The East Carolinian, February 4, 2004






PAGE B6

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 79 Number 112
WEDNESDAY
February 4, 2004
Jessica Johanson, graduate public health student from Sweden, paints a bowl to help support Greenville's homeless shelters.
Hand-painted art helps support homeless
International students
plan for Feast of Love
TABATHA JAMES
STAFF WRITER
Several tCU international
students gathered around
tables at the International
House last week to give glass
bowls a hand-painted touch from
their native countries.
The bowls will be
given as a token of
appreciation to those
who make a pledge at the
Feast of Love, where diners'
money will go to the Greenville
Community Shelter.
Tom Best, volunteer
for GCS, said it's a new
fundraiser for the international
students - one ECU wants to
continue.
The money raised will
profit the unemployed in
Greenville and give them a
secure, hospitable place to live
by assisting with the expenses
of shelter.
"We are hoping to raise at
least $100,000 through dona-
tions during the cause to support
the CCS Best said.
"They are decorating the
bottom ol thebowls first, and then
on the rim each student is
writing 'least of Love' in their
native language and in English
Best said.
"It's our pleasure being here
to decorate the bowls said
Shahla Naghiyera of Azerbaijan.
"We've written our 'love
words' in our very own language
on the bowls for the people to
have
Best said more than 200
international students from 50
different countries are study-
ing, conducting research and
participating in educational,
cultural and social activities
each year.
"We try to interact with
the International students and
have them connect with the
American culture said Bill
Mallett, international student
adviser.
"Volunteering is a big
thing in our society but not so
much in other societies around
the world, so this is one of the
ways we can share it
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeaitcarolinian.com.
tt Feast of Love
The Feast of Love Is Friday, Jan. 13 at
St. James United Methodist Church on
2000 E Sixth St. from 5 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Call the Greenville Community Shelter
at 752-0829 for more information.
Shelton ends
hiring freeze
Two percent budget reversion
creates 100 EPA, SPA positions
ERIN RICKERT
NEWS EDITOR
Interim Chancellor William Shelton
announced in an e-rnail sent to faculty that the two
percent reversion imposed by the State Budget
Office would be lifted.
Shelton said when ECU began this fiscal
year, the university had to hold 2 percent of the
appropriations that came to the university.
" There was a question on whether the
revenue projections for the state could
be met this year, so consequently the
State Budget Office encouraged that we
sit aside for the possibility of another 2 percent
said Shelton.
"At this time, it's a pretty good estimate
from our financial
people that the rev-
enues of the state are
making it so there
should not be any-
thing else that comes
up at this time
The 2 percent,
or nearly $3.2 million,
is a planning tool
used by administra-
tion to fall back on in
the event the state
decides to make a
mid-year budget
cut.
Once ECU financial
advisers saw a window
to remove the 2
percent reversion, they
notified She
ton, and he removed the hiring freeze
on all EPA and SPA staff and gave the
OK to fill almost 100 positions at the
university.
"It allows us to get back to a staffing level that
we believe we need to function appropriately
as an institution of higher learning
Shelton said.
The additional positions will help fill holes
in clerical and secretarial areas of the university
that have been vacant since the freeze was set
only days after our current fiscal year began
in July.
But according to Chuck Hawkins, associate
vice chancellor for financial services, "We
are not out of the woods yet
Hawkins said there are two more critical
points in the state budget that may still affect
ECU this fiscal year.
Hawkins said sales tax numbers, which will
come out in the next month and income tax
collection in April, could still influence the
way the budget is handled before the fiscal year
ends June 30.
"We are hoping the economy keeps going
and we do not have issues to deal with at all
Hawkins said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
SHELTON
Recent Incidents spark fire safety concerns on, off campus
Officials say everyday
routines cause most
dormitory disasters
ADRIANNA DRAKE
STAFF WRITER
Cooking and smoking are two
of the leading causes of deadly
fires, making student housing
a prime location for a potential
blaze. Statistics show, three years
ago, a steady decrease in reported
campus fires.
ECU residence halls experi-
enced minimal fires and haven't
reported any type of fire-related
injury in the last 10 years.
"We receive approximately
100 alarms a year to the dorms
said Tony Smart, battalion chief
for the Greenville Fire Depart-
ment.
"Of these, only around two or
three are actual fires, which are
mostly small in nature
The increase of housing fires
at ECU and across the nation
necessitates a greater need for
safety precautions.
Since everyday routines often
become the source of disaster,
ECU emphasizes the importance
of students practicing safety in
their rooms.
"Students can prevent fires in
the residence halls by first and
foremost following the guide-
lines established by ECU campus
living said Eddie Johnson,
safety manager for environmen-
tal health and safety at ECU.
"Most of these construction
materials are resistant to fire-it's
the building contents that most
often contribute to fires
see ON page A2
Students should always be aware of fire extinguishing tools.
Tips to prevent
fire from destroying
your apartment
ADRIANNA DRAKE
STAFF WRITER
The mixture of smoking and
alcohol causes rnosl apartment
fires in Greenville, and although
the majority haven't resulted in
fatalities, all ECU students resid-
ing in apartments should be
aware of fire safety precautions.
"There has to be at least one
smoke detector outside of the
bedroom area in any apartment
code said Tony Smart, chief
battalion for the Greenville Fire
Department (CII'K).
According to the National
Fire Protection Association,
having a smoke detector in your
apartment increases your chance
for survival up to SO percent, but
one-third of all homes and apart-
ments have smoke detectors that
don't work.
"It is the residents' responsi-
bility to check smoke detectors
they should be checked every
M days to make sure they are in
working condition said Diane
Allen, property manager for I lite
Properties.
Other apartments around
Cireenville are also equipped
with fire extinguishers. Many
complexes request their tenants
purchase a fire extinguisher and
receive basic training on how to
use (he device, but since many
apartments in Cireenville are
constructed in various materials,
only some are lire resistant.
"The basic framework on most
all of the apartments in Green-
ville are wood frame Smart said.
see OFF page A3
Black History Awareness
throughout February
Sept. 9, 1739 there was a slave revolt led by a slave named Cato.
, Congress passes an act declaring that slaves count as three-fifths of a man in determining rcprescnation in the House of
Representatives in Sept. 1787
Forecast tec required
Sunny READING
High of 53
Visit www.theeastcarollnlan.com to
view the latest stanrjnos of the 2004
democratic presidential hopefuts.
page A2
A recent report found that ECUs Cotege
ot Education rertaias ar�1 recruits more
educators than any other NC university
Features
page A5
This year marked the closing of several
local businesses Including popular
downtown hangout The Sports Pad
Sports
page A8
TCU armjneed that the university w
fjecome a rnernber of the Mountain West
Conference.
uont forget to catch the last
performance of Dance 2004
todayl For more Information
contact 328-6829.





PAGE A2
2 04-04
NEWS
ERIN RICKERT
News Editor
HOLLY O'NEAL
Assistant News Editor
news@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
Job Fair Workshop
Career Services presents a workshop to inform students how to get the
most out of a job fair on Thursday. Feb. 5 from 1230 p.m. -130 p.m. in
1003 Bate
Childhood Diabetes Presentation
Dr Anton-Lewis Usala, Department of Pediatrics, will speak on the
recognition and treatment of a co-existing endocrine problem in children
with diabetes Presentation will be Fnday. Feb 6 from 12:30 pm. -1:30
pm in 2E92 Brody
Resume Blitz
Career Services offers a Resume Blitz for students to have their resumes
critiqued Monday. Feb 9 from 11 a.m. -1 p.m and Tuesday, Feb 10 from
2 pm - 4 pm Both sessions will be in Bate Lobby
Career Readiness Workshop: Interviewing
Career Services offers a workshop on how to prepare for an interview
Monday, Feb 9 from 2:30 p.m - 3:30 p.m in 1012 Bale
Women in Academic Medicine Seminar
The Office of Academic and Faculty Development presents a seminar
on women in academic medicine Tuesday, Feb 10 from 8:30 a.m. - 4:
15 pm. at the Ironwood Golf and Country Club Call 744-3420 for more
information
Construction and Industrial Career Fair
There will be a Construction Management and Industrial Technology
Career Fair Wednesday, Feb 11 from 10 am - 2 p.m on the first floor of
the Science and Technology Building
Nursing and Allied Health Career Fair
There will be a Nursing and Allied Health Career Fair Thursday. Feb. 12
from 10 am - 2 p.m. in the Carol Belk Building
Science and Chemistry Career Fair
There will be a science and chemistry career fair Friday, Feb 13 from 10
am. - 2 p.m on the 3rd floor of the Science and Technology Building
Language Arts Conference
The College of Education will sponsor the Mary Lois Staton Reading
Language Arts Conference Friday, Feb 13 from 8 am - 4 pm at the
Greenville Hilton. The conference will feature newspaper columnist and
author Susie Wilde, children s author Pansie Hart Rood and 25 sessions
on literacy issues Contact Susan Ranson at 328-6830 for registration
LatinoHispanic Education Conference
The College of Education and the NC Center for International
Understanding hosts the first LatinoHispanic Education Conference on
Thursday. Feb 26 at 830 am at the Greenville Hilton Contact the Division
of Continuing Studies at or 1-800-767-9111 for registration
Drop Deadline
The last day for undergraduate students to drop term-length courses
or withdraw from school without grades is Wednesday. Feb 18 Block
courses may be dropped only during the first 40 percent of their regularly
scheduled class meetings
Graduate Scholarship Competition
The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation offers a scholarship valued at up to
$50,000 per year for up to six years to graduating seniors and recent
alumni Applicants must be a college senior or have graduated since May
1999, have a cumulative GPA of 3 5 or better on a 4 0 scale, plan to begin
graduate school in fall 2004 and be nominated by their undergraduate
institution
Deadline for application is March 29 Contact Michael Bassman at 328-
6373 tor more information
Computer Virus
ECU Information Technology Security reports a new form of malicious
software named "Beagle" spreading quickly through the campus computer
network The virus represents a threat lo personal data More details
including actions to take are available at the top of the "Latest Virus
Threats" list Web site at wwwsarc com
Volunteers Needed
The Literacy Volunteers of Pitt County need individuals to tutor English as
a second language to adult immigrants Knowledge of a second language
is no! necessary Sessions will be Friday, Feb 6 from 6 30 p m - 9 30 p m.
conlinumg lo Saturday, Feb 7 from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m al 504-A Dexter St
Contact Sharon Schlichting at 353-6578 tor more information
Summer Study Abroad
An opportunity to study abroad in Ghana and receive class credit is
offered May 20 - June 9 Contact Seodial F H Deena at 328-6683 tor
more information
Paper Person
The person featured at the top of today s paper is Eric Sylvester, freshman
undecided major
News Briefs
Local
NC Supreme Court rejects
Republican redistricting request
RALEIGH (AP) - The state Supreme
Court has denied a request to hold
this year's legislative elections using
temporary district maps imposed
by a judge in 2002
The court issued an order late
Friday refusing to grant an injunction
requested by a group of Republicans
who want to block the use of maps
drawn by the General Assembly
last fall
The justices did agree to an
expedited schedule to hear a
broader complaint brought by the
Republican plaintiffs, setting a
hearing dale for March 18.
