The East Carolinian, November 7, 2006












EastCarolinian
VOLUME 82, ISSUE 26
www.theeastcarolinian.com
YOUR SOURCE
FOR CAMPUS
NEWS SINCE 1925
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 7, 2006
The School of Theatre
and Dance present
Hedda Gabler.
Find out what this
performance is all
aboutPageA6
This Week in Health:
Insomnia. Not being
able to sleep can be
a huge problem for
college students. Find
out more about getting
a better night's sleep
PageA6
Brandon Fractious'
new career-high of
128 yards on 23
carries helped to
propel ECU to a 23-10
win over UCF. Read
the sports section to
see how the defense
helped carry a
sputtering offense for
a second week in a
rowPage A8
Despite losing a i
heartbreaker in
the conference
tournament, the
women's soccer team
has a bright future.
Read the sports front
page to see why the
women are excited for
2007PageA8
3 9 51 2 84 7 6
17 85 6 49 2 3
4 2 67 3 95 8 1
2 5 93 176 4 8
6 3 18 4 27 9 5
7 8 46 9 53 1 2
8 6 34 7 12 5 9
5 4 29 8 31 6 7
9 1 72 5 68 3 4
Test your skills at
SuDoKuPage All
NEWSPageA2
PULSEPageA6
SPORTSPageA8
OPINIONPageA4
CLASSIFIEDSPageAII
Project utilizes information to aid in disaster planning
Natural disasters are financially and emotionally draining. With the help of RENCI, ECU strives to accumulate information that could lessen the suffering
of thousands of people on the east coast of the U.S. so that when a hurricane rips through Greenville, results like these may not be so traumatic.
ECU works with RENCI
on research
BENJAMIN CORMACK
STAFF WRITER
In an effort to provide informa-
tion on planning for and respond-
ing to natural disasters like hur-
ricanes and floods and developing
more comprehensive disaster
plans, the Renaissance Computing
Institute will be working in coali-
tion with ECU.
This means that ECU research-
ers will soon be able to synthesize
their data on natural disasters and
emergency planning with institu-
tions across the state.
Through a three year, $1.7
million grant from the Chapel
Hill based Renaissance Comput-
ing Institute, ECU will house a
database designed to keep public
health, population and scientific
records that focus on the coastal
areas of North Carolina.
Jamie Kruse, director of
ECU's Center for Natural Hazards
Research, will direct the operations
of the RENCI program at ECU.
Kruse stated that she looks for-
ward to working and collaborating
with colleagues and state officials
across the state to help better plan
for and address natural disasters.
"This project will meld ECU's
research expertise in the area of
human systems and physical pro-
cesses of coastal North Carolina
with high performance computing
and visualization to produce truly
path breaking approaches to disas-
ter reduction said Kruse.
Ernest Marshburn, director of
strategic initiatives in the division
of research and graduate studies
at ECU, said that the goal of the
program is to better understand
the nature of natural disasters
from data about past hurricanes
and how they impacted the area
in order to make predictions as
to what is likely to happen, what
actions would need to be taken
and how to best to address various
problems.
The ultimate goal, he stated,
is to pull together the various ele-
ments that make-up the response
to a natural disaster in a way that
decisions can be coordinated more
efficiently and more effectively.
"If you think about where we
live we're very vulnerable to
natural disasters that aren't of the
immediate variety things that we
can see coming said Marshburn.
"When you know a hurricane
is coming, you have a reasonable
degree of assurance that you're going
to be impacted by that hurricane
A hurricane, as Marshburn
pointed out, has the potential
to greatly affect the economy,
real estate, local businesses, the
environment and even how pro-
cedures for helping people are
carried out.
Lloyd Novick, MD, MPH,
director of the Division of Com-
munity Health and Preventive
Medicine at the Brody School of
Medicine, believes that the data
will also prove useful for medical
and emergency response.
"The most critical problems
associated with disasters are pro-
tecting the health of the public and
arranging for the ongoing care of
individuals with existing chronic
diseases said Novick.
"The informatics project is a
major step forward in meeting the
health needs of eastern North Car-
olina and preparing for disaster
Dan Reed, director for RENCI,
said he looks forward to benefiting
from the expertise of universi-
ties and communities in solving
problems critical to the region
and state.
"This is our next step in creat-
ing a statewide virtual organiza-
tion that can address issues of
state and national importance
said Reed.
"This is a really exciting oppor-
tunity for ECU said Marshburn,
"It's something that sets ECU
apart from the other schools within
the UNC school system and is a
source of pride; something that
we can be proud of that we've
accomplished. It provides a tre-
mendous research opportunity
for the university, the faculty and
the students and it's a type of
research and research resource
that wouldn't be available any-
where else
Other RENCI locations will
open soon at UNC Asheville,
N.C. State University, Duke Uni-
versity and UNC Chapel Hill.
