The East Carolinian, Feburary 10, 2004






PAGE B6
D
Volume 79 Number 114
� THE EAST CAROLINIAN
tec
TUESDAY
February 10, 2004
Easley urges board not to enforce tuition increases
Editor's Note: The Board of
Governors will meet in Raleigh
this Friday to determine tuition
and fee Increases far the 2004-
OS school year.
RALEIGH AI') � liov. Mike
I asley is asking the University
Of North Carolina Hoard of Gov-
ernors to vote against campus-
based tuition increases when it
meets this week.
In a letter to board l hairman
Brad Wilson, Easley says raising
tuition would hurt access to
higher education in the state.
"Many families have been hit
hard by our national recession
and unhelpful trade policy, and
argue that increases of this size
should not be considered at this
time Easley wrote. "I agree
The letter is dated Friday and
was released on Sunday by the
governor's office. Calls to Wilson
requesting comment weren't
immediately returned.
Joni Worthington, a spokes-
woman with the University of
North Carolina system, said she
hadn't seen the letter but was
sure that Wilson would respond
on behalf of the Board of Gov-
ernors.
The full board is scheduled on
Friday to consider tuition and
fee Increases ranging from nine
to 19 percent for students who
are North Carolina residents in
the 16-campus system foi the
2004-05 academic year.
The General Assembly
imposed a 5 percent tuition
Increase for the entire sj stem this
academic year to partially offset
the cost oi enrollment growth.
The budget committee and
Other board members met foi
more than seven hours on Friday
to review the proposed tuition
increases and is scheduled to
continue on I liursday.
"Obviously the Board of Gov-
ernors is not taking this lightly.it
all Worthington said.
Worthington said most ol
the Campus-based increases tor
the upcoming school year raise
tuition and tees for residents
about $300.
A group of students and
faculty are lobbying against
the increase. They've printed
a 500-page book called "The
Personal Stories Project: Faces,
Not Numbers containing
about 800 stories detailing the
difficulty of keeping up with
rising tuition costs.
Fhe book is being distrib-
uted to the board and various
state legislators. Some campuses
are also planning bus trips
to the full board meeting on
Friday to lobby against the
increase.
Jonathan Ducote, the presi-
dent of the UNC Association
of Student Governments and
the only student on the board,
called Kasley's letter "absolutely
fantastic news
"The governor understands
that for North Carolina to come
around and come out on top in
the new economy that heavy
investments must be made in
education said Ducote, a senior
at NC State University.
Even if the increases are
approved by the board then
the General Assembly, the state
would still be one of the best
values for higher education in
see TUrTION page A2
EASLEY
Kerry pushes past competition
election (A)
�� f. m � John
4r a � � ���� Ke r r y s
rivals tried
Monday to slow his brisk pace
toward the Democratic nomi-
nation for president, with
John Edwards and Wesley
Clark searching for upset
wins in two Southern states
and Howard Dean beseech-
ing Wisconsin voters "to keep
this debate alive
As Edwards and Clark
concentrated on Virginia and
Tennessee, whit h hold prima-
ries Tuesday, Kerry ignored his
rivals and criticized President
Bush on foreign policy and his
stewardship of the economy.
Looking ahead to Wisconsin,
Dean said that despite
earlier statements that he
viewed the Feb. 17 primary as
a do-or-dle contest, he would
stay in the race regardless of
the outcome.
"I've just changed my
mind he said.
Before an audience in
Roanoke, V'a . Kerry scorned a
White House economic report
released earlier in the day that
predicted the economy would
grow in' 4 percent and create
2.6 million new jobs this
year.
"I've got a teeling this
report was prepared by the
same people who brought us
the intelligence OH Iraq Kerry
said, citing job losses ol more
than 2 million since Bush took
office.
The Massachusetts senator
also faulted Hush for policy
failures on North Korea,
AIDS, global warming and the
see KERRY page A2
John Kerry pushes ahead of his rivals in the fight to win votes and be the democratic nomination for president
Safety Walk sheds light on
potentially dangerous areas
SGA debates spring
election deadlines
Dates set, but rules still in question
STEPHEN RICE
STAFF WRITER
The SGA Senate met Monday to discuss
rules and dates for the upcoming student body
elections. For the first time this semester, atten-
dance was high enough to allow voting.
Senators heatedly debated when the dates
should be.
There was discussion on whether the
wording in the election rules and the pas-
sage of the bill violate the SGA constitution.
Debate lasted for nearly two hours. The
Senate's schedule said filing for student body
offices would begin on Feb. 16.
This would have placed the election before
spring break. Advocates said this plan would allow
for meaningful transition and training for new
student body officers. Others questioned chang-
ing the timeline if student media were already
informed of established filing dates.
Concern was expressed that the February date
is too early in the semester and does not follow
the precedent of elections being held later in the
spring. Fhe Senate voted to begin elections tiling
on March 1.
I bis pushes the election back to March 30
and 31. Supporters say additional time will help
to put)fieie tiling lor posilions.
Even though dates are set, the rules from last
semester's election are still in place since the
revisions were not voted on. The revisions are
designed to prevent loopholes,
Fhe Senate also had Melissa Price, the vice
president of finance for University of North Caro-
lina Association of Student Governments speak
about Students' Day in Raleigh this Friday.
"This is the opportunity to make history
said Price.
"We are going to rally on Feb. 13 to change
political thinking on tuition increases"
Flu increase, if approved, will add $300 to
tuition per year for the next three years.
Following Price's presentation, the Senate voted
in favor of a resolution to pave the freshman parking
lot. The project's projected cost is near $250,000.
This writer can be contacted at
news&theeas tcarolinian. corn.
Snow Hill Primary implements dual language program
Crime Prevention Sgt. Amy Davis and SGA member Hannah
Novak point out poorly lit areas on campus Monday night.
Darkened walkways,
broken emergency
phones found
HOLLY O'NEAL
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
About 20 people c rossed
campus Monday night in search
of unsafe areas during the
Student Government Associa-
tion's Safely Walk.
Teams Of two or more looked
for poor lighting, obstructed
walkways, malfunctioning emer-
gency phones and anything else
that would compromise students'
security.
Matthew Clark, junior con-
see WALK page A6
las Puentes' builds
bridges for Hispanics
PETER KALAJIAN
STAFF WRITER
Snow Mill Primary has
established a dual language
immersion program, the tirsl
ol its kind in rural eastern
North Carolina to be Utilized
by Kindergarten and first grade
HlspanU students In the area.
In cooper.n imi with the
ECU Geography Department,
Snow Mill is taking bold steps In
the ongoing i hallenge to otter
alternate learning opportunities
to Latino and Hispanit children
living within theit dislrii t.
IIndei the new program,
Spanish-speaking students u ill
he able to learn from a Spanish-
speaking instructor, while col-
laborating with peers and par-
ticipating in normal actis ities.
Dubbed "i as Puentes
which is Spanish lor bridges,
the program is the brainchild
of Paf MaiNcill, director ol
Growing numbers of Hispanic students warrant Spanish
speaking instructors in Greene County.
and Snow Hill parent, became
involved in the program when
she wrote a state grant to help
fund "l.as Puentes
Torres was unavailable for
comment by press time.
"l.as Puentes" requires an
application only and runs for
the entire school day. One-halt of
the students currently involved
instruction and federal programs
for Snow Hill Primary School.
" the Greene bounty Schools
have been very progressive in
watching cultural changes in our
communities said MacNcill.
"We appreciate all the efforts
of Rebei i a Torres and IIV
Rebecca Torres, associate
professor of geography at ECU
in the program speak English as
their second language.
Camoosha Bell is a bilingual
graduatestudent in international
relations and a Spanish tutor for
the modified program at ECU.
"The earlier people can learn
I foreign language, the better
said Bell.
"I feel that programs like Las
Puentes should be a federally
mandated part of the education
system. It would not only he
advantageous to the individual
but to society as a whole
Snow Hill, which sits in one
I ol the poorest counties In the
state, has a HispanicLatino pop-
ulation of approximately 1,600,
or 8 percent of the overall
population.
The majority of Spanish-
speaking inhabitants ol (Ireene
i ounty hail from Mexico.
Hispanics and Latinos are
the fastest growing demographic
In the nation as well as in rural
eastern North Carolina.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Black History Awareness
throughout February
-o Feb. 16, 1857, Frederick Douglass v�as elected president or Freedman Bank and Trust.
The Emancipation Proclamation freed all slaves in slates rebelling against the Union on Jan. 1, 1863.
Forecast tec required Online
News
PM Showers
High of 56
READING
VfcH wwwlteeastrarrjnraticom to read
more about the latest Ohio shootings,
which now number 21
page A2
Students w travel abroad to Egypt this
summer tn gain education eqwlence
and class credit
Features page b,
Valentine's Day Is right around the
comer If you stai haveni purchased
the perfect gift, TEC has suggestions.
Sports
page B4
Despite some ECU players career nights,
ECUS merfs basketbal team was stil
aetefedbylarlotte
Dorn target to get Information
on sexual responsibility this
week In Wright Plaza from
10 am-2 pm