With state lawmakers still waiting for
the new maps to be given federal
approval. Republican lawyer Tom
Farr said Monday that using the
old maps could avoid having to
delay this years primary election,
which is scheduled for May 4
Former Wlnterville officer
sentenced for planting pipe
bombs
GREENVILLE (AP) - A former
Winterville police officer convicted
last year of planting pipe bombs
along NC 11 has been sentenced
to five years in prison.
Thomas Uzenski. 35. also must serve
three years of supervised probation
and pay a $5,000 fine as part of
the federal sentence imposed
Monday by Judge Malcolm Howard
A jury found him guilty in October
of two counts each of possessing
and manufacturing a destruclive
device and one count of obstruction
of justice
The sentence came almost two
years after Uzenski was called a
hero tor finding a pipe bomb on the
side of NC 11 near Fortines Road on
March 25. 2002 Another bomb was
found the next day in almost the
same place
A month later. Alcohol, Tobacco,
Firearms and Explosives agents
arrested Uzenski for planting and
pretending to find the bombs
National
Poisonous ricin shows up in
Frist mailroom. at least 16
people decontaminated
WASHINGTON (AP) - Three Senate
office buildings were closed
Tuesday after a suspicious white
powder, apparently delivered
through the mail system, was found
in the Senate majority leaders office
Officials said several preliminary
tests - but not all of them - were
positive for ricin, a deadly poison
More definitive lest results were
expected later Tuesday.
"This is a criminal action said
Sen. Bill Frist, R-Tenn. whose staff
discovered the white powder in
their Dirksen Senate Office Building
mailroom Monday afternoon
Dirksen and the other two main Senate
office buildings were ciosed Tuesday
as authorities were to remove and
test all mail that has been delivered
there. Senate officials were hoping
that process would take only a
day. said one congressional official
speaking on condition of anonymity
The closures were forcing the
cancellation of committee meetings
scheduled for those buildings.
But the Capitol was to remain
open with the Senate convening
Tuesday morning as scheduled
There were no reports of anyone
becoming sick from exposure as of
Tuesday morning, the congressional
official said.
Kerry, Edwards tangle over South
Carolina as front-runner
eyes sweep
GREENVILLE. SC (AP) - After back-
to-back wins in Iowa and New
Hampshire. Sen. John Kerry was
hoping for a sweep in the biggest
test yet for Democratic hopefuls.
seven states holding primaries or
caucuses
But the race's two Southerners were
angling to slow the Massachusetts
Democrat's gathering momentum.
Sen. John Edwards of North Carolina
was counting on a victory in South
Carolina's first-in-the-South primary
on Tuesday to keep his own
campaign alive
And retired Army Gen Wesley
Clark of Arkansas hoped for a win
in Oklahoma and a respectable
showing in both Arizona and New
Mexico to propel his campaign into
the next round of contests
One-time front-runner Howard Dean
was hoping to put his campaign back
on track, but was looking beyond
Tuesday's contests-where he is not
running any TV ads and where polls
show he is badly lagging-to later
races
Dean's campaign, which has severely
cut back on spending, engaged in
another round of layoffs, aides said
Monday night
Tuesday's contests in Arizona.
Delaware, Missouri. New Mexico.
North Dakota. Oklahoma and South
Carolina are expected to help winnow
the field of major contenders, perhaps
to two.
World
Blalr announces inquiry into
intelligence on Iraqi weapons
LONDON (AP) - The British
government announced Tuesday
that it would hold an inquiry into the
intelligence used in deciding to go to
war with Iraq, and expected findings
to be ready months before a similar
investigation in the United States.
"I think there are issues" about
intelligence that need to be looked
at, Prime Minister Tony Blair
told a Parliamentary committee
But he insisted Saddam Hussein
had "weapons of mass destruction
capability" when Britain and the
United States went to war in March.
Announcing details in the House
of Commons, Foreign Secretary
Jack Straw said the inquiry would
look al the accuracy of prewar
intelligence about Iraqi weapons
and "discrepancies" between that
intelligence and what eventually
was found.
It is due to report before Parliament
breaks for the summer .in July.
The tive-member committee will
be chaired by Lord Butler, a retired
senior civil servant, and include
a Labour and a Conservative
lawmaker.
Taiwan's leader calls for
demilitarized zone with China
TAIPEI. Taiwan (AP) - Taiwan's
leader on Tuesday called for a
demilitarized zone with China, the
island's biggest security threat.
President Chen Shui-bian said at a
rare news conference that troops,
missiles and other weapons would
be removed from the zone. Chen
didn't say where the zone would be.
Leaders from China and Taiwan
have not met since the island
territory split away from the mainland
in 1949 Beijing has repeatedly
threatened to use force to take
over Taiwan, just 100 miles off
China's coast.
Chen's proposal might be difficult to
carry out as long as the two sides
disagree about Taiwan's political
status. Chinese leaders have insisted
that before any talks or formal
cooperation begins. Taiwan must
agree that it is an inseparable part
of China.
The Taiwanese president has
refused to accept any preconditions
for talks.
On
from page A1
According to (ampus Living
rules and regulations, the use of
candles, incense, propane stoves
and gas and charcoal grills are
not permitted in residence hall
rooms, hallways, hreeeways,
porches or roof areas.
The use of electric frying
pans, open coils (including hot
plates), oil lamps, electric or
kerosene heaters, deep tat cook-
ers and cooking with grease is
also prohibited.
"Most damage is caused by
smoke, not the fire, in most
cases said Waz Miller, interim
director of housing.
"folks should try to remem-
ber to close their doors on their
way out during a fire if at all
possible
Alter a fraternity house fire
in Chapel Hill on Mother's Day
weekend in 1999, state officials
created a new law to protect stu-
dents mandating monthly fire
drills and installation of sprin-
kler systems in new and present
residence halls.
Colleges and universities are
required to disclose information
on ail fire incidents to parents
and students before enrollment,
if requested, in the Campus lire
Safety Right to Know Act of
2003.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Great Location
NOW Leasing: Pick from six different floor plans. Live alone or share a
unit with a friend in your own furnished condominium at Ringgold Towers.
Located Next to ECU Recreation Center
Corner of 7th and Cotanche Street
635 Cotanche Street No. 900
Greenville, NC 27858
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 9am-5pm
12521752-2865
HIGH SPEED INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE!
Jennifer Chltwood, sophomore criminal justice major, receives a flu shot
from Nurse Josie Bertinr at a flu clinic in Dowdy Student Stores.
Flu season hits
students hard
eat Books at
reat Prices!
Friends ofSheppard Memorial Library
USED BOOK SALE
Friday, Feb. 6, 9 a.m 8 p.m.
Saturday, Feb 7, 9 a.m5 p.m.
Sunday, Feb 8, I -4 p.m.
Bag day - 5 per paper grocery bag of books
Willis Building, First & Reade Streets.
Campus battles severe
strain, insufficient
vaccination supplies
NICK HENNE
STAFF WRITER
A substantially higher number
of students were diagnosed with
the flu this year than in the pas)
even though Student Health
Services gave 1,2.50 van inations.
According to the (enter of
Disease Control and Prevention,
this year's llu season started ear-
lier than usual, and laboratory
work across the country showed
an increase in the number ol
specimen reporting positive for
type A. a more severe strain ol the
tlu virus.
Michelle Camarena, manag-
ing nurse ol MIS, said there was
1,177 symptomatic and diagnosed
i.ises reported.
"The problem this year is
that the strain of Influenza was
believed to be one not covered in
the vaccine said Camarena.
"I hey thought the vaccine
would help, but it may not be
preventing as much as it would if
it were covered
Camarena said while the vac-
c ine does help present this strain
of the flu, it's still possible to get
the flu after being vaccinated.
Christina Alfonso, freshman
psychology major, who battled
with the flu this year, said it
spread to three ol her friends in
her dorm.
"It the flu was bad; I hated
it. I got the flu shot, hut it didn't
work said Allonso.
Slls took several measures
to Increase education about the
tin and the services it offers to
students
stoasciMnaraNjoohW
turn clothes into cash!

0
Information
SHIRTS
SHORTS
TAHKS
ECU Health Services gave
approximately 1,000 flu shots
during last year's flu season,
and 1,250 have been given
to date this year.
see FLU page A3
BEtT�
HAIR ACaSSORI
JCWClRY
HATS
PURSES
StMJtli SOOTS
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LAVA LAMPS 'v?
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Empty your closet, fill your wallet StH us
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Al Plato's Closet' we buy and sail gently
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2 04 04
THE LAST CAROLINIAN � NLWS
PAGE A3
ECU produces more educators
than any other NC university
Flu
from page M
Students in a North Carolina public school get together to
finish school work before class lets out for the day.
Partnership East
program helps recruit
public school teachers
LUKE SPENCER
STAFF WRITER
A report released by the
North Carolina State Board
of Education showed ECU'S
College of Education recruits and
retainsmore full-time teachers
for Northarolina public schools
than any other institution of
higher learning In the state.
The state's Institutions of
Higher Education report showed
more than 11,700 ECU College
of Education alumni reside
in North Carolina and are
pursuing careers in educa-
tion at North Carolina public
schools.
Out of 126,513 state employ-
ees, around 11 percent graduated
from ECU's College of Educa-
tion.
Figures show signifi-
cant increases in both the
number of incoming gradu-
ates and undergraduates in the
College of Education.
Undergraduate on-cam pus
hours increased for the spring
by 12 percent and by 77
percent for off-campus and
distance education programs.
Additionally, graduate stu-
dent enrollment is projected
to be 4,667 for this spring, a
15 percent increase; from the
SJrrrieTTel-rod in 2irOS.
"The College of Education's
rapid growth can be attributed
to the strength of the cur-
riculum and faculty and the
way our program addresses
the entire public school
system said Yokima Cureton,
director of communication for
the College of Education.
Data collected in the
HIE report also points to the
success of a program devel-
oped by the College of Educa-
tion in collaboration with a
North Carolina Community Col-
lege System, the Partnership East
program.
The program, designed to
put more teachers in the eastern
part of the state where educa-
tors are desperately needed, has
led to an increase in ECU educa-
tion graduates placed in counties
east of 1-95.
Due in large part to the
success of this program,
Pitt, Craven, Wayne, Nash,
l.enoir, Johnston, Onslow, Beau-
fort and Cumberland county
districts became the
most popular destinations
for ECU graduates after the Wake
county district.