"These sites will bring a new
core of university and community
expertise to bear on important
problems that can't be solved by
one campus, one discipline or one
region of the state Reed said.
Other ECU researchers
involved in the RENCI project
include Wayne Cascio, professor
of cardiology at the Brody School
of Medicine; Ron Mitchelson, chair
of geography; Rick Ericson, Chair
of economics; Enrique Reyes, pro-
fessor of biology; Lee Bartolotti,
professor of chemistry; and Jeff
Johnson, professor of sociology.
The RENCI program at ECU
will open in the Rivers Building
by early 2007. The center will
be equipped with high-resolution
displays for scientific modeling and
visualization, audiovideo equip-
ment and network connections to
other RENCI sites and national
research networks. The site will
also have use of a vehicle designed
to showcase new technologies and
bring educational, economic devel-
opment and training programs to
surrounding communities.
More information about
RENCI is available at renci.org.
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian.com.
Student fees on the
rise once again
Projected goals for fee
increase presented to
attendees
KIMBERLY BELLAMY
STAFF WRITER
A PowerPoint presentation out-
lined the breakdown of fee increases
for the 2007-2008 academic year at
the student fee forum that was held
on Thursday, Nov. 2, 2006 in Hen-
drix Theater.
Derek Pantiel, president of the
association of student governments,
board of governor
members, members
of SGA, students
and others that
could influence the
outcome of the fee
increase were pres-
ent at the forum that
lasted from 5:30-
7:00 p.m.
The PowerPoint
described the pur-
pose of the increase,
and provided the
worst case scenario
of a 6.5 percent
increase, or $236.
"President
Bowles is asking for
fall funding from
the legislature, the
more funds allot-
ted, the less the
university has fo
pay said Pantiel.
Jones explained
that the target is not
to have an increase
that is any higher
than five percent.
The 6.5 cap
is based on the
amount that can
be applied over a
four year period
and was proposed
by Erskine Bowles,
the president of
the UNC system,
according to Pantiel.
According to
Pantiel, the worst
case scenario of the increase over
the next four years would be $1,481
for 2006-2007, $1,564.98 for 2007-
2008, $1,804.42 for 2008-2009, and
1,899.67 for 2009-2010.
According to the facts presented
in the PowerPoint, the increase will
provide about 50 percent funding
for university purposes, 25 percent
Tuition and fee comparisons
In-state tuition tor 2006-
2007: $2,335
In-state tuition tor 2007-
2008: $2,431
Fees for 2006-2007:
$1,668
Fees for 2007-2008:
$1,958
Ledonla Wright Cultural
Center: $1 increase
$15 to $16
Athletics: $50 increase
$436 to $486
Student Health Fee:
$20 increase
$200 to $220
Educational and Technol-
ogy: $8 increase
$137 to $145
Campus Recreation
and Wellness Fee: $43
increase
$178 to $221
Mendenhall Student Center:
$20 increase
$200 to $220
Student Activities Program
Fee: $0.50 increase
$49 to $49.50
for need base financial aid, and 25
percent for faculty salaries.
The fees will directly affect eight
different committees or entities on
campus including Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, Education and Technol-
ogy, Health Services, Recreational
Services, Athletics, Transit, Ledonia
Wright Cultural Center and Adult
Commuter Services.
Examples of the exact increase
amounts for 2007-2008 for each of
these parts of the university was also
provided at the forum.
Some of the reasons that were
provided for the increase included
the getting funding
to increase faculty
salaries, making
expansion the uni-
versity, the 5 per-
cent inflation rate
and the debt service
fee.
The Power
Point also outlined
the positive things
that the current
fees are providing
currently such as
the lowest educa-
tion and technol-
ogy fee in the state,
and providing the
most transit routes
across the state.
The turn-
out for the forum
wasn't has high as
expected but those
that attended got
to engage in a ques-
tion and answer
period.
Issues such as
how the fees will
affect out of state
students were men-
tioned and whether
or not it will pro-
vide funds for day-
care services.
Although the
turnout for the
forum wasn't as high
as expected, the
members of SGA
were pleased with
the amount of input they received and
reminded everyone of the next forum.
"We will vote as a student body
on Nov. 13 and you can voice your
opinions and make a difference
before Dec. 13 Jones said.
This writer can be contacted at
news9theeastcarolinian.com.
Attendees of the session were able to partake in various relaxation and spiritual exercises like the one shown here.
Wellness Japan educates
students, community
Reaping the benefits
of Japanese methods
ADELINE TRENTO
STAFF WRITER
Last Thursday, Nov. 2, ECU
students had the chance to learn
about alternative Japanese health
methods at Wellness Japan, a
seminar put on by ECU's Japan
Center East.
The seminar, which took
place at the ECU School of Nurs-
ing, was held to teach students
new ways to live a healthier
lifestyle.