PAGE A2
2-10-04
NEWS
ERIN RICKERT
News Editor
HOLLY O'NEAL
Assistant News Editor
news@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
Women In Academic Medicine Seminar
The Office of Academic and Faculty Development presents a seminar
on women in academic medicine today from 830 am - 4:15 p.m. at the
Ironwood Golf and Country Club Call 744-3420 for more information
Resume Blitz
Career Services offers a Resume Blitz, where students resumes are
critiqued on sight, today from 2 p.m. - 4 p.m in Bate Lobby
Mac Users Group
The Macintosh Users Group will meet tonight at 7 p.m in Murphy Center's
Jones room The meeting will focus on iPods and accessories with items
on display, and demo the latest features of the iTunes Music Store. Anyone
is invited to attend. For more info, visit http:www.ecumugorg.
Construction and Industrial Career Fair
There will be a Construction Management and Industrial Technology
Career Fair Wednesday from 10 am. - 2 p.m on the first floor of the
Science and Technology Building
Sex Smarts
Wellness Education presents "Sex Smarts a game show based on the
TV show "Street Smarts" Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Nursing and Allied Health Career Fair
There will be a Nursing and Allied Health Career Fair Thursday. Feb. 12
from 10 am - 2 p.m in the Carol Belk Building
Deans and Issues Forum
The ECU chapter of Omicron Delta Kappa will host the Deans and Issues
Forum on Thursday at 7 p m in 244 Mendenhall Student Center Garrie
Moore, vice chancellor tor Student Life, will moderate open discussion
on diversity, campus safety, transportation, parking, expansion, faculty
involvement and student organizations
Science and Chemistry Career Fair
There will be a science and chemistry career fair Friday from 10 am. - 2
p m on the third floor of the Science and Technology Building
Leadership Academy Applications
The ECU Leadership Academy will accept applications until Friday.
Applications are available online at www ecu eduleadership. in the Faculty
Senate office in the Raw! Annex on Reade Street and at the Office of the
Vice Chancellor for Heath Sciences in Brody The two-hour long classes
will meet on Fridays beginning Feb 27 and will focus on preparing faculty
and staff members to assume enhanced campus roles. Requirements for
applicants are a bachelor's degree and three years experience at ECU.
Self Defense Registration
Learn how to defend yourself in a progressive training system. Registration
is Friday from 10 am - 6 pm in 240 SRC Cost is $10 for members and
$20 for non-members, and the program runs March 21 - April 31.
Language Arts Conference
The College of Education will sponsor the Mary Lois Staton Reading
Language Arts Conference Friday, Feb 13 from 8 am - 4 p.m. at the
Greenville Hilton The conference will feature newspaper columnist and
author Susie Wilde, children's author Pansie Hart Flood and 25 sessions
on literacy issues Contact Susan Ranson at 328-6830 for registration
Book Drive
The ECU NC Teaching Fellows Program will sponsor a book drive on
Saturday. Feb.14 at Greenville Nissan and Greenville K-Mart from 9 a.m3
p m All contributors (books or cash) will receive a chance to win a dinner
lor two at one of several participating Greenville restaurants.
Books may be dropped off at the book drive or sentdelivered prior to
the Teaching Fellows office in 204 Spellman. Contact Mary Beth Corbin
at 328-4126 for more information
Negro Spiritual Presentation
The Ledonia Wnght Cultural Center will sponsor "The History of the Negro
Spiritual" presented by Dorthea Taylor, soprano, and Louise Toppin, piano,
on Sunday, Feb 15 at 5 p.m at Sycamore Hill Missionary Baptist Church
on Hooker Road
Resume Blitz
Career Services offers a Resume Blitz, where students' resumes are
critiqued on sight, Monday, Feb 16, from noon - 2 p.m. in Bate Lobby
Interviewing Workshop
Career Services offers a workshop on interviewing Monday. Feb 16. from
2 pm. - 3 p.m in 1012 Bate
Criminal Justice Applications
The deadline for students to apply for admission into the criminal justice
program is Monday, Feb 16 Applications are available outside 104-B
dale Contact Virginia Parker at 328-4192 for more information
PRSSA Meeting
The Public Relations Student Society of American will meet Monday. Feb
16 at 6 p.m in 202 Joyner East
Drop Deadline Extension
The last day for undergraduate students to drop term-length courses or
withdraw from school without grades has been extended to Wednesday.
Feb 25 Block courses may be dropped only during the first 40 percent
of their regularly scheduled class meetings
Sophomore Survey
Students who have completed 45-60 credit hours, with 30 of those at ECU.
must take the Sophomore survey before pre-registering for Summer or
Fall 2004 semesters The survey will be available on One Stop beginning
March 3.
Paper Person
The person featured at the top of today's paper is John Rappoport.
freshman construction management major
News Briefs
Local
NC National Guard unit
back in U.S. from Iraq
CLYDE (AP) - A company of North
Carolina National Guard soldiers
that spent nearly a year in Iraq is one
plane trip from home.
For the second time in two years,
the 211th Military Police Company
returned to the United States from
war. The more than 100 soldiers
who had been guarding a village
in northern Iraq landed Saturday
evening at McGuire Air Force Base
in New Jersey
"It didn't sink in until we stepped
out on the ground said Spec John
Parrish after the C-141 military plane
touched down "We're just glad to be
home
The soldiers will undergo debriefing
and counseling at Fort Dix, N J, before
returning to western North Carolina on
Friday, Capt Robert Carver, a National
Guard spokesman in Raleigh, said
Sunday
They'll be greeted at the unit's armory
in Haywood County by new yellow
ribbons each with a soldier's name
fixed to Ihe chain link fence along the
long, uphill drive Old ribbons placed
there 11 months ago when the 211th
left hang tattered and faded above the
new ones affixed on Saturday
The unit was activated in December
2001 and guarded Taliban and al-
Qaida prisoners in Afghanistan for
seven months in 2002 Five months
after returning from Afghanistan, the
211th had shipped out again in June.
Attorney General Cooper seeks
help from retailers in meth fight
RALEIGH (AP) - Attorney General
Roy Cooper's statewide campaign to
fight the spread of methamphetamine
labs could change the way North
Carolinians shop for cold medicine
North Carolina is moving to join a
growing number of states cracking
down on methamphetamine dealers
by limiting sales of cold tablets, putting
them behind counters, or training store
clerks to spot "suspicious" shoppers
and report them to the police.
Drug dealers buy over-the-counter
cold remedies, nasal decongestants
and asthma medicines for their
active ingredients, ephedrine or
pseudoephedrine A 48-tablet pack
of Sudafed yields methamphetamine
worth about $72 on the street,
according to police
States with acute methamphetamine
problems, such as Missouri and
California, limit purchasers to two
or three packs. Several other states
have programs encouraging retailers
lo limit purchases voluntarily.
In North Carolina, some drug and
grocery stores voluntarily limit
purchases to three packs in keeping
with guidelines from the Drug
Enforcement Administration But
other stores don't, prompting Cooper
to organize a statewide initiative to
train retailers to limit access and to
watch for suspicious consumers.
National
U.S Australia complete
free-trade pact
WASHINGTON (AP) - The United
States and Australia reached a
free-trade agreement Sunday that
officials say will eliminate duties from
more than 99 percent of American
manufacturing exports to Australia.
The deal, which requires
congressional approval, also will
boost most agricultural trade between
the two countries on products ranging
from beef to fruit to macadamia
nuts.
One notable exception is sugar, where
current rules will remain unchanged
American sugar producers had
lobbied hard against opening U.S.
markets to more Australian sugar,
and US officials were unwilling to
risk an election-year backlash despite
pressure from Australia
The agreement also calls for lengthy
phase-in periods to increase
Australian beef and dairy exports,
responding to pressure from US dairy
farmers and cattle ranchers who had
complained that a flood of cheaper
Australian products could have cost
thousands of jobs
Hundreds of opponents
of same-sex marriage
stage rally in Boston
BOSTON (AP) - Hundreds of
opponents of same-sex marriage
gathered Sunday on Boston Common
to show support for a proposed
constitutional amendment that would
define marriage as the union of one
man and one woman.
People held banners that read "Let
the people vote "Marriage, ancient,
sacred and "Homosexuality is not
normal" as they were entertained by
live music.
Speakers lined up forthe rally included
some of the state's most high-profile
gay marriage opponents, including
Archbishop Sean P O'Malley of the
Roman Catholic Boston Archdiocese,
and state House Speaker Thomas
Finneran.
Ed Zicko, 69, attended the rally with
his friend, Maureen Cavanaugh, 59,
both members of St Patrick's Catholic
church in Natick. He said he came
to the rally because marriage is a
tradition going back thousands of
years and "I think people should have
the opportunity to vote on it
A smaller group of counter-protesters,
some holding a banner that said
"Shame on you Sean in reference
to O'Malley, stood behind the main
stage.
Massachusetts' highest court, the
Supreme Judicial Court, ruled 4-3 in
November that same-sex couples had
a right under the state constitution to
the benefits of marriage, and this past
week it ruled by the same ratio that
only marriage-not civil union-would
satisfy its initial decision.
World
Crowds loot port as uprising
spreads in Haiti after bloody
battles between police, gunmen
ST MARC. Haiti (AP) - Hundreds of
Haitians looted TV sets, mattresses
and sacks of flour from shipping
containers Sunday in this port town,
one of several communities seized by
rebels in a bloody uprising against
President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.
Using felled trees, flaming tires
and car chassis, residents blocked
streets throughout St. Marc a day after
militants drove out police in gunbattles
that killed two people. Many residents
have formed neighborhood groups to
back insurgents in their push to expel
the president.
"After Aristide leaves, the country will
return to normal said Axel Philippe,
34, among dozens massed on the
highway leading to St. Marc, a city
of about 100.000 located some 45
miles northwest of the capital, Port-
au-Prince.
At least 18 people have been killed
since armed opponents of Aristide
began their assault Thursday, setting
police stations on fire and driving
officers from the northwestern city of
Gonaives Haiti's fourth-largest city
and several smaller nearby towns.
Haitien housing the studio of Radio
Vision 2000, the independent Haitian
broadcaster said.
Rebels continued to rule the streets
of Gonaives on Sunday, witnesses
said, though it was unclear how
many armed militants made up the
city of 200,000.
U.N Iraqis Debate
Ballots; Gl Killed
BAGHDAD. Iraq (AP) - UN, experts
met with Iraqi leaders for the first
time Sunday to discuss the chances
of holding early elections as Prince
Charles made a surprise visit and
Japan expanded its first military
deployment to a combat zone since
World War II.
In fresh violence, insurgents attacked
separate U.S. Army convoys with
explosives, killing one soldier and
wounding three others, witnesses
said. The soldier was killed when
a roadside bomb exploded near
Mahmudiyah, 20 miles south of
Baghdad, a military spokesman
said.
Kerry
from page A1
Calvin Mercer holds samples of papyri he obtained in Egypt.
It was produced using the ancient methods of making paper.
Shown in his right hand is Isis, the Egyptian goddess of fertility
and wife of Osiris.
Students travel to
land of pyramids
Study abroad trip offers
educational experience
JASMINE D. HARRELL
STAFF WRITER
ECU students looking for an
opportunity to experience a land
of ancient mysteries will have
the opportunity to study abroad
in Egypt this summer.
Led by Calvin Mercer, Ph.D
study abroad director and reli-
gious studies professor, this two-
week voyage includes visiting sites
of the oldest Egyptian pyramids;
the Egyptian museum, the Sphinx
and a four-day cruise along the
Nile Itiver.
"This is an Incredible oppor-
tunity to visit one of the most
interesting countries of the
world, said Mercer.
"Ihe ancient pharonic and
pyramid culture has fascinated
people through the centuries
The cost of the trip is $3,890,
which includes registration, air-
lare, hotels, meals, a four-day
cruise, guides, intercity transport,
tuition, insurance and adminis-
tration.
Mercer said students should
not allow money to be a deterrent
since other sources of funding are
available.
Students will receive six
semester hours ol credit for their
general education humanities
requirement or as general dec-

Information
For more Information on the
study abroad trip to Egypt,
contact Calvin Mercer at
328-4310 or
mercerc@mail.ecu.edu.
fives for their major.
"I'm always looking for as
much adventure as I can get
said Jeanne Rilcy, senior public
relations major.
"This trip will be a multicul-
tural educational experience, and
I'll learn a lot
Mercer said he estimates IS
people will be able to attend
depending on the availability of
I his seating.
"It's a great educational
opportunity to see other cultures
and their changes, especially after
911 said Jill Zelenko, senior
criminal justice major, who is
attending the trip.
There are still openings and
alternative funding available,
but Mercer said those interested
should contact him as soon as
possible.
Ihe trip was originally sched-
uled for the summer of 2003, but
was cancelled due to the univer-
sity's safety concerns.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeas tcarolinian. com.
Middle East peace process.
Edwards and Clark were
hoping strong showings in Ten-
nessee and Virginia would elimi-
nate the other and turn the race
into a two-man contest with
Kerry, but polls showed Kerry
well ahead in both states.
Dean, the former Vermont
governor who was once the
s party's front-runner, urged
5 Wisconsin voters to prove the
jj polls and the media wrong
and use their "power to choose
? the strongest candidate to beat
� George w. Bush
"The media claims this con-
test is over. They say your voice
and your vote don't count. They
expect you to rubber stamp the
choice of others. Hut you don't
have to listen to them Dean
told an audience of about 300 at
a downtown Madison hotel.
Dean began a two-day tour
and an aggressive advertising
campaign in Wisconsin, a state
he told supporters last week he
must win to keep his candidacy
alive. But on Monday, he said
his backers had persuaded him
to stay in the race regardless of
the results He dismissed his own
"obvious contradiction
Dean also began airing a
60-second biographical spot in
some Wisconsin markets, his
first advertising buy in the state
in months.
Kerry's winning streak he
handily won contests over the
weekend in Michigan, Washing-
ton state and Maine was clearly
taking a toll on his competitors.
Aides to both Clark and Edwards
said they expect their candidates
to lose Virginia and Tennessee,
even though both had earlier
been optimistic about winning
in their home region. A total of
I SI pledged delegates are at stake
in the two states.
Edwards andlark each have
one win apiece, while Kerry has
won 10 of the 12 contests thus
far. Kerry has more than twice
as many delegates as Dean, his
closest pursuer 426 after the
contest in Maine on Sunday
compared to Dean's 184, accord-
ing to an Associated Press tally. It
takes 2,162 delegates to win the
nomination.
Clark and Edwards have
vowed to forge ahead until Wis-
consin despite Kerry's increasing
advantage, hoping for a lucky
break or a potential slip-up by
the front-runner.
In Morrison, Term Edwards
met privately with Carrier Corp.
factory workers who found out
last week that the plant was
closing, eliminating 1,300 jobs.
I le said after the meeting at a bar-
becue restaurant near the plant
that the workers deserve to have
a president "who understands,
who knows what their lives are
like" and that President Bush is
out of touch.
"The president we have now
does not understand what these
folks are going through. I le does
not understand what is going on
in the lives of most Americans
Edwards said,
Clark told supporters in
Union City, Term that jobs were
his top issue. "People are strug-
gling in this country, and I think
it's a moral outrage he said.
Clark was sweeping through
six Tennessee dries before ending
his day in Nashville with country
music star Jaime O'Neal.
In Memphis, he acknowl-
edged polls showing him trailing
Kerry and Edwards in Tennessee
and Virginia. "You've got a front-
runner, you've got a good lawyer
and you've got an underdog. I'm
the underdog he said. Edwards
became a multimillionaire as a
plaintiffs' lawyer before being
elected to the Senate in 1998.
Kerry gained more support
on Monday when he won the
endorsements of West Virginia
Sen. Jay Rockefeller and New York
Rep. Nita l.owey. Kerry was also
backed by another major union,
the lHO.OOO-memher Amalgam-
ated Transit Union, the largest
Tuition
from page A1
the country.
According to the American
Association of Slate Colleges
and Universities, an organiza-
tion of about 400 public schools,
North Carolina had the eighth-
lowest average cost nationally
for resident undergrade for the
2003-04 school year.
In his letter to Wilson,
Easley acknowledged the
system's competitiveness but
said this isn't the time for tuition
increases.
"Despite fiscal challenges,
I will make every effort for my
2004-O.S budget to include full
funding for enrollment increases,
support for financial aid, and pay
increases for state employees,
including university faculty and
staff he wrote.
TEC is now hiring staff writers. Apply at our office located
on the 2nd floor of the Student Publications Building.
Experience required
Must have a 2.0 GPA