"We are extremely proud
of Partnership East and see it
as a national model for uni-
versities and community
colleges to address the cur-
rent teacher shortage in a
sustainable manner Cureton
said.
Marilyn Sheerer, dean of the
College of Education also thought
Partnership East was successful
In improving conditions in the
eastern part of the state.
"Partnership East is the most
powerful vehicle we have for
addressing the teacher shortage
in rural North Carolina said-
Sheerer.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
"We did more campaigns
as far as educational materials
in our lobby, on hand wash-
ing and respiratory etiquette
Camarena said.
"We actually did some
things out on campus during
our flu vaccine clinic with hand
sanitize! and tissues and talk-
ing to people about respiratory
etiquette
SIIS offered walk-in flu
shots as well as satellite clinics,
temporary set-ups at locations
across campus where students
could receive flu shots.
"We gave a good thousand
(flu shots at the satellite clinics,
and then the last 2.50 were prob-
ably walk-ins Camarena said.
These flu shot services are
offered yearly throughout the
typical flu season, but students
can begin getting shots as early
as October, Camarena said.
It's good to get the shot
before a flu outbreak occurs
because the shot takes up to two
weeks to have an effect.
Shots are recommended for
people who have chronic health
problems such as diabetes,
asthma, or hypertension.
"Their immune systems
are already compromised, and
for them to be sick, the illness
would be much more severe than
a healthy person Camarena
said.
Camarena said flu seasons
typically run through January
and February, but the majority of
the cases this year with students
occurred in December.
"It seems to be a typical lime
- it's cold, people's immune sys-
tems are lower, and that's when
the flu just seems to pop up
Camarena said.
Karen Warren, director of
Welluess Education, said in the
winter months people generally
spend time indoors where they're
exposed to one another more.
The flu is transmitted
through respiratory systems in
droplets when people cough or
sneeze, and people who have
the flu should practice good
hygiene by washing hands
frequently and covering their
mouths when they sneeze or
cough.
( temarena said there wasn't a
major difference In the number
of cases of the flu between people
who live on campus and in
apartments; classrooms are
probably the place where the
flu spread.
The flu is a virus and is can't
be cured with antibiotics; the
best thing for the flu is to drink
plenty of fluids and get sufficient
rest. Typical symptoms include
fever, chills, body aches and
headaches.
Between 10 percent and
20 percent of U.S. residents are
infected with the flu each year.
Although most people who get
the flu recover within a couple
weeks, the flu can lead to serious
illnesses, such as pneumonia.
An average of 36,000 people
in the U.S. die each year from the
flu, and 114,000 are hospitalized,
This writer can be contacted at
news&theeas tcarolmian. com.
Off
from page A1
"This in and of itself is not
combustible, however it will
support combustion if ignited
Inside walls are covered with
sheetrock, a material that is only
fire resistant for up to 30 minutes
if in contact with direct llames.
Whether a possibility of
fire is minor or major, there are
simple precautions apartment
residents can take to protect
themselves and their guests.
In many apartment settings,
when a resident moves In, they
are given a packet with differ-
ent information, including a
tip sheet from the Greenville
Eire Department.
Allen said all residents
should read this sheet because
there are many tips to protect
themselves.
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MORNING Z
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mix winterviews & weather
IRIE IM
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RETRO
Music from the late 70s & 80s
INSIGHTS
live local call-in news show
INSPIRATIONS
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RISE & SHINE
Saturday morning show
LOCAL
Independent & regional music
ft interviews
SKA
Roots of reggae & UB40
PUNK
Aggressive & intense music
ROOTS ROCK
am bands from the college
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R&B
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REQUEST ROCK
Listeners call-in their requests
KLASSIC ROCK
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Discussion of (ampus issues
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heal
MUSIC TO ANNOY THE
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Pure melal music
Call us on our request line at
328-6913
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and remember to change the
battery.
The sheet suggests a replace-
ment of batteries every six
months and to check your
smoke detector once a month.
"ECU and GFR want to promote
awareness in students that live
off campus said laddie Johnson,
safety manager for environmen-
tal health and safety at ECU.
"Homes and apartments
do not always get the type of
Information and training that
students on campus receive
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
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PAGF A4
1
: ������.
2-04-04
OPINION
Editor-in-chief
Michelle A. McLeod
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Erin Rickert
News Editor
Amanda Ungerfelt
Features Editor
Ryan Downey
Sports Editor
Meghann Roark
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Holly O'Neal
Asst. News Editor
John Bream
Asst. Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Asst Sports Editor
Mike Mashburn
Web Editor
Daniel Roy
Production Manager
Newsroom252.328.6366
Fax252.328.6558
Advertising252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, The East Carolinian prints 9.000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular academic year
and 5.000 on Wednesdays during the summer "Our View" is the opin-
ion of the editorial board and is written by editorial board members.
The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor which are limited to
250 words (which may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and include
a telephone number. Letters may be sent via e-mail to editor@theeast
Carolinian com or to The East Carolinian, Student Publications Building,
Greenville. NC 27858-4353 Call 252-328-6366 for more information.
One copy of The East Carolinian is free, each additional copy is $1
Our View
The planets
must have
realigned
recently
because in
some strange
twist of
idiocy, neither
player made
the cut.
The NBA All-Star game is approaching and
anyone who has paid a little attention this
season expected LeBron James and Carmelo
Anthony to be shoe-ins for at least reserves on
their respective Eastern and Western confer-
ence squads.
The planets must have realigned recently
because in some strange twist of idiocy, neither
player made the cut.
At the age of 19, LeBron James is averaging
20.8 points, 5.9 rebounds and 5.9 assists per
game.
Only three other players are averaging over 20
points, five boards and five helpers per game
and they are are Ray Allen. Kevin Garnett and
Paul Pierce, players who are much older, much
more experienced and are on far better teams
than James.
Anthony is averaging 19 points per game and
scored a career high 39 against the Portland
Trail Blazers on Monday night, marking him as
the youngest player ever to drop 39 points in
a game. Not only that, but he did it against a
potential playoff contender.
Both rookies are also on teams that had iden-
tical records of 17-65 last season. So far this
year, James's Cavs are 18-29 while Anthony's
Nuggets are 29-21. meaning that if the season
were to end right now. Denver would be in the
playoffs.
Are the coaches and David Stern insane? We're
talking about two kids, kids who are both in the
top 20 in the league in scoring. James already
has six double-doubles this year and has been
one or two assists or rebounds short of plenty
more and even triple-doubles several times.
Putting statistics aside, what about the buzz
this game could create if these two squared
off against each other in the All-Star game their
rookie year?
It's an atrocity that neither player made the
All-Star game but they do have plenty of years
ahead of them to show everyone what they
missed out on back in 2004.
Poor David Stern.
Tell us Dave, can you see the money slipping
through your fingers?
The purpose of TEC's opinion pages is to invoke
conversation in ECU'S community. To respond to an
opinion on this page, please send your letter, with your contact
information for verification, to edltor@theeastcarolinian.com.
Opinions In Brief
Extra week
disrupts players
in the Nil. these days, teams
are allowed two weeks between
conference championships and
the Super Bowl.
Nil greats, Bradshaw and
Montana, were only provided a
week between games, which is
routine for players on their regu-
lar schedule. Hut today s players are
now provided with an extra week,
in addition to more training, better
facilities and more qualified staff;
resulting in pansy players.
in my opinion, this extra week
is uncalled tor and not only dis-
rupts the natural rhythm of the
NFL for the players, hut the tans
as well.
Bush is on his way out
Hy choosing John Kerry, voters
in Iowa and New I lampshire have
shown that Democrats desperately
want to evict Bush from office,
One of Kerry's main campaign
strategies is to convince potential
supporters he is the man to sway
middle-of-the-road and right-
leaning Americans away from the
incumbent.
But few know or even care
what Kerry stands for. This anti-
Bush sentiment, though unify-
ing in its cause, obscures issues
and prohibits candidates with an
agenda focusing on change from
having a chance.
Ibo often, voters complain
of choosing "the lesser of two
evils In a country full of des-
perate ideas and people, there
should be more focus - from
the media, the public, the can-
didates - on platforms, not party
politics.
Leaders not
offering options
I don't know how many
people watched the last
Democratic candidates debate
Thursday. I did, but when it was
done I wasn't sure il I had learned
anything.
What I did see was that the
most interesting ideascame from
candidates who were so far off
the charts that they might as well
not even been at the debate in
the first place. Dennis Kucinich
is a fun candidate who seems to
care. In politics,
of course, it doesn't matter
what people seem like, it comes
down to what they do in office.
What I can say is that the
In My Opinion
Howard Dean goes down
(KRT)�There is no question,
luesday night's New Hampshire
primary was a huge disappoint-
ment for Howard Dean fans. Many
of us awoke that morning convinced
that short ot an outright upset, the
former governor would place only
a respectable few points behind the
winner. We were painfully wrong
Dean's double-digit loss in the
Granite State to Sen. ohn Kerry, fol-
lowing his even poorer showing in
Iowa, constituted a staggering one-
two blow to the Dean movement
While his second-place showing
was strong, many pundits now
question whether Deati can regain
his previous momentum, and revive
hisonce-formidablestandinginthe
(Mills.
With Kerry as the new front-
runner in the primary race, Demo-
crats are now faced with the very
real prospect of a nominee who
amounts to a watered-down version
ol what President Bush's challenger
should In-
Kerry is a decent-enough guy-a
war hero with a respectable record In
the Senate, but his motives tor seek-
ing the presidency seem less noble
than they are ego-based Kerry,
much like Bob I )ole in ll)ll(, seems
to view a hid for the presidency
more as a reward tor a long and
distinguished political career than
as a call to public service.
Kerry's original stint as the
presumptive tront-runner was
blindsided by the insurgenie of an
upstart from Vermont by the name
Ot Howard Dean, for a tour-term
senator from Massachusetts, the
former governor from a state ot
merely 600,000 residents should
have posed no serious threat.
Despite this, Kerry stumbled and
fell into the middle ot the crowded
roster of candidates, while watching
Dean's remarkable rise to the top.
What Kerry lacked was a strong,
solid message. He sent more time
touting his resume than advancing
his ideas. Explaining to Democrats
why he would make a better presi-
dent than any ot the others proved
to lie a struggle for the senator.
Dean's campaign, in sharp
contrast, inspired supporters at
every turn and was a strength
Kerry simply could not match. I he
former governor's unprecedented
use of the Internet lor lund rais-
ing, coupled with bis outspoken
opposition to the Iraq war and
passionate stump message, drove
the powerful grass-roots move-
ment that propelled him to the
front of the pack.
I he sudden resurgence of
Kerry's campaign stunned politi-
cal observers, who had been pre-
pared to crown Dean the Demo-
cratic nominee.
