The East Carolinian, February 26, 2004






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Volume 79 Number 122
M THE EAST CAROLINIAN
tec
THURSDAY
Lindsay Kilpatrick, freshman nursing major, donates
blood to the Red Cross Tuesday in Mendenhall.
Blood drives yield
low participation
Red Cross falls short of
100 pints per day goal
TABATHA JAMES
STAFF WRITER
One hundred pints per day was too high of a
goal for this week's Red Cross-sponsored blood
drive.
"It's very unfortunate that so few people
managed to show up said Jcannine Whitaker,
sophomore nursing major.
"I wish more people would realize how much
blood we lack for people in need. God forbid a
family member need a transfusion, and they can't
find a match
The country's blood supply is at a 10-year
low, said Debbie Page, account manager for donor
resources of the Red Cross.
Only 131 pints were collected during Tuesday
and Wednesday's efforts, said Treasa Whitley, Red
Cross team supervisor.
"Things were really slow. I think we need
to have more signs and more advanced e-mails
and articles to promote the drive said Whit-
ley.
Dale Forman, administrative assistant
for the Red Cross, said he was happy with the
turn out overall, but he would have liked to receive
at least 30-45 more donations each day.
Approximately 43 individuals gave a vial
of blood to be tested as a bone marrow match,
but that number also fell short of its goal.
From here, the blood from those that were
tested will be placed on the National Marrow
Donor Program Registry, and individuals who
are a match will be contacted and further work
will be done, said Forman.
Red Cross workers said they wanted to remind
students and faculty that they can benefit from
the process of giving blood.
Treasa Whitley said men and post-menopausal
women that give blood at least three times a
year reduce their chances of heart disease, heart
attack and stroke by 50 percent.
Red Cross workers said they would like to
thank those who donated their time and
blood for the cause.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeaitcarolinian.com.
Anorexia and bulimia nervosa affects primarily men and women in their teens and twenties.
Health experts educate
ECU on eating disorders
Programs, services
provided for students
NICK HENNE
STAFF WRITER
As part of national eating
disorder week, Feb. 29 - March
6, the healthy lifestyles team
is sponsoring several programs
including presentations, films
and eating disorder screenings
for students and faculty.
Karen Warren, director of
wellness education, said because
eating disorders are a sensitive
topic, all services offered are
confidential.
Warren said an increased
number of services will be pro-
vided this year, and it's important
for students to participate and
learn more about the issue.
"Eating disorders are much
more common than anyone
knows said Warren.
"There are a lot of people who
are suffering silently. It might be
family members of yours, it might
be a friend, it might be you
Warren said statistics show
college students are the most
susceptible to eating disorders.
"This is the age range where
eating disorders are most preva-
lent. On college campuses, 19
percent of students will have an
eating disorder, and that's much
higher than the national jstatis-
tics Warren said.
Though eating disorders have
negative, sometimes long-lasting
effects, recovery is possible.
An ECU alumna who chose
to remain anonymous, suffered
from anorexia for 11 years
before seeking treatment and
said her lifestyle has drastically
improved since overcoming the
condition.
"It affected every single
aspect of my life I'm much
more able to focus, finish tasks
and last through a day, whereas
before I didn't even have the
energy to last through a day
she said.
see EATING page A8
'Personal Stories'
express discontent
with UNC-system
Students discuss how increases,
budget cuts affect them
JOSH SLONE
STAFF WRITER
ECU students, like many others enrolled in
UNC-system schools, have noticed tuition is on
the rise, while school budgets are getting cut.
Hut most of us are not willing to
accept these changes without a fight.
ECU's Student Government Association has col-
lected 89 true personal accounts written by stu-
dents.
The Personal Stories Project started in Septem-
ber of 2003 and is "an effort to represent the voices
of hundreds of students and their families who have
come face-to-face with the reality of a university
system that has become increasingly unaffordable
and inaccessible said Amanda Devore, vice presi-
dent of legislative affairs for the University of North
Carolina Association of Student Governments.
ECU's SGA is working in partnership with the
UNCASG, a statewide organization, and overall it
has collected more than 800 stories from students
at UNC-system schools.
Each story is written by a student, family
member or alumni and addresses how raising
school tuition and university budget cuts have
affected their lives.
"I know students that have to work two jobs
just to make tuition and they're only in-state
students said Shannon O'Donnell, student body
secretary.
The stories were assembled in a book titled, The
Personal Stories Project: Faces, Not Numbers, and was
released earlier this month to the North Carolina
Legislature. The North Carolina General Assembly,
the UNC: Board of Governors and the 16 UNC-
system chancellors also received a copy.
The UNCASG hopes this will open the eyes of
students involved with the project as well as those
who make tuition cost and university budget deci-
sions.
"We want to get students heard, not just within
the university, but also within the state O'Donnell
said.
"A lot of times, government officials will raise
taxes, and they don't see the effects of the tax raises
- they only see the number side, where it's more
about revenue. We hope that we can give them a
different perspective
While hopeful the project will succeed in its
goals, O'Donnell said she understands the difficulty
students face when challenging state officials.
"When it comes down to it, we students are
kind of overlooked by state legislature just because
we aren't the highest voting population. I person-
ally would hope they Board of Governorsl would
not increase tuition, but their past record shows it
is highly possible O'Donnell said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
rt
Information
To read the first volume of "Personal Stories visit
www.personalstories.org.
Domestic violence discussions
planned for town hall meeting
Cases among college
students, African
Americans are topics
ADRIANNA DRAKE
STAFF WRITER
Every nine seconds, a
woman falls victim to domes-
tic violence.
To promote awareness of
specific environments where
domestic violence occurs,
ECU will host a Town Hall
meeting titled "Opening the
Dialogue: Responding to
Domestic Violence among
African Americans in
eastern North Carolina
tonight from 6 p.m. - 8:30
p.m. in llendrix Theatre.
The meeting is spon-
sored by ECU'S Division of
Academic Affairs, the Col-
lege of Human Ecology
and the National Steering
Committee for the Institute
on Domestic Vio-
lence in the African
American Community.
The original founders of
the IDVAAC Steering Com-
mittee will make presentations
followed by open discussion.
Speakers will address
topics such as "Domestic Vio-
lence on the College Campus:
Reflections of an Innova-
tive Social Work Program
Makinga Difference" and "Inter-
section of Domestic Violence,
Black Women and Incarcera-
tion
"We hope to learn from
the presenters and the other
participants ahout how to
see MEET page A2
Funny money pops up around Greenville
" Tips For Checking Your Bills
Recent arrest nets
$42,400 in bogus bills
KEITH S. BYERS
STAFF WRITER
There are a lot of people who
enjoy making money. Then are
also a lot of people who enjoy
making money - literally-and
wind up in jail as a result.
The counterfeiting of money
is one of the oldest crimes in
history. At some periods in
early history, it was considered
treasonous and was punishable
by death.
Counterfeit bills have been
appearing recently around
Greenville, including the largest
amount of fake bills ever seen by
Greenville police.
The U.S. Secret Service has
been investigating counterfeit-
ing since its creation in 1865,
and through the years - from
crude printing plates right up
to today's sophisticated laser jet
printers-has become an increas-
ing problem for law enforcement
nationwide.
The recent arrest of a Wilson,
N.C. couple netted $42,400 in
fake cash - the majority of which
was in a briefcase in the man's
trunk.
Greenville police said the
man, James Allen Toler, 39, had
purchased ink jet cartridges and
paper from the Office Depot on
Greenville Boulevard on Jan.
19.
"He paid with $120 worth of
counterfeit currency said P.T.I
RJ. Wright of the Greenville
Police Department. Wright said
the bills that he saw, $20s, $S0s
and $100s were of high quality.
Toler returned to the store
on Feb. 11 and was taken into
custody. During questioning by
Agent Anton Fickey of the U.S.
Secret Service, Toler said he had
-The president's face Is more life-like than on counterfeit money.
-There are smooth, fine lines printed behind the president and
behind the building on the backside.
-There is a polymer thread that can't be reproduced by copiers
and printers woven In the bill. The thread In the $100 bill reads
"USA 100" and the $50 bill reads "USA 50 The thread cant be
reproduced with copiers or printers but is visible when the bill Is
held up to a light or appears yellow In ultraviolet light
- There are red and blue threads embedded In the paper of genu-
ine bills.
-There Is a watermark, or "shadow to the right ol the face on the
bill that Isnt visible unless the bill Is held up to the light.
accidentally used the counter-
feit money because his wife,
Vivian Toler, 39, had tried to
use a check, and Office Depot's
scanner wasn't working. Police
searched Toler's car and discov-
ered a printer, reams of paper
and bills in the trunk - some of
see MONEY page A3
. � , c . ' '�
Black History Awareness
throughout February
Henry Lewis became the first African American to lead a symphony orchestra in the United States on Feb. 15,1968.
Feb. 10,1964 The Civil Rights Act of 1964 passed the House of Representatives on Feb. 10, prohibiting any state or local govern-
ment or public facility from denying access to anyone because of race or ethnic origin.
drecast TEC REQUIRED
READING
Showers
High of 47
Visit wwwtheeastcarollnlan.com to
read about Alan Greenspan's testimony
before the House Budget Committee.
m response to Caltomia Judges' alowtng
gay rnarrlage. President Bush Is urging a
ban on same-sex marriages
TEC takes a took at the nominees of the
76th annual Academy Awards, which
are set to air this Sunday at 8 pm
page 86
ECU's home game against USF this
Saturday also marks Senior Day The
Pirates wl say goodbye to live players.
Dorft target to vat the Central
Ticket Office m MSC tor tickets
to "A Tribute to Motown"
Saturday at 8 pm in Wright
Auditorium.





