tenter,
Wright Plaee Cafeteria, the A ustin Building, Joyner
Library East, and Cyber Cafe units located near the
center stairway in Memlenhull.
Please complete the survey as soon as possible
after the survey opens on March 3certainly
before sophomore pre-registration begins (shortly
after March 29). This will also help avoid delays
during pre-registration when the workload on
ECU computers is at a peak. The restriction on
registering will end on April 26 when this Sophomore
Survey ends.





3 2 04
THL CAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B8
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the I'irates to strike first. After
singles From lamii' Paige and
I'rcvor Lawhorn, Darryl l.awhorn
singled to center to plate Paige. A
sacrifice fly to right field from
Norwood pushed across Trevor
foi an early 2-0 lead.
The Tigers struck hack in the
bottom oi the Frame. A double
trom left fielder Ryan Huh and a
single to center from Zane Green
helped (Temson cut the lead in
half, 2-1.
ECU scored again in the
fourth only to see their two-
run lead wiped away by a one
out, three-run homer from Lou
Santangelo. The home run gave
the ligers a 4f lead heading to
the top of the seventh.
Darryl l.awhorn made sure
that lead was short-lived as he
sent a monstrous blast over the
scoreboard in right field. The
tape measure shot was the lon-
gest home run of the tournament
from any player on any team.
With the score tied at four,
I (V tacked on two more runs in
the eighth off a Jones home run
to send the Tigers packing hack
to South i .iiillim
Darryl Lawhorn led the
Pirates with three hits and
three RBI's including the Mark
McGuire-likeshot.
Ricky Brooks and Dustin
Sasser did the mound duty for
ECU and combined to silence
the potent Clemson offense to
only seven hits.
(iame four was a mere
formality for the Pirates as
they cruised to yet
another win, 7-4
this time over the Eagles for the
second time in as many days.
Trevor Lawhorn led the
Pirates in the tournament finale
with two hits, including one
homer. Teammate Minicozzi
also hit a three-run shot to lift
ECU to victory.
hour wins in two days left
Mazey excited.
"I would have been happy
with three, satisfied with two, but
to get four was above and beyond
what we expected Mazey said.
"Our guys feel like they can
beat the Yankees right now, even
with A-rod. Our guys play with
a chip on their shoulder, because
we don't seem to get any respect
in the polls. We try to tell
them not to worry about the
polls, cause it doesn't matter
who's in them at the begin-
ning of the season or in the-
middle of the season, all that
matters is the end of
the season. But these guys aren't
stupid. They pick up the paper
and they see that we start off
8-0 and don't crack the top 25.
and I think they play with a little
chip on their shoulder, especially
when you play a team that's In
the top 15. They wanted to prove
something and they did
With all the Pirate wins is
another winner. His name is
Keith Leclair and the tourna-
ment that was played in the
former coach's honor will truly
be one that he can remember
forever.
"Yesterday was his birthday
and we had a great win last night
and all his friends were back
together and it was for a great
cause Mazey said.
"So as far as Keith goes,
this weekend was for him and
1 think everything went great. I
don't think anything could have
worked out better
This writer can be contacted at
sports&theeas (Carolinian, com.
Basketball
from page B6
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the break. USF shot particularly
well from the field in the first
half, hitting more than 50 per-
cent of their shots.
"1 wrote two big words on the
board at halftiinc in the locker
room. I put 'dribblepinetration
llerrion said.
"In the first half we weren't
drawing to the basketball, we
weren't containing the ball, and
they were just getting way too
much dribble penetration against
us. We were rotating out of posi-
tion, and they were getting a lot
of easy baskets
ECU clamped down on the
defensive end of the floor in
the second half as they held USF
under 30 percent, and Leather
didn't attempt another shot
from the floor, forward Brandon
Brigman helped pick up some of
the slack for the Bulls with nine
points and was their lone offen-
sive presence inside. Brigman
was whistled tor his tilth foul
with 12:33 left, and the Pirates
promptly went on a 9-0 tear to
claim a SI-40 advantage.