It appeared that Kerry had
found a message. While attacks
from another opponent distracted
Dean in Iowa, Kerry quietly sewed
together this new message from
usurped fragments of the cam-
paign themes ol Dean and other
contenders.
What ultimately drew voters
to Kerry was not his ideas, but
the imaginary air of clectability
he possessed. While Dean was
taking some critical beatings,
Kerry sneaked in with his newly
adopted message, clubbed himself
"Senator Klectable and swnofxd
away with dual victories in Iowa
and New Hampshire.
The dilemma now facing pri-
mary voters could prove daunting.
In the coming weeks, they will le
asked to make a choice between
their heads and their hearts.
In Kerry they have a candi-
date whose strategy is careful and
c raited. He is someone who makes
all the necessary moves in order
to win the nomination, but lacks
,i vision tor moving this country
forward.
In Dean is a candidate who is
In mum and straightforward, whose
motives are genuine and heartfelt.
He has made some mistakes, but
has learned from them.
Throughout the remainder
nl the primary season, Kerry will
continue to claim the corner on
clei lability. This may appeal to
Democrats with cold feet over
Dean, but the notion that Kerry
has the best shot against Bush is
a myth.
While it is too early to gauge
how well any challenger will fare
against the president, a close race
is widely expected in November.
When it comes to Bush's overall
approval ratings, the country is
still evenly divided. The president
appears vulnerable, and if Kerry
can take him on, so can Dean.
front runners didn't have any
answers for the tough questions.
If they want to lambaste the Presi-
dent over the loss of manufactur-
ing jobs, then they should be able
to say what they will do in order
to keep it from happening on their
own watch. How they answer
those questions will determine
whether they have a chance to be
elected next November. If they
just continue to snipe at each
other and criticize without offer-
ing up another option, they arc-
not going to win and really don't
deserve to.
Technology creates
a cold world
I noticed it the other day when
I went through the self-checkout
at the grocery store. The "cashiers"
were get ting paid to do two things
- make sure nobody steals any-
thing and work out any glitches
in the system. The world's gotten
lazy, folks. What ever happened to
customer service?
Need more proof? The
machine that lets you check your
hooks out yourself at
Joyner Library or the ability
to order a pizza online call il
an advance in technology if you
want. 1 call it avoiding work and
interpersonal communication,
thus creating the beginning of a
cold world.
ECU e-mail needs help
Chances are, you've experi-
enced this problem in some way.
Maybe you have e-mailed a pro-
fessor with an important question
and are waiting for him or her to
respond through e-mail.
Or maybe your forgot your
password to L-bay and are wait-
ing for it to be e-mailed back to
you. Or maybe, as in my case, you
are waiting for an e-mail telling
you of important news about a
family member's medical condi-
tion. Whatever the situation,
you go to check your ECU e-mail
account, and surprise, the darn
thing is "experiencing prob-
lems
Can't the technical support
people fix this problem? It'd be
understandable if the server was
down once in a while, but now it
seems to be a weekly, sometimes
daily, occurrence. If places like
Hotmail, Yahoo! and even other
schools' e-mail accounts can keep
their systems working efficiently,
then so can we.
-ctotoe-cg
"Family makes me feel there's a reason I'm
alive I'm feeling my life, which I didn't always
do partly because I'd be drunk a lot:
Sean Penn
Actor





PAGL A5
JRc
ling work and
uiiunication,
eginning of a
needs help
ou've experi-
in some way.
mailed a pro-
rtant question
him or her to
mail.
r forgot your
and are wait-
lailed back to
1 my case, you
e-mail telling
news about a
ledical condi-
le situation,
ir ECU e-mail
ise, the darn
ncing prob-
lical support
blem? it'd be
he server was
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ly, sometimes
If places like
id even other
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ng efficiently,
�uiae'co
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I
� Aff CAWOl �
2-0404
FEATURES
AMANDA UNGERFELT
Features Editor
JOHN BREAM
Assistant Features Editor
features@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
Did You Know?
- Boxer Oscar De La Hoya (1973) and former Vice President Dan Quayle
(1947) both call today their birthday.
- Today is African American Coaches Day and National Girls and
Women in Sports Day
- This month is Bake for Fabulous Florida Strawberry Month.
- Today marks the midpoint of winter.
- On this day in 1998, Bill Gates gets a pie thrown in his face in Brussels,
Belgium.
Announcements
Rims
The Student Union Films Committee presents In America tonight at
7 p.m Thursday at 9:30 pm, Friday at 7 p.m. and midnight, Saturday at
9:30 p m and Sunday at 7 p.m. Love Actually is showing tonight at
9:30 p.m Thursday at 7 p.m Friday at 9:30 p.m Saturday at 7 p.m. and
midnight and Sunday at 3 p.m. All movies are free with a student ID and
are located in the Hendrix Theatre. For more information call 328-4700
Slam Poetry
The Student Union presents a Slam Poetry Competition tonight at 8 p.m.
in the Pirate Underground.
Political Film
See a hard-hitting video of Michael Moore speaking on his best-selling
book, Stupid White Men, with commentary ranging over today's hot
issues Stick around for a group discussion Register to vote on the spot
Learn what's at stake in the upcoming presidential elections. Free and
open to all. The film shows tonight at 7 p.m. in Room 14 Mendenhall. For
more information, visit www.peacedowneast.org.
Percussion Ensemble
The School ol Music presents a Percussion Ensemble directed by
Jonathan Wacker on Thursday, Feb. 5 at 8 p.m. in the A J Fletcher
Recital Hall. This event is free.
African Storyteller
Shindana Cooper, an African Storyteller, will give a presentation on
Friday, Feb. 6 at 7 p m in the MSC Great Room
Jazz Concert
The School ol Music presents the ECU Jazz Ensemble A and the ECU
Wind Ensemble in Concert directed by Carroll V. Dashiell Jr. and Scott
Carter on Friday. Feb. 6 at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. This event is free.
Top Fives
Top five albums
1 SpeakerboxxxThe Love Below. OutKast
2 The Very Best ofSheryl Crow, Sheryl Crow
3 Fallen, Evanescence
4.2004 Grammy Nominees, Various Artists
5 Soulful. Ruben Studdard
Top five singles
1. "Hey Ya OutKast
2 "The Way You Move OutKast featuring
Sleepy Brown
3 "Slow Jams Twisla featuring Kanye West &
Jamie Foxx
4. "You Don't Know My Name Alicia Keys
5. "Me. Myself, and I Beyonce
Top five movies
1 You Got Served
2 Along Came Polly
3 The Butterfly Effect
4 The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King
5. The Perfect Score
Top five DVDs
1 Out of Time
2 Freddy vs. Jason
3 Underworld
4 Uptown Girls
5 American Wedding
Top five books
1 The South Beach Diet. Arthur Agatston Rodale
2 The DaVinci Code. Dan Brown
3 The South Beach Diet Good Fats and Good
Carbs Guide. Arthur Agastston Rodale
4 Angels and Demons. Dan Brown
5 The Ultimate Weight Solution Food Guide.
Phillip C. McGraw
Top five TV shows
1. "The Golden Globe Awards" NBC
2. "American Idol - Tuesday FOX
3 "American Idol - Wednesday FOX
4. "American Idol - premiere special FOX
5. "Friends NBC
Celebrities in court: High-
profile
trial updates
Crime is new trend for
many famous people
TOMEKA STEELE
STAFF WRITER
It seems another celebrity's
charged with a crime every day.
High profile cases are sweeping
television stations, and view-
ers tune in to see What verdicts
will be thrown at today's hottest
celebrities.
You can't go a day with-
out hearing about the trials
of famous celebrities Michael
Jackson, Martha Stewart, Kobe
Bryant and Robert Blake.
A question viewers have is
whether these prominent people
will be able to get a fair trial
given their wealth and tame.
Since celebrities are involved, it
will be hard to find jurors who
don't already know about the
cases or have bias.
Apparently, bias is a problem
in Stewart's trial. Jury selection
for her trial began Jan. 6 and
will continue for two weeks or
until unbiased jurors can be
identified through rigorous test-
ing. Stewart is charged with
obstruction of justice, con-
cerning her sale of stock
in ImClone Systems,
and fraud.
Stewart sold
almost 4,000
shares of ImClone
stock on Dec. 27,
2001, a day before
regulators rejected
the company's applica-
tion of approval for new drug
testing. Many people believe she
knew the application would be
rejected. Stewart faces up to 30
years if convicted on all counts.
Stewart resigned as chair-
woman and CEO of her own
company in June 2003. This was
due to the stock of the company
starting to dwindle from the
accusations made against her.
The company and K-Mart, who
marketed her line, are now doing
every thing possible to dissociate
from Stewart's name.
Perhaps the biggest trial of the
decade is that of Jackson. He was
charged with molesting a young
boy suffering from cancer on
Dec. 18, 2003. The charges also
report Jackson convinced the boy
to drink alcohol and ot her harm-
ful substances.
The nine felony charges
allegedly took place at Jackson's
Neverland Ranch in February
and March 2003. Jackson may
face three to eight years, if con-
victed.
"I believe Michael loves kids
and that he's not a molester, but
at the same time, I wouldn't leave
my kids with him if I had some
said Tiffany Bonaparte, sopho-
more sociology major.
The first day of Jackson's trial
was Jan. 16. Superior Court Judge
Rodney Melville was assigned to
the trial. Jackson showed up 20
minutes late for the arraignment
and was scorned by the judge
who frowns on tardiness and
bathroom breaks.
Jackson pleaded not guilty
to molesting the boy. He cre-
ated a commotion outside the
courtroom before entering by
greeting fans, dancing on top of
an SUV and then blowing kisses
to the crowd. Jackson may have
to endure another trial with the
mother of two of his children,
Debbie Rowe.
Rowe is Jewish and isn't
happy her children are cared for
by Grace Rwarmba, of the Nation
of Islam. Reports claim Rowe
seeks custody of Prince Michael
and I'aris. She also offered to raise
see TRIALS page A6
Closing time for area hot spots
Greenville says
'goodbye' to several
local businesses
LAUREN MASON
SENIOR WRITER
The downtown and restau-
rant scene has changed dramati-
cally in the past lew months with
the recent closings of five well-
known establishments,
Since November, Kohl's
Frozen Custards ami Ohl Brian's
have closed their doors to local
restaurant visitors, while Main
Street Beer Company, The I'ad-
dock and the Sports I'ad have
all left a noticeable absence in
the downtown area. Though
each business closed for dif-
ferent reasons, the total effect
can speak for the ever-changing
economy and dining atmosphere
in Greenville.
The Sports I'ad was one of the
best-known clubs on fifth Street,
boasting an entertainment com-
plex with a sports bar, a karaoke
bar and a dance club. Typically
drawing on the downtown
crowds, many patrons were sur-
prised to hear of its closing after
New Year's Eve. The club's former
owner, Mark Saieed, made sure to
emphasize that the closing was
bv choice.