2 10-04
THL EAS1 CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGl A3
1 in this port town.
munities seized by
i uprising against
rtrand Aristide.
s. flaming tires
esidents blocked
St.Marcadayafler
olice in gunbattles
ile. Many residents
xirhood groups to
their push to expel
is. the country will
iaid Axel Philippe,
i massed on the
d St. Marc, a city
located some 45
the capital, Port-
have been killed
ments of Aristide
Thursday, setting
fire and driving
irthwestern city of
ourth-largest city
� nearby towns.
i studio of Radio
ependent Haitian
o rule the streets
inday. witnesses
as unclear how
nts made up the
Debate
il Killed
') - UN. experts
iers for the first
uss the chances
ctions as Prince
jrprise visit and
its first military
mbat zone since
urgents attacked
y convoys with
Dne soldier and
hers, witnesses
ras killed when
exploded near
miles south of
iry spokesman
426 after the
e on Sunday
's 184, accord-
id Press tally. It
tes to win the
dwards have
ead until Wis-
ry's increasing
g for a lucky
ial slip-up by
enn Edwards
Carrier Corp.
ho found out
:ie plant was
ig 1,300 jobs.
Mtlngatabdr-
lear the plant
eserve to have
understands,
their lives are
ddent Bush is
we have now
id what these
ugh. Ile does
iat is going on
t Americans
ipportcrs in
that jobs were
pie are strug-
�y, and I think
he said,
ping through
before ending
�with country'
'Neal.
he acknowl-
g him trailing
in Tennessee
ve got a front-
a good lawyer
inderdog. I'm
said. Kdwards
llionalre as a
before being
te in 1998.
nore support
he won the
Vest Virginia
and New York
erry was also
major union,
er Amalgam-
i. the largest
iveness hut
ne for tuition
challenges,
ffnrt for my
include lull
Hit increases,
I aid, and pay
employees,
?' faculty and
Bush: 'I expected to find the weapons'
President George W. Bush's approval rating has taken a dive by almost 10 percent in a month
Now Bush is receiving criticism from the Democrats over the failure to find Iraq's weapons
of mass destruction.
WASHINGTON (A I')
� President Bush denied he
marched America into war under
false pretenses and said the
U.Sled invasion was neces-
sary because Saddam Hussein
could have developed a nuclear
weapon.
"I don't think America
can stand by and hope for
the best said the president.
Bush suggested Saddam may
have destroyed or spirited
out of the country the banned
weapons the Bush administra-
tion cited as a main rationale
for the war.
"I expected to find the weap-
ons Bush said in an Oval Office
Interview broadcast Sunday on
NBC's "Meet the Press
"Sitting behind this desk,
making a very difficult decision
of war and peace, I based my
decision on the best intelligence
possible the president said. The
interview was taped Saturday.
Bush also was asked about
the fugitive Osama bin I.aden,
the suspected mastermind of
the Sept. 11 attacks whom the
president had pledged to get
"dead or alive
He chuckled when told that
a Republican lawmaker had pre-
dicted Osama would be captured
before the presidential election.
"I appreciate his optimism
Bush said. "I have no idea
whether we will capture or bring
him to justice I know we are
on the hunt
The interview, his tirst on a
Sunday talk show since taking
office, came as the president's
approval rating has dipped to
47 percent, according to an
Associated Press-lpsos poll
taken in early February; that
compares with .56 percent jusl
a month ago.
The appearance followed
weeks of criticism from demo-
crats over the failure so far to find
Iraq's cache of weapons.
"They could have been
destroyed during the war
Bush said, speculating about
reasons the reports might have
been wrong.
Saddam ami his henchmen
i mi ki have destroyed them as we
entered into Iraq. They could be
hidden. They could have been
transported to another country,
and we'll find out
The president said he
retained confidence in CIA
Director George Tenet. Bush
shook his head from side to side
when asked if Tenet's job was in
jeopardy.
"No, not at all, not at all
Bush said.
Bush pledged to cooper-
ate with a commission he set
up last week to examine
prewar intelligence lapses
and defended its March 2005
reporting date, which is four
months after the White House
election.
"There is going to be ample
time for the American people to
assess whether or not I made
the right decision in removing
Saddam Hussein from power
Bush said.
Democrats in Congress
and on the campaign trail said
Sunday they wanted to see the
findings before the election, if
possible.
"What we've got here is a
president who simply doesn't
want to be held accountable
presidential hopeful Wesley
Clark told CNN's "Late Edi-
tion
Bush did not directly respond
to election-year allegations that
his administration exaggerated
intelligence, but made clear that
the United States considered the
Iraqi president a dictator who
brutalized and killed his own
people.
"I strongly believe that inac-
tion in Iraq would have embold-
ened Saddam Hussein Bush
said. "He could have developed
a nuclear weapon over time I'm
not saying immediately, but over
time We would have been in
a position of blackmail. In other
words, you can't rely upon a
madman
Also on the foreign policy
front, Bush said, "diplomacy
Is just beginning" with North
Korea. The United States and its
allies are seeking to persuade the
communist nation to abandon
its nuclear weapons programs.
"We are making good progress
Bush said.
On domestic issues,
Bush said his tax cuts were
responsible for an economic
rebound.
He dismissed news reports
that there is no evidence
he reported for National
(iuard duty in Alabama during
the summer and fall of 1972,
(luring the Vietnam War.
"There may be no evidence
but I did report; otherwise, I
wouldn't have been honorably
discharged
Bush expressed indiffer-
ence about polls that showed
him trailing the Democratic
front-runner, Sen. John
Kerry of Massachusetts.
"I'm not going to lose
Bush said. "I don't planon losing
Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon has come under criticism
from both the Palestinians and his own government for his
disengagement plan.
Israeli Supreme Court hears
petition against West Bank
JERUSALEM (AP) � The
Supreme Court heard petitions
Monday from two Israeli human
rights groups against the West
Bank harrier, a day after the gov-
ernment said it would change its
route to minimize hardship for
Palestinians.
The rights groups argue that
any construction on occupied
land is illegal and that the bar-
rier violates human rights by
disrupting lives of thousands of
Palestinians.
"It's a matter of building a
fence which breaches the human
rights of Palestinians along its
path Avigdor Eeldman, lead
lawyer for the Center for the
Defense of the Individual, said
after the hearing.
The case was heard two weeks
before the International Court
of Justice in the Netherlands is
to examine the legality of the
barrier.
Supreme Court Chief Justice
Aharon Barak, who presided
at Monday's hearing, said the
three-judge panel would issue a
ruling "as soon as possible Ile
didn't say whether the decision
would come before the case in
The Hague.
Barak said he was consider-
ing sending the matter to a larger
panel, a step usually taken for the
most serious cases.
Any Israeli court decision
could affect Israel's case before
the world court, which is to issue
an advisory ruling at the request
of the U.N. General Assembly.
Israel insists the harrier
is necessary to keep out
Palestinian suicide bombers,
who have killed hundreds in
three years of violence. Palestin-
ians say it is a land grab aimed at
preventing them from creating
a state.
The barrier is seen as pan
of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel
Sharon's emerging plan to sepa-
rate Israelis and Palestinians.
Sharon has said he will carry out
other parts of his plan, includ-
ing the removal of most Israeli
settlements in the Gaa Strip, if
peace efforts fail in the coming
months.
Mi.iron, who has come under
criticism both from the Palestin-
ians and within his own gov-
ernment tor his disengagement
plan, canceled all events on his
schedule,Monday after being
diagnosed with kidney stones
in the urinary tract, his office
said.
A spokesman said Sharon.
75, was lo undergo treat-
ment later Monday and was
expected back at work Wednes-
day.
Settlers in Gaza have pledged
to fight a withdrawal On
Monday, leaders of the 7,800
Gaza settlers said they wire
preparing to move son families
into the area to thwart Sharon's
plan.
Palestinians have harshly
criticized the harrier, sayine,
a settlement must be reached
through negotiations.
Ill
THIS WEEK AT THE MOVIES
ELEPHANT
WED. 7 PM
THURS. 9:30 PM
FRI. 7 PM & MIDNIGHT
SAT. 9:30 PM
SUN. 7 PM
THE MATRIX REVOLUTIONS
WED. 9:30 PM
THURS. 7 PM
FRI. 9:30 PM
SAT. 7 PM & MIDNIGHT
SUN. 3 PM
FEB. 13th- Jazz at Night 8PM MSC Great Rooms
Tickets for Def Poetry Jam on sale for students
now. Tickets for the general public will go on
sale February 16th.
mr0
,
Pi rate
UNDERGROUND
FEB. 11th- Open Mic Night 7-9PM
SEVEN
TEN
OUT OF
AINT BAD!
For more info call
328-4715





PAGEA4
fV � -�
2-10-04
OPINION
Editor-in-chief
Michelle A. McLeod
editor@theeastcarollnian.com
252.328.6366
Erin Rickert
News Editor
Amanda Lingerfelt
Features Editor
Ryan Downey
Sports Editor
Meghann Roark
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Slstrunk
Photo Editor
Holly O'Neal
Asst News Editor
John Bream
Asst Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Asst Sports Editor
Mike Mashburn
Web Editor
Daniel Roy
Production Manager
Newsroom252.328.6366
Fax252.328.6558
Advertising252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925,The East Carolinian prints 9.000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular academic year
and 5,000 on Wednesdays during the summer. 'Our View" is the opin-
ion of the editorial board and is written by editorial board members.
The Easf Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor which are limited to
250 words (which may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and include
a telephone number. Letters may be sent via e-mail to editor@theeast
carolinian.com or to The East Carolinian, Student Publications Building,
Greenville. NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more information.
One copy of The East Carolinian is free, each additional copy is $1.
Our View
We're tired of hearing about it - and we
understand how contradictory it is to continue
discussing it. Janet Jackson will probably go
down in history with one of the most memo-
rable Super Bowl halftime show performances
of all time. And why shouldn't she - she flashed
and short of some skin.
Jackson and
Timberlake
have
apologized,
owing their But the question is, did her stunt warrant the
massive backlash she is receiving? Janet has
' been hung out to dry, so to speak, by MTV,
there's not CBS and Justin Timberlake - the exposer of
Jackson's upper anatomy.
much more
they can say
or do.
Terri Cartin, a Tennessee bank employee, who
alleges the incident caused her as well as
other viewers "to suffer outrage, anger, embar-
rassment and serious injury is suing Jackson.
Carlin is also suing Timberlake, CBS, MTV and
Viacom. However, no credible judge would
award her a penny.
According to CNN News, Janet was asked not
to attend the Grammy's if she wasn't prepared
to issue a public apology and if you watched
the telecast, Timberlake's Grammy acceptance
speech included such an apology.
To us. it seems like the punishment doesn't fit
the crime - for Jackson, or the American people.
FCC Chairman Michael Powell is up in arms. His
immediate investigation into how a breast found
itself bouncing around his airwaves, which are
usually reserved for gratuitous acts of violence
and corporate reconstruction of our reality, will
in the long run, waste millions of tax dollars.
We're not in a position to judge whether the
"wardrobe malfunction" explanation is fact or
fiction, but one thing's for sure, it came, it went,
it's over.
Jackson and Timbertake have apologized, and
short of owing their first born, there's not much
more they can say or do.
Powell needs to get a grip on reality. Jackson's
peepshow, while good coffeehouse conversa-
tion, is the least of our worries, and with the
trash that's pervading American TV, it should
also be the least of his.
The goal of the TEC Opinion page is to evoke discussion as well
as action on topics pertinent to the ECU community
We encourage a response from our readers. If you have an
opinion In reaction to one of our columns or perhaps In regard to
tne overall presentation of TEC, please express your view in one
of tour ways: direct a letter or fax to the editor, email a response
to the editor or simply phone in a response.
The 20,000 ECU students read our paper on a regular basis.
There's no better way to express your opinion than to take the
time to sit and react to a situation affecting the students of this
university through our Opinion page.
To be printed, the letter must be signed and contain a phone
number for verification.
teftgy5AisTHgeATof trfusmis eXAG(?eAaep
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In My Opinion
Don't force school spirit
In My Opinion
North Carolina needs a lottery
Students pay,
advertise university
HOLLY O'NEAL
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
I've never bought a piece of
merchandise with our school's
name on it, and I don't intend
to.
It's not that I harbor
any deep hatred of this insti-
tution. On the contrary, it's
an overall better place than
the other two colleges I've
attended, and I think our
athletic program is great and
those who participate in it,
even better.
But embedded in all those
purple and gold products
is an attitude of manda-
tory school spirit I can't toler-
ate.
Hearing repeated invoca-
tions to show my "Pirate Pride"
doesn't make me more excited to
attend ECU; it forces me to criti-
cally wonder why I'm instructed
to be so proud.
School pride is something
I hoped would end with high
school, the home of endless
pep rallies and overexcited
i luerleaders focused on "the
big game
College, I imagined, would
be a place where I could avoid
being pestered to scream for
victory in opposition to my
indifference.
Of course, a change of loca-
tion didn't change anything.
I've heard people say it's
my "duty" to cheer for our
school's athletic teams,
as if paying for my educa-
tion isn't enough - I'm
also expected to become ano-
ther billboard for ECU'S
already overly-marketed
image.
It's as much my duty to
care for anything school-
related as it is my duty to drink
Pepsi, the "official drink" of
ECU.
Whether I choose to do
either should be just that
- my choice.
I understand I'm not forced
into any sort of action, but it
must be understood by ECU's
fanatical supporters that other
interests exist In the student
body.
Rallying fans for a game is
great for those who care.
However, some of us
find continual calls for
expected sympathy annoying
and rude.
There are so many other
qualities of this university
worthy ot pride and atten-
tion, but their spirit comes
from willing exploration and
experience.
If there really is a
need lo require mindless back-
ing for one particular aspect
of campus culture, its qual-
ity and prominence don't
match.
Lotteries will reduce cost
of education
JOHN BREAM
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
With a lottery system recently
enacted by the Tennessee legisla-
ture, North Carolina is sand-
wiched between states that all
have lotteries.
In fact, North Carolina is the
only state on the entire eastern
seaboard without a lottery.
Because of the Christian con-
servatives in the state legislature,
the lottery hasn't even been given
a referendum in this state. It's time
for North Carolinians to take a
stand and reap the lenefits of a lot-
tery, especially In a state that ranks
in the bottom five in average SAT
scores. With a lottery, education
can truly be the big winner.
However, many people say a
lottery is just a tax on the poor,
who'll In turn spend what little
they have on the slight chance of
a huge payoff.
There's never a time when
everyone can be pleased, and I
find it hard to believe that if North
Carolina were to get the lottery, its
poor would begin splurging money
on tickets. And even so, they aren't
the majority of people. This is
America - majority rules - and
citizens should at least be given the
chance by the legislature to voice
their opinions through a vote.
With a lottery, education can
receive a huge boost. In South
Carolina and Georgia all students
wit h a B or above average are given
a free education at a state-sup-
ported school.
This is especially important In
today's economy where middle-
class people are losing jobs, which
has especially hit this state hard
because of the crumbling of the
textile industry.
With a lottery, there's potential
that students in North Carolina
can go to school for free, as well.
With the average GPA of ECU's
entering freshmen at 3.3 to 3.4,
this would mean that most ECU
students could potentially be here
at no cost to their parents if we had
a lottery.
Furthermore, the rate of tuition
increase in the UNC school system
is appalling. It seems as if tuition
and fees increase every year.
The UNC) Board of Gover-
nors is meeting on Friday to
discuss whether tuition should
be raised yet again - a propo-
sition that Gov, Mike Easley
- praise him - ardently opposes.
With a lottery funding our
state-supported schools, in addi-
tion to the legislature, tuition
increases can be a thing of the
past, and the overall education in
North Carolina's public schools
will be greatly improved.
The pros of a lottery far
outweigh the cons. It's time the
legislature let the citizens of this
state exercise their basic demo-
cratic rights and vote on this issue
once and for all - North Carolina
desperately needs a lottery.
Send Howard Dean packing to Vermont
(KRTI � Howard Dean's
downward spiral continued in
South Carolina and Oklahoma
and Ariona and North Dakota
and New Mexico and Delaware
and Missouri � excuse me
while I let out a Dean-like yelp
� Yeehaw!
Won't you go home to Ver-
mont, Howard Dean, and he
happy?
In interview after inter-
view as Tuesday polls and cau-
cuses closed in seven states, I
tight-smiled Dean prom-
ised to keep fighting for the
Democratic nomination,
despite John Kerry's seven
wins so lar and John Edwards'
and Wesley Clark's one each in
Tuesday's elections.
II there was a theme to Tues-
day's electoral battles it would
be voters' quest for a candidate
who can espouse moderation
and have the experience and
gravitas to beat President
Bush.
Polls keep showing the
economy and health care are
top concerns for voters, and
public approval of Bush's
job performance has slipped
below SO percent for the first
time.
Dean, despite his record
of balancing budgets in
Vermont, simply is too far to
the left for most of the nation.
He surely touched a nerve with
those Democrats who remain
angry at the 2000 election
debacle, but, please, let's move
on already.
There is anger among many
voters � including indepen-
dents - about the economy
and the war in Iraq, but pet-
ulant tirades such as Dean's
"I have a Scream" speech
after his second-place loss
in Iowa aren't the mark of a
leader.
At least not the kind
ol leader tor 21st-century
America. His harangue
seemed to he a throwback to
a (old War speech by, say,
Nikita Khrushchev. Quick
� grab Dean's shoes'
And so Dean had to settle
for third place in four stales
Tuesday, ranking fourth
in Delaware and fifth in
Oklahoma and South Caro-
lina This from a candidate
who was at the top of his
game. But Dean keeps saying
there won't he a Democratic
coronation, not if he has his
way.
Dean's right about one
thing Democrats need a real
contest, not a coronation to
test Kerry's or any other can-
didate's ability to stand up to
the president and win.
The problem is Dean is
about as liberal as Kerry is.
He's not the right candidate
to beat Bush. He's damaged
goods since Iowa.
The challenge from within
the Democratic Party should
be coming from moderates,
and on that count only two
are left in the race � North
Carolina's Sen. Edwards and
former Gen. Wesley Clark,
who's a moving target.
Both are fighting for the
middle.
Edwards not only took
South Carolina, as expected,
but he came in second in
Oklahoma and Missouri. Clark
stole some of Edwards' thun-
der, beating him by a hair in
Oklahoma and coming in
second behind Kerry in New
Mexico, North Dakota and
Arizona.
Unlike Clark and Edwards,
Kerry has vast Washington
experience.
But Kerry's Vietnam record
is a double-edged sword. He
stood up to a misguided war
that killed thousands of young
Americans.
In retrospect, most people
today would say he was on
the right side of the issue.
But passions still run high on
Vietnam, and some people view
those who dissented, as Kerry
did after he returned from
Nam, as traitors.
For months, Kerry's
detractors have tried to paint
him as the Great Satan lib-
eral, going so far as to liken
him to "Hanoi" Jane Fonda
and her Infamous rejection of
the war on North Vietnamese
soil.
Seems to me that Kerry's
war record speaks for itself.
His protests against the war
upon his return may well have
saved more lives than his crit-
ics claim he endangered by
speaking out.
In the military-rich South,
though, Kerry's public criti-
cism of Nam seems to cancel
out his military-hero status.
His is a zero-sum gain.
In fact, exit polls con-
ducted for The Associated Press
and other news organizations
Tuesday found that Edwards
beat Kerry in South Carolina
among all age groups and
most demographic groups,
including among military
veterans.
In the Southwest, Kerry
secured the Latino vote. But
New Mexico's and Arizona's
Hispanic voters, many trac-
ing their SpanishMexican
roots for generations in
those stales, don't necessarily
reflect the more conservative
concerns of white Southern
Democrats.
Southern whites will deter
mine if Bush stays, and that's
Kerry's challenge.
But winning the Southern
states alone, as Edwards may
do, won't be enough to steer
the party to the center.
And Dean's stubborn
refusal to leave the race now
only delays the Inevitable.
The Democrats need a
winning Southern strategy
that can give Bush the heebie-
jeebies.
They don't have one.