Moussa Badiane brought the
crowd to its feet several times on
the afternoon with some mon-
ster dunks and blocks. It was his
dunk on a fast break that seemed
to deflate any momentum left on
tin I 'SI- sideline.
The Bulls pulled to within
seven with just more than eight
minutes remaining, but the play
of Badiane and solid free throw
shooting down the stretch lifted
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the Pirates to an emotional nine-
point win. USF fell to 7-18 (1-13),
dead last in the conference.
Badiane scored 14 points
and had eight rebounds and
lour blocks. Derrick Wiley led
the Pirates with 17 points and
Mike Cook and Belton Rivers
both tallied double figures for
the Pirates.
"His (Badiane's) confidence
level right now is through the
roof. When (iabe (Mikulas) went
down, we pulled if off to the side
and told him it's time to play
llerrion said.
"A couple of years ago I don't
know if we would have gone
to him inside for a couple of
buckets. Now he is blocking, he
is very aggressive, running the
Moor and had a couple of dunks
that came out of nowhere that
was unbelievable. He is getting
better and better each day
ECU out-rebounded the Hulls
47-35 and committed only seven
turnovers which were big keys to
the game. However, perhaps the
chief factor in the win was the
swarming second-half defense.
"I thought our defensive
effort in the second half was
so much better. They shot 26
percent from the floor after 51.9
percent in the first half ller-
rion said.
"We really challenged the
Kins at halftime. We said, 'next
20 minutes, if you want to win
this basketball game and take a
step closer to getting to the C-
USA tournament, you've got to go
guard these guys for 20 minutes
and they did that
Ilerrion's squad will travel
to Marquette on Wednesday
and then to USM on Satur-
day. The Golden Eaglet were
a Final Four team a year ago,
but after the departure of
several key players, they will
most likely miss the NCAA
tournament thisseason. Southern
Miss is just ahead of ECU in the
conference standings and
the Pirates could realistically
move into ninth place in C-
USA with two wins. However,
they are also in danger of
missing the postseason if they
falter away from Minges.
"Right now, we just have to
keep winning and to go into
Marquette with an open mind.
They're not the same Marquette
team as last year, so if we just go
in there and play with an open
mind and play like we've played
the last three games, we'll come
out with a good result said
Wiley after the game.
The fate of FCU's season rests
squarely on the shoulders of the
Pirate seniors. The same seniors
who have played their hearts out
for the Pirate faithful are wrap-
ping up their collegiate careers.
lling will leave ECU as the
school's second all-time leading
rebounder and is one of only four
players to score more than 1,000
points and have more than 800
rebounds in his career at ECU.
(irindley played two years
at ECU after transferring from
Monroe College. Grindley
finished his two-year career with
a .500 field-goal percentage.
MacKay was recruited as a
shooter from Australia and he
didn't disappoint. He scored a
career-high 14 points on 4-of-6
shooting from long range against
Houston earlier this season
and averaged 2.5 points in his
two-year Pirate career.
Wiley was the Pirate's leading
scorer each of his two seasons in
uniform. He has scored more
than 20 points In a game 12
times and is 10th in C-USA at
15.0 points per game.
Mikulas' four-year career
at ECU was cut short by an
untimely injury, but was
impressive nonetheless. Mikulas
leaves as the school's all-time
leader in free throws made and
attempted. He is also one of only
11 players to score more than
1,000 poi nts a nd have more t ha n
500 rebounds.
"We are really going to miss
them. F.rroyl and Gabe is the first
complete recruiting class for us
that we have graduated since I've
been here. Both of those kids
have had tremendous basketball
careers here Herrion said.
"1 could not have asked for
live better guys to coach. I am
really going to miss those guys
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
SGA ANNUAL FUNDING SEMINARS!
Do you want $$MONEY$$ to help operate
your student organization?
Sign-up to attend an SGA Funding Seminar
in 255 Mendenhall.
?Classes are being offered throughout the month of March.
Packets will not be accepted if you do not attend a training class.
Deadline for submitting annual funding
packets is FRIDAY. APRIL 2.
lt is highly recommended that your officers and advisor attend together.


Title
The East Carolinian, March 2, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 02, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1712
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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