9"
$
The Sports Pad, a favorite dowtown destination for students, closed its doors in January.
"We chose to sell the prop-
erty for real estate reasons. We
were ready to make a move and
another deal came, so we chose
to sell said Mark Saieed.
In a recent article with The
Daily Reflector, Saieed spoke ot his
30 years working downtown and
his need for a change.
He now manages Emerald
City Billiards in the Rivergate
Shopping Center.
The Paddock was another
downtown fixture that drew in
a diverse crowd with its weekly
shows and open atmosphere.
The primarily gay club was
known lor bringing in people
- no matter their sexual prefer-
ence, and it was recognized as the
best place to "pick up chicks" by
Playboy when they listed ECU as
one of their top 25 party schools
in 2002.
The Paddock was a haven
for the gay community over
the years, and a commonplace
where people could mix, mingle
and make friends.
The recent opening of
Barcode on Memorial Drive
has given the regular Paddock
customers another place to get
see CLOSE page A7
Precautions help to keep ECU students safe
The blue light phones on campus are one of the many ways
that students can help protect themselves late at night.
Tips to prevent
on-campus crime
LENORA BOWLER
STAFF WRITER
Campus safety is not to be
taken lightly. All students of a
large university should recognize
the importance of correct safety
precautions and be mindful of all
surroundings.
ECU lias a large, open campus
that is constantly growing, allow-
ing anyone to come and go. So
just how sale is our campus?
" ECU is a safe campus-it's
as safe as what you make it
said Crime Prevention Sgt. Amy
Davis.
While the police department
is doing everything they can to
minimize the crime on campus,
students have to help out.
Sgt. Davis said students must
be aware of their surroundings,
and the Resident Advisers need
to educate the students on their
floors.
Marie Oliver, Resident Adviser
of Fletcher Mall, said because of
the construction, she feels the
campus has been slacking in
providing protection for students
in the construction areas.
Oliver said she would like
to see police officers around
see SAFETY page A7





PAGE A6
1HC EAST CAROLINIAN � EEATURES
2 04 04
Trump's 'Apprentice' offers
many lessons in business
(KRT)�Location, location,
location. Sex sells. Don't fall
asleep on the job.
Who says there's nothing to
learn from watching NBC's new
reality show "The Apprentice?"
Produced by Donald Trump
and Mark Burnett of "Survi-
vor" fame, the series stars 16
well-groomed, 20- and 30-
something contestants vying to
land a $250,000 "dream (oh" in
Donald Trump's empire. Kach
week, The Donald sends the
two teams, men versus women,
on a "business" assignment:
selling lemonade, creating an
advertising campaign, and,
more recently, negotiating the
best prices for items ranging
from squid to cigars. The win-
ning team receives a reward
such as a tour of Trump's lavish
apartment - and the other is sent
to the board room. At the end
of each episode, Trump barks
"You're fired and points the
loser to the "down elevator
I he show has caught the
attention of millions of viewers,
including some business school
students and professors. After all,
instead of stranding them in the
Amazon or forcing them to eat
pig's brains (really, where's the
educational value in that?), this
show throws the contestants into
the real jungle, the fast-paced,
dog-eat-dog business world.
But could it become worthy of
textbook fodder for budding
entrepreneurs?
"I think Donald Trump
might be giving some feedback
that just might be valuable said
Eugene Muscat, senior associate
dean of the University of San
Francisco's School of Business
Donald Trump plays boss to two teams in "The Apprentice
and Management.
Muscat suggests that students
track the candidate they most
identify with - the Harvard MBA
graduate, for instance - and see
how the person fares. I le doesn't
advocate setting aside an hour a
week to watch it but said that
if there's any lesson to learn,
it could be in the feedback that
each contestant receives.
Kathleen Kane, an organiza-
tional behavior professor at the
same school, said she might use
clips of the show to spark discus-
sion. Analyzing how the groups
interact could offer insight into
building trust and forming coali-
tions, she said.
Certainly, the show so
far has displayed examples of
how not to run an operation.
2 04
i
V
E
AS (CAM.
Trials
from page A5
Prince Michael II - the baby Jack-
son dangled from a German hotel
balcony- whose mother has yet
to be named.
Bryant is on trial for
allegations ot raping a young
woman during his stay at a Col-
orado hotel. His lawyer, Pamela
Mackey, used Bryant's race as
qn,e, of primary reasons he was
accused.
This shocked many people.
Mackey also told the judge
that there is a history of
African American men wrongly
accused of rape by white
women. This is unfor-
tunate since all parties
involved hoped race would
not become an issue.
"I think the sex was consen-
sual. Why would Bryant rape
her when he has girls throwing
themselves at him all the time?
said Victoria Blue, junior English
education major.
Blake is on trial - accused of
shooting his wife, Bonny Lee, on
May 4, 2001. If Blake is convicted,
he'll face life in prison without
parole.
The 70-year-old is free on a
$1.5 million bail but remains on
house arrest. Blake's trial takes
place in February. He hopes a cast
of hundreds will help beat his
murder charges. Blake's lawyer
submitted a list of 670 potential
witnesses to the judge.
With all of these celebrity
trials, there is hound to be
someone who'd document them
in an interesting way. Starz
Behind Bar? is a deck of cards in
which the faces are mug shots of
celebrities. It was created by Ryan
hriesner and Smoky Burns. The
story behind the stars' arrest is
printed on each card.
Bryant is the ace of spades.
This writer can be contacted at
leaturei@theea5tcarolinian.com.
OPEN HOUSE FOR THE DAYTIME MBA PROGRAM:
February 21 from 10:30 am-3:00 pm
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro
Bryan School of Business and Economics
For more information call 336-334-5390,
visit mybryanmba.com or send an e-mail to mba@uncg.edu.
MY BRYAN MBAj
TEC is now hiring staff writers. Apply at our office located
on the 2nd floor of the Student Publications Building.
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2 04 04
5BOBO
204 04
THL EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGEA7
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SIGN UP IN ADVANCE IN THE STUDENT UNION (MENDENHALL 236)
OR 30 MINUTES PRIOR TO THE EVENT IN THE PIRATE UNDERGROUND
RULES AND REGULATIONS
All contestants will need to arrive 15 minutes before showtime.
Poems can be on am subject in any style
No contestant is allowed to have any props, costumes, or musical
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Ilicrc will be a II) miiuilc time limit on all performances.
EVALUATION CRITERIA
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Each winner will receive two tickets to Russell Simmons
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SPONSORED BY POPULAR ENTERTAINMENT AND SPECTRUM COMMITTEES
Safety
from page A5
unlit areas near construction
sites ami at the main entrances
of the dormitories. As an RA,
Oliver said she Is doing her part In
educating the residents on her
hall. She urges them to use
the buddy system and to "never
hesitate to call the police for
ride
Many safety services are
offered for students to use
to their advantage. Including
calling campus police, they
can also call SafeRide, use the
emergency blue light posts or
the university escort service.
The.ECU Police Department
has met and discussed placing
camera surveillance systems
outside of dormitories andor
using the ECU OneCards to
enter dorms. They believe
that these actions will help to
reduce the crime on campus.
Tiffany Kenner, sophomore
undecided major, lives on
campus and said that she feels
pretty safe.
"I haven't really heard about
anything that has happened
Kenner said.
f) Safety Tips:
Top Ten Campus Crime Prevention Tips:
1. Dont walk or jog alone. Walk in well-lit, populated areas.
2. Participate In Pirate Protection. Mark your valuables.
3. Lock car and room doors to prevent theft.
4. Report suspicious activity.
5. Use the blue light phones throughout campus to report suspicious
activity or II you feel threatened In any way.
6. Use the ECU Police Night Patrol Escort Service at 328-RIDE (328-
7433), must show OneCard.
7. If heading out alone, tell someone where you are going.
8. ATM visits should take place during daytime hours, If possible.
9. Do not carry or keep large amounts of cash In your room.
10. Park In well-lit areas.
According to criminal statis-
tics from the Police Department,
larceny, liquor law violations
and drug violations were the
most common criminal offenses
in 2002. The least common
criminal offenses were non-
forcible sex offenses, murder and
forcible sex offenses.
The majority of crimes take
place around 12 a.m. - 4 a.m
usually in dark areas. The Police
Department urges students
to utilize the buddy system
when traveling at night and
remain in well-lit areas of
campus.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Close
from page A5
together, but many will miss
the downtown icon.
Main Street Beer Company
was nestled back in the neigh-
borhoods close to campus off
Jarvis Street and served many
of the students and locals who
lived nearby.
Their relaxed atmosphere
and wide selection of beers
brought in many customers, but
their closing in the past months
has left many wondering what
happened.
"They changed their menu
and nothing happened. They
tried to change from a pizza and
beer place to a more up scale res-
taurant and it didn't work said
Nick I'ittman, senior electronics
major.
Though the restaurant was
well-advertised and often ran
lunch specials for students, the
most recent renovations seemed
to be too much of a change for
regular customers. This could
prove to be a pattern for other
small local cafes in the area that
have to compete with larger
national chain restaurants.
Kohl's was best known for its
custard and other frozen treats,
but the popular (ireenville
eatery closed recently, much to
the dismay of the local custom-
ers. Located in the Red Ranks
Road Shopping Center, the shop
was often difficult to see from
Greenville Boulevard, and may
not have been able to bring in as
much business as needed for the
growing property rates.
The recent changes in
owners at Overtoil's and other
nearby stores may have also
influenced the sudden closing.
"1 didn't know about the
store because I never go back into
that shopping center. It's hard to
find unless you know where to
look, and I can understand why
more people didn't know about
it said Linda Rusnak, senior
accounting major.
Oh! Brian's, found along
Greenville Boulevard, was the
place to get a good rack of ribs
or other freshly grilled meals. Up
until recently, the only obvious
sign of the closing was the lack
of traffic in the parking lot. How-
ever, with the recent additions
of several new restaurants in the
area, Oh! Brian's was competing
with better-recognized chains
and wasn't able to keep their
business.
"I've been to Oh! Brian's
several times in the past few
years, and it was always busy
with a long wait for seating, so
I was surprised to hear that it
had closed said Megan Brewer,
senior hospitality management
major.
With Greenville bringing in
more national chain businesses
to accommodate the ever-grow-
ing city, it is likely that more
local businesses will feel the
economic pressure.
With any luck, the long-
standing Greenville icons will
remain, but expect change for
this typically transient college
town.