PAGE A5
2-10-04
units. Close to ECU. For more
information contact Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
CLASSIFIEDS
TO PLACE AN AD
Come by The East Carolinian office
on the second floor of the Student Publications Building
(above the cashiers office)
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DEADLINES
Thursday at 4 p.m. for the next Tuesday's paper
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Monday at 4 p.m. for the next Thursday's paper
FOR REHT
pinebrook apt. 758-4015- 1&2 BR
apts, dishwasher, CD, central air
Si heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or 12
month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, Si cable.
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bedrooms, Beech Street Villas,
Cypress Gardens, Cotanche Street,
Gladiolus, lasmine, Peony, Woodcliff,
Forest Acres, Wesley Commons, Park
Village. All units close to ECU. Water
and sewer included with some
units. For more information contact
Wainright Property Management
756-6209.
Duplexes for rent: 2 Si 3 bedrooms,
2nd Street, Lewis Street and College
Towne Row. Close to ECU. Pet
with fee at some units. For more
information contact Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
For rent: Upscale 3 BR3 Bath
Near campus, only if you like
the BEST! Call 252-561-7368 or
dayle@bellsouth.net
For rent- 2 bedroom, 1 bath, brick
duplex, Stancill Drive. Walking
distance to ECU. Central air. $525
month. Pets OK wfee. Call 353-2717
or 353-2713.
Sublease Available NOW! 2 bedroom
1 bath in Wyndham Court. End unit
with private deck. Pets allowed.
J405.00 per month. Contact Bear
Robinson (252)258-5526.
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015- 1 Si 2
BR apts, dishwasher, GD, central
air St heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or
12 month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
includes water, sewer, & cable.
LOOKING FOR someone to sublease 1
or 2 bedroom apartment In Eastgate
available now. Rent is J410 a month
and there is no security deposit.
Contact Barrett at (919)656-7444.
For rent- 2 bedroom, 1 bath, brick
duplex, Stancill Drive. Walking
distance to ECU, central air. $525
month. Pets OK wfee. Call 353-2717
or 353-2713.
House for rent: 204 13th Street- 3 BR,
2 BA close to ECU. Short term lease
available. Small pet allowed with
fee. For more information contact
Wainright Property Management
756-6209.
Townhouses for rent: Cannon and
Cedar Court- 2 bedrooms, 1 12
bath. Free basic cable with some
Responsible Roommate for 2 BRBA
home with indoor dog. Approx. 20
min from ECU. Call Paul @ 252-341 -
6998.
Two Female Roommates wanted to
share a 4 bedroom 3 bath townhouse
at Sterling for fall '04. 'Almost
furnished Call for more details
(910)520-5964 or (252)412-4998.
Responsible Female roommate
needed to share 2 BD1 BA house
2 blocks from ECU. Available
immediately. Furnished or
unfurnished. Call Miranda at 758-
4774 leave message.
Up to $500Wk processing mail. Get
paid for each piece. Create your own
schedule. (626)821-4061.
Responsible person needed to
watch 5 month old on Mondays
from 7:00am to 3:30pm. Nursing,
Education, Child Development
majors preferred. Please call 355-
6680 between 3:30 and 9:00pm or
email ladypahe@cox.net.
Are you looking for the experience of
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Teresa 888-892-1829.
Bartender Trainees needed $250
a day potential, local positions 1-
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The Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting part-time
youth soccer coaches for the indoor
soccer program. Applicants must
possess a good knowledge of soccer
skills and have the ability and patience
to work with youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young people
ages 3-18 in soccer fundamentals.
Hours are from 3:30 pm to 9 pm,
Monday-Friday with some weekend
coaching. Flexible hours according
to class schedules. This program
will run from March 8 to mid May.
Salary start at $6.25 per hour. Apply
at the City of Greenville, Human
Resources Department, 201 Martin
L. King Dr. For more information,
please contact the Athletic Office at
329-4550, Monday through Friday,
10 am until 7 pm.
Office Assistant: Part-timeSummer
Full-time. Answering telephones,
filing and customer service. Apply
at Wainright Property Management
3481 -A South Evans Street Greenville.
756-6209
Glffl PEflSlllMS
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Kind of jockey or
brake
5 Wine container
9 Night hunter to
be
14 Choir part
15 Mane man?
16 Chicago airport
17 Push-button
forerunner
18 Supply of BB's
19 Climbing device
20 Arrangements
22 & others
24 Trial by fire
25 Botch
27 Honest man?
29 Astronaut turned
senator turned
astronaut
32 Filled with
wonder
37 Watched a tape
again
38 Track gatherings
39 Com serving
40 Middle ot the
road
42 Having a will
44 Very dry, as wine
45 Dash to pieces
47 Desert springs
48 Peevishness
50 Uncorks
51 Writer Buntline
52 Rich or Worth
54 Work gang
57 Needle hole
59 Categorize
63 Swift
65 Seth's son
67 Siamese, today
68 Stage type
69 Farm parcel
70 Orange coat
71 Like an unkempt
lawn
72 Notices
73 Oxen link
DOWN
1 June celebrants
2 Nastase of tennis
3 ERA, e.g.
4 Like colonnades
5 Set of students
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6 Objective
7 Anybody
8 Windsor or
bowline
9 Alley in comics?
10 Blanch
11 Better than
never?
12 Love god
13 Hiker's shelter
21 Summit
23 Blanche's
leader?
26 Humiliate
28 Woodwind
instruments
29 Get a hold on
30 Embankment
31 Put up
33 Leash
34 Discontinue
35 Consumed
36 Apply bandages
to
41 Test score
43 Wall hanging
46 Systematized
Solutions
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knowledge
49 Relax
53 Relaxes
54 Bird's crop
55 Few and far
between
56 Fencer's foil
58 Affirmative votes
60 Buckeye State
61 Line of cabs
62 Powerful trend
64 Calendar
component
66 Mispickel, e.g.
Delta Zeta would like to thank
the brothers of Theta Chi for an
awesome time at the Graffiti social
last weekend!
The sisters of Delta Zeta would
like to congratulate all of our new
girls: Monica Abuelhawa, Andrea
Barney, Megan Boutchyard,
Danielle Cann, o Cooke, Laura
Dough, Taylor Morris, Laura Mullis,
Adair Parks, and Kelly Rawls. You
guys are awesome and we are
lucky to have all you! Keep up the
good work!
Congratulations Katie Reese and
Morgan Webb on being our sisters
o the week! Love your kappa Delta
sisters!
The sisters of Delta eta would like
to thank the brothers of Delta Sig
for a great time Thursday night!
The sisters of Delta Zeta would
like to thank Kappa Sigma for
an awesome social. You guys are
great, we all had a lot of fun!
King Tut, Abu Simbel, Alexandria.
Contact: mercerc@mail.ecu.edu or
328-4310.
Pre-Dental Honor Society meting
Wednesday, Feb. 11th @ 6 pm in
Biology North 108 - D. Come be a part
of ECU's 1st Pre-Dental Club.
Come join us for the February 14 contra
dance! Live, old-time music by a string
band. Potluck dinner, 6 pm; concert
7pm, lesson 7:30 pm; dance: 8 pm-
10:30 pm. Band: Bill Si Libby Hicks;
Caller: Chris Mohr. No experience
needed; we'll teach you as we go
along! Come alone or bring a friend!
J3 (students) $5 (FASG members)
$8 (general). Co-sponsors: ECU Folk
and Country Dancers (752-7350) and
Fold Arts Society of Greenville (795-
4980). An alcohol and smoke-free
event.www.geocities.comecufolkand
countrydancers Location: Willis Bldg
1st & Reade sts� downtown.
DIHEfl
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Come join us for the February
14 contra dance! Live, old-time
music by a string band. Potluck
dinner, 6 p.m concert 7 p.m
lesson: 7:30 p.m dance: 8:00
p.m 10:30 p.m. Band: Bill St
Libby Hicks; caller: Chris Mohr.
No experience needed; we'll teach
you as we go along I Come alone
or bring a friend! i 3 (students) J5
(FASG members) $8 (general).
Cosponsors: ECU Folk and Country
Dancers (752-7350) and Folk Arts
Society of Greenville (795-4980).
An alcohol and smoke-free
event, www.geocities.comecufo
Ikandcountrydancers Location:
Willis Bldg 1st Si Reade sts
downtown.
Give yourself Egypt Si The Nile in
summer '04. You deserve it. ECU
college credit, inexpensive group
rates, funding help available. Giza
and Sakkara pyramids, Sphinx,
Luxor, Valley of the Kings, Menphis,
Dapper
Dan's
age ('luiliini!
ECU
TRANSIT
Currently hiring bus drivers
Extremely Mi work hours. Appfy at
wwwiranstaedu Questions? contact
any Transit Manager at 328-4724.
Jeelr & Mure.
We have
moved to
SOI Dickinson Ave.
752-1750
nsnsnssEi