race a;
tec
Ir
NEWS
ERIN RICKERT
News Editor
HOQy O'NEAL
Assistant News Editor
news@trieeastcaroliniaacom
252.3286366
Announcements
Domestic Violence Forum
The School o' Sooai Wo win sponsor a community form on domestic
violence in the eastern North CaroSna African -American community, today
from6pm -BXpm ri HendrixTheatre
Resume Blitz
Career Services oresents a Resume Blitz where students can have their
resumes critiqued on site today from 5 pm - 6 p m �i 129 Speight
Doing Business with Government
A session on how existing businesses can set up and get contracts with
local state and federal government wi be held today from noon - 2 pm.
in the WHS BukSng Conference Room
Sigma Xi Seminar
The ECU Chapter of Sigma Xj presents a Spotlight Seminar featuring the
work of physcs John Kenney PvD today at 330 pm in SZ 309 Science
and Technology Lecture Hal Annex
Education Career Fair
There will be an Education Career Fair Fnday from 9 am - noon
in Mendenhall
Fulbright Lecture
Shagufa Kapadia from New School University will speak on
adolescent-parent relationships m inoia Fnday from 10 am. -11 am m
2l8ARagsdaie
Resume Workshop
Career Services offers a resume-writing workshop on Monday
March 1 from 8.30 am - 9 15 am in the Student Professional
Development Office
English TA6 Lecture
Biodun Jeyifo. English professor at Cornell University, will speak at the
annual English TAG Lecture Thursday March 4 at 7 p.m m 1031 Bate
Jeyifo s lecture s tilled "On Being Anglophone Now Meditations on
Globalization Language and Desire' A reception will follow the lecture
Dances of Universal Peace
The Office of Adult and Commuter Student Services sponsors the Dances
of Universal Peace Sunday from 4 pm -6 pm in 244 Mendenhall The
particjatory event features simple circle dancing and singing led by a
trained leader and accompanied with live music
Carter Center Internships
Peter Mather director of educational programs for The Carter Center m
Atlanta Ga will hold an information session on internship opportunities
Fnday March 5 m 221 Mendenhall from 10 30 a m - noon The session
is open to aH faculty and students who are interested in international
development and humanitarian issues
SRC Family Fun Day
The Department of Recreational Services and the Office for Adult and
Community Students will co-sponsor Family Fun Day on Saturday March
6 from I0am-3pmmthe SRC Events will include group fitness, sports
a climbing wall bowkng. a movie and arts and crafts There is no cost for
students spouses and dependent children of students above age six
Belize Summer Study Abroad
There is an opportunity to study atyoad in Belize an English speaking
country and gam three credit hours in English ethnic studies humanities
or other independent studies topics The program runs from May 29 -
June 20 Space is limited For more information contact Gay Witentz at
328-6678 or wiientzg mail ecu edu
Sophomore Survey
Students who nave completed 45-60 credit hours. 30 from ECU. must
take the Sophomore Survey before pre- registering for summer or fall 2004
semesters The survey will be available on OneStop beginning March 3
Daily Reflector Scholarship
Students interested in media related careers can appfy for two of the
annual $2,500 James M Cox Jr Foundation Scholarships offered by The
Dairy Reflector Applicants must be a umor at ECU with a minimum of two
full-time semesters remaining until graduation (excluding summer school).
show interest in a media-reated career have a minimum 3 0 GPA in the
last academic year and no grades below a C in their maor
Applications are due Apni 1 and can be obtained from Vicky Moms,
director of Donors Stewardship. Greenville Centre. Suite 1100 2200 S
Charles Btvd For more information contact Morns at 328-9573
Special Olympics Fundraising
The ECU Police Department s raising funds for the Special Olympics of
North Carolina this year T-shirts, hats and car magnets are available in
the Blount House from 8am -5pm
Paper Person
The student featured at the top of today s paper is Daniela Jones a
sophomore psychology major
News Briefs
Local
Easfey names members of OLF
study group
RALEIGH (AP) - A group tasked
with studying the effects of
locating a landing field in eastern
North Carolina will consist of
government environmental and
military officials. Gov Mike Easley
said Tuesday
The group will examine the
proposed landing field and make
a recommendation within 60 days
regarding the overall impact of
tnesrte
The announcement comes after a
series of meetings between Navy
offoais and Eastey
Sid Eagles, who recently retired as
chief judge of the North Carolina
Court of Appeals is chairman of
the group
The panel 3iso will include state
Sen Scott Thomas D-Craven. Rep.
Bill Culpepper D-Chowan. Crime
Control and Pubic Safety Secretary
Bryan Beatty Enwonrnent and Natural
Resources Secretary Bi Ross, and
two Navy rear admirals
The group wfl observe a Navy FA-18
ffy-over in Washington County on
Fnday
Woman. 90, dies after assault
at assisted-Hving home
WWSTON-SALEM (AP) - Police are
investigating the death of a 90-year-
old woman who was assaulted m
January at the assisted-Irving center
where she lived
Katherine Cromer Bovender dfed Feb
13 after being moved to a different
center The assault on Bovender
took place Jan 16 or Jan 17 at the
Martin House of Winston-Salem.
formerly Meadowbrook Terrace said
Wwston-Satem Poire U Bity Riggs
"We feel confident that she has been
assaulted and we're investigating that
as an elder-abuse case Riggs said
2-2i
"We ve-ao to expand the scope of the
investigation now into ner death"
Poke w try to determine whether
Bovender s death was connected
to fie assaut Riggs sad Authorities
have asked the Forsyth County
Department of Social Services
to investigate the Martin House
BP �
National
Judge lets government try
to prow tobacco companies
lured children
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
governments claim that tobacco
companies aggressively marketed
cigarettes to children can proceed
as part of a $289 billion Justice
Department lawsuit against the
industry a federal judge ruled
Tuesday
i J S. District Judge Gladys Kesster
demed a motion by the companies
to dismiss a section of the case
alegjng a youth marketing campaign
was part of a decades-long effort
to mislead the public about the
dangers of smoking in violation of
federal racketeering laws
'The government must be given
the opportunity to prove its claim
about defendants youth marketing
subscheme at trial Kessier wrote
in a 23-page opinion
The government lawsuit, filed in
US District Court tor the District of
Columbia seeks recovery of profits
the industry made from sales of
cigarettes from 1971 to 2000 to
people who became addicted at a
young age
8 ports to such cartoon characters as
Joe Camel as evidence of an effort to
target children along with advertising
that glamorized smoking, placement
of products m stores near schools, at
movies and rock concerts and ads in
magazines that cater to young readers
Bush urging international
community to provide strong
security presence in Haiti
WASHINGTON (AP' - President
Bush said Wednesday that the
United States is encouraging the
rtemationai community to provide
a soong security presence m Haiti
as America and its aies continue to
fry to achieve a postcaf solution to
the island nation's escalating
violence
Bush said the United States was
fJscusswig such a security presence
at the moment but he provided
no details
Bush said he has been closely
consulting with Secretary of
State Colin Powell in an effort to
reach an accord between Haitian
President Jean-Bertrand Anstide
and rebels who have seized
control of large parts of Haiti
'We will have a robust presence
with an effective strategy' Bush
told reporters following an Oval
Office meeting with the president
of Georgia
He repeated the United States
often-stated policy in recent days
that it will turn back any Haitian
refugees trying to reach Amencan
shores
World
of government workers
strike against strike ban in India
NEW DELHI (AP) - Millions of
Indian workers walked off the job
Tuesday to protest a Supreme
Court decision banning strikes by
government employees
Air. tram and bus services were
disrupted in Calcutta, and all financial
institutions, including insurance
companies, were closed in Bombay.
State-run banks in New Delhi
were shut down, and government-
run institutions in Bangalore. India's
information technology hub. were
also affected
"We have a right to strike shouted
about 1.500 bank workers as
they marched in Bombay waving
red banners associated with
communisl-led unions
Tapan Sen. leader of the Center
of Indian Trade Unions, estimated
about 40 million workers took
part and said many were from the
unorganized sector
India's highest court ruled in August
that government employees canno:
strike and those who do can be
fired Walkouts by state workers
inconvenience citizens and hurt
the economy the Supreme Court
said, and disputes should be resolved
in the courts
United States suspends
imports of French cold cuts, tote
gras, France says
PARIS (AP) - The United States
is suspending imports of French
cold cuts and foie gras because
of food safety concerns. Frances
Agriculture Ministry said Tuesday.
American veterinary experts
inspected sites in France and found
they did not conform with U.S. food
safety requirements, the ministry
said It did not give further details or
say if any other beef or poultry
products were banned
"France shares neither the
observations of the American
authorities nor the conclusions
they fell should be taken the
statement said
The statement said a high-level
mission from the Agriculture
Ministry, along with French veterinary
officials, went to Washington on
Monday to explain what France
has done over the past several
months to respond to the "specific
requirements" of the U.S. system
The statement did not elaborate.
Electoral College carries on past tradition
election in
Method of presidential
selection continues
PETER KALAJIAN
STAFF WRITER
Ever) four years represen-
tatives from every state are
elected for a job most Americans
feel should rest in their hands
chaos-
8 our
frJZ national
. "w" "w" m leader
Article
II of the United States Constitu-
tion lavs out the manner in which
the president and vice-president
are elected, and with little varia-
tion, those methods are still
employed today
Section 1. paragraph 2 of
the Constitution states, "each
State shall appoint, in
such a Manner as the Legislature
theieal mav direct, a Number of
electors, equal to the
whole number of Sena-
tors and Representatives to
which the state may be entitled in
(ingress
Today, that number of
representatives ranges from
I (Wyoming) to 55alifornU).
Article II was written during a
time when national literacy and
education were luxuries for the
upper classes of society.
The Continental Congress
of 1775 included a constitu-
tional provision that would
ensure average Americans
would be involved in the political
process, while guaranteeing
that the final word would
comi Ikjci more knowledgeable
Individuals.
So the Electoral College was
formed.
Originally. Article II stated
that electors meet in their
respective states, and vote for
two people. The person with
the highest number ot votes
became president, and the
runner-up would tie vice-presi-
dent.
This clause was nullified bv
the 12th Amendment, which
introduced the one vote, two-
candidate system of today.
In a published report
to Congress about the
electoral college and
its place in modern
'M'urica. Thomas H.Neale of the
Government and Finance divi-
sion ot the I Unary of Congress
reported that the electoral col-
lege "seeks to reconcile differ-
ing state and federal interests,
provide a degree of popular
participation in the election,
give the less populous states
some leverage in the process
and generally insulate the
election from political manipula-
tion
The theory of the Llectoral
l College is simple: The first can-
didate to receive a majority of the
VW votes, wins
When the average
inerican casts his or her
vote, they cast it not
for a particular person, but for the
state delegation of electors
representing that political party
in the national election.
The Constitution, while spe-
cific on the number of electors
and the manner in which they
are chosen, is ambiguous on the
discretion of electors to make
their own decisions: that is, to
vote for ,i candidate contrary to
the popular election on their
state.
tccordinsj to Heale's report,
while rare, "faithless elec-
tors, the name given to those
members of the delegation who
vote against the wishes of
their constituencies, have exer-
cised their constitutional powers
of dissent a number of times,
most recenth In 1998 and with
a blank ballot in the hotly
contested 2000 Gore-Bush
election.
Heale is quick to point out;
however, that never once in
American history have "faith-
less" members of the Electoral
College managed to affect the
outcome of an election
But in the ensuing legal
battle between Texas Goverpor
George W. Bush and then
Vice-President AI Gore, the
words "Electoral College"
would be forever etched into the
collective consciousness of Un-
American public.
By winning the popular
election by over 500,000 votes
and initially being awarded
the disputed electoral votes from
the state of Florida, Al Gore felt
he was entitled to the presi-
dency.
Upon recounts though,
Bush won Florida by the nar-
rowest margin since the 1960
Nixon-Kennedy race�less than
1,000 votes�and was awarded
that states' electorate and
eventually, after several weeks
of legal wrangling by both sides,
the presidency.
This writer can be contacted at
newi@theeastcarolinian.com.
Meet
from page A1
Eastern Northarolina
was chosen by the IDVAAC tnr j
specific reason
"Thell) A( SteeringCom-
mittee wanted to assess tin-
perceptions surround-
ing domestic vio-
lence among African
Americans in a rural part ot
the I' S said Peggy Novotny,
marketing coordinator tor the
( ollege of Human I Ologj
Coordinators are hoping
for a large turnout since the
meeting will be open to the
entire community.
"We hope to fill Hendrix
Theatre, vshich seats 750
people Novotny said.
The IDVAAC will vid-
eotape the meeting for
dot umentation
There will be a park and
ride offered for those without a
universits parking permit and
treeparkingand shut tie sir vices
will be available beginning at
5 p.m.
Attendees will need to
park at the Belk
Building on the corner
ot (harks Boulevard and
Greenville Boulevard. The bus
will pick up and dropoff ever
20 minutes.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
r�
Contact Info
301 SJarvis IS.
DV�3rd
c

9CrtW4th
1 93 33
5th
Join Us For Our
LEAP Year Celebration
Sunday Feb 29th
s2.50 Pints
Guinness. Bass. New Castle
For more information on the
Town Hall meeting contact
the College of Human Ecol-
ogy marketing office at
328-2882.
CoIoj
Get t
the polyp,
Get the cure,
1-80O-ACS-23U5 or eancer.org
Qet fyeady fop
atalog :
onnectiori
UAE.
2 New Sprint: 2004 Shipments
Arriving Daily!
New Shipments of Rainbow Sandals Are Here
Including Unind New Shies!
210 E. S'1 St. 758-8612
cualogconni gcduncM

"
I





2-26 04
THL EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
3rd
East Carolina University
Senior Nursing Students
The road to success starts
with Moses Cone Health System.
We offer New Graduates
? Karty employment options with NCLEX support
r Intrusive S-wcek dmroom and clinical experiences to complement your department orientation.
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Community Features
� On ECU Bus Route
� 24-Hour Emergency Maintenance LJ
24-Hour Slate of the Art Computer Center
� Resort Style Pool with Hot Tub
Apartment Features
� Ethernet Service Included
� WD in every apartment
� Private bedrooms available
� Private bathrooms aailable
Money
from page A1
President Bush backed the creation of a constitutional
amendment against same-sex marriages, claiming that the
unions threaten the sanctity of marriage.
Bush urges gay marriage
ban, but Republicans in
Congress aren't rushing
WASHINGTON (AP) � Presi-
dent Bush wants quick election-
year enactment of a constitu-
tional amendment prohibiting
gays from marrying each other,
hut Republicans in (longress are
not rushing to heed his call.
After Bush's announcement
Tuesday, House Majority leader
Tom Del.ay, R-Texas, said it
would take time to gauge the
level of support in Congress for
a constitutional amendment.
He suggested the difficulty of
passing one may cause lawmak-
ers to take a different approach
to preserving marriage as a solely
man-woman union.
"We don't want to do this
in haste said DeLay.
The front-runner for the
Democratic presidential nomi-
nation. Sen. John Kerry of Mas-
sachusetts, and his leading rival,
Sen. John Edwards of North
Carolina, struggled to make
their opposition to Hush's stance-
clear as they carefully tiptoed
around politically sensitive
turf.
Kerry said he supports civil
unions, "and 1 think that that is
permissible within state law and
it ought to be
"If he really wants to help
married couples, what he should
he doing is helping them resolve
their economic problems, their
health care problems said
Edwards while campaigning
In Georgia.
Meeting long-held expecta-
tions of his most conservative
supporters, Bush argued that
same-sex weddings threaten
the institution of marriage-and
thus society- and that actions by
several local jurisdictions allow-
ing gay marriage make federal
intervention the only recourse.
"If we are to prevent Un-
meaning of marriage from being
changed forever, our nation must
enact a constitutional amend-
ment to protect marriage in
America said the president.
"Marriage cannot be severed
from its cultural, religious and
natural roots without weakening
the good influence of society
Hush called on Congress "to
promptly pass and to send to the
states for ratification" an amend-
ment to define marriage as a
union of a man and a woman.
He had opposed legalizing civil
unions as governor of lexas, but
Bush left the door open for states
to do so now - an alternative gay
rights groups find insufficient.
Bush's conservative sup-
porters who view prohibit-
ing gay marriage as a priority
were thrilled.
which had yet to be cut up.
"If you are going to do
criminal activity, you are going
to make a mistake at some point
in time, and that's what he did
Wright said.
He also said that in Green-
ville, most of the counterfeit bills
turn up at fast food restaurants,
and he had about 60 calls to
investigate counterfeit currency
last year.
"A lot of times we get the call
that a retail establishment has a
counterfeit bill. We will do it as
a fraud investigation and go pick
the currency up. Ninety nine
percent of the time the pcisnii
who has passed it has already
left Wright said.
He also said the bills are
kept until the Secret Service
agent from Raleigh comes
to pick them up. Wright
said $2()s are the bills most
counterfeited.
Local businesses in the
downtown area have recently
seen more bills popping up.
Sue Walton, a bartender at
Buffalo Wild Wings on Tilth
Street said last fall she was
working when counterfeit
money appeared.
"The manager on duty said
it was easy for him to spot. She
waitress wasn't paying atten-
tion said Walton.
"I am pretty sure it was a
$50 bill
Walton said recently Buf-
falo Wild Wings put up a
memo reminding staff to check
their bills.
Buffalo Wild Wings use a spe-
cial pen to check any bill that
looks suspicious. A simple mark
drawn on the bill can usually
prove if it's real or not.
However, according to Sgt.
Joe Friday of the Greenville
Police Department's investiga-
tive division says the pens are
fallible.
Friday said holding the bill
up to light and look for the holo-
gram etched into the right corner
detects a counterfeit bill.
A person who receives a bad
bill as change or spends one acci-
dentally will not he charged. In
Toler's case, the state could
ask for three to five years impris-
onment.
If convicted in
federal court, Tolcr could receive
up to 10 years in prison, police
said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com
Are you Jewish?
Get involved with
fellow Jews on
campus through
Hillel
,iH.LLllHJJ,l'illljy:CTl
Next Event:
UNC Friday Night Dinner
February 27th, 2004
For more information contact Jon at:
JSM0512(a)mail. ecu.edu