According to a Hyer for the
event, "The Wellness Japan
program is designed to educate
people to become more health
conscious by introducing them
to trendy as well as traditional
Japanese methods of wellness
Students attending Wellness
Japan were shown Japanese relax-
ation and exercise techniques
along with alternative medical
treatments for common problems.
Students were educated about
karate, Reiki, Shiatsu acupressure,
I
power eating and acupuncture.
Participants were taught new
techniques to reduce stress with
Shiatsu and Reiki, and ways to
eat healthier by adding different
Japanese foods to their diet.
Students were also shown a
new way to exercise through karate
and they learned about different
pressure points for acupuncture.
"I thought the seminar was
really informative said Lindsay
Morton, junior nursing major.
"It was pretty interesting to
learn about different Japanese
medical treatments, like Shiatsu
acupressure to relieve stress
Morton said.
"I think it's good for students
to learn new ways to reduce
stress and stay healthy
Wellness Japan offered stu-
dents a chance to listen to expert
speakers and volunteer to try
some of the relaxation tech-
niques.
Many of the topics discussed
at the seminar offered hands-on
activities to get the students
involved and interested in some
of the Japanese methods.
Students were also able to
sample Japanese health food, such
as notto, an energizing food made
from fermented soybeans.
Although the event was $7 for
students, many people attended
the seminar and most felt it was
worth the money.
"I definitely think it was
worth it said Morton.
"We got to listen to really
educated speakers and learn about
different health techniques that I
had never even heard of before
ECU's Japan Center East
plans to hold more educational
seminars in the future.
They will sponsor a tradi-
tional Japanese tea ceremony in
January for students that wish
to learn more about Japanese
culture.
Participants will get to watch
a demonstration of the tea cere-
mony and learn about the ritual.
Students that may be inter-
ested in attending this event
can get more information from
the Japan Center East Web site
at ecu.edujapancentereast.com.
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarol i n ian .com.





News
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 7, 2006 PAGE A2
TUES
CORRECTIONS
The coaches' quotes that
in Thursday's edition of the
ECU vs. UCF football pre-
view were incorrect. Both
quotes were placed from the
ECU vs. SMU football pre-
view and the quote situated
next to UCF Head Coach
George O'Leary was actually
a quote from SMU Head
Coach Phil Bennett.
The East Carolinian apolo-
gizes for the mistake.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Pi Kappa Delta information
session
Wednesday, Nov. 8 at 7
p.m.
Professional communica-
tions forensic service will
hold an information session
in Bate 1015 for all those
interested in the organiza-
tion. The fraternity is co-ed,
multi-disciplinary and is
seeking dedicated individu-
als committed to improving
their world while improving
communication skills.
For additional information,
visit pkdecu.com.
Study Abroad Information
Session
Thursday, Nov. 30
In Bate 1028 at 7 p.m.
Phi Sigma Pi will be hosting
an information session for
students who are interested
in studying abroad. A few
students within the organi-
zation of Phi Sigma Pi will
speak about their experi-
ences in such places as
Russia, England, Scotland,
France and Nigeria. This
event is open to anyone who
is interested. Thanks and I
hope to see you there! If
there are any questions,
contact Anna Logemann
at alll217@ecu.edu (have
the subject of the e-mail be
"Study Abroad").
Hedda Gabler
The event starts Thursday,
Nov. 16 and ends Tuesday,
Nov. 21,
It begins every day at 8 p.m.
except Sunday at 2 p.m. in
McGinnis Auditorium.
Less than forty-eight hours
after returning from a luxuri-
ous honeymoon, the former
Hedda Gabler, now Hedda
Tesman, lies dead in the
parlor of her new home, the
victim of a self-inflicted gun-
shot to the head. It includes
her husband, the ambitious
scholar George Tesman, his
doting Aunt Julie and the
powerful Judge Brack, who
seems intent on playing a
very large role in the young
couple's life. Into this mix
comes an old schoolmate
of Hedda's, Thea Elvsted,
who has courageously aban-
doned a loveless marriage in
favor of the passionate part-
nership she has found with
the troubled Eilert Lovborg,
a brilliant thinker who is an
academic rival of Tesman's
and who shares an intense
secret history with Hedda.
ECUARTS.com
VOLUNTEER
OPPORTUNITIES
Nov. 8
Cleaning Day
12 - 5 p.m.
Family Violence Program
Volunteers needed to assist
with cleaning out and orga-
nizing closets. Contact Sara
Munzer at 758-4400.
Nov. 9
Gladiators!
5 - 8 p.m.
Student Recreation Center
Volunteers needed to set-
upbreak down and assist
in running the event.
Contact David Gaskins at
gaskinsd@ecu.edu.
Nov. 17-18
Set-up for Festival of Trees
Starts at 9 a.m.