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PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
2-10-04
Opportunity rover peeks over
crater rim, across Mars plain
PASADEN . I alit. (AP)
� NASA's Opportunity rovei
peeked over the rim of the
cratei In which it landed and was
able to see the clamshell holder
and parachute it discarded just
before hitting the flat, gray
surface ot Mars, scientists said
Monday.
A color photograph from
Opportunity, released at S Vs
Jet Propulsion Laboratory,
showed the two objects dis-
tinctly, OH a largely featureless
surface.
"There is the hardware tli.it
we've littered the surface with
said sin had Malln, a member ol
the mission science team.
The rover was shielded In
a clamshell-like device during
its entry into the atmosphere
of Mars.
The photograph, when com-
bined with pictures taken from
orbit, helped confirm exactly
where Opportunity landed on
Mar nil Ian. 24.
NASA planned lor its orbit-
ing satellite to begin looking
for another martian spacecraft,
Britain's ill-fated Beagle 2 lander,
on Thursday.
SA described the gray
photograph shown Monday asan
'approximatetrue-color image
Mars' iron-rich dust gives the
planet its overall reddish color,
but Opportunity landed in a
relatively dust-free area.
Scientists likened Opportu-
nity's landing to a holc-in-one
by a goiter who cannot see the
holeushioned by air bags, the
rover bounced and rolled across
the martian surface right into
a small crater, where Opportu-
nity has plenty of exposed rock
in reach ol its robotii geologic
instruments.
Microscopic images of the
curbsie outcropping that rims
part of the crater show its fine
layers hold numerous spheri-
cal granules, "embedded in it
like blueberries in a muffin
Cornell University astronomer
Steve Squyres said.
The granules probably
formed either when molten rock,
spewed skyward in a volcanic
eruption or following a meteor
impact, cooled and solidified
or when minerals, carried by
ground water, slowly built up to
form rounded features within
the surrounding rock.
Opportunity and its twin,
Spirit, are exploring oppo-
site sides of the Red Planet
on an $820 million mission
to look for geologic evidence
that Mars was once a wetter
place that might have been hos-
pitable to life.
Letter shows bin Laden not recruiting Iraqis
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) � A
letter seized from an al-Qaida
courier shows Osama bin
laden has made little headway
in recruiting Iraqis for a holy
war against America, rais-
ing questions about the Bush
administration's contention
that Iraq is the central front in
the war on terror.
The 17-page letter, cited as
a key piece of intelligence that
offered a rare window into for-
eign terrorist operations in Iraq,
appealed to al-Qaida leaders to
help spark a civil war between
Iraq's two main Muslim sects
in an ettort to "tear the country
apart U.S. officials said Monday.
One senior U.S. officer. Brig.
Gon. Mark Kimmitt, warned
the plea could mean more
"spectacular" attacks because
the rebels were despairing that
their devastating car bombs and
the steady killing of U.S. troops
were failing to shove the Ameri-
cans from Iraq or spark massive
discord.
The letter was believed writ-
ten by Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, a
Jordanian suspected of al-Qaida
links. Al-Zarqawi is the chief
suspect in several recent bomb-
ings, and the Bush administra-
tion cited his presence in Iraq
as evidence of Iraq's terrorist
connections even before the
war.
Having found no weapons
of mass destruction in Iraq, the
administration has been shifting
the reason forgoing to war to the
light against global terrorism and
to oust Saddam I lussein.
Military and coalition offi-
cials who rarely speak about
intelligence information were
quick to describe the letter as
proof of a terrorist role in the
Iraqi resistance.
White House spokesman
Scott McClellan said that the
letter, first reported Monday by
The New York Times, shows that
"Iraq is the central front in the
war on terrorism
'There are foreign terror-
ists who realie the stakes are
high and they seek to do every-
thing they can to undermine
the aspirations of the Iraqi
people McClellan said. "
But democracy and free-
dom are taking root in Iraq
and there's no turning back
The letter, as quoted by the
Times, acknowledges problems
in recruiting Iraqis to join the
fight against an American
force "growing stronger day
after day
"Many Iraqis would honor
you as a guest and give you
refuge, for you are a Muslim
brother it said.
"However, they will not
allow you to make their home
a base for operations or a safe
house
That suggests that Iraqis
may be willing to support
their homegrown insurgency
but have little interest in back-
ing foreign infiltrators.
The letter's appeals for
outside help raises questions
whether al-Qaida had a support
network here before Saddam's
downfall.
Safety
from page A1
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struction management major,
examined where downtown
Greenville and ECU intersect.
He said he found a broken
emergency phone in one of the
parking lots, hardly any light
along the walkway from the first
campus entrance on Fifth Street
to the dorms and complications
due to construction near White
Residence Hall.
"There was cracked pave-
ment in some areas that could
probably trip somebody said
Clark.
Each team was respon-
sible for noting safety concerns
within a portion of campus.
Other observations included
insufficient lighting around
Brewster, the Science and Tech-
nology Building and the mall in
the middle of campus.
There was also an emergency
phone fenced in between Stu-
dent Health Service and Plan-
nagan and overgrown bushes
near Christenbury and Clement
Residence Hall.
Participants, who were
rewarded at the walk's end with
30 pizzas donated by Pizza Hut,
filled out surveys and made
recommendations to be read by
SGA, and later assessed with a
light meter on Feb. 12.
SGA Secretary and senior
political science and communi-
cation major Shannon
O'Donnell said results from
both outings will be presented
to university administrators
during the Attention Walk and
Safe Ride ribbon cutting on
Feb. 18.
Interim Chancellor William
Shelton, Assistant Vice Chan-
cellor for Student Life Carrie
Moore and members of the
Impact Team have been asked
to attend.
The last walk occurred in
spring 2002.
O'Donnell said she wanted
to do more for students' safety
when she noticed an increase
in the number of incidents
reported by the campus net-
work's alert system.
" There are unsafe areas on
campus said O'Donnell.
"You don't get mugged
in front of people during the
day
Class officers, cabinet mem-
bers and the internal affairs
committee organized the Safety
Walk.
"I love this university so
much said Maggie O'Neill,
sophomore political science and
economics major and director of
internal aflairs, public relations
chairman,
O'Neill helped by making
the survey, which she said would
hopefully target some of the
university's security problems.
'This security is one of
ihe downfalls of ECU. Making
people aware will help to solve
the problem O'Neill said.
The walk was planned before
a rape in White Hall in January
challenged students' sense of
wellbelng,
However, O'Donnell said
she hopes the incident will
incite the campus community
to make safety a priority.
The walk was originally
scheduled lorp.m but
began at 7:20 p.m. because an
SGA meeting ran longer than
expected.
While O'Donnell said the
turnout lor the walk "could've
been better she believes the
walk was an overall success.
"If we got the opinion of just
one student, then we did our
job as student government O'
Donnell said.
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PAGE B1
D
991
8th
H nun
2 10 04
FEATURES
AMANDA LINGERFELT
Features Editor
JOHN BREAM
Assistant Features Editor
features@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Did You Know?
- Actresses Laura Dern (1967) and Sharon Stone (1958) both call
today their birthday.
- This month is International Expect Success Month.
- Today is Leadership Success Day
- On this day in 1996. IBM's Deep Blue defeated chess champion
Gary Kasparov.
- On this day in 1989, "Miami Vice" aired its 100th episode.
Announcements
Percussion Performance
The School of Music presents the ECU Percussion Players, directed by John
Neal, tonight at 8 p.m. in the A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall. This event is free.
Films
The Student Union Films Committee presents Elephant on Wednesday at
7 p.m Thursday at 9:30 p.m Friday at 7 p.m. and midnight, Saturday at 9:30
p.m. and Sunday at 7 p.m. The Matrix Revolutions is showing Wednesday
at 9:30 p.m. Thursday at 7 p.m. Friday at 9:30 p.m, Saturday at 7 p.m. and
midnight and Sunday at 3 p.m. All movies are free with a student ID and are
located in the Hendrix Theatre. For more information, call 328-4700.
Open MIc Night
The Student Union Popular Entertainment Committee presents Open
Mic Night on Wednesday. Feb 11 from 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. in the Pirate
Underground.
Music Among Friends
The School of Music presents Music Among Friends: Yoram Youngerman,
viola; and pianist Paul Tardif present music by Joachim, Brahms and
Schumann on Wednesday. Feb. 11 at 8 p.m. in the A. J. Fletcher Recital
Hall Tickets are $5
Poetic Expressions
The Ledonia Wright Cultural Center presents Poeft'c Expressions: Readings,
Rhymes, Rhythm featuring Mona Daye on Thursday, Feb. 12 at 7:30 p.m.
in the LWCC Gallery.
Music of Love and Courtship
The ECU Chamber Singers present It Music Be the Food otLove, Sing On!
Music of Love and Courtship conducted by Dan Bara on Thursday, Feb. 12
at 8 pm in the A J. Fletcher Recital Hall. This event is free.
Jazz at Night
The Student Union presents Jazz at Night with the ECU Jazz Ensemble
on Friday. Feb 13 at 8 p.m in the MSC Great Room Tickets are $5
lor the general public and tree for students. Pick up tickets at the
Central Ticket Office.
Contra Dance
A Valentine's Contra Dance will be held on Saturday, Feb 14 from 8 p.m 10
30 p.m. in the Willis Building. Lessons begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets will be
available at the door
Guest Recital
The School of Music presents a guest recital by guitarist Patrick
Kearney on Saturday. Feb. 14 at 8 p.m. in the A. J Fletcher Recital Hall.
This event is free.
Faculty Recital
The School of Music presents a faculty recital by violinist Joanne Bath
and pianist Charles Bath on Sunday, Feb. 15 at 3 p.m. in the A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall. Tickets are $5.
Cultural Performance
The Ledonia Wright Cultural Center presents The History ot the Negro
Spiritual featuring soprano Dorthea Taylor and pianist Louise Toppin on
Sunday. Feb. 15 at 5 p.m. in the Sycamore Hill Missionary Baptist Church
on Hooker Rd
Early Music Ensemble
The ECU Early Music EnsembleViol Consort presents The Glories of the
Fifteenth Century: Plainchant and Polyphony on Sunday, Feb 15 at 7:30
p.m. at St. Timothy's Episcopal Church. This event is tree.
TV This Week
"Scrubs"
Tune in to celebrate Michael J Fox's return to network TV as he begins
a three-episode stint on "Scrubs" with tonight's "super-sized" installment
Fox plays Dr Kevin Casey, an accomplished surgeon recently diagnosed
with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder. "Scrubs" airs tonight at 915
p.m. on NBC.
"Sports lllustrated's 40th Anniversary
Swlmsult Special"
Model Melissa Keller and comic Jake Johannsen host this behind-the-
scenes look at the 2004 Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue. The TV special
airs on Wednesday, Feb. 11 at 10 p.m on Spike TV
"The Perfect Husband: The Laci Peterson Story"
On Christmas Eve 2002. a pregnant Laci Peterson went missing In the
months that followed, her husband went from investigator to prime suspect
This new made-for-TV movie stars Dean Cain as Scott Peterson. Told from
the point of view of composite "friends" Tommy (David Denman) and Katie
Vignatti (Sarah Joy Brown), the film chronicles this story of a "perfect couple"
and the nightmare that followed the young woman's disappearance. "The
Perfect Husband" airs Friday, Feb. 13 at 8 p.m. on USA.
"Celebrity Spelling Bee 2004"
A group of 15 celebrities trom TV. tilm and sports break into four teams to
compete in a spelling bee contest The celebrities include Corbin Bersen,
Alice Cooper and Brett Butler. "Celebrity Spelling Bee" airs Friday, Feb. 13
at 8 p.m on FOX
Jewelr
shdp
Guy's guide to giving
her the perfect piece
STEPHANIE BRINCEFIELD
STAFF WRITER
Valentine's Day is written in
history as an occasion to celebrate
companionship and exchange
gifts that represent love. While
flowers arc expected, many gift-
givers know that fine jewelry
ranks high among women's most
desired tokens oi affection.
This Valentine's Day, the
most treasured jewelry items
are personalized and distinctive
because the) allow a personal
touch.
Sterling silver is the most
practically priced metal lor col-
lege students If you're afraid
silver will be too plain, there are
ways to make it more unique.
Engraving her initials or etch-
ing statements ol love are simple
ways to add meaning to a piece
ol jeweliy.
I he I Is.i I'eretti collection of
Tiffany & Co. offers a sterling
Silver, open-heart pendant that
symbolizes love without the need
for engravings or Hair.
It you're looking tor a bigger
way to say "I love you then
diamonds are your next plan
of action. Diamonds are the
most popular jewels given on
Valentine's Day, with birthstones
ranking second.
If you choose diamonds, ear-
rings and ne klaces are the most
affordable puces recommended
for the average college student.
For the ultimate surprise, you
can have your diamond Inscribed
with a sei ret message thinks lo
cutting edge laser technology.
II you wanl 1" shop locally,
Robinson jewelers on Red Banks
Road has a variety of precious
stones, pearls ud silver priced
from $50 - $300.
"College men are mostly
buying necklaces and earrings
adorned with either diamonds
or birthstones said Jennifer
Tucker, sales associate.
"Diamonds just make a
woman teel more special
As lor a ring, unless you're
going to "pop the question
avoid this piece of jewelry at all
costs. Rings are a sign of eternity
and may overwhelm your girl-
friend. However, if a proposal is
in your plans, the round cut dia-
mond mounted on a white gold
hand is the mosl popular ring
this year, according to Tucker.
The latest trends are also an
important factor. If diamonds
and pearls are too traditional
tor your significant other, I hen
visit Pizaz, also located on Red
Hanks Road.
I'iza offers a large selection
of the latest jewelry fashions
where you can find unique
jewelry to match your woman's
personality and compliment her
wardrobe.
There's no right or wrong
when it comes to choosing the
best piece of jewelry for the one
you love. Find the accessory
that matches her personality or
symbolizes her character. If the
task becomes too overwhelming,
don't hesitate to ask one of her
friends to help you shop.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
o
- When deciding what color,
piece and stone to buy, take
consider what she already wears,
and stick to something similar.
- Look lor something that
reminds you of her, not some-
thing that's just attractive In
general.
- Shop (ram a well-established
professional jeweler, Ask a friend
lor a recommendation just as
you would tor a doctor, or check
with the Chamber of Commerce
or Better Business Bureau.
- Donl be dazzled by discounts.
The "drastic discount" price is
usually the normal retail price
elsewhere.
- Ask about the quality mark and
registered trademark.
- When buying gemstones, And
out it the stone has been treated
In any way to Improve Its beauty.
- When buying diamonds, look
for the four C's: cut, color, clarity
and carat weight.
- When shopping for pearls, look
for surface cleanliness and luster.
They should be glowing with iri-
descence - not chalky or dull.
Show him you really care Be cheap,
creative this
Valentine's
Thoughtfulness,
intimacy matter
JOHN BREAM
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
It's that time oi year
again when love is In the air
and chocolates, stuffed animals
and flowers flourish in stores.
There's not a whole lot you
can find fol youi man on these
shelve because Valentine's
Day - much like a wedding
is one of l hose days
designed spec il ic ally In please
females.
Luckily, the gilts most
guys like rarely change, and
finding the perfect Valen-
tine's Day gill doesn't mean
flocking to the store. It just
requires a little time and
I bought.
Despite men's robust
bravados, gills that show cre-
ativity are cherished Show him
how much you care by docu-
menting your favorite times
together. Make him a photo
album, sc rapbook or even a
CD ol the significant songs in
your relationship
"I'd been dating the same
gu for over a year and half,
SO I got him a pic lure' of us
together and put it In a 'love'
picture frame and made
him a CD said sophomore
communication major Katie
Davidson.
" I here were 1-1 songs
on the i thai were kind of
sappy and romantic that were
Our songs I think il made a
good gift
Valentine's Day can
also be used lo gel your guy
something you like. It could
he the perlee t time lo get
him a shirt or pair ol pants
you think he'd look especially
good in. Clothes, accessories
and boxers were all mentioned
popu
gills
on www.msn.com as the
20 most
lar V-Day
ideas for men.
Most
don't like
cook and
men
to
are
dving to get .
meal that isn't
m ic rowa ed
or at
the dining
hall
Even if you lack
Julia Child's zest for the
kitchen, cooking his favorite
meal is romantk and saves
money.
" I ast year I bought
my boyfriend a pair of
boxers and baked him
cookies said sophomore
biology major Mary Catherine
Knight.
"lie really, really liked the
cookies. He ate them all before
the night was over
If creative genius isn't
your strong suit, there are
several traditional gifts to buy
your guy. Men are gadget-
oriented people - anything
clei t run ic or technologi-
c al should be a smash. The
latest DVD, CD or video game is
iiis ri a bad idea.
"Right now I don't have
a girl, but when I did, I always
liked to get new CDs or a
game for my Xbox said sopho-
more athletic trailing major
I ysander Little.
"I still play the game's I got
for Valentine's last year all the
time
A night full of memories
and gilts is great, but what
mosl men really crave on Val-
entine's Day is intimacy. Doing
something extra special after
your dale, like modeling new
lingerie bought especially for
the occasion, is sure lo drive
him wild.
"All the hoop-la of Valen-

Top five gifts
for your man
1. DVDsCDs
2. Cologne
3. Clothesboxers
4. MP3 player
5. Anything thoughtful
tine's Day is really crazy said
David McMillan, freshman
undecided major.
"All I really want is se jex,
and more sex and maybe a
steak
In reality, guys will like
anything the) get tor Valentine's
Day. What matters most is
that you show him how much
you really care, which sometimes
isn't best shown with a gift,
lust be sure to do something
extra special for him on Valen
line's Day. All guys really want
is for their girls to be' happy,
and on Saturday that's all that
matters.
This writer can be contacted at
fealures&lheeastcarolinianxom.
Creating the perfect
night on a budget
AMANDA LINGERFELT
FEATURES EDITOR
Valentine's Day is a day for
expressing your love to your sig-
nificant other. However, being a
college student means that you
most likely have limited funds
that hinder you from expressing
thai love. This Valentine's, spend
more time than money to create
t he perfect gilt for your loved one.
Perhaps the best way lo spend
your Valentine's night with your
girl I riend or boy friend is to spend
it together, find out your room-
mate's plans in advance and see
if you can try and locate a nice,
quiet place where you and your
date can spend some quality time
alone together.
Once you base designated a
location, set a romantic mood.
Inexpensive items like candles
and sheer fabric can turn any
drab apartment or dorm room
Into a COZJ lias en. Place scented
tea light candles (vanilla is the
aromatherapy scent for sensual-
ity) around the room and drape
fabric over bright lamps for the
right atmosphere.
Music is another cheap
ss.is to set the mood and add
a personal touch. Burn a CD
ol songs that earry special
meaning tor the two of you,
like the first song you danced
lo or your date's favorite song.
As the old saying goes, the
way to a man's heart is through
bis stomach. And men, this is true
for ladies, too. Planning an inti-
mate least is another great way
to add a creative, cheap touch.
Show your date you remember
their favorite food by cooking it
see GIFTS page B2