This writer can be contacted at
teatures@theeastcarolinian.com.
uJUlIjlj
r�j
warn
GALL: 328-7182
SRC
RIGHTHERE
IRIGHTNOW
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
328-6387
www.recserv.ecu.edu





PAGLA8
2-04 04
KtMMCUMI
ec
SPORTS
RYAN DOWNEY
Sports Editor
TONY Z0PP0
Assistant Sports Editor
sports@theeastcaroHnian.com
252.328.6366
Announcements
Women's tennis splits matches at VCU Invitational
East Carolina University's women's tennis team opened the spring semester
portion of its 2003-04 schedule by splitting four matches in last weekend's
VCU 4-1 Invitational The Lady Pirates defeated Drexel. 4-1. and Georgetown.
3-1. while suffering tosses to 17th-ranked VCU. 4-1. and American, 3-2. ECU
is scheduled to open its home schedule on Wednesday. Feb. 4. against
Charlotte Match time at the ECU Tennis Complex is 2 pm. See chart on
pA10
Sports Briefs
James not voted to All-Star team
LeBron James missed the cut Tuesday in voting for All-Star reserves,
finishing behind Eastern Conference guards Paul Pierce, Michael Redd.
Baron Davis and Jason Kidd The leagues 29 coaches selected the
reserves Shaquille ONeal of the Los Angeles Lakers was among the
Western Conference reserves for the league's showcase event Feb 15 in
Los Angeles Other All - Star reserves for the West are: Dirk Nowitzki of Dallas,
Peja Stojakovic and Brad Miller of Sacramento, Sam Cassell of Minnesota,
Andrei Kirilenko of Utah and Ray Allen of Seattle The other East reserves
are: Jamaal Magloire of New Orleans, Ron Artest of Indiana and Kenyon
Martin of New Jersey
Henson headed to the NFL
Drew Henson has agreed to leave the New York Yankees to pursue a
career in the NFL Henson s agent, Casey Close, told the Yankees the third
baseman is quitting after three mediocre seasons in the minor leagues,
a baseball official said on the condition he not be identified Henson will
forfeit the $12 million he is owed from the contract he agreed to with the
Yankees in 2001, the official said The NFLs Houston Texans. who hold the
quarterback's rights, announced that Henson would work out with the team
on Feb 12 in a showcase for the other 31 NFL franchises
O'Neal loses pay check
Shaquille O Neal was suspended without pay by the NBA, one day after
using obscene language and publicly criticizing the officials during a
television interview The suspension was announced just hours after O'Neal
issued a statement apologizing for the comments he made following the
Lakers' victory over the Toronto Raptors on Sunday O'Neal will serve the
suspension Monday night, sitting out a game against the Indiana Pacers
It will cost him nearly $295,000
Williams and Bulls agree to buyout
Jay Williams and the Chicago Bulls agreed on a contract buyout. Bill Duffy,
Williams agent said the buyout was in the $3 million range Williams had
two more years worth about $77 million left on his original deal Williams
played one season with the Chicago Bulls before he was seriously injured
in a motorcycle accident on June 19 He spent two weeks at a Chicago
hospital before being transferred to Duke University Medical Center, where
he continues to rehab The buyout allows the Bulls to gain a roster spot
and flexibility with the salary cap.
Colorado to investigate sex allegations
The University of Colorados president agreed to form an independent
commission to look into allegations the school uses sex to recruit football
players President Elizabeth Hoffman said that she hopes to convene the
commission in two or three weeks and will take action if it turns up any
impropriety or makes any recommendations After meeting with Hoffman,
state Sens Peter Groff and Dan Grossman agreed to delay plans for a
special legislative investigation, which could include subpoena powers.
The move comes less than a week after the allegations were disclosed in
a federal civil lawsuit against the stale's flagship university
AP Men's Top 25
RankTeamRect
1Duke18-1
2Stanford18-0
3Saint Josephs18-0
4Pittsburgh20-1
5Connecticut17-3
6Louisville16-2
7Mississippi St18-1
8Gonzaga17-2
9Kentucky14-3
10Cincinnati15-2
11Texas14-3
12Arizona14-4
13Oklahoma St15-2
14Wisconsin14-3
15Georgia Tech16-4
16Wake Forest13-4
17North Carolina13-5
18Syracuse14-3
19Texas Tech16-4
20Kansas13-4
21Florida13-5
22Oklahoma134
23Providence14-4
24Utah St17-1
25.South Carolina18-3
Others receiving votes Air Force 116. VanderbiIt 113, Seton Hall 101.
S Illinois 65. N C State 58, Florida St 53, Marquette 49. Dayton 27,
Purdue 26. Charlotte 20, Creighton 17 W Michigan 17. Memphis
10, Hawaii 7 Kent St 4. Rice 4. Illinois 3. Michigan St 3, Iowa St 2.
Vermont 2. Va Commonwealth 1
ECU plans
new facility
Project to start in 2005
Football signing day party
BRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Plans are underway to begin
the process of constructing a new
intramuralclub sports facility for
F.CU students. This is no ordinary
facility however, and according to
Nance Mize, the Director of Recre-
ational Services, the new complex
will be enormous.
"It will be the largest outdoor
facility for intramural and club
sports in the nation said Mize.
With six softball,
multi-purpose, and soccer
fields, six tennis courts, six hat-
ting cages, four basketball and
volleyball courts, two rugby fields,
and one stadium soccer field, the
new athletic facility will most be
breathtaking.
Also in the plans arc a six acre
lake for water sports, a skate park,
Irisbee golf courses, an outdoor
pool, and much more. See the
diagram for a complete outlook
of the project.
The complex is slated to be
129 acres, some 109 more than
the current site for intramural
sports, mount Fields.
Ohio State University will
become a distant second, as they
currently boast a 45-acrc facility
for students.
The facility will be about 4
12 miles away from the heavily
populated neighborhood that �0
Blount Fields is in the middle �f
night games'and abe'tte'r loader Fans wi" 9et a ,irst 9iimPse at tne future of ECU football at the signing party Wednesday.
sound system for playoffs and
tournaments. Mie believes the
new location is perfect.
"We have had a lot of
complaints from people living
around lllount Fields about the
noise level and how long we keep
the lights on Mize said.
"This new facility will grant
us a tremendous amount of
freedom as far as the sound and
lights are concerned
The new complex gives club
and intramural teams more
opportunities to practice and
will allow ECU to host larger
tournaments.
By collecting interest on debt
service accounts and student
fees, money has yet to become
a big issue in the plans. The
initial phase of the complex
which includes the fields and
courts, the restrooms, and a
storage building will cost
anywhere from $6 to $6.5 million
dollars.
Mize believes the project will
cost $30 to $40 million.
Construction is scheduled
to begin in the fall of 2005,
but Mize is hopeful that it can
be completed by that time.
Before construction can begin,
officials must enter the design
stage in which they must hire an
architectural firm to do the design
for the new facility.
After the design phase is com-
pleted, officials will then tcgin
to form committees that contain
faculty and students in order to
gather valuable opinions on how
the campus community would
like the place to look.
If everything goes accord-
ing to plan, get ready students,
because one of the most elite
facilities in the nation is on its'
way to Greenville,
The writer con be contacted at
sports@theeas tcarolinian.com.
ECU Head Football Coach
John Thompson will officially
unveil his 2004 signing class
on Wednesday, Feb. 4, during a
special Signing Hay Party at 5:30
p.m. at the Murphy Center.
The event, held in the Harvey
Hall banquet room, is open to the
public and free ot charge.
Thompson will formally
announce the newest additions
to the Pirate family. A tally
board with details on the sign-
ees, video highlights, and light
refreshments will all be part of
the festivities.
The ECU coaching staff will
also be on hand to meet and greet
fans. ECUpirates.com, the official
web site of the Pirates, will list
complete details of the 2004
signing class late Wednesday
afternoon in conjunction with
the signing day party.
A Saturday full of surprises
Men's and women's
teams shake
up the court
ROBERT LEONARD
' STAFF WRITER
If you like predictable
games, Saturday was not the
day for you. On a day where
ranked teams around the coun-
try lost, ECU provided it's own
surprises as both the men's and
the women's team played host to
Conference USA opponents,
The women were the first
take the court in Minges,
as they took on a defensive
minded Marquette team. The
key to this game was to convert
on every offensive chance down
the floor.
And they did.
The Pirates put up 61 points
on Marquette's swarming
defense as Courtney Willis,
Keisha Anthony and Jennifer S
Jackson all scored in double fig- �
ures. Marquette is only giving
up an average of roughly 56 s
a game, so 61 was no doubt a f
see SATURDAY page Aw Both of ECU'S basketball teams provided drama Saturday.
NCAA basketball season hitting high gear
Kentucky was one of many teams to fall last weekend.
Duke tops
national rankings
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Since the NET. season just
ended last weekend, and the NBA
is never worth watching, almost
all sports-lovers' eyes will be
fixated on college basketball.
So far it has been a year that
has showcased inconsistent play
from the number ones and sur-
prise upsets week in and week
out.
Duke's rise to the top took
a shaky path through the
beginning of the season, losing
to Purdue and almost going
down to a few no-names.
I iiiwcver, since the Purdue loss, the
Blue IVvils have been on a tear,
ripping through the rest ol their
non-conference schedule and
early AC opponents. Though
the Blue Devils look poised
to win yet another ACC title,
they may have their toughest
contest up to date this Thurs-
day night when they travel to
Chapel Mill.
While the Tar Heels have
been struggling lately, Duke has
shifted to high gear, winning
their games by an average ot
21 points during their current
15-gaine winning streak.
However, this is Duke and Caro-
lina - a game where numbers
never have any bearing on the
outcome.
Like the Blue Devils, the
Louisville Cardinals have also
proven their ability to win games
after an early loss in the season.
Opening the season with a
heartbreaking loss to Iowa,
the Cardinals reeled off 16
straight before falling to
Marquette over the
weekend. Steve Novak did all he
11 uld to single-handedly end the
Cardinal streak, dropping 30
points on Kick Pitlno's men.
lor Duke and Louisville, the
hopes of being undefeated ended
very early. It seems like being
undefeated at the beginning of
lebruary would get your team
some notoriety for the top spot
right? Wrong.
Preseason polls, as terribly
biased as they are, secured the
chances of holding the nation's
top spot early on in the season
for teams like UConn, Duke
Elorida and Kansas. UConn (6)'
Kansas (15) and Elorida (22)!
the preseason positioned teams'
now have no shot of rising back
to the top ot the polls.
And why is that?
Because they should
have never received early
see NCAA pageAW





PAGE A9
HI! I AST CAROLINIAN �SPORTS
2 04 04
ling staff will
neet and greet
m, the official
:atej, will list
of the 2004
Wednesday
unction with
�ty.
TEC is now hiring staff writers. Apply at our office located
on the '2nd floor of the Student Publications Building.