Greenville Convention
Center
Six volunteers needed to
move trees boxes to assigned
spots on Friday. Several vol-
unteers needed Saturday to
set up trees. Contact Tami
Smith at 328-9337.
7
Tue
8
Wed
Campus & Community
9 Thu 10 Fri
11 Sat 12 Sun 13
Mon
Russian Film Series:
"The Diamond Arm"
Movies have English
subtitles or dubbing.
Bate 2011
6:30 p.m.
Last Conservative
Concert
FRAIL
Pirate Underground
7 p.m.
REBEL STUDENT
EXHIBITION
Emerge Gallery
Open through Nov.
26
Tuesday Sat. 11 a.m.
- 9 p.m.
Sun 1 - 4 p.m.
L.A. Theatre Works:
The Caine Mutiny
Court Martial
Reserve your tickets
now at Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall
Student Center. Call
252-328-4788 for
ticket information.
Wright Auditorium
ACHIEVE: Preparing
to Apply to Graduate
School
College Hill Suites
Conference Room
7 p.m.
Cultural BINGO
$500 Cash in Prizes
Destination 360
9 p.m.
Teaching with Technol-
ogy "Think-In"
This event will provide
faculty the opportunity
to share their exper-
tise using technology
in both face-to-face
and distance education
courses.
Mendenhall Student
Center
10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Freshman Roundtable
The Roundtables are
designed to provide
freshmen with perti-
nent information about
resources at ECU.
Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center
3:30-4:30 p.m.
Gladiators!
Student Recreation
Center
5:30 p.m.
ECU's Brewster Lecture
in History
Professor of History
and Women's Studies
Barbara J. Harris of the
UNC Chapel Hill will
speak at the annual
Brewster Lecture. Her
lecture is "The Fabric
of Piety: Aristocratic
Women and Care of the
Dead, 1450-1550
Science and Technol-
ogy Building, Room
0C207.
8 p.m.
Gideon Yago
Gideon Yago is an MTV
news correspondent
coming to speak at ECU
about the war overseas
and how its portrayed by
the media. Only avail-
able to ECU students,
one ticket per ID.
Hendrix Theater
8-9 p.m.
ECU English Reading:
Down in the Flood
Luke Whisnant, ECU
creative writing profes-
sor, will read from his
short story collection,
Down in the Flood.
Bate 1031
8 p.m.
Si Kahn
American singer, song
writer, speaker and
author of Fox in the Hen
House, Si Kahn, will
discuss civil rights and
community labor orga-
nizing across the south.
Kahn also serves as the
Public Safety & Justice
Campaign Director for
the Southeast.
Mendenhall Student
Center 244
7 p.m.
HarlanBeats
Hip hop artist Harlan
breaks the traditional
barriers of music and
"remind you of some-
one you've never been
reminded of before
Pirate Underground
9 p.m.
Football
ECU vs. Marshall
Dowdy-Ficklen Sta-
dium
1 p.m.
Men's Basketball
ECU Vs. Morgan State
Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum
6 p.m.
Send us your calendar
submissions
Visit theeastcarolinian.
comcalendar to add
your event here.
Pate Conaway Organic
Textiles Workshop ,
Textiles artist Pate
Conaway, present an
interactive workshop
on the importance of
organic materials and
its multiple usages for
contemporary large
scale knitting.
Mendenhall Student
Center Gallery
4-6 p.m.
Global Understanding
with Jacek Teller
Editor of the inde-
pendent publication
Friend Orange, Jacek
Teller is a peace activist
and a member of Iraq
( Veterans Against the
War. The Polish-born
immigrant will share
his unique experiences
in an interactive pre-
sentation that speaks
to the importance of
global understanding.
Mendenhall Student
Center 221
6 p.m.
A Screening from Sun-
dance
American Blackout a
Sundance award win-
ning film by director
Ain Inada, is a provoca-
tive documentary that
explores the historical
suppression of black
voters in the U.S. with
style and intelligence.
Hendrix Theater
8 - 10 p.m.
BRIEFS
Man who pleaded guilty to
aiding Hamas released from cus-
tody
(AP) - The imam of a north
Georgia mosque who pleaded
guilty to providing material sup-
port to the militant group Hamas
has been released from federal
custody and will be electronically
monitored at home while awaiting
sentencing.
The charges and plea agree-
ment involving Mohamed
Shorbagi, 42, were filed Aug. 28
in federal court in Rome, but were
sealed until Oct. 13.
Shorbagi agreed to a maxi-
mum of 15 years in prison, pros-
ecutors said. His sentencing hear-
ing, scheduled for last Friday,
was delayed at the request of both
prosecutors and the defense A new
date hasn't been set.
He had attended Holy Land
Foundation meetings at which
high-level Hamas officials made
presentations condemning Israel,
and hosted high-level Hamas
officials at the Rome mosque at
which he served as imam, prosecu-
tors said.