PAGLB2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � ILATURES
210-04
Horoscopes
Aries (March 21 -April 20)
Monday through Wednesday, watch
for key officials to demand new
dedication and loyalty In the coming
weeks, business obligations and
daily duties will steadily increase
After Wednesday, social timing is
vital to new friendships Expect
minor disputes, canceled plans and
last-minute reversals
Taurus (April 21 -May 20)
Early this week, long-term
relationships begin several weeks
of open discussion. After Tuesday
expect loved ones to no longer
remain silent or avoid difficult
subiects. Later this week, respond
quickly to revitalized vitality in the
lower back, ribs or abdomen Over
the next four weeks fitness will
steadily improve
Gemini (May 21-June 21)
Deeply felt romantic ideals may be
revealed over the next few days
Some Gemlnis also will experience
renewed sensuality and a returning
faith in long-term commitment Stay
open to unexpected proposals.
Serious long-term intentions will
require discussion Avoid excess
spending Budgets are vital
Cancer (June 22- July 22)
Beginning Tuesday and lasting
three weeks, work duties and
family obligations will compete for
equal attention Although business
relations are complex, loved
ones need your honest support
and continued dedication After
this week, watch also for a
sudden increase in social invitations
and group events Stay balanced;
friends will expect fast promises
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22)
Over the next nine days, committed
relationships may move to a new
level of security, intimacy and trust
Unattached Leos can expect unique
Film series takes students to Bermuda
passions, sudden invitations and
powerful romantic overtures After
Thursday, watch also for unusual
messages from distant friends or
isolated relatives
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). At
present, private power struggles
and misinformation are strong
influences in the workplace After
Friday, romantic passions will
dramatically increase. Expect quick
overtures from potential lovers and a
series of exotic invitations Trust your
instincts Attractions are deeply felt
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct 23)
Unfinished relationships may
reappear and demand resolution
Late Monday watch for unique
requests from friends or messages
from the past Thursday through
Sunday also accent yesterday s
financial obligations and renewed
paperwork Remain attentive to
small details
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 22)
Previously trusted business tactics
will prove useless Avoid public
discussion or group competition,
if possible. Disputes may be
unavoidable In the coming weeks,
team assignments will demand
diplomacy Be prepared After
Thursday, key relationships
experience a powerful wave of
rekindled attraction
Sagittarius (Nov. 23-Oec. 21)
Withheld emotions and unique
observations may challenge a close
relationship Over the next nine days,
watch for fast social reversals and
bold discussions The pasl behavior
or outdated opinions of loved ones
may need to be publicly addressed
and resolved Don't be shy.
Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan 20)
Yesterday's business ideals and
postponed career dreams may rise
quickly to the surface. Long-term
fnends and close relatives will expect
renewed ambitions and obvious
progress Find positive ways to
study new skills or bring added work
enjoyment into your life
Aquarius (Jan. 21-Feb. 19)
Before midweek, a close friend or
lover may acknowledge your recent
actions, support or accomplishments
For many Aquarians, unique forms of
flattery will lead to increased trust
and renewed intimacy. Listen to the
wisdom of loved ones and accept all
genuine invitations Over the next nine
days, social or family disputes can be
easily resolved
Pisces (Feb. 20-March 20)
Financial discussions may demand
special diplomacy over the next j
nine days. Pay close attention to
the continuing expectations of j
loved ones In the coming weeks.
your ability to complete difficult '
assignments will prove invaluable
Late Saturday, romance is pleasing
Enjoy quiet encounters and subtle
overtures for your affection
If your birthday is this week
Over the next few weeks, authority
figures, although emotionally
vague or temporarily unavailable,
will require clearly defined
facts, reliable paperwork and
detailed records Projects finalized
over the next two to three months will
be quickly established as permanent.
After mid-June, watch also for a fast
senes of romantic or social proposals
Love relationships may experience
a powerful wave of sensuality,
attraction and renewed interest
over the summer months If so,
expect serious decisions or solid
commitments to be necessary
before the end of September.
Much of 2004 will trigger a need for
added romantic and financial security
Stay balanced.
� �
Bermuda, Gem of the Atlantic, gives viewers a look at famous attractions like Spittal Pond.
Names in the News
We want to extend our heartfelt
thanks to Terri Carlin for protecting
our nation's morals. According to the
Smoking Gun Web site, the Knoxville,
Tenn, a bank employee, 47. has filed
a class-action lawsuit "on behalf of all
Americans" who suffered through the
indignity of watching Janet Jackson
expose herself at the Super Bowl
Sunday Seems Cariin is not satisfied
with Janet's heartfelt apology
Filed in US District Court in
Tennessee, the suit alleges thai
Janet s "sexually explicit conduct"
caused Carlin and millions of other
CBS viewers 'to suffer outrage, anger,
embarrassment and serious injury
The suit seeks compensatory and
punitive damages from Jackson as
well as Justin Timberlake, CBS, MTV
and Viacom without naming an exact
dollar figure But the payout could add
up lo billions, since Carlin indicates
that damages should not exceed the
combined gross revenues of all the
defendants over the last three years
Not bad at all!
But honestly, how could a mere few
billion dollars heal the pain and horror
we all felt?
you may recall, sang a duet with
Vandross a few months after he
suffered a stroke in his Manhattan
apartment last year
LABELLE STEPS IN
No. we re not going to move on from
the Super Bowl yet According to
"Extra Janet Jackson, who pulled out
ol Sunday's Grammy extravaganza
will be replaced as a presenter by
Patti LaBelle in a segment honoring
the angelic-voiced soul crooner
Luther Vandross. who will not be in
attendance due to ill health LaBelle.
TRIP TO HAWAII? HA!
Oh no, you're not free ust yet In
other idiotic Nlpplegate-related
news. NSync pretty boy JC Chasez
has issued a scathing indictment of
the NFL for having the gall to yank
him from Sunday's Pro Bowl halftime
show and then asking him to sing
the national anthem instead Pro
Bowl organizers are so afraid that
hell unleash some nasty spectacle
that they've scrapped the whole
pop element from the show, opting
instead for a family-friendly Hawaiian
performance featuring hula dancers
(No sex appeal there!)
The 27-year-old hip-swiveling singer
says the NFL first asked him to sing a
different tune than the planned "Some
Girls (Dance With Women) because
it contained racy lyrics So they settled
on the suggestively tilled "Blowin Me
Up (With Her Love) Bui that contains
the words "horny and "naughty" - so
they tossed that act
Chasez said in a statement "While I
agree the mishap at the Super Bowl
was a huge mistake, the NFLs shallow
effort lo portray my music as sexually
indecent brings to mind another era
when innocent artists were smeared
with a broad brush by insecure but
powerful people. That's not the
America I love I'll sing the national
anthem anytime, anywhere, but not
for this NFL"
Kiley Dean, the 21 -year-old R&B singer
whos almost as cute as Chasez, will
sing the anthem instead
A DARK DAY
FOR SANDLER
This is a sad. sad, sad time for
beloved American comedian Adam
Sandier. Us Weekly reports that
the 37-year-old star's beloved dog.
Meatball, died Jan 27 from a heart
attack at the tender age of 4.
And lest any heartless reader
suspect Meatball was anything less
than a bona fide member of
Sandler's family, let us remind you
that the English bulldog wore a
yarmulke and a tuxedo to walk
down the aisle at Sandler's June
'03 wedding to Jackie Titone. And
Meatball has his own photo and
video section on Sandler's Web site
(www adamsandlercom). We feel
your pain, sir
TERRORIZER
RECUPERATES
The Terrorizer is gonna be fine The
Terrorizer is the sweet moniker for Tara
Dakides, the champion snowboarder
who had a nasty little scrape on the
"Late Show With David Letterman"
Thursday night, when she fell 25 feet
off a ramp while performing a stunt
The Mammoth Lakes. Calif resident.
28, was released from the hospital
Friday after receiving stitches and a
visit from Dave.
"The only thing I am upset about is
that the French judge only gave me a
56 Dakides quipped from bed
Gifts
from page B1
lor him or her. Or bake a cake and
frost it with both of your initials.
"I alwavs make sure to give
my girlfriend tomethlng with
chocolate in it, just because it's
an aphrodisiac said luster
Matthews, junior construction
management major.
Afthough spending tlmealora
and sharing a meal are cheap
ways to celebrate Valentine's with
your honey, you probably will he
expected to produce some kind
ol gilt this is where the creative
juices are crucial to give some-
thing cheap, yet meaningful.
With some photographs, old
magazines, scissors and glue,
the possibilities are endless.
I land-made projects like a small
scrapbnok, a Valentine's card or
a collage ol photos are a way to
shoes that you put both time
and thought into a gift. Include
a poem lor your date in your
project. Or, if you lack writing
abilities, search the Internet and
quote someone else - just be sure
to include attribution to avoid
getting caught in a lie.
Another cheap way to go on
Valentine's is by creating a box
or basket unique to your date.
Decorate the outside ol the box
or basket and till it with old
ticket stubs, photographs and
Whatever else you have that
reminds you ol vour relationship.
Save space in the box for future
memories
Whatever you decide to do, be
sure to make it original, spec ial
and thoughtlul.
"Flowers and teddy bears
are so overrated said Lauren
Andraka, junior elementary
education major.
"Just once, I would like a guy
to think outside of that and give
me something thoughtful
This writer can be contacted at
feotures@theeastcorolinian.com.

On The Web
Themed dinner, movie
offers entertainment
LENORA BOWLER
STAFF WHITER
The E t! "ravel-Adventure
Film Series gives students and
staff a way to experience other
locations while staying right here
in Greenville Tonight, the series
continues with the showing of
Bermuda, Gem of the AtkmtU,
The Travel-Adventure Film
Series is made for people who
enjoy traveling because it gives
viewers a first hand experience
from the eyes of the director.
"It's a great opportunity for
people to learn about different
countries said Audra Thomas,
recreation program director.
"It's an affordable way to
travel
Bermuda, Gem of the Atlantic
consists of real-life footage pro-
duced by filmmaker Tom sterling.
In Bermuda, Gem of the Atlan-
tic, Sterling takes his tourists
to the Devil's Hole, Bermuda's
oldest tourist attraction, and the
Spittal Pond Bermuda's largest
wildlife sanctuary.
rhe evening starts with
showings at 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.
Viewers can complete the Ber-
muda experience by purchasing
tickets to a themed dinner. The
dinner includes Bermuda spinal h
salad, roast beet with smothered
onions, Paella (chicken and
vellOW rice), sweet potato casse-
role, green beans with sun-dried
mangoes, banana bread and sour
cream pound cake.
The Travel Adventureine-
mas, started by Burton I lolmes In
I89.s, are reincarnations ol what
the Travel Adventureinema
Society call travelogues. At thai
time Holmes used glass lantern
slides to illustrate live lectures
of his world travels. After World
War II, color film became the
most popular medium.
Now that we base digital
Imagery and digital sound tech-
nology, man artistsproducers
can create outstanding travel
adventure presentations. With
powerful digital cameras, very
bright projection equipment
and a love for adventure, film-
makers are creating a new world
ol entertainment.
Thomas said students are
encouraged to come take part in
o
Event Info
The Travel Adventure Film
Series presents 'Bermuda
- Gem of the Atlantic'
Screenings are tonight
at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Themed dinner Is at 6 p.m.
Tickets are available at
the Central Ticket Office,
328-4788
these exotic, exciting events. The
ecent is tree lor students.
"Bermuda is an interesting
place to know about. I would
like to see what the series is all
aboutsaid (haunte Rucker, busi-
ness and communication major.
( omlng soon in March and
pril, i in-1 ravel-Adventure Series
will present Norway by Dale John-
son and rhe New Zealand Expert-
ence by Grant Foster. All tickets
and theme dinner packages can
be purchased at the ECU Central
Ticket Office
This writer can be contacted at
teatures@theeaslcaroHnian.com.
How a Pirate Should Eat
No cooking, No Cleaning and Your Parents Pay For It!
INTRODUCING MEAL DEAL DAYS
USE YOUR CARD AT WOE'S
ON WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 1 1 TH
AND ENTER TO WIN A
$250 SPRING BREAK VOUCHER
FROM BEACH LIFE VACATIONS
PLUS OTHER GREAT PRIZES
AND GET FREE CHIPS AND QUESO
WITH PURCHASE
MORE MEAL DAYS COMING SOON
877-632-5332 WWW.UMEALDEAL.COM
Archive ol romantic song
lyrics: www.theromantlc.com
lovesongsmain.htm






2-10 04
muda
2-10-04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � IIAHJRLS
PAGE B3
V-
Dittal Pond.
it Info
venture Him
its 'Bermuda
Atlantic'
e tonight
7:30 p.m.
;r Is at 6 p.m.
callable at
cket Office,
rig events, rhe
idents.
in Interesting
Mint. I would
:1c scries is .ill
teRucker, busl-
ication major,
in March and
Venture Series
'by Daiejohn-
'tuildihl Ixieri-
Icr. All tickets
packages can
e ECU Central
contacted at
irolinian.com.
E'S
COiVI
icccssories.
idals
ate Shop
Oth Str�e
B-0003
East Carolina University Campus Livin
Good Times, Good Food,
and Great Friends!
� Everything's Included
Cable TV, high-speed Internet, daily newspapers,
and local phone service are all included. So are heat,
electricity, trash pickup, and water�all things you
usually pay for separately off campus.
� Stay Out of the Kitchen
With a meal plan from Campus Dining, there's no
cooking to do or dishes to wash, and you'll save
money because you don't pay sales tax on your meal
plan purchases.
� Sleep Later
You don't nave to commute to campus, and you're
right there for classes, concerts, ball games, and plays.
� Score Some Loot
You'll have the chance to win big prizes when you
sign up to live on campus.