� Experience required
� Must have a .( (JPA
ECU announces ticket promotions
for remaining women's home games
It's tke season to
show your (ove
Come to
Sastbroofe
Village Green
(Ipartments
fct
our
XS
"Share Ijotir Weart" Blood Drive
on Friday, February 6tk from 12 tit 51
Save a life and enjoy food fun & free stuff
One Day Only 12 Deposit Oral
Don't miss your chanct to save $$$
Pay only 12 deposit for 2- & 3 bedrooms
during the Mood drive & move in whenever you choose
this Spring or Summer 2004
Jj &OSlfjrOOft Lt. (OffO��M(UBU.Bu�aTiaI�s SUKiAow lOtKSt)
Jfetol�9-&100 gmoifc eAvg@nowait.riet
Visit us at iMvw.eastbroofeviUagegreen.eoin
ECU Athletics has announced
ticket promotions for the three
remaining Lady Pirates' home
basketball games in Williams
Arena al Minges Coliseum.
The Monday, Feb. 2 game
against nationally ranked (No.
13) Del'aul has been designated
as Ian Appreciation Day.
ll Pirate fans may purchase
a ticket to this game at the
Minges ticket window lor only
$2.
On Friday, Feb. 13, the l.ady
Pirates will take on nationally
ranked (No. 21 TCU with a 7 p.m.
tip off. This game is highlighted
by a Baseball Picket promotion.
Anyone who presents their ECU
vs. UNO Asheville baseball ticket
stub to the Minges ticket window
is eligible to receive a free admis-
sion ticket to the game.
In addition, the Take A Kid to
the Game promotion allows any
adult who purchases a ticket at
full price to receive a free child's
Ik kel to the game. Minges ticket
office will open at 6 p.m.
For the l.ady Pirates home
finale of the 2003-04 season
against Houston, three promo-
tions are being offered to I'irate
tans starting at 1 p.m. Senior Citi-
zen Pay allows all senior citizens
(62 years or older) to receive free
admission.
Youth league Day presents
O
Ticket Info
For more information on any of
these promotions, call the ticket
office at 1-800-DIAL-ECU or
252-328-4500
an opportunity to any youth
who wears a recreation, youth,
or church league jersey to receive
free admission when accompa-
nied by an adult.
Finally, all Girl Scouts wear-
ing their uniform will receive a
free ticket to the game on Girl
Scout Day.
TCU to join Mountain West Conference
(KRT) The TCU Board of
Trustees announced today that
the University has accepted an
invitation to become the ninth
member of the Mountain West
Conference, beginning with
the 2005-06 academic year. In
so doing TCU will be joining
with the United States Air Force
Academy, Hrigham Young Uni-
versity, Colorado State Univer-
sity, University of New Mexico,
University ot Nevada - Las Vegas,
San Diego State University, Uni-
versity of Utah and University of
Wyoming.
In making the announce-
ment, Hoard Chairman John
V. Roach said, "We studied the
pros and cons very carefully.
After taking all the (actors into
consideration as best we can,
our decision is based on what
we believe to be in the best
long-term interest of the overall
institution
Athletics I )i rector Kric flyman
echoed Chairman Roach's com-
ments and added, "Conference
alignment is a very difficult
issue al this lime in the history of
Intercollegiate athletics and lots
of people have debated the pros
and cons of movements all over
the country. Conference USA
helped elevate us to where we
are today and our experience in
the league was overwhelmingly
positive. I lowever, for us now the
debate is over. We look forward
to new and exciting opportu-
nities in the Mountain West
Conference as we continue to
build our nationally prominent
TCU Athletic Director Eric Hyman announced that the University
will become a member of the Mountain West Conference.
athletics program
The Mountain West
Conference was conceived on
May 26, 1998. The cornerstone
of the conference's formation
was the maintenance of long
standing athletic rivalries among
its member institutions. Hence
the Mountain West Conference
was formed, located in Colorado
Springs, Colo when the MWCs
doors opened for business the
new league had in place a seven-
year contract with ESPN, giving
the broadcaster exclusive national
television rights to MWC football
and men's basketball; and three-
year agreements to send the
league's football champion to
the Liberty Howl and a second
team to the Las Vegas Bowl.
The Conference officially
began operations on July 1, 1999.
Prior to opening it doors an exec-
utive committee was established
and named Craig Thompson
commissioner. Thompson had
less than one-year to name the
new league, settle on a city to
serve as the league's headquar-
ters, find a television partner,
arrange for bowl tie-ins, hire
staff, and develop a logo.
TCU Chancellor Victor
Boschini said, "I am extremely
excited about the opportunities
ahead in the Mountain West
Conference, but we also need to
say that we had a great experi-
ence competing with the line
universities in C-USA and with
that association. We leave with
nothing but high regard for those
institutions and will continue to
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2 04 04
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGEA10
o
Tennis VCU Invitational results
NCAA
from page A8
6-1 6-0
6-1 6-1
6-2 6-1
6-4 6-4
6-0 6-0
ECU 4, Drexel 1
Individual scores not available
VCU 4, ECU 1
Singles
1 Silvia Unkova (VCU) det Kirstin Buchanan (ECU)
2 Olga Borisova (VCU) def Raluca Baicu (ECU)
3 Cristina Gago (VCU) def Cristina Meilicke (ECU)
4 Gillie Bailey (ECU) def Diana OCampo (VCU)
Doubles
Cristina ArhbasCamille Ripert (VCU)
def Ashley PerkmsonSara Boseman (ECU)
ECU 3, Georgetown 1
Singles
1 Kirstin Buchanan (ECU) led Jordan Botjer (GU)
2 Raluca Baicu (ECU) def Lara Madonia (GU)
3 Cristina Meilicke (ECU) def Sana Maiouf (GU)
4 Gillie Bailey (ECU) def Kristin Dew (GU)
Doubles
Nora GardnerEileen Boyle (GU)
def Ashley PerkmsonSara Boseman (ECU)
American 3, ECU 2
Singles
1 Knstina Georgieva (AU) def Kirstin Buchanan (ECU) 6-1 6-2
6-3 6-1
6-2 6-2
6-3 6-3
4-6 6-2 3-2 DNF
6-0 6-0
6-0 2-6 6-4
6-1 6-1
2 Raluca Baicu (ECU) def Sasha Zerkalova (AU)
3 Julia Colarusso (AU) def Cristina Meilicke (ECU)
4 Gillie Bailey (ECU) def Ashley Wroten (AU)
Doubles
Brandi KligmanRachael Honig (AU)
def Ashley PerkmsonSara Boseman (ECU)
6-1 6-0
consideration from the
beginning. I'reseason polls
may cost a team like St.
Joseph's a number one seed in
the NCAA tournament. Both
St. Joe's and Stanford had
to climb their way to the
top of the rankings and
still have not attained the
number one spot. Duke lost
earlyonintheseason.but madeit
back to the top.
The way college basketball
is handled in the beginning
of the season and throughout
the remainder of the year
may never change, but the
excitement will always
be there. Whether it is
five ranked teams falling
in one day, three overtime
games in one night, or just
listening to Dick Vitale com-
mentate on a nail-biting
game, college basketball
will never lose its luster.
Kids play with heart
and passion night in and
night out, striving to earn a
spot in the tourney in
March.
The writer can be contacted at
sports@theea5tcaroiinian.com.
from page A8
Saturday
MlCCeSS. II sou had told me our
women would score (1 on the
Golden I agles, I would base said
sou were i rav And that's not
a knock on l( U, just a compli-
ment tin Marquette,
I he second surprise came
with Marquette'i hoi shooting
night. lour players scored in
double figures on route to a
14-poinl victor) I he team's 75
total points was the second high-
est scoring game nl the year for
Manuette. Onl) one point shy of
matching the season high of 76.
I be Golden I aglet arc like all
other defensive minded teams,
if they could heal you 1-0. they
would probably take It, so scoring
75 was a maor shock.
The third surprise, DO doubt
the best news about the game,
wasthectowd Ovei l,500pople
showed up to cheer on the ladies.
I he game .is run teles iscil
around the area I he women
deserve It; they play with great
emotion, and are Inn to watch.
The tirst oddity in the men's
game came bilnrr the tip off.
With Gabriel Mtkulasoul tor the
scis. riandt ores Rouse sidelined
as will, the las up drills gave me
the impression that some players
SHAKE THE CHILL WITH SDME HOT
FUN FROM ECU RECREATIONS!
Spring Leagues now forming
were still in the locker room, but
that was not the case; the team
looked that thin.
With only nine of the
potential 12 players dressed
(freshman Keith Foster remains
academically ineligible), the
Pirates knew they had to stay
out of foul trouble and remain
fresh. In addition to the shock of
only seeing nine players dressed,
Head Coach Bill Herrion started
a new lineup.
freshman Mike Cook, who
has emerged as a big scoring
threat, started at the point
ahead of fellow freshman lal'het
McNeil.
That wasn't that big of a
shock considering how well
Cook has played. But Herrion
wasn't done throwing curve
balls. Freshman Frank
Robinson saw his first start
of the year at the shooting guard
ahead of Belton Rivers. The rest
of the lineup was the same, so no
shake up there.
1 thought that Herrion is
either trying something new,
or is sending a message to his
team. This five proved to have
an amazing start. I was by far the
best start of an ECU basketball
game I've ever seen.
Two and a half minutes into
the game, the Pirates had forced
two turnovers including one on a
charge call. Del'aul's head coach
received a technical foul, giving
F.rroyl Bing two free throws and
ECU the ball.
Bing would make both shots
and eventually hit a three to
extend the Pirates' lead to 12-
2. The hot start was the biggest
surprise on Saturday. Unfortu-
nately, the next .17 and one-half
minutes proved to be more of an
unwelcome surprise as DePaul
won 70-65.
Another strange develop-
ment tor the men was the tirst
man off the bench. It wasn't
McNeil or Rivers as I expected.
Three-point sniper Luke McKay
was the first to check into the
game, and scored nine points, all
from behind the arc.
His shooting ability drew the
defense to him all night and left
one on one match-ups down low.
hat will factor in largely in this
team's ability to win for the rest
ot the year.
The writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Thursday Night League (max 4 person teams)
Registration Feb. 3rd at 6 p.m. in the Bowling Alley
League play begins Feb. 5th at 7 p.m.
TALK IS CHEAP!
LET YDUR SKILLS DD THE TALKING
Hours:
MonWed. 9 a.m-11:30 p.m.
Thur. 9 a.m-12:30 a.m.
Fri 1p.m1:30 a.m.
Sat 12noon-1:30 a.m.
Sat. lp.m-11:30 p.m.
.500 Change Games
Sunday 1-6 (plus .50C shoe rental)
Dollar Daze
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 1-6
plus .50C shoe rental)
For more info, contact the Recreations Office at 328 4738
TEC is now hiring staff writers. Apply at our office located
on the iind floor of the Student Publications Building.
� Experience required
� Musi have a 2.0 (iPA
flswS





PAGE A1'
� 1lf IA3T CAMX'NIAN
20404 immediately. (252)258-6622.