Hamas gained control of
the Palestinian Authority after
winning elections in January.
S.C. Police investigate second
triple homicide this week
(AP) - A man suspected in
a triple homicide, the second in
the Columbia area in a week,
has been arrested on a highway
in Georgia, Richland County
Sheriff Leon Lott said Saturday
William Harold Jenkins Jr
57, is charged with murder in the
shooting deaths at an apartment
near Fort Jackson, Lott said.
Jenkins turned himself in
about 3:45 p.m. to authorities
in Georgia less than two hours
after Lott held a news confer-
ence about a nationwide search.
Jenkins called the Cobb
County Sheriff's Office, said he
was wanted and waited on the
side of a road to be picked up,
Lott said.At least one of the vic-
tims, Robert Smith, 48, lived
at the apartment with Jenkins.
The woman is identified as
Rochelle Robinson, 25. She lived
about 10 miles from the crime
scene. The second male victim
remains unidentified, Watts said.
Tyesha Johnson, who lives
in the apartment complex, said
she knows three men lived in
the apartment but she didn't
know anything about them.
She said someone else
was shot and wounded
in the complex recently.
Lott said the most recent homi-
cides are not connected to the others.
"We live in violent times
he said. "There's a certain level
of fear we all should have
Couple robs bank to help pay
for funeral urn
(AP)-Federalagentssayacouple
robbed a bank in Tualitan to help
pay for an urn for a relative's ashes.
Authorities arrested Erica J.
Olson and her boyfriend, Darrel
R. Callier for the crime. Both
are 21. Agents say Callier
demanded cash from a teller and
walked out with nearly $2,000.
He and Olson went to a hotel,
wired some of the money to a
relative to buy an urn for Collier's
grandmother's ashes and Olson
took the rest of the money, police
say.
Olson then got her hair done and
played slot machines at a local store.
Investigators didn't link the duo
with the robbery until five days
later when, under questioning for
a series of residential and business
burglaries, Callier confessed to
robbing the bank.
Olson also confessed,
according to court records.
Callier said in a letter penned at
his arrest that he robbed the bank
a time when he was at his "all
time low" and that he has been
sick to his stomach ever since.
The pair were indicted this week
by a federal grand jury and are in
custody in the Clackamas County
Jail on burglary charges. Their
lawyers could not be reached for
comment.
Overseas Condom Production
Hurting U.S. Business
(AP) - Condom production
in the United States is facing
competition from overseas, put-
ting many jobs at stake, The
New York Times reported.
Most of the competition is coming
from Asia, where condoms can
be produced for a fraction of the
cost.
Through AIDS preven-
tion and other programs over-
seas, Alabama companies
have won federal contracts to
produce billions of condoms.
The U.S. government is the
largest donor of condoms in the
world. The Times reported in the
past two decades that more than 9
billion condoms have been bought
by the United States in response to
the worldwide AIDS crisis.
ECU implements new program to encourage diversity
M.A.D.E. for YOU has
first event
BENJAMIN CORMACK
STAFF WRITER
In an effort to encourage
more minority students to enroll
at ECU, the first Multicultural
Appreciation Day Experience,
entitled MADEfor YOU, was
held in Mendenhall Student Center
over the weekend.
High school students from
around North Carolina came to
ECU to learn more about the
university and consider it for their
own college education.
Highlights included perfor-
mances by Black Student Union,
SALSA, and the ECU Gospel
Choir A panel of current ECU stu-
dents was held in Hendrix Theatre
and they answered questions from
the visiting students about what
college life and ECU are like.
Academic Advisor Tara M.
Honesty coordinated the event and
was on the committee that planned
the event.
While this was the first time
for MADE Honesty pointed
out that it was not the first time
ECU has made an effort to appeal
to minority students.
"We normally have a piece
in conjunction with spring open
house, but we wanted to do some-
thing for the fall said Honesty.
"At this point a lot of students
still have not applied, they're still
undecided as to where they want
to attend, but we thought that we
could get a jump-start with them
in the fall to help put F2CU in their
ear. We just want to continue to
make sure that we continually
keep our minority population in
the increase and we don't want it
to decrease. We want a positive
increase
Among the school officials
involved in the event, several
students volunteered to help,
and be on a panel to discuss
their own experiences at ECU.
Leticia Ortega, a sophomore
interior design and social work
major, responded to a question
about ECU school spirit.
"ECU has a lot of school spirit,
no matter if we loose or win said
Ortega. "We're out there support-
ing our athletic teams, out thereat
the football games I've been to
other cities where there's a univer-
sity, but you can't really tell what
university's actually there. But you
talk about ECU and you know it's
the Pirates, it's purple and gold,
and they're proud of it
Braxton Mercer, a sophomore
information and computer technol-
ogy major, told of his own experi-
ence growing up in a single-parent
home.