I
I
I
1


0�Sl'a M'SS ��
s'9n up at
of 0(jf i '
. February Sgl Sn-Up
Pot " Gaey


1
I
I
I



Return to Campus Living Sign-Up, February 16 through 27





PAGE B4
21004
Pirates lose 96-90 in overtime
PAGE
SPORTS
RYAN DOWNEY
Sports Editor
TDNYZOPPO
Assistant Sports Editor
sports@theeastcarolinlan.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
Basketball shooting challenge
ECU intramural basketball will be holding a shooting challenge today
from 7 p.m - 9 p.m at the SRC The challenge will test abilities in various
basketball skills.
Swiss ball training
Swiss ball training is a 90 minute practical training lab featuring
exercises for the Swiss ball, or 'stability ball, a dynamic exercise tool.
Working with the Swiss ball is perfect for abslower back and can
challenge all major muscle groups of the upper and lower extremities
Registration ends Wednesday. Feb. 11
Indoor soccer team reg. meeting
A meeting will be held for those interested in intramural Indoor soccer
Registration is Monday. Feb. 16. The meeting takes place at 5 p.m. in MSC
Multi-purpose room.
Indoor soccer officials meeting
A meeting for Intramural, indoor soccer officials will be held Monday, Feb
16, at 9 p.m. In SRC 202. This meeting is for anyone interested in being an
indoor soccer official this spring.
Adventure Program
The ECU Adventure Program has three trips in the works for February
Backpacking trip
Participants will go to Croatan National Forest Feb 21 -22. Register by Friday,
Feb 13. Pre-trip meeting is Tuesday. Feb. 17
SuKayaktag
The adventure program will be going to Goose Creek for kayaking. Register
by Friday, Feb. 13. Pre-trip meeting is Wednesday, Feb. 18
Rock Climbing
Interested parties will be taking a trip to Riot Mountain Sunday, Feb.22
Harnesses and gear will be provided for free. The deadline to register is
Friday, Feb. 13. Pre-trip meeting is Tuesday, Feb 17.
For wore litorirutlwi mi any of the progn�, eat 328-1187
Sports Briefs
Pitt sophomore Fitzgerald headed to NFL Draft
Heisman Trophy runner-up Larry Fitzgerald will enter the NFL Draft and
not return to Pittsburgh for his junior year. The star receiver made the
announcement Monday, tour days after he was declared eligible by the
NFL for the draft. He is expected to be among the first picks in the draft
Fitzgerald left the Academy ot Holy Angels in Richfield, Minn midway
through his senior year in 2001 and transferred to Valley Forge (Pa) Military
Academy to boost his grades for college The NFL cleared the way tor
Fitzgerald to enter the April draft because he is three years past his senior
year of high school The league s decision on Fitzgerald came on the same
day a federal udge ruled running back Maurice Clarett could also turn pro
despite playing only one season at Ohio State.
Hedrlck sets record
Chad Hednck broke the men's world overall points record and led the United
States to its first 1-2 finish Sunday at the World Allround Speedskating
Championships Hedrick became the first American allround champion
since Eric Flaim in 1988 Sham Davis finished second, and the American
double broke a nine-year dominance by Dutch skaters at the worlds
Singh inching up on Tiger
Vijay Singh blew away the field Sunday al Pebble Beach to continue an
amazing run thai keeps moving him closer to his ultimate goal replacing
Tiger Woods at No. 1 Singh birdied his first three holes to bury co-leader
Arron Oberholser. closing with a 3-under 69 for a three-shot victory in the
Pebble Beach National Pro-Am Singh finished at 16-under 272. three shots
ahead ot Jeff Maggert Maggert overcame a four-putt for double bogey on
No 16 with birdies on his last two holes for a 69 Phil Mlckelson also had
a 69 and finished third
Els wins loose one
Ernie Els held off Adam Scott by a stroke in the Heineken Classic after
blowing an eight-stroke lead with a terrible start Sunday that included a
triple bogey Els stumbled to his third straight victory in the event, playing
the front nine in 6 over en route to a 2-over 74 He opened with a course-
record 60 playing the front nine in 7 under and added rounds ot 66 and
68 to finish at 20-under 268 at historic Royal Melbourne Scott who shot a
67 on Sunday, tied the South African star for the lead with a birdie on No
9, but Els rebounded with four birdies in a five-hole stretch
Wle finishes In top 40
Michelle Wie closed with an even-par 72 on Sunday to tie for 38th at 2-under
214 in the Hawaii Pearl Open Playing in her second men's tournament of
the year Wie was the only female in the field of 192 Defending champion
Greg Meyer, a Japanese tour player, shot a 67 for a winning 13-under 203
total
Worker killed
A worker at Daytona International Speedway was struck and killed by a
paraplegic dnver going more than 100 mph during a race tor compact
cars Sunday The worker. 44-year-old Roy H Weaver III, was standing in the
middle of the track picking up debris dunng a caution period when he was
hit by a car driven by Ray Paprota of Birmingham, Ala. track spokesman
David Talley said Paprota, who doesn't have use of his legs and drives a
car equipped with hand controls, was trying to catch up the main pack
ot cars after a two-car crash at the opposite end of the track brought out
a yellow flag
Badiane, Cook, Rouse
have career nights
BRANDON HUGHES
SENIOR WRITER
ECU (9-10, 1-8) was hoping
for the momentum gained after
their first Conference USA road
win to follow them home to
Minges Coliseum; but amid
the flurry of points, whistle
shrills and career performances,
Charlotte (14-5, 6-2) came out a
winner in the overtime contest
Saturday night.
The Pirates shot 39 percent
in the first half but was able to
build a 40-35 lead at the break.
Charlotte came back in the
second half and was paced
by Eddie Basden and Curtis
Withers who scored 27 and
21 points respectively. ECU
was holding on to a slim lead
but struggled at the line down
the stretch. Calvin Clemmons
capitalized for the 49ers as he
tied the game 80-80 at the end
of regulation with a dunk.
The overtime period saw
more of the same offensive
barrage of points. The 49ers
scored 16 points in a five-minute
span while holding ECU to just
3-of-12 shooting in the extra
frame as the Pirates fell 96-90.
The Pirates tied a school
record with 36 personal fouls
and five players fouled out.
Moussa Badiane dominated the
paint for the Pirates, scoring a
career-high of 20 points with 11
Despite their best efforts and with support from fans, ECU could not hold back the 49ers.
rebounds. Mike Cook and Corey
Rouse also had career numbers
with 18 and 14 points each.
Derrick Wiley and Erroyl Bing
struggled from the field but were
able to post tO points each despite
shooting a combined 4-of-25
from the floor.
Grading the Pirates
Frank Robinson B
The freshman swingman
is slowly starting to come into
his own and played well in his
starting role. Robinson
scored seven points on 3-of-6
shooting.
Moussa Badiane A
Badiane finally became a
threat in the post, connecting
on 9-of-14 shots.
He also ripped down 11
boards but was just 50 percent
from the line.
Derrick Wiley D
The Pirates leading scorer
had one of the worst shooting
nights of his career, hitting only
2-of-17.
But lit did get it done at the
line, stroking 6-of-8 and he
recorded six rebounds.
Erroyl Bing C
Bing played well on defense
but his post game disappeared
and he became an outside
shooter, clearly not his strength.
Bing attempted and missed just
one shot inside the arc and was
2-of-7 from beyond.
He did have six boards but
made only 4-of-7 from the line.
Mike Cook A
Cook is playing well and has
displayed uncanny poise for a
freshman point guard.
He shot well from the field
on his way to 18 points and six
rebounds. Cook also was strong
at drawing the foul, going to the
see BASKETBALL page B8
Lady Pirates fall hard on the road
ECU women drop
four straight
ERIC GILMORE
STAFF WRITER
The women's basketball team
lost both pivotal Conference
USA match-ups on the road last
weekend. The Lady Pirates fell to
Saint Louis in a heartbreaking
loss in overtime 84-81 Friday
night. ECU then packed their
hags for a quick turnaround and
dropped their second game in as
many days against Memphis. The
Tigers, riding a six-game winning
streak, downed the Lady Pirates
by a count of 79-60.
The ECU women (14-8, 5-
4) are now a dismal eighth in
the conference standings after
starting the season off at 5-0.
The Lady Pirates are a full game
behind
Louisville and Marquette
who both sit at 6-3 in C-USA.
The Lady Pirates went on
the road trip without their Head
Coach Sharon
Baldwin-Tetter. Baldwin-
Tener gave birth the day before
the Pirates departed for
Saint Louis. She delivered
six pound-10 ounce Luke - her
first child.
Baldwin-Tener assigned assis-
tant coach Brade Salley to coach
the Saint Louis match-up while
Chrissy Roberts would handle
the duties against Memphis.
Saint Louis (8-15, 2-8) used
a career-high of 32 points from
senior forward Angie Lewis to
beat the Lady Pirates, lewis
recorded 15 field goals and
grabbed 12 rebounds, playing
every minute of the game.
Jennifer Jackson scored with
The Lady Pirates have lost four straight conference games.
43 seconds left to play In regula-
tion to tie the score and forced
an SLU turnover with little more
than 20 ticks left. However,
Jackson's desperation three-
pointer fell short and overtime
was forced.
Sophomore Lakrisa Brown
sealed the game on two free
throws with 8.1 seconds left in
the extra session. Jackson led
the way for ECU with 22 points
on 9-of-21 shooting. Alisha
Bishop moved Into eighth all-
tnne on three-point list with
five three-pointers
Bishop was five of seven from
behind the arc and finished with
21 points.
Courtney Willis recorded her
11th double-double of the year
with 14 points and
12 rebounds. Willis passed
both Justine Allpress and Tome-
kia Blackmon to move into sev-
enth in career scoring at ECU.
Tamekia Powell also notched
double figures with 10 points.
The University of Memphis
(17-6, 7-3) is the hottest team
in the conference and the Tigers
smoked the Lady Pirates by 19
points on Saturday night. The
Memphis trio of Jennifer Sulli-
van, Princess Swilley and Victoria
Crawford scored 63 of the team's
79 points. Sullivan notched a
career-high of 26 points.
ECU was cold from the field
in the first half shooting, only 27
percent. The poor shooting had
ECU down by 11 at the break,
32-21. Unfortunately, the Lady
Pirates got as close as seven in
the second-half, but could not
surmount a comeback.
Courtney Willis led the
Pirates with 16 points and eight
rebounds, extending her streak
of double-figure scoring to 22
s games. Jennifer Jackson was
H the only other Pirate to score in
� double figures as she added 10.
�� ECU will have a week off
before they are set to face nation-
ally ranked TCU
Friday, Feb. 13. Tip-off is
scheduled at 7 p.m. The Lady
Pirates will have little rest before
concluding the home schedule
on Sunday, Feb. 15 when they
take on nationally ranked Hous-
ton at 2 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeas tcarolinian. com.
Pirate men's soccer announces signing class
ECU men's soccer Head
Coach Michael Benn announced
Wednesday the signing of six
high school players to National
Letters of Intent for the
2004 season. Five of the six sign-
ees are North Carolina natives.
"We are very excited about
the group of young men
that are coming in to play soccer
at ECU said Benn.
The members of the 2004
signing class are listed below:
J.W. Gallagher, 5-11, 170,
Forward, Wilson, NC (Fike
High School)
All-conference and all-
region selection as a junior and
senior Lettered four seasons
for the Demons Led team to
conference championship in
Class 3-A Big Eight Conference
as a senior Set school record
for career goals (78) and career
assists (68) Named
Region Offensive Player of the
Year as a senior Flamed Most
Valuable Player award in the 2003
Wilson Dally Times Tournament
Also lettered three seasons in
football as a kicker and defensive
back.
Danny l.undquist, 6-0,
160, Defender, Wlnston-
Salem, NC (Mount labor High
School)
Four-year letterwinner for the
Spartans Helped Mount Tabor
tothe4-Astatechampionshipand
Metro 4-A Conference champi-
onshipasa junior Helped team
to a 19-4-1 record as a senior
Named to the North Caro-
lina Soccer (loaches Asso-
ciation all-state first team
as a defender as a senior
Also named to the Metro 4-A
All-Conference team as well
as the All-Region 8 team as a
senior Also earned Forsyth
County Soccer Spectacular
MVP honors in 2003
Played club ball for the
Highland Football (Tub coached
by Desmond Armstrong.
Alex Diedrichs, 5 10, 155,
Midfielder, Wake Forest, NC
(Wakefield High School)
Four-year letterwinner as
a midfielder tor the Wolver-
ines Helped Wakefield to a
20-2-2 record as a junior and
a 17-5-3 record as a senior
Named to the all-conference,
all-region and all-state teams
as a junior and senior linshed
career as Wakelield's all-time
leading goals scorer (47 goals) and
all-time leader in assists (S3)
Participated in the Adidas ESP
Camp in 2002 and 2003
Played club ball tor the Triangle
Futbol Navy 86 team coached by
AI Pastore.
Paul Neimeister, 6-0,
160, Defender, Shamong, NJ
(Shawnee High School)
Helped the Renegades
to three conference titles,
three South Jersey Coaches
tournament titles, three sec-
tional titles and two state
championships Finished high
school career 76-3-2 and helped
Shawnee to a No. 3 rank-
ing nationally Named
first-team all-conference,
second team all-group 4 and
all-state as a junior Earned
tirst-teani all-conference, first-
team All-South Jersey, first-
team ail-group 4 and all-state
as senior I'laved sweeper as
a senior and helped the defense
record a 26-0-1 record with 19
shutouts, nine goals allowed and
a 0.3) goals allowed average.
Alex Morrow, 5-10, 160,
Defender, Pittsboro, NC
(Northwood High School)
Four-year letterwinner for
the Chargers Led Northwood
to three conference champion-
ships and two state Final Fours
including a 24-4-1 record as a
senior Named all-conference
as a sophomore and junior and
all-region as a junior Shared
team's Co-MVP honors as a
senior Tallied seven goals and
12 assists as a senior Played
club hall for Triangle Futbol Navy
85 team coached by Pete Sadin.
Matt Gipe, 5-11, 160, For-
ward, Charlotte, NC (Char-
lotte Catholic High School)
Played four seasons up top for
the Cougars Helped Charlotte
Catholic to four consecutive
(Mass 2-A state champion-
ship games with the Cougars
winning the state title in 2001
and 2003 Led the Cougars
in scoring three consecutive
seasons finishing with 25
goals and four
assists as a junior and 13 goals
and 18 assists as a senior
Named to the 2A Region 9 first
team as a junior and senior
and earned Co-Player of the
Year honors as a junior Also
named Player of the Year on
the Rocky River first
team in 2002 and 2003
Selected to the all-state team
and All-Mecklenburg first-
team as a junior and senior
Named to the All-Observer First
team as a junior Played club
ball for the Charlotte Soccer
Club '85 Blues Premier team
coached by Sean Bubb
Helped the Blues Premier
to 17 championships and
two state championships
leading the team in scoring four
consecutive seasons.
I
u
Air
An
Bn
Cei
Cir
Cla
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Gil