PAGE A2
IMMW�MM
2-26-04
NEWS
ERIN RICKERT
News Editor
HOLLY O'NEAL
Assistant News Editor
news@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
Domestic Violence Forum
The School of Social Work will sponsor a community lorm on domestic
violence in the eastern North Carolina Afncan-Amencan community, today
from 6 p m - 8 30 p m in Hendnx Theatre
Resume Blitz
Career Services presents a Resume Blitz where students can have their
resumes critiqued on site today from 5 p m - 6 p.m in 129 Speight.
Doing Business with Government
A session on how existing businesses can set up and get contracts with
local, slate and federal government will be held today from noon - 2 p.m.
in the Willis Building Conference Room
Sigma Xi Seminar
The ECU Chapter of Sigma Xi presents a Spotlight Seminar featuring the
work o( physics John Kenney PhD today at 3:30 p.m in SZ 309 Science
and Technology Lecture Hall Annex
Education Career Fair
There will be an Education Career Fair Friday from 9 am - noon
in Mendenhall
Fulbright Lecture
Shagufa Kapadia from New School University will speak on
adolescent-parent relationships in India. Friday from 10 am-11 a.m. in
218ARagsdale
Resume Workshop
Career Services offers a resume-writing workshop on Monday.
March 1 from 8:30 am - 9:15 am in the Student Professional
Development Office
English TAG Lecture
Biodun Jeyifo, English professor at Cornell University, will speak at the
annual English TAG Lecture Thursday. March 4 at 7 p.m in 1031 Bate
Jeyifos lecture is titled, 'On Being Anglophone Now: Meditations on
Globalization Language and Desire" A reception will follow the lecture.
Dances of Universal Peace
The Office of Adult and Commuter Student Services sponsors the Dances
of Universal Peace Sunday from 4 pm - 6 p.m in 244 Mendenhall. The
participatory event features simple circle dancing and singing led by a
trained leader and accompanied with live music
Carter Center Internships
Peter Mather, director of educational programs for The Carter Center in
Atlanta. Ga. will hold an information session on internship opportunities
Friday. March 5 in 221 Mendenhall from 10 30 am - noon The session
is open to all faculty and students who are interested in international
development and humanitarian issues
SRC Family Fun Day
The Department of Recreational Services and the Office for Adult and
Community Students will co-sponsor Family Fun Day on Saturday, March
6 from 10 am -3pm in the SRC Events will include group fitness, sports,
a climbing wall, bowling, a movie and arts and crafts. There is no cost for
students, spouses and dependent children of students above age six
Belize Summer Study Abroad
There is an opportunity to study abroad in Belize, an English speaking
country, and gain three credit hours in English, ethnic studies, humanities
or other independent studies topics The program runs from May 29 -
June 20 Space is limited For more information contact Gay Wilentz at
328-6678 or wilentzg mail ecu edu
Sophomore Survey
Students who have completed 45-60 credit hours, 30 from ECU, must
take the Sophomore Survey before pre-regislering lor summer or fall 2004
semesters The survey will be available on OneStop beginning March 3
Daily Reflector Scholarship
Students interested in media-related careers can apply for two of the
annual $2,500 James M Cox Jr. Foundation Scholarships offered by The
Daily Reflector Applicants must be a unior at ECU with a minimum of two
lull time semesters remaining until graduation (excluding summer school),
show interest in a media-related career, have a minimum 3 0 GPA in the
last academic year and no grades below a C in their major
Applications are due April 1 and can be obtained from Vicky Morris.
director of Donors Stewardship. Greenville Centre, Suite 1100, 2200 S
Charles Blvd For more information contact Morris at 328-9573
Special Olympics Fundraising
The ECU Police Department is raising funds for the Special Olympics of
North Carolina this year T-shirts, hats and car magnets are available in
the Blount House from 8 a m - 5 p m
Paper Person
The student featured at the top of today's paper is Daniela Jones, a
sophomore psychology major
News Briefs
Local
Easley names members of OLF
study group
RALEIGH (AP) - A group tasked
with studying the effects of
locating a landing field in eastern
North Carolina will consist of
government, environmental and
military officials, Gov. Mike Easley
said Tuesday
The group will examine the
proposed landing field and make
a recommendation within 60 days
regarding the overall impact ot
the site.
The announcement comes after a
series of meetings between Navy
officials and Easley
Sid Eagles, who recently retired as
chief judge of the North Carolina
Court of Appeals, is chairman of
the group.
The panel also will include state
Sen. Scott Thomas, D-Craven, Rep.
Bill Culpepper, D-Chowan, Crime
Control and Public Safety Secretary
Bryan Beatty, Environment and Natural
Resources Secretary Bill Ross, and
two Navy rear admirals.
The group will observe a Navy FA-18
fly-over in Washington County on
Fnday
Woman, 90, dies after assault
at assisted-living home
WINSTON-SALEM (AP) - Police are
investigating the death of a 90-year-
old woman who was assaulted in
January at the assisted-living center
where she lived
Katherine Cromer Bovender died Feb
13 after being moved to a different
center The assault on Bovender
took place Jan 16 or Jan. 17 at the
Martin House of Winston-Salem.
formerly Meadowbrook Terrace, said
Winston-Salem Police Lt Billy Riggs.
"We feel confident that she has been
assaulted, and we're investigating that
as an elder-abuse case Riggs said
"We've had to expand the scope of the
investigation now into her death"
Police will try to determine whether
Bovender s death was connected
to the assault, Riggs said Authorities
have asked the Forsyth County
Department of Social Services
to investigate the Martin House.
Riggs said
National
Judge lets government try
to prove tobacco companies
lured children
WASHINGTON (AP) - The
government's claim that tobacco
companies aggressively marketed
cigarettes to children can proceed
as part of a $289 billion Justice
Department lawsuit against the
industry, a federal judge ruled
Tuesday
US. District Judge Gladys Kessler
denied a motion by the companies
to dismiss a section of the case
alleging a youth marketing campaign
was part of a decades-long effort
to mislead the public about the
dangers of smoking in violation of
federal racketeering laws.
"The government must be given
the opportunity to prove its claim
about defendants youth marketing
subscheme at trial Kessler wrote
in a 23-page opinion.
The government lawsuit, filed in
US. District Court for the District of
Columbia, seeks recovery of profits
the industry made from sales of
cigarettes from 1971 to 2000 to
people who became addicted at a
young age
It points to such cartoon characters as
Joe Camel as evidence of an effort to
target children, along with advertising
that glamorized smoking: placement
of products in stores near schools, at
movies and rock concerts: and ads in
magazines that cater to young readers.
Bush urging international
community to provide strong
security presence in Haiti
WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Bush said Wednesday that the
United States is encouraging the
international community to provide
a strong security presence in Haiti
as America and its allies continue to
try to achieve a political solution to
the island nation's escalating
violence.
Bush said the United States was
discussing such a security presence
at the moment, but he provided
no details.
Bush said he has been closely
consulting with Secretary of
State Colin Powell in an effort to
reach an accord between Haitian
President Jean-Bertrand Aristide
and rebels who have seized
control of large parts of Haiti
"We will have a robust presence
with an effective strategy Bush
told reporters following an Oval
Office meeting with the president
of Georgia
He repeated the United Stales
often-stated policy in recent days
thai it will turn back any Haitian
refugees trying to reach American
shores
World
Millions of government workers
strike against strike ban in India
NEW DELHI (AP) - Millions of
Indian workers walked off the job
Tuesday to protest a Supreme
Court decision banning strikes by
government employees
Air. train and bus services were
disrupted in Calcutta, and all financial
institutions, including insurance
companies, were closed in Bombay.
Stale-run banks in New Delhi
were shut down, and government-
run institutions in Bangalore, India's
information technology hub, were
also affected
"We have a right to strike shouted
about 1,500 bank workers as
they marched in Bombay, waving
red banners associated with
communist-led unions
Tapan Sen, leader of the Center
of Indian Trade Unions, estimated
about 40 million workers took
part and said many were from the
unorganized sector
India's highest court ruled in August
that government employees cannot
strike and those who do can be
fired. Walkouts by state workers
inconvenience citizens and hurt
the economy, the Supreme Court
said, and disputes should be resolved
in the courts
United States suspends
Imports of French cold cuts, foie
gras, France says
PARIS (AP) - The United Slates
is suspending imports of French
cold cuts and foie gras because
of food safety concerns, France's
Agriculture Ministry said Tuesday.
American veterinary experts
inspected sites in France and found
they did not conform with U.S. food
safety requirements, the ministry
said. It did not give further details or
say if any other beef or poultry
products were banned.
"France shares neither the
observations of the American
authorities nor the conclusions
they felt should be taken the
statement said.
The statement said a high-level
mission from the Agriculture
Ministry, along with French veterinary
officials, went to Washington on
Monday to explain what France
has done over the past several
months to respond to the "specific
requirements" of the U.S. system.
The statement did not elaborate
Electoral College carries on past tradition
Method of presidential
selection continues
PETER KALAJIAN
STAFF WRITER
1 very four years represen-
tatives from every state are
elected for a job most Americans
feel should rest in their hands:
I - � c h oos-
fc!vT �.��� . . ing our
iir� B national
� �-f" -y leader.
Article
II of the United States Constitu-
tion lays out Ihe manner in which
the president and vice-president
are elected, and with little varia-
tion, those methods are still
em ployed today.
Section 1, paragraph 2 of
the Constitution states, "each
State shall appoint, in
sui h a Manner as the Legislature
thereof may direct, a Number of
electors, equal to the
whole number al Sena-
tors and Representatives to
which the state may be entitled in
(Congress
Today, that number of
representatives ranges from
I (Wyoming) to 5.s (California).
Article II was written during a
time when national literacy and
education were luxuries for the
upper classes of society.
The Continental Congress
of 1775 included a constitu-
tional provision that would
ensure average Americans
would be involved in the political
process, while guaranteeing
that the final word would
come from more knowledgeable
individuals.
So the Electoral College was
formed.
Originally, Article II stated
that electors meet in thru
respective states, and vote for
two people. The person with
the highest number ol voles
became president, and the
runner-up would be vice-presi-
dent.
This clause was nullified by
the 12th Amendment, which
introduced the one vote, two-
candidate system of today.
In a published report
to Congress about the
electoral college and
its place in modern
America, Thomas II.Neale of the
Government and finance divi-
sion of the library of Congress
reported that the electoral col-
lege "seeks to reconcile differ-
ing stale and federal Interests,
provide a degree of popular
participation in the election,
give the less populous states
some leverage in the process
and generally insulate the
election from political manipula-
tion
ihe theory oi the Electoral
College is simple: Ihe first can-
didate to receive a majority of the
538 votes, wins.
When the average
American casts his or her
vote, they cast it not
for a particular person, but forthe
state delegation of electors
representing that political party
in the national election.
I he (Constitution, while spe-
Clflc on the number of electors
and the manner in which they
are chosen, is ambiguous on Ihe
discretion of electors to make
their own decisions; that is, to
vote lor a candidate contrary to
the popular election on their
state.
According to lleale's report,
while rare, "faithless" elec-
tors, the name given to those
members ot the delegation who
vote against the wishes of
their constituencies, have exer-
cised their constitutional powers
of dissent a number of limes,
mosl recently in 1998 and with
a blank ballot in the hotly
contested 2000 Gore-Bush
election.
lleale is quick to point out;
however, that never once in
American history have "faith-
less" members of the Electoral
(College managed to affect the
outcome of an election.
liut in the ensuing legal
battle between Texas Goverpo
George W. Bush and then
Vice-President Al Gore, the
words "Electoral (College"
would be forever etched into the
collective consciousness of Ihe
American public.
By winning the popular
election by over 500,000 voles
and initially being awarded
the disputed electoral votes from
the state of Florida, Al Core felt
he was entitled to the presi-
dency.
Upon recounts though,
Bush won Florida by the nar-
rowest margin since the 1960
Nixon-Kennedy race�less than
1,000 voles�and was awarded
that states' electorate and
eventually, after several weeks
of legal wrangling by both sides,
Ihe presidency.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Meet
from page A1
Eastern North Carolina
was chosen by the IDVAACfora
specific reason.
"The IDVA At: steering Com-
mittee wanted to assess Ihe
perceptions surround-
ing domestic vio-
lence among African
Americans in a rural part ol
the U.S said Peggy Novotny,
marketing coordinator lor Ihe
College of Human Ecology,
(Coordinator are hoping
for a large turnout since the
uncling will be open lo the
entire community.
"We hope to fill Hendri.x
Theatre, which seats 750
people Novotny said.
Ihe IDVAAC will vid-
eotape the meeting for
documentation.
There will be a park and
ride offered for those without a
university parking permit and
free parkingand shuttle services
will be available beginning at
5 p.m.
Attendees will need to
park at the Belk
Building on the corner
of Charles Boulevard and
Greenville Boulevard. The bus
will pic k up and drop off every
20 minutes.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
tt
Contact Info
301 S. Jarvis 1
O o.I3rd
Summit mtownJtn c a. � 34th
5lh
Join Us For Our LEAP Year Celebration Sunday Feb 29th 2.50 Pints Guinness. Bass. New Castte
For more information on me
Town Hall meeting contact
the College of Human Ecol-
ogy martetlng office at
328-2882.
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1-800- ACS-23U5 or cancer.org
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r New Sprinii 20(14 Shipments
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2-21

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United States
wrts of French
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cerns, Frances
said Tuesday,
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contacted at
ilinian.com.

�3rd
(A c Q. fO 34th
5th
ition
2-26 04
THE LAST CAROLINIAN � NLWS
PAGL A3
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Money
from page A1
President Bush backed the creation of a constitutional
amendment against same-sex marriages, claiming that the
unions threaten the sanctity of marriage.
Bush urges gay marriage
ban, but Republicans in
Congress aren't rushing
WASHINGTON (AP) � Presi-
dent Bush wants quick election-
year enactment of a constitu-
tional amendment prohibiting
gays from marrying each other,
hut Republicans in Congress are
not rushing to heed his call.
After Bush's announcement
Tuesday, House Majority Leader
Tom Del.ay, It-Texas, said it
would take time to gauge the
level of support in Congress for
a constitutional amendment.
He suggested the difficulty of
passing one may cause lawmak-
ers to take a different approach
to preserving marriage as a solely
man-woman union.
"We don't want to do this
in haste said Del.ay.
The front-runner for the
Democratic presidential nomi-
nation, Sen. John Kerry of Mas-
sachusetts, and his leading rival,
Sen. John Edwards of North
Carolina, struggled to make
their opposition to Bush's stance
clear as they carefully tiptoed
around politically sensitive
turf.
Kerry said he supports civil
unions, "and I think that that is
permissible within state law and
it ought to be
"If he really wants to help
married couples, what he should
be doing is helping them resolve
their economic problems, their
health care problems said
Edwards while campaigning
in Georgia.
Meeting long-held expecta-
tions of his most conservative
supporters, Bush argued that
same-sex weddings threaten
the institution of marriage-and
thus society - and that actions by
several local jurisdictions allow-
ing gay marriage make federal
intervention the only recourse.
"If we are to prevent the
meaning of marriage from being
changed forever, our nation must
enact a constitutional amend-
ment to protect marriage in
America said the president.
"Marriage cannot be severed
from its cultural, religious and
natural roots without weakening
the good influence of society
Bush called on Congress "to
promptly pass and to send to the
slates for ratification" an amend-
ment to deline marriage as a
union of a man and a woman.
He had opposed legalizing civil
unions as governor of lexas, but
Bush left the door open for states
to do so now-an alternative gay
rights groups find Insufficient,
Bush's conservative sup-
porters who view prohibit-
ing gay marriage as a priority
were thrilled.
which had yet to be cut up.
"If you are going to do
criminal activity, you are going
to make a mistake at some point
in time, and that's what he did
Wright said.
He also said that in Green
vUJe, most of the counterfeit bills
turn up at last food restaurants,
and he had about 60 calls to
investigate counterfeit currency
last year.
"A lot of times we get the call
that a retail establishment has a
counterfeit bill. We will do it as
a fraud investigation and go pick
the currency up. Ninety nine
percent of the time the person
who has passed it has already
left Wright said.
He also said the bills are
kept until the Secret Service
agent from Raleigh comes
to pick them up. Wright
said $20 are the bills most
counterfeited.
Local businesses In the
downtown area have recently
seen more bills popping up.
Sue Walton, a bartender at
Buffalo Wild Wings on Fifth
Street said last fall she was
working when counterfeit
money appeared.
"The manager on duty said
it was easy for him to spot. She
waitress wasn't paying atten-
tion said Walton.
"I am pretty sure it was a
$50 bill
Walton said recently Buf-
falo Wild Wings put up a
memo reminding staff to check
their bills.
Buffalo VVild Wings use a spe-
cial pen to check any bill that
looks suspicious. A simple mark
drawn on the bill can usually
prove if it's real or not.
However, according to Sgt.
Joe Friday of the Greenville
Police Department's investiga-
tive division savs the pens are
fallible.
Friday said holding the bill
up to light and look for the holo-
gram etched into the right corner
detects a counterfeit bill.
A person who receives a had
bill as change or spends one acci-
dentally will not be charged. In
loler's case, the state could
ask for three to five years impris-
onment.
If convicted in
federal court, loler could receive
up to 10 years in prison, police
said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com
Are you Jewish?
Get involved with
fellow Jews on
campus through
Hillel
Next Event:
UNC Friday Night Dinner
February 27th, 2004
For more information contact Jon at:
JSM0512(a)mail.ecu.edu