While his mother did go to
college, she did not finish. This
fact, he says, really motivated him
to succeed.
"It's always been my personal
motivation, ever since I was young
to make sure I was successful in
life. I set in my mind that I would
be successful in college, and that
I would be able to graduate, and
be able to provide for my future
family the things that I may not
have been able to receive as a
child"
"In order for us to continue
to create this diversity on campus
that we have and to maintain it, it's
going to take programs like this
to step in, bring people to campus,
and show them that ECU really is
a great place
Brandon Moore, freshman psy-
chology major said, "By us being
minority students through
social stratification we've already
been marked-off because we can't
live-up to the standards of the
majority, which is mostly Cauca-
sian people. Which is a total lie.
Everyone is equal. It's how you
should make your life. If you take
the lessons learned from your life
and apply them to your life, you
can live as who you want to be.
What's vital to be a minority is
that it's very, very vital to us, our
community as well as ourselves to
educate ourselves about the issues
in society today. We have to prove
them wrong I've proven so many
people wrong. It's so nice to prove
people wrong because their face is
priceless
"A lot of other universities
Honesty said, "have specific things
where they bring in Latinos or
African Americans for that par-
ticular day. By being able to bring
everyone in at one point kind of
keeps it more family like and I
think that's what ECU, the com-
munity of ECU, is sort of like a
family. I'm just hoping that it will
take us to our goal of being able to
bring in more minority students
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian.com.
Bi
thi
Oil
"
-a





TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A3
i Gottha
npty feeling
Get double Jam points for dropping $125 or more into your Pirate
Bucks account before November 9, 2006. The more you deposit,
the more points you get for clothes, electronics, sporting goods,
gift cards, USB accessories, and more.
VW you've twrnb on emPty, y should:
C Rake i double 0a fom-b
www.ecu.edudining
: US. Cellular
PRESENTS THE GREATEST
JffiS SCREENING OF jjjT
FBI willing to go under cover
in Congress if necessary
BURRUS
(MCT) The new chief
of the FBI's Criminal Division,
which is swamped with public
corruption cases, says the bureau
is ramping up its ability to catch
crooked politicians and might run
an undercover sting on Congress.
Assistant FBI Director .lames
Burrus called the bureau's public
corruption program "a sleeping
giant that we've awoken and
predicted the nation will see
continued emphasis in that area
"for many, many, many years to
come
So much evidence of wrong-
doing is surfacing in the nation's
capital that Burrus recently com-
mitted to adding a fourth 1.5- to
20-member public corruption
squad to the FBI's Washington
field office.
In the past year, former
Republican Heps. Duke Cunning-
ham and Boh Ney have pleaded
guilty to corruption charges. FBI
agents are investigating about
a dozen other members of Con-
gress, including as many as three
senators The Justice Department
also is expected to begin seeking
indictments soon after a massive
FBI investigation of the Alaska
Legislature.
If conditions warrant. Burrus
said, he wouldn't balk at urging
an undercover sting like the
famed Abscam operation in the
late 1970s in which a U.S. senator
and six House members agreed on
camera to take bribes from FBI
agents posing as Arab sheikhs.
"We look for those opportu-
nities a lot Burrus said, using
words rarely heard at the bureau
over the last quarter century.
"I would do it on Capi-
tol Hill. I would do it in any
state legislature If we could
do an undercover operation,
and it would get me better evi-
dence, I'd do it in a second
Philip Heymann, who over-
saw the Abscam investigation as
chief of the Justice Department's
Criminal Division during tin-
Carter administration, expressed
surprise to learn of the FBI's will-
ingness to attempt another con-
gressional sting after the outcry
from Capitol Hill over Abscam.
"It shows courage at the FBI
said Heymann, now a criminal law
professor at Harvard University.
1 e said he concluded, after watch-
ing a recent public television docu-
mentary and listening to experts,
that "there is more corruption (on
Capitol Hill) than I ever thought
imaginable" and that a single
FBI sting "might result in very
large numbers of prosecutions
But even without an under-
cover operation, Heymann and
other observers say they have
been pleased with the OOP-
controlled Justice Department's
willingness to pursue old-fash-
ioned investigations, even if
they hurt congressional Repub-
licans in Tuesday's elections.
Nationally over the last year,
(iOO agents worked 'iOO public
corruption cases, resulting in
6.r0 arrests, 1,000 indictments
and BOO convictions, Burrus said.
FBI Director Robert Mueller,
who listed public corruption as his
top criminal investigative priority
when he shifted the FBI's focus to
terrorism in 1200'J, said last month
that the surge in convictions
"sends the message that public
corruption will not be tolerated
Despite the realignment, the
number ofagents working on public
corruption has remained constant.