PAGE B5
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
2 10 04
the 49ers.
� an outside
t his strength.
rid missed just
le arc and was
id.
, boards but
from the line.
look A
g well and has
ly poise for a
uid.
from the field
points and six
lso was strong
il, going to the
3ALL page B8
oad
; of seven from
1 finished with
is recorded her
ile of the year
i
Willis passed
ess and Tome-
nove into sev-
oring at ECU.
also notched
h 10 points.
f of Memphis
hottest team
and the Tigers
Pirates by 19
ay night. The
lennifer Sulli-
.7 and Victoria
i of the team's
an notched a
joints.
from the field
loting, only 27
shooting had
at the break,
tely, the Lady
ie as seven in
but could not
lack.
illis led the
ints and eight
ng her streak
scoring to 22
Jackson was
ate to score in
he added 10.
e a week off
lo face nation-
3. Tip-off Is
in. The Lady
tie rest before
ime schedule
5 when they
ranked Hous-
contacted at
rolinian.com.
;lass
le Futbol Navy
y PeteSadin.
II, 160, tot-
, NC (Char-
igh School)
ionsuptopfor
ped Charlotte
consecutive
champion -
the Cougars
title in 2001
the Cougars
consecutive
lg with 25
four
and 13 goals
. a senior
Region 9 first
� and senior
'layer of the
unior Also
the Year on
tiver first
nd 2003
Il-state team
iiburg first-
�nd senior
Observer First
. Played club
lottc Soccer
rentier team
m Bubb
les Premier
nships and
mpionships
l scoring four
s.
2004 Housing Guide
Lady Pirates win, men fall at
UNC-W in dual meet action
The Lady Pirates continue their winning meets this season.
Iiinior Dbne Parker and soph-
omore Holly Williams each won
two events and the ECA1 women
won seven of the 13 events as
the Lady Pirates defeated UNC
Wilmington, I2H-I14, Saturday
afternoon to split the dual meet
with theSeahawks. TheSeahawk
men defeated ECU, 162-81.
"It was a great meet Head
Swimming Coach Kick Kobe
said.
"The women swam well and
got the win. The men had a very
tough meet against a very good
Wilmington team. We'll finish
with the regular season and we'll
start getting ready for the confer-
ence championships
Parker led the BCTJ women
winning the 200 1M in 2:
07.32. She posted a time of 2:
05.54 to win the 200 butterfly.
Holly Williams took first in
the 1000 freestyle (10:34.36)
and 200 backstroke (2:08.53).
Freshman Kate Gordon added a
win in the 200 freestyle(1:56.50).
Sophomore diver Lucy Hicks
finished first in 1 meter diving,
posting a 213.97. The Lady
Pirates split relays with the
Seahawks. The 400 medley relay
team of Martha Snead, Parker,
Meredith l.indgren and
Adrienne Williams won the
event in 3:56.28.
On the men's side, junior
Casey Cronin paced ECU win-
ning the 200 IM (1:54.43) and
finishing second in the 500
freestyle (4:39.88) and 200
breaststroke (2:10.36). Matt
Walker took the 200 freestyle
in 1:41.98.
The Lady Pirates wrapped up
the regular season with an 8-2
record. The F.CU men finished its
dual meet season 6-4.
F.CU will next be in action
Feb. 26-28 when the Pirates
travel to Houston, Texas for the
Conference USA Championship
for the women and the C-USA
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Move with ease KAMPUS DINING
Watch for our 2004 Housing Guide
inserted in the Tuesday, February
17th Edition of The East Carolinian.
The Housing Guide will include apart-
ment listings, information on leases,
choosing a roommate, decorating tips
and living expenses.
Ssveebt for your
Sweetheart -
Valentine '�y Day Gift
Idea at Pirate
Market
Use your
Pirate
Bucks &
Save 7
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Valentine's
Gift Items Also
Available At:
The Spot, Croatan,&
The Wright Place
info
4
"Cart
fi
Construction Jdcmaqement
Ondustriaf Techno foaij Career 'Tair
Wednesday, 'February 11, Z004
10a.m. -Zh.m.
Wms ftuifdin
y
Hook who s comma
Alpha Insulation & Waterproofing
America's Home Place, Inc.
Brassfield & Gorric
Centex Homes
Cintas
Clark Construction
Crowder Construction Co.
Dargan Construction
D.R. Horton
East Carolina University Human Resources
Gilbert Southern Corp Kiewit Company
The Hamlin Companies
Hensel Phelps Construction Co.
Hess Constriiction Company, Inc.
Hourigan Construction Corp.
KB Homes
K.Hovnanian
Mercedes Homes
Ncff Rental
Picerne Military Housing
Pizzagalli Construction Company
Pulte Homes Corp.
Regulator Marine, Inc.
Service Roofing & Sheet Metal Co.
Sherwin Williams
Stock BLiilding Supply
U.S. Army Recruiting
U.S. Navy Recruiting
Warwick Air Conditioning, Inc.
Wayne J. Griffin Electric, Inc.
Western Summit Constructors, Inc.
The Whiting-Turner Contracting Co.
T-or more information contact: Student IProfessionafUevelohment
J01 � $th Street (Career Services T-touse) � 328-6050 � www.ecu.educareer







2 10 04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B6
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Valentine's Day that's cheaper than a tattoo.
r
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AT 5 P.M.
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THE DEADLINE IS FEB. 10 AT 5 PM � DON'T MISS IT!





PAGE B
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
2 10 04
Frasure breaks weight throw record Men's tennis
gets started
Freshman Eric Frasure put his
name in the school record hook
with a new Pirate standard in the
weight throw to highlight a busy
weekend for ECU'S men's and
women's track and field teams.
ECU'S men split its squad,
sending several athletes to Lin-
coln, Neb to participate in the
Frank Sevigne Dusker Invita-
tional. The rest of the ECU men,
including Frasure, competed in
the Carolina (lassie in Chapel
Mill, NC. ECU'S women's team
also were in Chapel Hill on
Saturday.
With a throw of S9-2.2S,
Frasure shattered the previous
Pirate indoor record of SH-1.7S,
set by I Won Carter last season.
Frasure's mark qualified him for
the IC4A Indoor Championship
meet in March and placed him
third in Saturday's competition.
Frasure also placed eighth in the
shot put (45-8.5).
Earning new IC4A berths for
the Pirates in the Nebraska meet
were Oamarcus Fox in the 60
meters (6.89), DeAndrc flyman
in the 200 (21.94), and both of
ECU'S 4x400 relay teams.
Domanlck Richmond had a
top-l() finish in the 400-meter
run, placing eighth with a time
of 48.16.
Tara DcBriellc highlighted
the women's meet with her
ECAC qualifying time of 2:13.79
in the 800-meter run, earning
her a third-place finish. She has
already qualified for the ECACs
in the 500 earlier this season.
Other top-10 finishes for
the Lady Pirates on Saturday
came from Jessica Collins, who
finished fourth in the 3,000 (10:
06.49), and Colleen McGinn,
who was fifth in the high jump
by clearing 5-6.
Up next for the ECU men
is the Valentine Classic, to be
held next Friday and Saturday
in Boston. The l.ady Pirates
will return to lilacksburg, Va
to compete in the Virginia
lech Challenge.
��Track Results
Frank Sevigne Husker InvitationalCarolina Classic Feb. 7,2004 Chapel Hill, N.C.
Feb. 6-7,2004 Uncoln, Neb.
RESULTS: ECU WOMENLong Jump
21. Jenee Moore17-4.75
RESULTS: ECU MEN60 Meters21. Alisha Hopkins17-4.75
60 Meters13. Darneshea Jones7.82Triple Jump
Damarcus Fox 6.89 (semis)Darneshea Jones7.86 (prelims)22 Emily Thompson34-85
Damarcus Fox 6.92 (prelims) DeAndre Hyman 7.03Kelsey Walker817 (prelims)Weight Throw
(prelims)60-Meter Hurdles14. Jessica Georgio43-225
Nicole Callaham9.66 (prelims)16 Emily Thompson37-125
60-Meter Hurdles200 Meters
Hector Cotto 8.58 (prelims)20 Darneshea Jones26.18RESULTS: ECU MEN
Ronnie Pollard 8.63 (prelims)24. Jenee Moore26.39
200 Meters43 Kelsey Walker276260-Meter Hurdles Mark McGee8.92 (prelims)
13. DeAndre Hyman 21.94400 Meters
31. Hector Cotto 231935. Brie Beikowilz1:04.97200 Meters 18. Ric Davis23.26
400 Meters800 Meiers
8. Domonick Richmond 48.163. Tara DeBrielle2:13.79800 Meters
12 Darrus Cofield 48.5823. Lauren Miller2:245013. KyleYunaska15866
21. Michael Hillian 49.4831, Wes Ricci2:04.99
24. B.J. Henderson 49.553000 Meters 4 Jessica Collins10:06493000 Meters
800 Meters23. Megan Walling12:02.6411. Craig Schmidt849.48
14 Ricardo Bell 1:5431'19. Stephen Tausend9:03.67
High Jump28 James McLellan9:15.84
4x400 Relay5. Colleen McGinn5-6
11. Lewis. Richmond, 3:16.76Shot Put
Henderson HillianPole Vault8 Eric Frasure45-85
15 Pollard, Hyman. 3:187714. Lindsey Rosales 14. Tammie Mentzel10-1175 10-11.75Weight Throw
Walls. Bell21 Nicole Marchewka10-63 Eric Frasure 9. Mayso Porch59-2.25' 51-2.75
ECU ran its record to 2-0
with a hard-fought 4-3 win over
Charleston Southern in men's
tennis action on Friday.
I he Buccaneers took
the Pirates to the limit,
winning the doubles points and
capturing victories at number
one and three singles. ECU
proved strong at the bottom,
winning the four, five and
six singles, as well as the
number two singles.
CSU's Quentin Gulchard
and Jean l)e l.ange captured
the number one doubles
match, defeating Charl Meyer
and Darren Mansell, 8-4. The
number two doubles team from
CSU, Lebo Jacobs and Kutlwano
Lephuthlno, defeated the F.c ll
team of Paulo Baumer and
Nick Rose, 9-8. ECU took the
number three doubles, 8-5, with
Felipe Fonseca and Mark Gellard
defeating the CSU team
of Babar Akbar and Lee
Schuttle.
Gulchard defeated Meyer,
6-4, 6-4, at number one
singles, while Jacobs defeated
Mansell, 5-7, 7-5 (10-6) at
number three singles. F.CU's
Baumer defeated De l.ange, 6-2,
7-6 (7-1) at number two, while
Fonseca defeated l.ephuthino,
6-3, 6-2, at number four.
Gellard got the best of
Schuttle at number five, 7-6,
6-1, and Cierard Galindo
defeated Akbar, 6-3, 6-1, at
number six singles.
I'irate tennis sweeps
Charlotte, 7-0
FCU's men's tennis team
got its 2004 dual match season
underway with a 7-0 sweep of
visiting Charlotte on Thursday
afternoon at the ECU Tennis
Complex.
The Pirates claimed all six
singles points with wins by Charl
Meyer, Paulo Baumer, Darren
Mansell, Felipe Fonseca, Mark
Gellard, and Gerard Galindo.
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2-10-04
IHL LAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B8
Basketball
from page B4
Offciing Apartments &
Houses, t'ln Duplex
Communities Convenient
To BCl, Pitt Community
College & The Medical
District.
Hnuifonl Creek
3 Bedroom And 2 S Hath Duplexes.
Country I Hub I iving Without Hie I'rice.
On Bradford (.reel nirse.
Approximately 1,350 Sq.lt
Covered Parl
Fully Equipped I ��
Washer St Dryer.
fas OK With Deposit
Affordability
Convenience
Location
Rherxuilk
3 Bedroom And 3 Hath House.
Kitchen Appliances
Dishwasher
Washer K I )ryer.
Central AirS Heat
Covered Parking
No Pets Allowed
Eastgate Milage
2 Bedroom And 1 Bath Apartment.
Fully Equipped l.iu hi
Washer & Dryei Hookups.
Central Air - Heat.
On ECU Bus Route.
24 Hour Emei en) Malntenaiu i.
Pets OK With Deposit.
WyttiUutm Court
2 Bedroom And I Bath Apartment.
5 Blocks From I
Energy Efficient.
Kitchen Appliam
Washer K Dryei Hookups.
Central Air& Heat
On ECU Bus R ,
Pets OK With I
line and making 8-of-11.
Helton Rivers B
Rivers has seen Ilis min-
utes diminish but Stepped
up and played It) solid
ones foi Mead oai h BUI
Her r ion. Rivers was
2-ois trom beyond
the an. and perfect at the line
for eight points, lie didn't
turn the ball over and had two
assists.
Japhet McNeil C
McNeil distributed the
ball well w ilh sis assisls and
just one turnover. Hut he
wasn't an offensive threat,
going l-of-8 front the field,
including a 0-of-4 night out-
side.
LukeMacKay NG
MacKay has stepped up and
Showed some shooting touch
in past games, but Herrion
relegated MacKay to just three
minutes and he missed his
only three-point attempt.
Corey Rouse A
House was huge off the
bench and complimented Badi-
ane well inside. Rouse dropped
14 points on 5-of-7 shooting
and was 4-of-5 from the free-
throw line.
Garth Grindley D
Grindley has seen more
action after the loss of
Gabriel Mikulas but had more
fouls than points and
rebounds combined in 11 min-
utes.
This writer can be contacted at
sports&theeastcarolinian. com.
Football Signing
i61 -REN 1 www.pinnaciepropert ymaiiagemeni
00��!�' Most-Icy Drive � Greenville, NC
Professionally managed by Pinnacle- Property Management
11
I he 2004 ECU football signing class is one of the largest in school history and is predominantly
defensive this year. I ul t the 28 ret ruits, 16 will play defense (or the Pirates. Size and speed are the
main criteria foi this hunch and here is a brief look at what they'll bring to ECU football.
NAME POS HT WT HOMETOWN
Zach Baker S 6'2 205 Tucson, Ariz
Steve Belford DE 6"4 240 Royal Palm Beach, Ha.
Pierre Bell RB 6"2 205 Vanceboro, N.C.
Zach Davis C 6"4 250 Jacksonville, Fla.
DavonDrew QB 6"4 215 New Bern. N.C.
Jamar Flournoy LB 6"0 220 Valley, Ala.
JoshGrier DT 6"3 315 Daytona Beach, Fla.
Sean Harmon TE 6"3 264 Edmond.Okla.
Fred Hicks DL 6"1 275 Seffner.Fla.
Demetrius Hodges DB 5" 10 175 West Palm Beach, Fla.
Chris Johnson WR 5"11 175 Orlando, Fla.
D'Mario Kelly S 511 201 Norcross.Ga.
Durwln Lamb DE 6"2 230 Miami, Fla.
Shawn Levesque TE 6"4 260 League City, Texas
J.J. Millbrook DB 510 180 Miami, Ra.
Patrick Pinkney QB 6"1 189 Fayetteville, N.C.
Joel Renaud OL 6"7 325 Pompano Beach, Fla.
Tony Richardson LB 6"2 205 Sandersville, Ga.
Ted Riley DB 6"0 184 Boynton Beach, Fla.
Mark Robinson DE 6"4 208 Longwood. Fla.
Richie Santos OL 6"6 295 Deltona Beach, Fla.
Chris Sellars OL 6"5 310 Newport News, Va.
Zach Slate DE 6"5 210 Melbourne, Fla.
Stacy Walls DB 5"9 170 Sandersville, Ga.
Paul Walsh OL 6"5 300 Tallahassee, Fla.
Jarrett Wiggins DE 6"4 215 Camden, S.C.
Mike Williams OL 6"3 287 Orlando, Fla.
Travis Williams DB 5"11 175 Daytona Beach. Fla.
LAST SCHOOL
Pima College Ariz.
Lake Worth HS
West Craven HS
Trinity Christian HS
New Bern HS
Hutchinson CC Kan.
Atlantic HS
NE Oklahoma A&M College
Armwood HS
Georgia Military Academy
Olympic HS
Norcross HS
Pace HS
Kilgore College Texas
Pace HS
Pine Forest HS
Reedley College Calif.
Washington County HS
American Heritage HS
Lyman HS
Deltona HS
New Mexico Military Institute
Melbourne HS
Washington County HS
N. Florida Christian HS
Camden HS
Boone HS
Atlantic HS


Title
The East Carolinian, Feburary 10, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 10, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1703
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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