PAGEA4
2-26-04
OPINION
Michelle A. McLeod
Editor-in-chief
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Erin Rickert
News Editor
Amanda Ungerfelt
Features Editor
Ryan Downey
Sports Editor
Meghann Roark
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Holly O'Neal
Asst News Editor
John Bream
Asst Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Asst. Sports Editor
Mike Mashburn
Web Editor
Daniel Roy
Production Manager
Newsroom252.328.6366
Fax252.328.6558
Advertising252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, The East Carolinian prints 9.000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular academic year
and 5.000 on Wednesdays during the summer "Our View" is the opin-
ion of the editorial board and is written by editorial board members.
The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor which are limited to
250 words (which may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and include
a telephone number. Letters may be sent via e-mail to editor@theeast
carolinian.com or to The East Carolinian, Student Publications Building.
Greenville, NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more information.
One copy of The East Carolinian is free, each additional copy is $1.
Our View
Corporate
bosses don't
look at the
human cost
of the
decisions
they make,
only the
profit mar-
gins that will
come with
them.
International business has been lauded by the
current presidential administration as good for
business and the economy.
Access to foreign labor markets allowed many
companies to send manufacturing jobs over-
seas where there are less stringent environ-
mental standards and, above all, a much lower
standard of pay
Business leaders countered criticism of the
practice by saying the policies allow the
American consumer to save money on goods
because they are cheaper to produce in other
countries.
There is truth in that argument. Goods made
in other countries by foreign workers do cost
less than comparable goods made in the
U.S. One example given in a report on "CBS
News" pointed out that a bedroom set made in
America, by American workers, costs an aver-
age of over $600 more than a comparable item
produced in China.
Each time a company closes a factory in the
U.S. to make products cheaper for the con-
sumer, honest American workers lose jobs and
health insurance.
Corporate bosses don't look at the human cost
of the decisions they make, only the profit mar-
gins that will come with them.
The value of a human life is nothing compared
to the value of an inexpensively made refrig-
erator.
Taking away a person's livelihood takes away
his or her ability to live a normal life. Corpora-
tions are banking on the idea that Americans
who haven't lost their jobs yet will look at the
price tags and think about how much products
cost them at the checkout line as opposed to
how much it costs the unemployed.
Does putting people out of work help build up
stronger communities and inspire children to
seek the "American Dream?"
Are we so empty and callous that the plight
of other people in this country means nothing
more to us then saving money at Wal-Mart and
other discount stores?
We hope not.
The purpose of TEC's opinion pages is to invoke
conversation in ECU'S community. To respond to an
opinion on this page, please send your letter, with your contact
intamafion for verification, to editor@theeastcarolinian.com.
In My Opinion
A lot of talk, no action
from ECU students
In My Opinion
Nader announces
presidential candidacy
Apathy speaks louder
than words
HOLLY O'NEAL
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Every place has character
- from the busy, professional
sidewalks of New York City to
the calm valleys of the Appala-
chian Mountains. Sometimes i'
takes only a visit to identify it,
sometimes it takes a lifetime to
understand an area's complex
composition.
College towns' identities
are difficult to define. Com-
prised of an influential, tran-
sitory population at odds with
the established community,
these places have to synthesize
diverse goals and backgrounds
with geographical history to
maintain an identity.
However, what happens
when the mostly young college
population has little affilia-
tion with their institution's
hometown? Or does nothing
to engender cultural growth
for their school and its com-
munity?
Many active, engaged indi-
viduals and groups are at ECU,
but their presence has yet to
create an Identifiable culture
tor the college. This is not the
fault of the few who lead and
participate on and around
campus - it's the fault of the
majority who doesn't.
II you ask any truthful
person enrolled at a North
Carolina college to tell you
about ECU, they'll say it's a
party school. We, as members
of the ECU community, know
there's more: movies, concerts,
tin' Cultural Center, athletics,
poetry readings, art exhibits
the list could go on.
However, what has ECU'S
el led on Greenville been?
(Tubs are the primary atten-
tion in a potentially beautiful
and interesting downtown; the
campus becomes more barren
and unattractive as trees are
torn down tor construction;
there's an obvious segregation
between Greenville residents
and college students.
So, I guess it's not that
ECU doesn't have an identity
- it's more like our identity is
built on apathy and stagna-
tion. Because of that, it can't
rcatl encompass-any thing
else.
Even with all the recent
concern about safety
following two rapes in
residence halls, what have
students done other than
wait to see what the admin-
istration will do for them?
There have been
meetings and attempts to
bring students into the
discourse on safety, but they
haven't been well attended.
Communication is key in
times of fear and reexamina-
tions of protocol, but there's
a near silence from the
majority of students, except
in classroom conversations.
ECU has an undeniable
effect on eastern North Caro-
lina. As the major center of
higher education between
Kaleigh and the coast, it
represents the intellectual
and cultural high points of
this area.
Or, it should.
It's hard to care about a
place that no one else seems
to care about and to try to
bring enrichment to people
who don't want it.
If ECU really is all talk
and no action - and that's
how it seems to some
outsiders I've asked - then we
don't have to worry.
However, if there's some-
thing more, those involved
should speak up to let anyone
interested hear.
Democrats eye
independent
outsider with caution
PETER KALAJIAN
STAFF WRITER
After the 2000 Presidential
Campaign, with the Demo-
crats in America scratching
their collective heads in dis-
belief, Ralph Nader and the
(ireen I'arty took the brunt
of the blame over the 11-hour
Supreme Court decision,
which ensured a Democratic
loss in the Presidential elec-
tion.
Nader declared his fifth
bid for the presidency
on "Meet the Press" last
week.
This will be Nader's
first foray into national
politics since the hotly
debated 2000 election
which, in the end, awarded
(ieorge VV. Hush the presi-
dency.
When the Supreme Court
decision put an end to the
Democrats' bid for the White
House four years ago, much of
the blame was heaped directly
onto the shoulders of Nader's
2.7 percent of the national
vote, which were votes
siphoned from the former
Vice President's campaign.
Nader has been the public
face of the liberal, environ-
mental (ireen Party for riiost
of his political career, but has
chosen this year to run as an
independent.
In an interview last week
with USA Today, Nader cited
the June Green Party Conven-
tion as being too late to begin
a serious campaign.
In the same article, Nader
said, "This campaign will
help beat Bush because we
can expose the Bush regime's
vulnerabilities and failures,
in additional, effective ways
that the Democrats are too
cautious or loo indentured
to corporations to do by
themselves
However, Nader may be
the only one hearing his
call to arms. Sen. John Kerry
has already won 19 of the 21
Democratic primaries and
in recent polls conducted
by USA Today and CNN, has
been beating President Bush
consistently.
The Nader campaign may
be over this year before it
begins. His supporters have
to raise enough money to be
competitive on the primary
circuit.
To be included on the bal-
lots next week in the Texas
primary; Nader must produce
65,000 petition signatures.
While not impossible, we
may see Ralph Nader simply
steamrolled by the spending
power of the major national
parties as the election heats
up.
"This time around I don't
see the Nader campaign get-
ting much support It may
be just a fraction of the votes
he won last time said David
Condradt, Ph.D professor of
Political Science.
The biggest obstacle to the
Nader campaign could be the
combined democratic resolve
to oust President Hush.
As the decisive Super Tues-
day primaries approach and
Kerry continues to strongly
lead the democrats, Nader's
campaign could become more
difficult.
"He didn't make the Green
Party. He's probably not going
to get on all the ballots and
there will he attempts to stop
him getting on the ballot
Condradt said.
Opinions in Brief
TEC EDITORIAL BOARD
Same-sex marriages
continue to climb
Who knew so many same-
sex couples were waiting to tie
the knot?
s. � l.ir, more than 3,000 gay
marriages have been performed
in San I ranciscoand surprisingly
58 percent of San Francisco B.i
area residents support the union;
the other 42 percent protest.
However, times are changing,
and if these couples are happy,
then all I can say is good luck.
I onsidennghnw mans marriages
end in divorce, let's see how long
it takes before we see the "first
.i divorce" in newspaper head-
lines.
Homosexuals deserve same
rights as heterosexuals
Americans and politicians
are still debating whether or
not same sex marriages should
be legal. I say let two women or
men get married it they're in love
and that's what they want. People
keep referring to the Bible to
say homosexuality is a sin and
a marriage cannot be between
two men or two women. The
Bible is ancient in our times.
I he Bible also says that women
are property; women today
are Iree and independent. We
have lo overcome this barrier.
Homosexuals are a part of our
society, so let them be like
us and get married. I don't
believe homosexuality is a
Choice. You know the ridicule
that is to come if you are a gay
or lesbian, so why would you
choose to bring that upon
yourself? We allow murderers
to get married, and they're sin-
ners. If homosexuality is such a
sin, why not allow them to get
married along with all of us?
Enough with Janet
Please, it's time to move
on. Last month's Super Bowl
should be remembered as one
of the greatest football games
of all-time, not for Janet
Jackson's breast. In reality, this
wasn't as bad as what's shown on
national television each day with
murders and rapes, not to men-
tion drugs. Television exec utives
should focus on more Important
issues instead ol something that
merely rivaled 'Baywatch
the Crisis in Haiti
With the uprising in Haiti,
people are questioning whether
or not the U.S. government will
send troops to stop the militant
takeover as it did in 1994. Our
government has made it very
clear that it doesn't want to
get involved in the situation
in Haiti.
At least at this point, this
uprising doesn't directly affect
our country like in 1994 with the
boatloads of Haitian refugees on
an exodus to Florida. Seeing the
same stories ol Haitian refugees
being picked up from waters off
the coast ot Florida as we did in
1994 will cause our country to
find an interest in uprising.
Students need to get up and
get involved
Ou r campus is undergoing an
intense period of change. Many
lop administrative positions at
ECU remain unfilled. The Chan-
cellor Search Committee is taking
steps toward filling the top spot
at ECU, and it's safe to say that
person will fill the position for
many years to come. This person
will influence how the university
oerates including policies and
procedures governing students.
It's for this reason students need
to Income more involved in the
search process. When a chancel-
lor is found, it will be too late
and quite ineffective for students
to complain that he or she is not
meeting their needs. We need a
chancellor with innovation and
insight into the workings of the
university as well as how stu-
dents fit into the puzzle. This
is geared toward freshmen and
sophomores especially - get up,
get out and get involved.






2-2604
THE LAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A5
hearing his
n. John Kerry
i 19 of the 21
rimaries and
s conducted
ind CNN, has
resident Bush
ampaign may
ear before it
jporters have
money to be
the primary
ed on the bal-
in the Texas
must produce
signatures,
mpossible, we
Nader simply
the spending
lajor national
�lection heats
round I don't
ampaign get-
ort It may
n of the votes
e said David
professor of
)bstacle to the
i could be the
icratic resolve
t Bush.
ve Super Tues-
ipproach and
s to strongly
rats, Nader's
become more
ake the Green
ibly not going
e ballots and
empts to stop
the ballot
1 to get up and
lived
undergoing an
change. Many
re positions at
led.TheChan-
mittee is taking
ig the top spot
afe to say that
le position for
ic. Phis person
the university
g policies and
ning students.
students need
nvolvcd in the
hen a chancel-
ill be too late
ve for students
ic or she is not
ds. We need a
inovation and
orkings of the
I as how Itu-
! puzzle. This
freshmen and
:ially - get up,
volvcd.
You drank.
You danced.
Youhads�)
missinj
Sor"
efaifj
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Weird News
Hong Kong steps up patrols
after film company shoots pom
video at airport
HONG KONG (AP) - A porn star
bared all by (lashing open her
silver raincoat in a movie shot
secretly at Hong Kong's airport with
backdrops that include the departure
lounge
Red-faced airport officials have
since stepped up security to help
ensure Chek Lap Kok airport doesn't
appear in any sequels to the hour-
long film Exposure Trip in Hong
Kong, reportedly produced by a
Japanese company.
"We were not aware of the
unauthorized filming. Otherwise we'd
have stopped it Airport Authority
spokeswoman Sylvia Chan told The
Associated Press on Tuesday.
The Sun, a tabloid newspaper,
reported earlier that about 20
minutes of the video were filmed in
and around the airport, and copies
are available in pirate VCD stores in
Hong Kong.
British woman fined for again
registering her cows as voters
LONDON (AP) - Brenda Gould is in
trouble again for registering her cows
as voters.
For the second year running, the
woman from Newmarket, near
Cambridge in eastern England, has
listed two names on the registration
form who turned out to be cows,
East Cambridgeshire District Council
said Thursday
The previous year, in addition to
registering two cows as Henry and
Sophie Bull, she listed Jake Woofles
- later found to be a dog - as eligible
to vote in local government elections,
the council said.
This year she indicated that her
address had been split into two
properties, that she resided in one
part and that two other persons lived
in the second, a council spokesman
said The persons she claimed lived
in the second property were, in fact,
her cows, the spokesman said.
Stellar funerals In the works
for Taiwan
TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) - There isn't much
room for cemeteries in densely-
populated Taiwan, so a U.S. firm
is offering an alternative: shooting
people's ashes into space
The Houston-based Celestis Inc
announced Thursday that it has
signed a deal with one of Taiwan's
biggest funeral homes, Baushan
Enterprise, to provide "space burials"
to the Taiwanese.
Robert Tysor, chief executive ol
Celestis. said the ashes are packed
into an aluminum tube about the size
of a lipstick container, which is shot
into space on commercial rockets
from bases in the United States and
Russia.
The tube orbits Earth once every
90 minutes before re-entering the
atmosphere and burning up, he
said. It can orbit for months or even
years, he said.
"It helps one fulfill the instinctive
desire to explore space said Tysor.
Hidden bullets compromise
kitchen safety
HOWARD, Wis (AP) - A man and his
wife took cover behind a refrigerator
when bullets began exploding in their
oven, authorities say.
Capt Craig Kohlbeck of the Brown
County Sheriff's Department said the
husband had put the ammunition
and three handguns in the
oven before the couple left on a
vacation.
He told officers he thought the items
would be safe there in case someone
broke into the home while they were
away
They had apparently forgotten
about the bullets by the time they
returned.
Report news students need to know
Accepting applications for STAFF WRTTERS
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4





RAGI A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
2 26 04
Nader acknowledges difficulty in
getting on '04 presidential ballot
. �-� m
mm � � � n
WASHINGTON IAI') � Ralph
Nader, lacing the wrath of
Democrats who blame him for
Al Gore's loss in 2000, on
Monday
offered
words of
advice
to party
memhers who fear his candi-
dacy will help re-elect President
Hush.
"I urge the liberal establish-
ment to relax and rejoice Nader
told reporters at a news confer-
ence "1'his is a campaign that
strives to displace the present
corporate regime of the Bush
administration
Nader faces a daunting task
in simply getting his name on
the ballot in all SO states. The
consumer advocate, who turns
70 next week, is an independent
without major party support or
significant financial resources.
Nader's tirst target is Texas,
where he said he needs to garner
more than 60,000 signatures m
a 60-day X'riod from voters who
are not participating in the Dem-
ocratic or Republican primaries.
"It won't be easy Nader said.
As an independent, Nader
won't be eligible for up to about
$18.6 million in government
luruling for the primary season,
said federal Election Commis-
sion spokesman Bob Biersack.
Nader andthe2000election
Ralph Nader ran in MOOasthe Green Party presidential candidate
fcl iiruAjmll. il4 ilJi cJ
Nader
(Green) 1L k
1
2.882,738
(2 7)
TrieNaderfacta?
cs FLORIDA
) Total votes Percent
Bush
l
NEW HAMPSHIRE
Total votes Percent
2,912,790 4fcB Bush
273569 46.1
Gore
2,91253 48J Gore
266348 : 4&8
Difference
537
Difference
7,211
Nader
97,488 1.6
Nader
22,198
3.9
NadertNghest percentages Alaska10.1Naderthigtiest vote totals California New York Massachusetts418,707 244030 173�64
Vermont69
Massachusetts64
Rhode Island Montana Hawaii Maine6.1 5.9 59 5.7Texas Minnesota137,994 126096
Ohio Illinois Pennsylvania Washington Florida117,799 103,730 103092 103002 97,488 C20MKKT
Colorado 5.3 DC 52 Minnesota 5.2 Soutca -Ptaadantui b�om I7BB-2000'
And his failure to capture 5 per-
cent of the vote in 2000�he got
2.7 percent as the Green Party's
candidate�also prevents him
Irom receiving taxpayer fund-
ing in the general election.
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Connections � On-site Management
24 hour Emergency Maintenance � Dishwasher �
Self-Cleaning Oven � Frost Free Refrigerator � Central
HeatAir Conditioning � B-Ball Court
Billiards Table � Ceiling Fans � 24 hour On-Site Laundry
Facilities � Clubhouse � FREE Broadband High Speed
Wireless Internet � Basic Cable, Water & Sewer
Additional Security Lighting & Exterior Doors Have
Deadbolts � ECU Bus Service Available
�Convenient to several shopping plazas,restaurants and
entertainment
252-752-0277 1806 E 1st St.� Located 4 blocks from ECU campus � www.wilsonacres.com
OPEN MonFri.
7:30 AM- 6:00 PM,
Saturdav
9:00 AM- 1:00 PM
ARE YOU
NOT IF YOU
HAVEN'T TOtD
YOUR MRU
www.shareyourlite org
1-B00-355-SHARE
sn
K? CoiMon on Oipn I Tat c&mtan