Burrus argued that the
FBI is "uniquely qualified" to
handle such cases, pointing to
the bureau's political indepen-
dence, exemplified by Muel-
ler's 10-year term. Burrus said
that Alice Fisher, the politically
appointed chief of the Justice
Department's Criminal Division
with whom he confers weekly,
also has "an aggressive attitude"
about pursuing public officials.
"Operation Rainmaker the
FBI's broad investigation of a
Washington lobbying ring, has
already led to a handful of convic-
tions, including Ney's guilty plea
last month. The inquiry was one
reason for the resignation last
year of House Majority Leader
Tom DeLay, R-Texas, who also
faces state campaign finance
charges.
New program for class
registration starting in summer
Students won't have to
memorize registration
codes
CLAIRE MURPHY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
This week's SGA Senate
meeting mainly focused on the
upcoming changes in KCU's
registration systems.
Students are used to going to
their advisors, sitting in front of
the black screen with neon green
text, and getting into the classes
they desire That will no longer
be the case by the time it is time
to sign up lor summer sessions.
That program is no longer offered
as an option to universities.
According to the guest speak-
ers at the meeting, Associate Vice
Chancellor for Academic Services
Don Joyner, Registrar Angela
Anderson, and Elizabeth Han,
who is the training guru for the
new system, the program ECU
will be using is called Banner.
It is completely web-based, and
students w ill have to register for
classes by themselves, Anderson
has been working on Banner for
two years.
According to Joyner Banner
allows students to" audit classes
according to the appropriate
degree This means the system
can recognize a student's rank,
and tell what classes are needed for
the necessary major according to
the catalog belonging to the year
the student entered the university.
Banner is paid for by stu-
dent technology fees, and will
be available through OneStop.
More advertisement for
Banner will be around campus
in the very near future. More
information can be found at till
sisbanner.com.
There were also speakers
on behalf of the Buccaneer, the
campus yearbook. Genevia Hill,
who is the assistant director for
student media, and Mary Ruth
Helms, the Buccaneer yearbook
advisor, say that for the 007 cen-
tennial issue, the staff is looking
for students to apply as writers,
as well as other positions. This
year's issue will be $4R9, includ-
ing shipping and handling.
SGA Secretary Keri Brockett,
a junior child life major, spoke
on a conference she went to at
Embry-Riddle University in Day-
tona Beach, Fla where attendees
were taught how to improve their
student government.
After Brockett spoke. Cole
Jones, president of the student
body, announced opportunities
for different campus events.
The meeting was concluded
under the authority of Speaker of
the House, Jon Massaehi.
The next SGA meeting will
be held on Nov. 13, when they will
discuss student fees. Students are
encouraged to vote.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications
for the position of
GENERAL MANAGER
WZMB91.3FM
for the 2006-07 academic year.
Applications are available in the Media Board Office
(Self Help Building, 301 Evans St. Suite 205A, Greenville NC)
The deadline for submitting an application is
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006
AT 5 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-9236.





News
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 7, 2006 PAGE A2
TUE!
Campus & Community
CORRECTIONS
The coaches' quotes that
in Thursday's edition of the
ECU vs. UCF football pre-
view were incorrect. Both
quotes were placed from the
ECU vs. SMU football pre-
view and the quote situated
next to UCF Head Coach
George O'Leary was actually
a quote from SMU Head
Coach Phil Bennett.
The East Carolinian apolo-
gizes for the mistake.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Pi Kappa Delta information
session
Wednesday, Nov. 8 at 7
p.m.
Professional communica-
tions forensic service will
hold an information session
in Bate 1015 for all those
interested in the organiza-
tion. The fraternity is co-ed,
multi-disciplinary and is
seeking dedicated individu-
als committed to improving
their world while improving
communication skills.
For additional information,
visit pkdecu.com.
Study Abroad Information
Session
Thursday, Nov. 30
In Bate 1028 at 7 p.m.
Phi Sigma Pi will be hosting
an information session for
students who are interested
in studying abroad. A few
students within the organi-
zation of Phi Sigma Pi will
speak about their experi-
ences in such places as
Russia, England, Scotland,
France and Nigeria. This
event is open to anyone who
is interested. Thanks and I
hope to see you there! If
there are any questions,
contact Anna Logemann
at alll217@ecu.edu (have
the subject of the e-mail be
"Study Abroad").
Hedda Gabler
The event starts Thursday,
Nov. 16 and ends Tuesday,
Nov. 21,
It begins every day at 8 p.m.
except Sunday at 2 p.m. in
McGinnis Auditorium.