3 BR, 2 BA, all appliances, fenced
backyard, large bonus room, utility
shed, three blocks behind ECU
football stadium. !900.00mo Call
756-8137 or 412-1696.
CLASSIFIEDS
TO PLACE AN AD
Come by The East Carolinian office
on the second floor of the Student Publications Building
(above the cashiers, office)
Monday - Friday, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
RATES
Students (w valid ID) $2 for 25 words or fewer
Non-students $4 for 25 words or fewer
5c per word over 25
All classified ads must be prepaid.
DEADLINES
Thursday at 4 p.m. for the next Tuesday's paper
Friday at 4 p.m. for the next Wednesday's paper
Monday at 4 p.m. for the next Thursday's paper
FOMfll
34 BR house, walk to ECU, pets
negotiable. $750.00mo. Available
Immediately. 341 -9947 or 355-7939.
Sublease for one bedroom in Pirate's
Cove. Rent for 300 instead of 360.
Call immediately 252-312-5859.
Female only.
Townhouses for rent: Cannon
and Cedar Court- 2 bedrooms,
! 1 12 bath. Free basic cable
i with some units. Close to ECU.
I For more information contact
j Wainright Property Management
I 756-6209.
SPinebrook Apt. 758-4015- 1 St 2
I BR apts, dishwasher, GD, central
air St heat, pool, ECU bus line, 9 or
12 month leases. Pets allowed. Rent
Includes water, sewer, Si cable.
�1 Spring Break Vacationsl
Jancun, Jamaica, Acapulco,
lahamas, & Florida. Best Parties,
lest Hotels, Best Pricesl Croup
�Discounts, Organizers Travel Free!
Space is limited! Book Now & Save!
11-800-234-7007. www.endlesssum
Imertours.com
Duplexes for rent: 2 St 3 bedrooms,
L?nd Street, Lewis Street and College
lowne Row. Close to ECU. Pet
with fee at some units. For more
information contact Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
House for rent: 204 13th Street- 3 BR,
2 BA close to ECU. Short term lease
available. Small pet allowed with
fee. For more information contact
Wainright Property Management
756-6209.
For rent- 2 bedroom, 1 bath, brick
duplex, Stancill Drive. Walking
distance to ECU, central air. $525
month. Pets OK wfee. Call 353-2717
or 353-2713.
Apartments for rent: 1, 2 St 3
bedrooms, Beech Street Villas,
Cypress Gardens, Cotanche Street,
Gladiolus, jasmine, Peony, Woodcliff,
Forest Acres, Wesley Commons, Park
Village. All units close to ECU. Water
and sewer included with some
units. For more information contact
Wainright Property Management
756-6209.
For rent- 2 bedroom, 1 bath, brick
duplex, Stancill Drive. Walking
distance to ECU. Central air. $525
month. Pets OK wfee. Call 353-2717
or 353-2713.
$475 Large 1 BR apt. with fireplace,
24-hour workout facilities,
cable, quiet neighborhood.
No undergraduates. Renting
pinebrook apt. 758-4015- 1St2
BR apts, dishwasher, GD, central
air St heat, pool, ECU bus line,
9 or 12 month leases. Pets allowed.
Rent includes water, sewer,
St cable.
Female Roommate needed to sub-
lease apt. � Pirate's Cove for 300
a month. All utilities included. Call
Kristen (252)551-3849 or Melanie at
(919)818-3403.
Responsible Female roommate
needed to share 2 BD1 BA house
2 blocks from ECU. Available
immediately. Furnished or
unfurnished. Call Miranda at 758-
4774 leave mesiage.
Roommate needed to share
2 BR apt. No security deposit.
Free water, cable, washerdryer.
$297mo� 12 utilities. Located
downtown across from Peasants.
Call 252-635-8758 or email
cdaub73@hotmail.com.
Two Female Roommates wanted
to share a 4 bedroom 3 bath
townhouse at Sterling for fall
'04. 'Almost furnished Call for
more details (910)520-5964 or
(252)412-4998
FOR SALE
1983 Knox 14' x 60' Singlewide
Trailer. Partially furnished,
plywood floors, plus more. Asking
8,500. Call 927-2576 or 923-0075
for more info.
HELP MED
Office Assistant: Part-time
Summer Full-time. Answering
telephones, filing and customer
service. Apply at Wainright Property
Management 3481-A South Evans
Street Greenville. 756-6209
Bartender Trainees needed $250
a day potential, local positions 1-
800-293-3985 ext. 306
Help wanted for stock and sales.
Heavy Lifting Required. Apply at
the Youth Shop Boutique, Arlington
Village, Greenville 756-2855.
Are you looking for the experience of
a lifetime? Horizon Camps consists
of 3 outstanding co-ed summer
camps located in NY, PA, and WV.
We are seeking amazing staff to
work with incredible kids. Contact
uswww.horizoncamps.com or 1-
800-544-5448.
BARTENDER TRAINEES needed $250
a day potential, local positions call
1-800-293-3985 ext. 306.
Up toSOOWt. prrKMftNpnaH. Get
paid for each piece. Create your own
schedule. (626)821-4061.
Summer ob in the Outer Banks!
Steamers Shellfish to Go seeking
full-time employees from early
May until end of August. ob
includes food prep, expediting,
steaming, andor cashiering.
Housing available. Contact Matt
at 916-7345.
The Greenville Recreation St Parks
Department is recruiting part-
time youth soccer coaches for the
indoor soccer program. Applicants
must possess a good knowledge of
soccer skills and have the ability
and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 3-18 in soccer
fundamentals. Hours are from 3:30
pm to 9 pm, Monday-Friday with
some weekend coaching. Flexible
hours according to class schedules.
This program will run from March
8 to mid May. Salary start at
$6.25 per hour. Apply at the City
of Greenville, Human Resources
Department, 201 Martin L. King
Dr. For more information, please
contact the Athletic Office at 329-
4550, Monday through Friday, 10
am until 7 pm
Food Delivery Drivers wanted
for Restaurant Runners.
Part-time positions (6-12hr
Including tips). Perfect for
college studentll Some Lunch
Time(11a 12p)M F availability
required. 2 way radios allow
you to be anywhere In Greenville
when not on a delivery. Reliable
transportation a must and
knowledge of Greenville streets
advantageous. Call 756-5527 or
check out our website & www.r
estaurantrunners.com. Sorry no
Dorm Students.
GflEEtiPtflSOHflLs
ADPI'S "Heart to Heart Social" Spring
Recruitment Feburary 5th, 4:00-7:00
� ADPi House. Call for a ride: 758-
5447.
01HFH
Full Time Students Stop wasting
your Time and Talents on PT jobs
with bad hrs. St pay LOOKI For
1 weekend a month the National
Guard wants you to go to college,
FREE TUITION! Learn a job
skill St stay a student! FT students
get over $800mo In Education
Benefits S� PAY for more info, call
252-916-9073 or visit www.1-800-
GO-GAURD.com
1 Spring Break Vacations! Cancun,
lamaica Acapulco, Bahamas, h Florida.
Best parties. Best Hotels, Best Prices!
Group Discounts, Organizers Travel
Free! Space is limited! Book Now Si
Save! 1-800-234-7007. www.endles
ssummertours.com
ART.
ASK FOR
MORE.
-r�r-
Fur more information about the
iniportanoB of art education, ploaae otnUct
www AmericansForTheArts org.

AMERICANS
"ARTS
FREE
� i�t XH�r maintenance response
� of imrcitiriied phone calls
� of note) neighbors
� of crawlJ criliers
� Of high lltilit) hills
� of ECU parking hassles
�Of ungrateful landlords
� ol unanswered questions
� of high rents
� ol grumpv personnel
� ol unlullilled promises
�ol units that uere noi cleaned
� ol walls that were never painted
� ol appliances thai don't work
W y mlh.iiii Court &
Kustgate Village Apts.
3200 V Moselev Dr.
561-RENT or 531-9011
nwn.piimaclepropertv
managcmcnt.com
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Crossword
ACROSS
1 Exchange
5 Butterfly snare
8 Fitting
14 Stadium level
15 Olympic "Dream
Team"
16 Interior lining of
eyes
17 Eradicated
19 Proclamations
20 Fatalities
21 Network of
"Nature"
23 Pass over
24 Thanksgiving
guest of honor?
25 Angler's rods
27 Expert
28 Show teeth
30 Sketched out
32 Long period of
time
33 Modestly
34 Field research
36 Struck out
40 Current-
measuring
instruments
42 "Norma"
43 Bishop's aides
46 Overdo the TLC
47 First of a count
48 Laurel and Mikita
49 Scottish cap
50 Small bottle
52 Part of TGIF
53 Asiatic deer
56 Motionless
58 Deceptive
60 Premier passive
protester
61 Also
62 A single time
63 Composilions
64 Slangy
affirmative
65 Loch for
monsters
DOWN
1 Ornamental
button
2 Rub over
3 Ventilating
4 Positive particle
5 Bonkers
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6 Wind dir.
7 PoJliwog
8 Oscar-night VIPs
9 Carmine, e.g.
10 Elevator man?
11 Nag
12 Lure
13 Spoke roughly
18 Resistance
measure
22 Vision restrictors
25 Ate like a
chicken
26 Offers to buyers
28 Solidify
29 Caviar base
30 Skin problem
31 Gobs'
agreement
33 Cupolas
35 Open hostilities
37 Brass
instrument
38 Take in food
39 Sandra or Ruby
41 State ol being on
edge
Solutions
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43 Unusually tall
seasoning plant
44 Loos and Louise
45 Eats one's heart
out
46 Eurasian plum
49 Greek letter
51 Clytemnestra's
mother
53 Swill
54 Circle parts
55 bread choices
57 Reticent
59 Bud's sidekick
CAPTAIN RlBMAN Team Captain RibMan
by SprengelmeyerS Davis
Captain ribman has the awesome
responsibility of assembling a staff
for the office of chief vigilante.
I AM PROUD
TO ANNOUNCE MY
FIRST APPOINTAAJNTS.
IVe RECRUITED THE
BEST PEOPLE TO
ADVANCE Mi
CRIME-FIGHTING
AGENDA
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IN CHARGE
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ROM UNFLATTERING
PRESS COVERAGE,
IS REX "PAPPA'
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HEADING UP
THE DEPARTMENT
MAKE-UP ANO BLEMISH
MANAGEMENT IS
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IS MY STINKING RICH
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PAGFA12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
2-04-04
'Penates @we
APARTMENT COMMUNITY

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Gilt
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detect!
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Sunday 12 a.m. - 5 p.m.
252.752.9995
www.piratescoveapartments.com
On ECU Bus Route
3305 E. 10th St.
k
Tl


Title
The East Carolinian, February 4, 2004
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 04, 2004
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1701
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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