PAGE A7
2-26-04
CLASSIFIEDS
TO PLACE AN AD
Come by The East Carolinian office
on the second floor of the Student Publications Building
(above the cashiers office)
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
RATES
Students (w valid ID) $2 for 25 words or fewer
Non-students $4 for 25 words or fewer
5c per word over 25
All classified ads must be prepaid.
DEADUNES
Thursday at 4 p.m. for the next Tuesday's paper
Friday at 4 p.m. for the next Wednesday's paper
Monday at 4 p.m. for the next Thursday's paper
FOftflfllT
34 BR house, walk to ECU, pets
negotiable. $750.007mo. Available
Immediately. 341-9947 or 355-
7939.
3 BD1 BATH house on 1707
S. Elm St. Tailgate and walk to
games. Hardwood floors, excellent
condition, pretty yard w ample
parking. $850.00 no pets. Available
March 1st. 321-4802
ABOVE BW- 3 Apartments for rent. 2
and 3 bedroom. Available une, July,
and August. Call 252-725-5458 or
329-8738.
SUBLEASE THROUGH September
Southhaven spacious one bedroom
new appliances. Located near PCC,
end unit, no pets, $400. 752-8926
FOR RENT: Upscale 3 BR3 Bath
Near campus, only if you like the
BEST! Call 252-561-7368 or 561-
7679 or dayle@bellsouth.net
PINEBROOK APT. 758-4015- 1&2
BR apts, dishwasher, GD, central
air & heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or
12 month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, & cable.
WYNDHAM CIRCLE Duplex 2 BD 2
BA Available June 1st and Aug. 1st,
$625.00 month, newly decorated,
cathedral ceilings, nice landlord,
good parking, call fast 321 -4802.
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015- 1 & 2
BR apts, dishwasher, CD, central
air & heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or
12 month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, & cable.
ROOM FOR rent 2 blocks from
campus- just graduated. Great house
with frontback porch. Washerdryer.
HeatAC For interview call 919-349-
8321.
1 SPRING Break Vacations! Cancun,
lamaica, Acapulco, Bahamas, &
Florida. Best Parties, Best Hotels, Best
Prices! Group Discounts, Organizers
Travel Free! Space is limited! Book
Now & Save! 1-800-234-7007.
www.endlesssummertours.com
TWO ROOMS for rent, furnished
or unfurnished, $275 a month not
including utilities, phone, cable.
Close to campus.
PRIVATE BEDROOMBATH share
kitchen, laundry room, living room.
Patio, shed outside. Furnished or
unfurnished bedroom. $330mo.
Plus 13 utilities. CALL 757-497-
2856.
TIRED OF sharing a room and want
to walk to campus? Male roommate
needed! Available August. Bedroom
with house privileges, free parking,
walk to campus. Contact Newman
Center, 953 East 10th St. - 757-
1991.
FOR SALE
MOVING SALE! Nice Stuff! Saturday
February 28th, 7:30 am-10:00 am.
2345 Springhill Road, Greenville,
NC 27858. '86 Mustang $1450, car
alarm, furniture, pictures, clothes,
entertainment center, organizers,
house items, TV, much more!
MOVING SALE! Complete bedroom
set, entertainment center, dinette,
bakers rack, jewelry. Please call 341 -
0360 leave a message with contact
information. Serious inquires only.
ATTENTION FURNITURE,
appliances, and much more for
sale. Prices negotiable. Contact
lenelle. Daytime (252)757-
0552 or nighttime (252)916-
3811. Everything MUST go
HEIP1
INBOUND CALL Center Agents
Needed. Must type 30 wpm,
excellent verbal skills required
Hiring for 2nd shift & weekends,
15-30 hoursweek. Fax resume to
353-7125 to apply.
MAKE MONEY taking Online Surveys.
Earn J10-J125 for surveys. Earn
$25-$250 for Focus Groups. Visit
www.cash4studnets.comecaru
PART TIME & full time summer
positions open in water Analysis
Retail sales. Will train on the job.
Secure your job before you go on
Spring Break. Greenville Pool &
Supply Co. 3730 S. Charles Blvd.
(Bells Fork). Pick up an application
between 9 & 5 Monday-Friday and
9-2 on Saturday. Applications must
be turned in by March 1st, 2004 for
consideration. No phone calls please.
FOOD DELIVERY Drivers wanted
for Restaurant Runners. Part-time
positions (6-12hr. including tips).
Perfect for college student Some
lunch time (11a-2p) M-F availability
required. 2-way radios allows you to
anywhere in Greenville when not on
a delivery. Reliable transportation a
must and knowledge of Greenville
streets advantageous. Call 756-
5527 or check out our website @
www.restaurantrunners.com. Sorry
no dorm students!
UP TO $S00Wk processing mail. Get
paid for each piece. Create your own
schedule. (626)821-4061.
PART-TIME Network Technician
needed immediately. Local internet
and cable TV company seeks highly
motivated technician Please call
540-200-0100.
BARTENDER TRAINEES needed
$250 a day potential, local positions
1-800-293-3985 ext. 306
CYPRESS GLEN Retirement
Community Dining Services is
accepting applications for part lime
wait staff (11 am to 2 pm and 4 pm
to 7 pm). If you are looking for a
job with flexible hours in a good
professional atmosphere, apply
now. 100 Hickory Street, Greenville,
NC. EOE
LOOKING FOR five ECU students
to work with 40 UNC students out
west this summer. Challenging work
but great resume experience. Avg.
student makes $2,3!2month. Call
1-888-478-5330 for details.

ARE YOU looking for the experience
of a lifetime? Horizon Camps consists
of 3 outstanding co-ed summer
camps located in NY, PA, and WV.
We are seeking amazing staff to
Crossword
ACROSS
1 "Heart and "
5 Thoroughly
modem memo
10 Knife wounds
14 Earthenware pot
15 Tilts to one side
16 Jot
17 Lacking a
seacoast
19 Actress Foch
20 Avoid capture
21 Shade provider
22 Indiana pro
23 Protuberance
25 Warhol's
movement
26 Sentimental
feeling
30 Rage
31 Met highlight
32 Guarantee
34 Dined
37 Cocktail choice
39 More mean
41 Ernie of the PGA
42 Tidy up
44 Notion
45 TV adjunct
46 Clam's siphon,
e.g.
48 Renowned
51 Minor quarrel
52 Disc jockey's cue
53 Trident-shaped
letter
54 Pester
59 Eager
60 Crinkled fabric
62 Queue
63 Slipped up
64 Tire holders
65 Huskies' pull
66 Campus
commons
67 Military group
DOWN
1 Shoe part
2 Norway's patron
saint
3 Radius's
neighbor
4 Alan or Cheryl
5 Toucauirs
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author
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6 Ancient kingdom
of Greece
7 Some socks
8 News piece
9 Psychedelic drug
10 Horsd'oeuvre
11 New York city
12 Skin cream
13 Intelligent
18 Camera element
22 Breathing
spaces?
24 First bids
25 Attack fish
26 Ditto
27 By mouth
28 Douglas' trees?
29 Make lace
33 Still running
34 Verdi heroine
35 Adolescent
36PartofQ.E.D.
38 Sustain
40 Up to, briefly
43 Mosaic piece
45 Nullified
47 Aleutian island
Solutions
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48 Baby equines 56 Related (to)
49 Blacksmith's
block
50 Battleship to
remember
53 Lima's place
55 Hosiery shade
57 Big rig
58 Formerly,
formerly
60 Next in a series;
abbr.
61 '60s radicals
work with incredible kids. Contact
uswww.horizoncamps.com or
1-800-544-5448.
WORK HARD! Play Hard! Change
Lives! Girls resident camp looking
for counselors, lifeguards,
wranglers, boating staff, crafts,
nature, unit leaders, business
manager, and health supervisor.
$200-$350week! May 22-August
1. Free Housing! 1-800-672-2148
x 410 or keyauwee@aol.com.
www.tarheeltriad.org for an online
application.
NEED EXTRA cash? Looking for
business partners to join my
team. Work from home, 7-10
hoursweek. Salary potential of up
to $1000 first month. Check out
www.nsdteam.comwealth.php
dnabusiness or email me at
dnabusiness@yahoo.com.
ALPHA OMICRON Pi would like to
thank Beta for a great social last
weekend!
THE SISTERS if Alpha Omcron Pi
would like to thank Lambda Chi for
a wonderful social last weekend!
said Reba as her fingers ran through
Olivia's hair from the nap to the for
musSinGaSmUchASPOsslbLEaLLonGt
HewAy. "Wellll replied Olivia's eyes
in the mirrorSi then say'n "Began
with share'n cribs, bibs, then play pens,
then kindergarten, playgrounds, pups,
stages, sages, rages of fashion that
isSi NOW the World, the Universe&
best & most of all y'allll "Soyou
think Mosey'll help roenout our triple
date?" asked Reba
"KnnnOOOoooOOOoooOOOwww"
sang Olivia. TKD
1 SPRING Break Vacations! Cancun,
lamaica Acapulco, Bahamas, fit Florida.
Best parties, Best Hotels, Best Prices!
Group Discounts, Organizers Travel
Free! Space is limited! Book Now St
Save I 1-800-234-7007. www.endles
ssummertours.com
ECU
TRANSIT
Currently hiring bus drivers
Extremefy flexiWe work hours. Apply at
wwwtransitecuedu. Questions? contact
any Transit Manager at 328-4724.
oie
THE CARD post Report 397
Multiply Inn Olivia's V-Day in the
Land of Wuv (part 3). morning
aftathe day afta "Mighty
kind of Olivia fix'n extra eggs
for Budgie before those two
stepped out back" said Bubber.
"Sumpthin about his coat need'n
to reflect these smiles you got
back for usreplied Reba and
1 like her (point'n her spoon at
him)wish to say you are mighty
mighty kindour kind "Wellll"
said Bobber from the day we
were bornthe same daymy
two brothers have considered me
the mean one Hearing that Reba
jumped up, opened the screen
door Si hollered "Olivvvvia TKD
Report 429 Trip InnOV-DLW
in the Land of WuvPart 4
(Ev'nz 'ell aloneSt though
2 is company3 is a party!)
"NOW OIivvvvviatelll me
more abouttheboyzzznexdoor
THE DAILY Reflector is making two
$2,500 annual scholarships available
to undergraduate students at East
Carolina University who are interested
in pursuing a career in a media-related
field. Fields of study may include
but are not limited to journalism,
advertising, art, accounting, and
computer services. The recipients of
the scholarship are also invited to
compete for a possible internship
with the newspaper. Scholarship
requirements St guidelines: must
be at least a junior at ECU with a
minimum of two full-time semesters
remaining until graduation (this does
not include summer school), be able
to demonstrate interest in pursuing a
career in a media-related field, have a
minimum 3.0 collegiate GPA in the last
academic year and no grades below a
C in area of academic major, submit
scholarship application and supportive
materials to ECU by April 1, 2004.
Applications can be obtained from:
Mrs. Vicky Morris, Director of Donors
Stewardship, University Development,
Greenville Centre, Suite 1100, 2200
South Charles Blvd. Greenville. NC
27858. Phone: 252-328-9573.
SPRING
BREAK
BAHAMAS
CRUISE
$279!
5 Days, Meals. Parties. Taxes
Party With Real World Celebrilies!
Panama City $179
Daytona $159, Cancun $499
Ethics Award Winning Company1
SpringBrtakTravcl.com
1-800-678-6386
Dapper
Dan's
n and Vintage Clothir
LEARN TO SKYDIVE
Carolina Sky Sports
1-800-SKYDIVE
www.carolinaskysports.com
Come see
our NEW
Shop!
SOI Dickinson Avc.
752-1750
FREE
�ol poor maintenance rwpome
� of una'tiirncd phone calls
� of nois neighbor!
� of crawl) critters
� of high uiilii) hills
� of ECU parking hassles
� of ungruleful landlords
� of unanswered questions
� ol high rents
� of grumps personnel
� of unl'uliilled promises
� nl units that � ere mil cleaned
�o! walls thai were BOVST painted
�of appliances thai don"t work
MHIlium Court &
Kastgatc Village Apts.
3200 F Mosekv Dr.
561-RENT or 531-9011
wwtt.pinnacleproprrtv
numum nit'��� "in
MONITORED NK.HTLV BY SECURITY
e en
Hear the last Pirate women's
basketball game of the season
this Friday vs. Charlotte on
WZMB beginnning at 6:45 p.m.






PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
2-26-04
I
World Court ends Israeli hearings
llll HAGUE, Netherlands
AP) � The Arab League deliv-
ered a scathing attack Wednes-
day against Israel's separation
barrier, saying the structure
is a violation of international
law and suggesting its architects
be arrested.
The 22-member group's
testimony highlighted the third
and final day of testimony
before the International Court of
Justice, which is examining the
legality of the barrier.
Israel, which savs the barrier
is for self defense, has avoided
the hearings. It says the structure
is a matter for negotiations, not
a courtroom, and has questioned
the fairness of the forum. All
of the 15 countries and orga-
nizations testifying this week
support the Palestinian case.
The Arab League echoed
efforts by other participants
this week to put the spotlight
not only on the West Bank
barrier, but on Israel's 37-year
occupation of the Palestinian
territories.
Eating
from page
Overcoming her condition
has improved relationships
with her family and boyfriend,
and has given her a new, more
positive outlook on herself,
she said.
"I feel like a completely dif-
ferent person. I feel more whole
and my life has changed com-
pletely since then
The woman said she
unsuccessfully tried to recover
from the condition on her
own, and her recovery did not
begin until she received coun-
seling.
The biggest step she had to
take was admitting she needed
help.
"My family pointed it
out to me. I kind of knew,
but I didn't really see myself
in the mirror as I appeared to
others I really didn't think
of it as a problem until my mom
broke down crying and told
me
She said she has been pres-
sured throughout her life by
coaches, family and herself to
look good and be thin.
Her friends had even given
her positive feedback on her
thin appearance, which encour-
aged her to continue eating small
amounts of food.
Valarie Kisler-van Reede,
licensed psychologist at
the counseling and student
development center, said any
student who feels they may
have an eating disorder should
seek professional help.
"They have to come here and
talk to someone about it they
are not the only one said Kisler-
van Reede.
Students often have a mis-
conception of what counseling is
and what it provides for people.
Counseling is not what students
think it's going to be, Kisler-van
Reede said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeostcorolinian. cow.

Events
Feb. 29 - March 6
Campus Living Television runs
the videos Killing Us Softly and
How You Look Is Not Who You
Are.
Display cases in Mendenhall
will showcase a body Image an
display.
March 3
Karen Warren will speak on,
TWhen Your Eating Gets Out of
Whack Finding Normal from
5 p.m. - 6 p.m. In the Student
Hearth Center.
March 4
The Center for Counseling and
Student Development and Well-
ness Education staff will provide
confidential eating disorder
screenings for students and
faculty in 221 Mendenhall from
1 p.m. - 5 p.m.
March 10
Robin High, director of Aramark
Nutrition Services will present,
"Eating Well with no Money and
no Time at the Student Health
Center from 5 p.m. - 6 pm
Spring Break in Panama City Beach. Florida!
SAMPRIPER
liCACOH
WorlfJ �. I ormf.t K(-�j M.trly
SAVE $5TKBai?.�
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon called the barrier between
Israel and Palestine "hypocrisy" in an interview.
, i i
800 Afifi.fiHH � www.nrJf)ifjcrb(.i(on.fom
Michael Bothe, head of
the Arab League's legal team,
told the justices that the bar-
rier goes well beyond security
concerns, lie said the barrier is
meant to lead "consolidation of
the unlawful Israeli settlements"
in the West Bank while making
life "burdensome, even impos-
sible" for Palestinians.
TEC is now hiring staff writers. Apply at our
on the 2nd floor of the Student Publications Building.
� Experience required
� Must have a 8.0 GPA
ofTice located
if ifii
THAT'S WHAT FALLING ASLEEP IS FOR.

V
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2-26-04
PAGE B1
�� FAIT CAHCM h
226 04
FEATURES
AMANDA UNGERFELT
Features Editor
JOHN BREAM
Assistant Features Editor
features@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
And the Oscar goes to
ed
Did You Know?
- The late country singer Johnny Cash (1932), pop singer Michael Bolton
(1954) and R&B singer Erykah Badu (1971) all call today
their birthday.
- This month is Return Shopping Carts to the Supermarket Month
- Today is For Pete's Sake Day and Introduce a Girl to
Engineering Day
- On this day in 1998, Oprah Winfrey beat the Texas Cattlemen
in court
Announcements
Films
The Student Union Rims Committee presents 21 Grams today at 9:30 p.m,
Friday at 7 p.m. and midnight, Saturday at 9:30 p.m. and Sunday at 7 p.m.
Elf is showing today at 7 p.m, Friday at 9:30 p.m Saturday at 7 p.m and
midnight and Sunday at 3 p.m All movies are free with a student ID and are
located in the Hendrix Theatre. For more information, call 328-4700.
Art Awards Ceremony
The 2004 School of Art Undergraduate Exhibition Awards Ceremony
will be held at 5 p.m. today in Speight Auditorium. The exhibition will run
through April 17
Guitar Ensemble
The School of Music presents a Guitar Ensemble directed by Elliot Frank
at 8 pm. today in the A. J Fletcher Recital Hall. This event is free.
Movie Night
The Ledonia Wright Cultural Center presents an African American Movie
Night at 8 p.m. today in the Lendonia Wright Cultural Center Gallery.
Volunteer Opportunity
Help Operation Sunshine get their new home ready for open house by
painting, trim work, yard work and little odds and ends at 10 am on Saturday.
Feb. 28. Contact Jessica or Elizabeth at 328-1554 oreac0513@mail.ecu.edu.
Space is limited.
Pirate Underground Band
The Student Union presents Annika Bently - Chamber Rock at 9 p.m on
Saturday, Feb 28 in the Pirate Underground
Black History Concert
The School of Music presents A Tribute to Motown at 8 p.m on Saturday,
Feb 28 in the Wright Auditorium Tickets are $5-810
Picks for 76th Annual
Academy Awards
MICAH MASSEI
SENIOR WRITER
As the major awards season
begins to draw to a close, per-
haps the most significant (and
overly-hyped) awards ceremony
of them all, the Academy Awards,
will answer the predictions
of both film critics and Hlmgoers
alike wondering who's the best
of 2004. Here is a breakdown of
some of this year's nominees.
Oscars
Best Picture
Nominees: The Lord of the
Rings: The Return of the King,
Mystic River, Seuhiscuit. Last in
Translation, Master & Commander:
The Far Side of the World.
The winner of the coveted
Best Picture prize comes down to
two films: The Lord of the Rings:
The Retain of the Kins and Mysth
River. Although all of the nomi-
nees are worthy, it's the inspired
battle between technical (TheLord
of the Rings) and dramatic (Mystic
River) masterworks that will
decide the Best Picture winner.
With no acting nominations, the
majority of the 11 nods awarded
to The Lord of the Rings are for
technical achievements, while
three of the six nods given to
Mystic River honor the perfor-
mances. Even though Mystii
River is the type of deep, dra-
matic work Oscar normally tips
its hat to - having noted Acad-
emy-favorite Clint Eastwood as
its director never hurts - expect
Peter Jackson's third and final
installment of the The Lord of
The 76th Annual
Academy Awards
Sunday, Feb. 29
8 p.m. on ABC
the Rings trilogy lo capture tin
Osc.il gold.
Best Director
Nominees: Peter lac kson,
Peter Weir, Cllnl Eastwood,
soli,i Coppola, I ernando Mel-
relles
(oppola's noiiiinalii.il foi
Lost in Translation is deserving.
but unexpected because lor ml
the third time in Oscar history,
a female has been nominated for
liesl Director. This inspires tIn-
never-ending debate Involving
the "all too familiar" nominating
process thai seems soone-dimen-
sional. Much like the competitive
race between The Lard of the Rings
and Mystic River for Best Picture,
the Best Director category has
Mystic River's ciint Eastwood
and The Lord of the Rings dire
tor fackson eager!) v ylng for the
directing prize. Although an
"Oscar-split" is fathomable (i.e.
Oscar's occasional decision to
split the Best PictureBest Direc-
tor winner), look lor ackson to
be honored lor the The Lord of the
Rings trilogy as a whole.
Best Actor
Nominees: Sean IVnn, Bill
Murray, lude I aw, lobnny Depp,
lien Kingsley,
Both I'enn and Mutra
gave the performances oi their
(well-respected) acting lives,
and either nominee
would be deserving of Osc.n
gold. However, the Acad-
emy tends to honor the
dramatic ovei the comedic, and
although Murray's performance is
more poignant than "laugh-out-
loud-funny watch lor I'enn to
capture his first osc ai .liter three
pre ions nominations.
see OSCARS page B3
Small budget movies make Oscar cut
LGreenville LIVE
aA.J. McMurphy'sMesh Cafe
1914 Timbury Drive1011-A Red Banks Road
H355-7956321-MESH
HSaturday, Feb. 28,9 p.m.Thursday, Feb. 26,9 p.m.
�Jake JohnsonBig Bertha Friday. Feb. 27,9 p.m.
Chefs 505Comedy
505 Red Banks RoadSaturday, Feb 28,9 p.m
355-7505 Wednesday, March 3,7:30 p.m.Deejay
-ECU jazz faculty and studentsPeasants 110 E. Fourth St.
Christy's Euro Pub752-5855
301 S. Jarvis St.Thursday, Feb 26,9 p.m.
758-2774Field Trip
Tuesday. March 2,10 p.m.Friday, Feb. 27,9 p.m.
Open mic nightKB Band Saturday, Feb. 28.9 p.m.
City Hotel and BistroMountain of Venus
203 S.W. Greenville Blvd.Tuesday, March 1,9 p.m.
355-8300Live Music
Wednesday. March 3,7 p.m.
Live musicPlayer'8 Choice
Community Square,
MMCorrigan'sMemorial Drive
122 E. Fifth St355-4149
758-3114Thursday, Feb 26.10 pm.
Friday, Feb 27 10 p.m.Karaoke
Live musicSaturday. Feb. 28,10 p.m.
Saturday, Feb 28,10 p.m.Live Music
.Live musicPlayers Retreat
Courtyard Tavern1631 Pactolus Road
703 S.E. Greenville Blvd758-6856
321-0202Thursday, Feb. 26,7 p.m.
Sunday. Feb. 29,7 p.m.Karaoke
Live MusicSaturday. Feb 28.9 p.m. Take 3
El Ranchito
315 E. Tenth St.Professor O'Cools
IT .561-7336605 Greenville Blvd.
Thursday. Feb 26.7 p.m.355-2946
Mariachi BandSaturday, Feb. 28,9:30 p.m Karaoke
Ham's
701 Evans St.Wimple's Steam Bar
830-2739206 Main St Winterville
:omThursday. Feb. 26.10 p.m.355-4220
KaraokeFriday. Feb. 27,7:30 p.m
MelotaltalmSaturday, Feb. 28.10 p.m.Canyon
swiientt suckedMickey DavidSaturday, Feb. 28,7:30 p.m.
Sunday. Feb. 29,10 p.mVictor Hudson
Open mic night
Keisha Castle-Hughes, Best Actress nominee for her
performance in Whale Rider, is only 13 years old.
Lesser-known films get
Academy nominations
ADAM PARR
STAFF WRITER
Believe it or not, there
are some movies that just
don't make it down here
to Greenville. Despite our
seemingly endless abun-
dance of highbrow cultural
entertainment, eastern North
Carolina rarely screens movies
that don't have their own Happy
Meal action figure.
Before unknown people
from movies you've never heard
of start walking ofl with awards
on Sunday, we're here to give you
a beads up.
For the most part, the i Iscars
are following tradition this year,
with a parade- ol I'ix dramas
controlling the headlines.
Well-deserved bloc khust-
ers such as Lord of the Rings
and Mystii Rlvei collected a
slew ol nominations, which
is no surprise. However, there
is hope for fellow lilin geeks as
some smaller, lesser-known lilms
ret eh some (redll tins veai
Of course most ol the
buzz this sear centers around
Lust iii Translation, Ihc quiet,
careful film hy Sofia I oppola is
not commended lor bowling vou
over while you watch it licit rather
see MOVIES page B2
Fashion anticipated at Oscar ceremony
Awards show promises
unforgettable outfits
JESSICA CRESON
STAFF WRITER
Journalists and paparazzi try
their hardest to catch a glimpse
of each celebrity in passing on
the red carpet before awards
shows, asking, "Who are you
wearing?"
I here is always a great deal
of hype about what the celebri-
ties are wearing and who is with
whom on the awards pre-shows
and in tin- in.igaincs. The Oscar
Awards is definitely one of those
award shows.
Most often, the designers
make the gowns spec ilically tor
.in a Iress. In orclei to get the
particular look the actressactor
is looking lor, there has to be a
connection with the designer.
For that reason, it means a lot
loi I he ac tors and ai tresses to
Kim- c redil to the designer the)
are wearing.
I he ac tresses and ac tors
reveal a little bit about their
personality when we sec the
outfits Hies show up wearing.
Some look trendy, sew, (lassy or
even ta k. With all these stvies
on one red carpet, the excitement
is ine itable.
This war. pink has been
a popular color for both men
and women, lustin limlierlake
and Hillary Duff both sported
link at the Grammy's, as well
as c arson Kressley from "Queer
Eye lor the Straight (iuy" at the
(.olden (ilobes, A retro look from
the 1940s with a azz influence,
as seen on (oven Stefan might
also appear at the Oscars this
year.
Valentino, Vera Wang,
Armani, Chanel, Gucci, Jean
Paul faultier, Christian Dior
and Versace are some ol the most
common designers of red carpet
celebrities.
"The best outfits are the ones
worn by actors who look like they
just woke up said (lay St i I Icy,
junior history education major.
However, according to the
fashion critics, hair and makeup
not done by a professional is
noticed. The messy, just-got-
out-ol-bed, look is out and the
well-groomed is in.
A political opinion mixed
with the formal look ol tin
led carpet is definitely a don't.
With the presidential election
getting closer and closer along
with many celebrities who have
already spoken against Bush, the
stars might want to use the red
carpet as a chance to voice their
opinion.
Since the Oscars are more
traditional, daring styles reallv
stand out. lor the most part,
elegance is what makes the grade
lor the fashion police.
"Nicole Kidman needs to gel
a little bit more advice on her
attire. She Isa pretty woman, but
no sense of lashion said Carita
Powell) criminal justice major.
Ironically, Kidman was
judged as best dressed lor the
I iscars in 2003, winning an
Oscar tor The Hours. She wore a
black lean Paid tiaultier couture
gown with unusual straps. Her
hair was tightly pulled back
with gold makeup. It will be
interesting to see if she will go
with something more playful
this year.
Renee Zellweger was another
actress named Best Dressed in
200;i. She wore a scarlet red
Carolina llerrera gown, who
see FASHION page B3
WORST DRESSED






PAG
PAGEB2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
2-26-04
Cinema Scene
Student Union Films
Free with a student ID
Elf - starring Will Ferrell. Ed Asner and
Bob Newtiart. A toddler accidentally
ends up in Santas bag and lives out
his childhood at the North Pole Now
grown, Buddy no longer fits in with the
other elves and journeys to find his
biological father Rated: PG.
In Theaters
21 Grams - starring Benicio Del
Torro and Sean Penn The complex
interconnected story of Paul (Penn),
a drug addict and his mother, a
terminally ill mathematics professor,
and a spiritual ex-convict. Jack (Del
Toro) that intersects tragically and
redemptively following a car accident
Rated: R.
Against the Ropes - stamng Meg
Ryan and Omar Epps The true story
ol Jackie Kallen, a Jewish woman
from Detroit who became the boxing
manager of James Toney, Bronco
McKart and Thomas Hearns by
overcoming all odds Rated: PG-13.
Along Came Polly - starring Ben
Stiller. Jennifer Aniston and Phillip
Seymour Hoffman A newly wedded
husband (Stiller) is cheated on by his
wife during their Honeymoon Soon
after, he becomes involved in another
relationship with a free-spirited
woman named Polly (Aniston).
Rated; PG-13.
Barbershop 2 - starring Ice Cube.
Cedric the Entertainer and Queen
Latifah Sequel to this fall's runaway
hit - spend another day with the crew
of Calvin's barbershop in the South
Side of Chicago Rated; R
Broken Lizard's Club Dread
- starring Bill Paxton, Jay
Chandrasekhar and Kevin Heffernan.
Broken Lizard is back - surrounded
by limber, wanton women on a Jimmy
Buffet-wannabe's booze-soaked
island resort. But a machete-wielding
killer is loose on the island, turning
this tropical bacchanal into Club
Dread. Rated: R.
The Butterfly Effect - starring
Ashlon Kulcher. Amy Smart and
Melora Walters A young man with
a dark and troubled past discovers
that he has the ability to travel back
in time and occupy his childhood
body. He soon finds that with every
trip back in time, it alters his future,
leading him to keep traveling back
to repair the damage, with disastrous
results Rated: R.
Catch That Kid - starring Ktisten
Stewart. Corbin Bleu and Max
Theiriot. A youngster who, with the
help of two friends, robs the state-
of-the-art bank where her mother
works to acquire the cash needed
for a costly operation to save her
ailing father Rated: PG.
moves from the Big Apple to the
suburbs and finds herself out of place
when competing for the lead in her
new school's drama department
Rated: PG.
Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights
starring Romola Garai, Diego Luna
and Mika Boorem The updated
version of the 1987 classic tells a
timeless story of a young woman's
discovery of love, sensuality and
independence - but with a new
sizzling style and rhythm - set among
the context of the revolutionary-eve
Cuba Rated: PG-13.
to make ends meet sees his golden
opportunities in a house that is being
sold back for taxes. The house was
wrongfully taken from its owner,
who vows to get it back at any cost
Rated: R.
Miracle - starring Kurt Russell.
Patricia Clarkson and Noah Emmerich
The amazing story of the 1980 U. S.
Olympic hockey team, which stunned
the heavily favored Soviet squad in
the semifinals to advance to the
championship game, inspiring the
famous question: "Do you believe in
miracles?" Rated: PG
The Passion of The Christ - starring
James Caviezel, Monica Bellucci and
Maia Morgenstern. Controversial
story of the last 12 hours in the life
of Jesus Christ as told by director-
screenwriter-producer Mel Gibson
Rated: R
trail of a serial killer whose victims
appear to be men with whom she has
had a sexual encounter. However, she
becomes the prime suspect since
she blacks out right before these
murders occur. Rated: R.
21 Grams - starring Benicio Del
Torro and Sean Penn The complex
interconnected story of Paul (Penn).
a drug addict and his mother, a
terminally ill mathematics professor,
and a spiritual ex-convict, Jack (Del
Toro) that intersects tragically and
redemptfvety following a car accident
Rated: R
Cheaper By the Dozen - starring
Steve Martin. Bonnie Hunt and Tom
Welling Story of a family of 12 children
who move to Chicago and their often
humorous adjustments to big city life.
Rated: PG
Cold Mountain - starring Jude Law,
Nicole Kidman and Rene Zellwegei.
Story of the long journey home of
a wounded Civil War soldier who
returns home to North Carolina to be
reunited with his wife. Rated: R
Confessions of a Teenage Drama
Queen - starring Lindsay Lohan,
Adam Garcia and Alison Pill A girl
Eurotrtp - starring Scott Mechlowica
and Jacob Pitts. An American teen
discovers that his German pen
pal who helped him translate his
homework is a beautiful girl and sets
off to Europe to meet her Rated: R
50 First Dates - starring Adam
Sandier and Drew Barrymore A
veterinarian in Hawaii falls in love
with a girl who has short-term
memory loss and must repeatedly
get her to fall in love with him so
she'll remember their relationship
Rated: PG-13
The House of Sand and Fog
- starring Jennifer Connelly and
Ben Kingsley. A man who struggles
The Perfect Score - starring Scarlett
Johanson, Chris Evans and Darius
Miles Five desperate high school
students who break into the Princeton
Testing Center in order to steal the
answers to the SAT, Rated: PG-13.
Twisted - starring Ashley Judd,
Samuel L Jackson and Andy Garcia
Newly appointed police detective,
Jessica Shepard (Judd), is on the
Welcome to Mooseport - starring
Ray Romano, Gene Hackman and
Fred Savage. A two-term president
moves to a small New England
town to retire and write his memoirs,
but instead becomes involved in a
tough race for mayor with the local
hardware store owner (Romano).
Rated: PG-13.
Win A Date With Tad Hamilton
- starring Kate Bosworth, Josh
Duhamel and Topher Grace A small-
town girl from West Virginia wins a
contest to meet her big screen idol
Tad Hamilton. Rated: PG-13.
You Got Served - starring Marques
Houston, Omarion, J-Boog and
Fizz. The social subculture of street
dancing is explored through a pair
of friends. David (Omarion) and Elgin
(Houston), who want to open their
own hip-hop dance and recording
studio, but in order to do thai,
they must first win a street dance
competition against another group
of street dancers to prove that they
have talent. Rated: PG-13.
Movies
from page B1
for picking away at your brain
for days alter. Translation is up
for four awards, including Hest
Picture, Best Actor and Best
Director.
Best I'icture is a stretch for
Translation, but Bill Murray is
a serious contender for a role
so seamless that, at times, he
appears to be playing himself.
Coppola is the third female
director ever nominated
for best director. and
deservedly so - if nothing else for
has ing the guts to make such a
personal film - one that teeters
so precariously between monu-
mental and meaningless.
Another smaller film,
21 drums, has made a huge
impact on critics and audiences
alike. Naomi Watts gets some
well-deserved attention for her
leading role next to Sean
Penn, who would have
been nominated for this
movie had he not already
been picked for Mystic River.
Benicio Del I'oro, who would
be entertaining in his sleep, is
recognized for it with a
nomination for Best Supporting
Actor.
Ben Kingsley and Shohreh
Ashdashloo are both rec-
ognized for Impressive
roles in the
little known film House of
Sand and f a movie about an
Iranian immigrant trying
to return to America.
Kingsley is consistently
impressive and Ashdashloo is
quietly brilliant, but the movie
itself is simply not entertaining
enough to warrant an Oscar.
As for the rest of the
Supporting Actor category,
Alec Baldwin gets noticed for
his supporting role in
The Cooler, a movie
about a gambler where
he all too naturally scares the
hell out of William H. Macy.
Dijmon Hounsou is
nominated for his riveting part in
the New York drama ; America.
Best Actress is dominated
by Watts' turn in 21 Grams
and an eerily-good transfor-
mation by Charlize Theron in
Monster, a film about Aileen
Wuornos, a prostitute executed
last year in Florida after being
convicted of murdering six
men.
The relatively unknown
Keisha Castle-Hughes gets a
nod for her leading role in the
powerful drama Whale
Ruler, a movie about the
indigenous people of New
Zealand. Samantha Morton also
gets a nomination for her role
.is an Irish housewife with a bad
haircut in In America.
If you happened to have
missed some of these movies,
you still have time to do your
homework before the show on
Sunday.
This writer can be contacted at
leatures@theeastcarolinian.com.
CHANCELLOR'S LEADERSHIP
CONFERENCE
MARCH 6, 2004
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
THEME: DEALING WITH THE UGLY REALITY:
CHANCING THE FACE OF LEADERSHIP"
KEYNOTE SPEAKER: DR. JOE MARTIN
AUTHOR, MOTIVATIONAL SPEAKER, PROFESSOR
DR. MARTIN IS A NATIONALLY KNOWN SPEAKER AND AUTHOR WHO HAS
HELPEDTHOUSANDSOF STUDENTS ACROSS THE COUNTRY FIND THEIR
PURPOSE, MAXIMIZE THEIR POTENTIAL, AND LIVE MORE RESPONSIBLY. HE HAS
BECOME RECOGNIZED AS ONE OF AMERICA'S TOP MOTIVATIONAL PROFESSORS
CONFERENCE INCLUDES: KEYNOTE ADDRESS, THREE WORKSHOP SESSIONS
AS WELL AS A LUNCH AND FIRESIDE CHAT WITH CHANCELLOR SHELTON.
STUDENTS WILL ALSO HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO HEAR FROM A PANEL
OF ECU LEADERS DURING THE AFTERNOON ADMINISTRATIVE PANEL
REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS TUESDAY, MARCH 2, 2004. REGISTRATION FORMS CAN BE PICKED UP
IN 109 MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER IN THE OFFICE OF STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT.
REGISTRATION IS FREE AND NOW OPEN TO ALL REGISTERED STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS.
i





2-26 -04
killer whose victims
in with whom she has
:ounter. However, she
)rime suspect since
t right before these
Rated: R.
ooseport - starring
�iene Hackman and
two-term president
nail New England
id write his memoirs,
:omes involved in a
Tiayor with the local
I owner (Romano).
nth Tad Hamilton
e Bosworth. Josh
pher Grace. A small-
Vest Virginia wins a
her big screen idol
ated: PG-13.
I - starring Marques
irion, J-Boog and
subculture of street
ored through a pair
(Omarion) and Elgin
want to open their
snce and recording
order to do that,
win a street dance
linst another group
s to prove that they
id: PG-13.
vie about the
people of New
ntha Morton also
it ion for her role
isewife with .1 bad
merica.
ppened to have
of these movies,
time to do yout
fore the show on
7 be contacted at
jstcarolinian.com.
PAGF B3
THF FAST CAROIINIAN � FEATURES
2 26 0-1
IN
OR
AS
HAS
ORS.
IONS
TON.
ANEL
EL.
KED UP
'ME NT.
riONS.
East Carolina University Campus Livin
Good Times, Good Food,
and Great Friends!
� Everything's Included
Cable TV, high-speed Internet, daily newspapers,
and local phone service are all included. So are heat,
electricity, trash pickup, and water�all things you
usually pay for separately off campus.
� Stay Out of the Kitchen
With a meal plan from Campus Dining, there's no
cooking to do or dishes to wash, and you'll save
money because you don't pay sales tax on your meal
plan purchases.
� Sleep Later
You don't have to commute to campus, and you're
right there for classes, concerts, ball games, and plays.
� Score Some Loot
You'll have the chance to win big prizes when you
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Return to Campus Living Sign-Up, February 16 through 27






PAUL B4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
22604
PAGE
Oscars
from page B1
Best Actress
Nominees; Kelsha astle-
Hughes, Diane Keaton, Saman-
tha Morton, Charllzt I lur. mi.
Naomi Watts.
No nomination tor ost m
Translation's Scarlett lohansson
lust shows the Academy's love ol
using the 'snuhhing-lo-shiH k
technique to throw oft all Osi ar
predictors
lohansson won iriliial
acclaim and se oral . ril n s
awards for her performance
in Itt in Translation, as
well as two Golden Globe
nominations (the oilier tor Girl
With I I'eail I,nnut). M I lur
expet ted nomination would
make her the youngest Best
ctress nominee ever, ct the
i idem) opu-d to nominate
unknown 13-year-old .uticss
Kelsha Castle-Hughes for her
film debut in Nikiaro's Whale
Rider.
Keaton could walk ,iwa an
Oscar-winner for the first time
llnce 1978, when she won for
Aitnk Hall.
Hut watch out for "eve-
i .itulv" turned "dramatii -
.Rlrcss" I heron to capture the
prize for her startling work in
Monster.
Best Supporting Actor
Nominees: Alec Baldwin,
Benlcio Del Fbro, Djimon
llounsou, rim Robbins, Ken
Watanabe.
A few ol Hollywood's most
cherished and beloved actors
final I v received their due with
a first-time Academy Award
nomination.
I hough Robbins was noticed
tor his wonderful directing work
behind the 99SDeadMan Walk.
inn, the 20 sear movie veteran
has appe.ired in more than
4ii films but never landed an
acting nomination until
now.
Perhaps just as
notable was Baldwin's
nomination for The Cooler, in
which this self-described "Hol-
lywood every-man" finally cap-
tured the eyes ol both film critics
and Academy voters.
I un though thcyareallstellar
performances, the Academy
tends to repeat itself sometimes
when it comes to the nomination
process,
llounsou's nod for
the little-seen In America
is more of a "make-up"
nomination for I997's Amitad,
where he was an early candidate
to not only be nominated but
win.
The last tew years, the Acad-
emy has gotten into the habit
ol consistently nominating the
same people.
Though quietly praised, Pel
loro's performance in 21 Grams
received little notice from award
groups (including the (iolden
Globes). However, this is the
first serious film-outing he's
had since his Oscar-winning
turn In 20()0's Traffic hence
the nomination by process. Best
bet: Robbins.
Best Supporting Actress
Nominees: Shohreh Agh-
dashloo. Patricia Clarkson,
Mania Gay Harden, Holly
Hunter, Renee Zellweger.
The Best Supporting Actress
category seems easy to predict
but is always shocking.
Lauren Bacall, Winona
Ryder, Kate Hudson and
countless others were expected
to take home Oscar gold for
their respected nominated
years. Yet, if you look on their
mantles, you won't find an
Oscar. Because of this ongoing
trend, look for Aghdashloo to
upset this year's unfortunate cer-
tainty, Zellweger, for the award.
This writer can be contacted at
feotures@theeastcarolinian.com
What do you think will win the
Oscar for Best Picture?
TABATHA CARROLL
SOPHOMORE
MERCHANDISING AND
BUSINESS MAJOR
'Seabiscuit. I don't like those
magical movies
DAWN REID
JUNIOR BUSINESS MAJOR
"Seabiscuit. The Lord of the
Rings was nice, but there's
something about the
little horse's heart
WeHavealllxgjventhe
gfcof an extra daqthisipar
- share ft with the World and
Sun Feb. 19 - LEAP DAY, 20CH
The Dances of Universal Peace
:00 - 6x00 pm Mendenhall Student Center
free and Available RarldndH free Refreshments
SporfconexJbytfofriafAcUtc
CHERITA HARRIS
JAVA CITY EMPLOYEE
"I have seen the preview of
Seabiscuit and it looked alright"
SEAN HERRfTT
SOPHOMORE PHYSICAL
ACTIVITY FITNESS MAJOR
'Lord of the Rings. I love action
Fashion
from page B1
also designed her the year
before at the 74th Oscars. A
Herrera gown is most likely
going to show up again this
year on Zellweger, who is also
nominated this year for Best
Supporting Actress in Cold
Mountain.
"I'm looking forward to
seeing Johnny Depp this year.
His style is always different
from the average black tux, but
he still looks great anyway said
Harb Kuchar, sophomore special
education major.
Depp, who is nominated this
year for Best Actor in a leading
Role for the popular Pirates
of tlic Caribbean The Curse of
the Mack Pearl, definitely will
dress outside of the box com-
pared to the other nominees.
Bill Murray is also nominated
for Lost in Translation and Scan
I'enn for his performance in
Mystic River. Ben Kinglsey is also
nominated for House of Sand
and Fr.
Although fashionable looks
are noticed by all, everyone
waits for the "what was shehe
thinking" ensembles.
Diane Keaton is nomi-
nated this year for Best
Supporting Actress In
Something's Gotta Give. She
was considered one of the worst-
dressed for the Golden Globes
in 2004, so we'll see if she
will redeem herself at the
Oscars.
Scarlet Johansson was
another worst dressed actress
of the 2004 Golden Cilobes. She
wore a beige Stella McCartney
dress that did not flatter her
figure.
Jennifer l.opez and Meryl
Streep were both considered
worst dressed last year at the
Oscars.
. i ording in fashion guru
Mr. Rtac kwrll, the ultimate
worst dressed for 2003 was Paris
Hilton.
This writer can be contacted at
features� theeastcarolinian. com.
i
Attention ECU
Sophomores
(Students who have completed 45-60 credit hours)
If at least 30 of your credit hours were
completed at ECU (not counting Math 0001
or 0045), you are required to complete the
Sophomore Survey
before you can pre-register for either Summer or
Fall 2004 courses. When you submit your survey
responses, a "tag" is removed from your records
so that you can pre-register. Registration staff can
verify that your responses were received and that the
tag was removed.
You can complete the form beginning March 3rd by
going to the ECU "One-Stop web site, entering your
ECU Exchange email userid and password to sign
on, and clicking on "Sophomore Survey" in the box
labeled "Surveys Messages will also be sent to your
ECU email account with links to the "One-Stop
You can also access the "One-Stop" from:
ECU on-line kiosks at Mentlenhall Student Center,
Wright Place Cafeteria, the Austin Building, Joyner
Library East, and Cyber Cafe units located near the
center stairway in Mendenhall.
Please complete the survey as soon as possible
after the survey opens on March 3rcertainly
before sophomore pre-registration begins (shortly
after March 29). This will also help avoid delays
during pre-registration when the workload on
ECU computers is at a peak. The restriction on
registering will end on April 26 when this Sophomore
Survey ends.
I
i
I





22604
I Alii Hi.
THE FAST CAROLINIAN � FFATURFS
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Why not live somewhere that fits your lifestyle and your budget? Exclusively for students, River
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Located on the ECU shuttle route
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PAGi 9
2 26 04
SPORTS
RYAN DOWNEY
Sports Editor
TONY ZOPPO
Assistant Sports Editor
sports@theeastcarolinlan.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
Intramural Basketball Championship Night
The finals of frve-on-five intramural basketball will be held tonight at the
SRC Champions will be crowned for co-recreational, fraternity gold and
purple, soronty. men's gold and purple, graduate studentsfaculty and
staff and women s leagues Games start at 6 p.m on courts one and two
Admission is free
Rock Climbing
The adventure program will be going to Pilot Mountain March 6-7
Harnesses and gear are provided. The registration deadline is Friday, Feb
27 Pre-trip meeting is Tuesday, March 2
Spring Break trip
The Adventure program is organizing a multi-element trip to the Florida
Everglades Sea Kayak trip Registration deadline is Wednesday, March
3 Pre-trip meeting is Thursday, March 4 The trip should include Hiking,
Kayaking, Climbing and Canoeing
Sports Briefs
Athletics director search meeting
The ECU Athletics Director Search Committee will meet at 9 a.m. on Friday.
Feb 27 and 9 am. on Saturday. Feb. 28. Both meetings will be held at
the offices of the Research Triangle Regional Partnership, 1000 Trade
Drive, Suite 124, RDU Airport Both meetings will move to closed session
immediately to consider the qualifications, competence, performance and
conditions of appointment of prospective public officers or employees
The committee is chaired by Stephen Showfety. vice chairman of the ECU
Board of Trustees
Redskins cut Smith, Armstead, two others
Bruce Smith, the NFls career sack leader, was cut by the Washington
Redskins Tuesday along with Jessie Armstead and two other veterans
in moves to help the team get under the $806 million salary cap Smith's
release was expected The 40-year-old defensive end had indicated he
would retire after passing Reggie White for the all-time sack record in
December The release of Armstead will have the biggest on-field impact
The live-lime Pro Bowl linebacker signed a three-year. $4.5 million contract
two years ago after nine seasons with the New York Giants Armstead. 33,
had 9 12 sacks and 216 tackles in two seasons with Washington and
provided veteran locker room leadership Barker, who turns 40 in June,
spent three years with the Redskins, with the last two among the worst of
his career He had a career-low 30-yard net average in 2002, raising it to
343 last season Dalton was acquired in a trade with Denver last August
as the Redskins tried to patch up their defensive line He started the last
nine games and finished with 17 tackles
Third witness describes chaotic scene
Former NBA star Jayson Williams ran naked from a bathroom in his New
Jersey mansion and handed some clothing to an acquaintance after a
hired driver was fatally shot, a witness testified Tuesday. Gordnick said
he "assumed" Williams wanted him to get rid of the clothes, prompting an
objection from defense lawyer Billy Martin Gordnick said he put the clothes
in a black garbage bag, placed it in his car. put other clothing from Williams'
bedroom floor in the car of another friend. Kent Culuko, and hid both bags
at a highway underpass Gordnick is the third witness to describe a chaotic
scene after driver Costas "Gus" Christoli was hit with a single blast from a
shotgun held by Williams on Feb 14, 2002 None were with Williams and
members of the Harlem Globetrotters when the fatal shooting occurred; all
three have said they saw Williams wiping down the shotgun
Bryant case gets political
The district attorney prosecuting NBA star Kobe Bryant on a sexual
assault charge will run for re-election while the case proceeds Distncl
Attorney Mark Hurlbert was appointed by Governor Bill Owens in 2002
The Republican announced his plans Monday to seek another term in the
district that includes Eagle. Summit, Lake and Clear Creek counties. Bryant
was accused last July of raping a resort worker The Los Angeles Lakers
guard says the sex was consensual Hurlbert began his career in Eagle
County in 1994 as a deputy district attorney For now, he laces no GOP
opponent Debbie Marquez. a chairwoman of the Eagle County Democratic
Party, said she expected a Democrat to run
Young switching to shortstop for Rangers
Michael Young wanted to get the Issue settled He's ready to be the Texas
Rangers shortstop Young told manager Buck Showalter on Tuesday, the
day before the team's first full-squad workout, that he would move from
second base to fill the void created by the trade of American League MVP
and Gold Glove winner Alex Rodriguez That means two-time All-Star
Alfonso Soriano the player Texas got from the New York Yankees in the
A-Rod deal, will remain at second base Young figured it he might end
up playing shortstop anyway, he wanted as much work as possible there
during the six weeks before the season opener
n
TEC Rankings
Team
Stanford (5)
St Josephs
Duke
Pittsburgh
Gonzaga
Miss Si
Oklahoma St
Connecticut
Kentucky
Record
23-0
24-0
22-3
252
23-2
21-2
21-3
21-5
19-4
Pts.
100
93
88
88
77
75
72
64
61
IW
1
2
3
5
7
4
6
NR
8
10 Texas
20-4 54
ECU hosting USF on senior day
Pirates say farewell to
five veteran players
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
After two emotional home
wins against Tulane and TCU,
the Pirates will face another
emotional game this Saturday
when they say goodbye to five
seniors in Minges Coliseum.
Derrick Wiley, F.rroyl
Ring, Luke Mackay, Garth
Grindley and injured Gabriel
Mikulas will play their last game
as a Pirate against the University
of South Florida - a team strug-
gling to find their way in Confer-
ence USA.
The Bulls only had seven wins
this season and one in league play
against Southern Miss.
They still have three
starters averaging double-digits
and a human eraser inside,
derrick Morris, who averages four
blocked shots a game. Terrencc
Leather and Bradley Mosley will
be Fill's main threats as they
score 15 and 14 respectively in
each contest.
In the first meeting between
the two teams, the Pirates got
the best of the Bulls in a S9-S7
road win, a win that snapped a
huge road losing streak for the
Belton Rivers has come on strong for the Pirates as of late.
19 followed by Derrick Wiley's 14
and lrroyl Bing's 10.
The Bulls' Brian Swift posed
problems from the outside as
he shot his way to 20 points on
six of 11 shooting from behind
the arc.
South Florida made nine
three-point field goals in the
contest.
Coming down the stretch,
the Pirates knew they would
have to win at least halt of their
remaining six games to get a bid
in the conference tournament.
So far, so good.
BGU chalked up two
home wins in a row and still
has three games remaining on
the season.
With a win this weekend,
l.( :U could mine into the last spot
for the conference tournament.
If the Pirates and the Cougars
(Houston) were to both lose or
win the same amount of games
1 to complete the season, Houston
will enter the tournament before
ECU because of an earlier win in
the season.
I ECU will need the seniors,
diaper dandies, coaching staff
and plenty of fans to close out
this home stand with another
Pirates that had been with them
evii since they entered the new
league.
That game proved to be
another emergence ol Pirate
talent as freshman Frank
Robinson, seven of 10 shooting
from the field, led the way with
This writer can be contacted at
iports@tbeeastcarolinian.com.
Leclair Invitational starts Friday
Tournament held in
honor of former coach
BRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Keith leclair battles
every day of his life. Stricken
with Lou Cehrig's only a couple
of years ago, the disease slowly
deteriorated his nervous system.
Al.S ultimately paralyzes patients
as the disease kills brain and
spinal cord nerve cells. With the
motor neurons dead, the brain
can't initiate or control muscle
movement.
That won't keep Leclair from
fighting, however, and this
weekend is the chance for
Greenville and the
surrounding areas to join
Leclair in his corner. Clem-
son and Georgia Southern,
whom Leclair has very strong
ties with, will be traveling to
Harrington field for round-
robin action. Leclair played
under Clemson Head Coach Jack
l.eggett at Western Carolina and
was later an assistant to l.eggett
belore assuming the I lead (oach-
ing duties in the early 1990s
when l.eggett stepped clown.
Georgia Southern Head
Coach Rodney Hennon was an
assistant on l.eclair's coaching
staff with the Catamounts.
With some of l.eclair's
connections coming hack to
Greenville, Pirate Head Coach
Randy Maey thinks it's a great
opportunity to honor such a
wonderful man.
"It's an opportunity for all
of Keith's friends to get back
together said Maey.
"This is a great event for a
great person. It's in his honor,
and we would like to continue
this tournament every season in
his honor
As for the competition,
Clemson enters this weekend
ranked No. 11 in the nation in
the latest Baseball America Top
25 Poll. Nonetheless, the Tigers
dropped their season opener
to Charlotte 5-4, so expect
this Tiger siuad to come into
Greenville hungry tor victories.
Georgia Southern enters the
tournament with a S-S record.
Botli (quads, according to Maey,
have great pitching.
"The teams we're playing
this weekend are loaded with
pitching, so we're going to lair
the best arms we've seen all
Season Maey said.
The tournament format
allows each team to play
the other two teams twice,
so all teams will have four
games in three days.
This is a lough task
against even bail learns, let alone
squads like nationally ranked
Clemson and Georgia Southern.
"Four games in three days
Is a lot, no matter who you're
playing. Against the competi-
tion we're playing, it's going to
be hard. We are really going to
have to pitch well and do some
The Pirates face two nationally ranked teams this weekend.
timelv hitting Maey said.
"lint out guvs believe they
can win
Jamie Paige, senior left
fielder for the Pirates, has been
wearing ami will continue to
wear Leclair's number (23) in
honor Ol the man who has done
so much for the Pirate program
in so little time.
"I ike I said s many times,
it's the biggest honor I've ever
received and I will try my best
to represent coach Leclair in a
positive manner said Paige
Hie Piratesenta the weekend
with an unblemished B-0 mark
on the season and will begin
action on I ridayal i p.m. against
Georgia Southern.
I hit ty minutes alter game
one, ECU will take on Clemson
in game two of the invitational.
Saturday, the Pirates return
to action 30 minutes after the
ClemsonGeorgia Southern
game facing Clemson for the
second time.
Sunday, the diamond Pirates
take on Georgia Southern for the
second time at 4 p.m.
If you're a true ECU baseball
fan, then you should be there
this weekend to honor one of
the greatest men to ever come
through the Pirate program.
It's the least we can do for
someone who fights every day
for his life.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Minges Maniacs buck profane trend
For more information visit www.t1ieeastcarollnlan.com.
Vulgarity in stands an
explosive issue
TONY ZOPPO
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
It's Thursday night, you are
watching what may be the best
rivalry in sports at home on
your television - Carolina vs.
Duke. Naturally, you're a Heels
fan and they're playing some
oi the best basketball they've
played all season. Sean May gets
the ball inside and misses a hook
shot, grabs the rebound, misses,
grabs another board and misses
the follow once again.
The first thing that comes
out of your mouth is a slew ol
vulgarities that would make your
grandmother turn in her grave.
What if VOU were at the Dean
Dome and did that same thing
Would you expect to be thrown
out, or would you parade your
right to Iree speech
I his is the problem affecting
colleges across the nation, and
the controversy is only growing.
Sporting events, particularly
college basketball games, held
by public institutions in public
facilities are bound by the first
Amendment.
I hen again, one has to con-
sider the well-being of others,
especially children, who are
exposed to foul language at
these gaiiirs
President of Utah State Uni-
versity, Kennit Hall, is an expert
on the lirst Amendment and said
free speech at public universities
is "at once the most obvious and
paradoxical of constitutional
principles
Freedom ol speech is a must
and a necessary component
in academli freedom, hut the
O
Minges
Maniacs
Code ol Conduct: The Minges
Maniacs was created to support
all aspects of the Pirate Basketball
team and while we want to create
a tough home environment for
our opponents, we must do so
with class and integrity Good
sportsmanship practiced by the
Minges Maniacs is vital if we are
to continue as a first-class athletic
program.
Objective: II is the purpose of
the Minges Maniacs student
organization to provide the Pirate
Basketball teams with unified and
energetic student support
Mil-
wwwmingesmaniacs.com
paradox is created in the need to
uphold Civility and respn t loi
the surrounding community.
Where exactly is the line
drawn between constitutional
rights and protecting a degree
oi i Ivlllty?
Hall believes universities
have the right to eject students
for using loul language, and they
also carry a responsibility to do
so in order to maintain a sale
environment for other fans.
"I think that's legally justifi-
able and sustainable, "said Hall in
a recent USA 7Mny Interview.
"There are two interesting
and controlling factors. First,
the process of admission to an
athletic event is a license, wbii h
can be revoked.
"Second, there is an exemp-
tion to the first Amendment for
'fighting words' used to try to
The Minges Maniacs have been lauded for their enthusiasm.
incite or intimidate
In recent years, many people
have seen and been exposed to
student sections ni universities
using profanlt)
The University ol Maryland,
spec ifically, had problems on .m
21 against the Duke Blue Devils.
Each lime Blue Devils guard J.J.
Kedii k stepped In the tree throw
line, fans would cheer, "(Exple-
tive) you, J.J
Issues with this kind of
behavior have also been seen
throughout tin- Big Ten at hnckes
games tor the I iniversity of North
Dakota and in early February at
the Cincinnati - Xavier game.
However, at one university,
you tan count on rarely ever
being exposed to that kind of
behavior IsEi i
The Minges Maniacs is the
student section that keeps the
home-court advantage strong in
Greenville.
Head i caches Hick Pltino
anil lorn Crean, of Louisville
see NCAA page B8





PAGL 13
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
226 04
Lady Pirates finish up season
Women will take on
Charlotte this Friday
ERIC GILMORE
STAFF WRITER
The women's basketball team
will conclude their regular season
as they take on in-state rival and
conference foeharlotte this
Friday, Feb. 27 at Halton Arena.
Tlp-oti is slated for : p.m.
The ECU women (14-12,
5-8) are looking for a win before
heading into the conference
tournament. The lady Pirates
have lost eight consecutive games
and posted their List win against
Charlotte on Ian. 25. Out of the
last six ECU losses, four have
been in overtime.
Charlotte I4-I2, 7-6) comes
into the match-up having
lost four straight. Losses to
nationally ranked Houston and
TCU at home, coupled with losses
on the road to Louisville and
Cincinnati, the lady 49ers are
starving lor a win. Charlotte won
the regular season conference
title last year, but has struggled
in their campaign to repeat.
They are currently in sole
possession of seventh place
In Conference USA, but could
move as high as sixth or as low
as eighth.
The game will have
seeding implications going into
the conference tournament
and will help to determine the
final conference standings. A
Charlotte win would almost
solidify a first round match-up
between the Lady 49ers and the
Lady Pirates as the seventh seed
is pitted against the tenth.
ECU will attempt to
rekindle the spirit of the last
match-up between the two
teams, which ended up as an
80-55 blowoutovertheLady49ers.
The lady Pirates only saw a
two-point advantage at 28-26 at
the end of thelirst half. However,
after the intermission, it was all
ECU. The women outscored
Charlotte S2-29 in the second half
thanks to the stellar play of stars
Courtney Willis and Jennifer
Jackson. Willis contributed 26
points and nine rebounds, while
The Lady Pirates are looking to end a losing trend on Friday.
Jackson posted 24 points and
nine boards.
Peaches Harris led the
Lady 49er attack as she scored
18 points and nine rebounds.
Charlotte shot four of 30
from behind the arc, while
the Lady Pirates shot 44.1
percent from the field.
However, that game was the peak
of the women's season. It was
their eighth consecutive win and
the Lady Pirates were a perfect 5-
0 in conference. A month makes
quite a difference as the women
have currently dropped eight
straight, all in conference.
Courtney Willis will lead
the Lady Pirate attack for the
last time in a regular season
game. Willis is averaging a
double-double at 19.5 points
per game and 10.5 rebounds.
The senior's totals are good
for fourth and third in the
league respectively. Willis has
posted double-doubles in 14
games this season and has
scored double figures in each.
The standout senior needs just
five points to move into fifth
in career scoring at KCU, which
would help Willis pass Sylvia
Bragg who played from 1982-
1986.
Jennifer Jackson has also
helped to provide some scoring
as she is averaging 15.3 and 6.8
rebounds. The junior recently
became the 18th Lady Pirate to
score 1,000 points in her career.
Charlotte's best win came
over a DePaul team 74-70 at
home. No. 18 DePaul became
a victim of the home court
advantage at Halton Arena.
Nationally ranked Houston
and TCU both scraped by with
four and nine point wins respec-
tively. Charlotte ranks fourth in
the conference in attendance
and the crowd will be geared up
as five 49ers will be honored in
senior activities. Peaches Harris,
Tiffanie Hoey, LaShantaJohnson
and Ivi Manclic will all play their
final game in Halton Arena.
Harris is one of the best
Lady 49ers to play in a Charlotte
uniform. The senior is one of
twelve Charlotte players to score
1,000 points in a career.
The match-up will help
for one team to gain much-
needed momentum headed into
postseason play. Both teams
are assured of playing in the
Conference USA tournament,
which is slated to take place in
Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas on
March 4 - 7.
This writer can be contacted at
iports@theeastcarolinian.com.
TEC is now hiring staff writers. Apply at our office located
on the cJnd floor of the Student Publications Building.
Experience required
Must have a '2.0 GI'A
Brown & Brown
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� .
2 26 04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B8
� lll'KXU' JMIIJAKK
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from page B6
and Marquette respectively, have
both commented on how power-
ful the home-court advantage is
for ECU. Crean even felt sorry for
anyone who has to play at Minges
Coliseum.
"My condolences go out to
the teams who have not been
there yet said Orean.
However, he isn't sending
his condolences because the
Maniacs are known for acting
inappropriately.
"You're breaking a code ot
civility when you use language
like that said Jon Medford,
president ol the Mlngei
Maniacs.
"There are children and
families around, and it reflects
negatively on you because you
can't think of anything more
creative. One of the main goals
for our organization is to be
creative. We want to get in the
players' heads, but not in a vulgar
way
"We have been really lucky at
ECU lo not have many problems
with bad language said Sett)
Morton, who will he taking over
presidential duties for Medtord
next year.
"There will always be one
or two rotten apples, but as a
group, our students are intelli-
gent enough to realize the harm
it can do. We represent the Pirate
Nation verv well
What about those rotten
apples who believe it is their
right to mouth off?
"I think universities should
start implementing two-
strikes-you're-out rules, so you
can be banned from attend-
ing games for the rest of the
KUari if you are caught being
ridiculously vulgar Medford
said.
"I just don't know if rules like
this could be enforced and still
co-exist with the Hrst Amend-
ment. We are going to have to
rely on creating a more knowl-
edgable fan base, which is what
we try to do with the Web site we
have running
Medford believes that those
who insist on using profanity
should not only take an exam-
ple from the Maniacs, but also
from another well-known and
well-respected program - Duke
University.
Back on Dec. 12, 2003, the
Blue Devils squared off against
St. John's at Cameron Indoor
Stadium.
Mike Jarvis was still the Head
Coach for the Johnnies and the
Red Storm played terribly. During
the game, the Cameron Crazies
started a chant of "lire Jarvis,
lire Jarvis
After that night, many
of the fans that attended the
game, and especially those who
participated in the chant,
wrote Mike Jarvis e-mails
apologizing to him. The Duke
fans felt ashamed for chant-
ing that way and admitted it
was completely out of line and
unnecessary. Jarvis went on to
call 'Coach K' to let him know
what the fans had done and told
him how classy he thought it
was.
Vulgarity and obscene behav-
ior at these games will burn on,
but something must be done in
order to put out the fire.
The NCAA is looking into the
situation and formulating ways
to reduce the occurrence of these
obscene and profane behaviors.
Until a plan of action is
decided upon, if you're a fan
and you go to watch a game in
person, remember that you're
not in the privacy of your own
home.
Be conscious of the people
around you, and then make
up your mind of how you'd
like to act when May misses
that fourth follow up shot or
when the Pirates' Derrick Wiley
shoots five of 25 from the
floor.
Your reaction may be slightly
different if you stop to think
about it.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Get caught reading.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 26, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 26, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1711
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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