Less than forty-eight hours
after returning from a luxuri-
ous honeymoon, the former
Hedda Gabler, now Hedda
Tesman, lies dead in the
parlor of her new home, the
victim of a self-inflicted gun-
shot to the head. It includes
her husband, the ambitious
scholar George Tesman, his
doting Aunt Julie and the
powerful Judge Brack, who
seems intent on playing a
very large role in the young
couple's life. Into this mix
comes an old schoolmate
of Hedda's, Thea Elvsted,
who has courageously aban-
doned a loveless marriage in
favor of the passionate part-
nership she has found with
the troubled Eilert Lovborg,
a brilliant thinker who is an
academic rival of Tesman's
and who shares an intense
secret history with Hedda.
ECUARTS.com
VOLUNTEER
OPPORTUNITIES
Nov. 8
Cleaning Day
12 - 5 p.m.
Family Violence Program
Volunteers needed to assist
with cleaning out and orga-
nizing closets. Contact Sara
Munzer at 758-4400.
Nov. 9
Gladiators!
5 - 8 p.m.
Student Recreation Center
Volunteers needed to set-
upbreak down and assist
in running the event.
Contact David Gaskins at
gaskinsd@ecu.edu.
Nov. 17-18
Set-up for Festival of Trees
Starts at 9 a.m.
Greenville Convention
Center
Six volunteers needed to
move trees boxes to assigned
spots on Friday. Several vol-
unteers needed Saturday to
set up trees. Contact Tami
Smith at 328-9337.
7
Tue
8
Wed
9 Thu 10 Fri 11 Sat 12 Sun 13
Mon
Russian Film Series:
"The Diamond Arm"
Movies have English
subtitles or dubbing.
Bate 2011
6:30 p.m.
Last Conservative
Concert
FRAIL
Pirate Underground
7 p.m.
REBEL STUDENT
EXHIBITION
Emerge Gallery
Open through Nov.
26
Tuesday Sat. 11 a.m.
- 9 p.m.
Sun 1 - 4 p.m.
L.A. Theatre Works:
The Caine Mutiny
Court Martial
Reserve your tickets
now at Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall
Student Center. Call
252-328-4788 for
ticket information.
Wright Auditorium
ACHIEVE: Preparing
to Apply to Graduate
School
College Hill Suites
Conference Room
7 p.m.
Cultural BINGO
$500 Cash in Prizes
Destination 360
9 p.m.
Teaching with Technol-
ogy "Think-In"
This event will provide
faculty the opportunity
to share their exper-
tise using technology
in both face-to-face
and distance education
courses.
Mendenhall Student
Center
10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Freshman Roundtable
The Roundtables are
designed to provide
freshmen with perti-
nent information about
resources at ECU.
Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center
3:30-4:30 p.m.
Gladiators!
Student Recreation
Center
5:30 p.m.
ECU's Brewster Lecture
in History
Professor of History
and Women's Studies
Barbara J. Harris of the
UNC Chapel Hill will
speak at the annual
Brewster Lecture. Her
lecture is "The Fabric
of Piety: Aristocratic
Women and Care of the
Dead, 1450-1550
Science and Technol-
ogy Building, Room
0C207.
8 p.m.
Gideon Yago
Gideon Yago is an MTV
news correspondent
coming to speak at ECU
about the war overseas
and how its portrayed by
the media. Only avail-
able to ECU students,
one ticket per ID.
Hendrix Theater
8 - 9 p.m.
ECU English Reading:
Down in the Flood
Luke Whisnant, ECU
creative writing profes-
sor, will read from his
short story collection,
Down in the Flood.
Bate 1031
8 p.m.
Si Kahn
American singer, song
writer, speaker and
author of Fox in the Hen
House, Si Kahn, will
discuss civil rights and
community labor orga-
nizing across the south.
Kahn also serves as the
Public Safety & Justice
Campaign Director for
the Southeast.
Mendenhall Student
Center 244
7 p.m.
HarlanBeats
Hip hop artist Harlan
breaks the traditional
barriers of music and
"remind you of some-
one you've never been
reminded of before
Pirate Underground
9 p.m.
Football
ECU vs. Marshall
Dowdy-Ficklen Sta-
dium
1 p.m.
Men's Basketball
ECU Vs. Morgan State
Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum
6 p.m.
Send us your calendar
submissions
Visit theeastcarolinian.
comcalendar to add
your event here.
Pate Conaway Organic
Textiles Workshop ,
Textiles artist Pate
Conaway, present an
interactive workshop
on the importance of
organic materials and
its multiple usages for
contemporary large
scale knitting.
Mendenhall Student
Center Gallery
4 - 6 p.m.
Global Understanding
with Jacek Teller
Editor of the inde-
pendent publication
Friend Orange, Jacek
Teller is a peace activist
and a member of Iraq
Veterans Against the
War. The Polish-born
immigrant will share
his unique experiences
in an interactive pre-
sentation that speaks
to the importance of
global understanding.
Mendenhall Student
Center 221
6 p.m.
A Screening from Sun-
dance
American Blackout a
Sundance award win-
ning film by director
Ain Inada, is a provoca-
tive documentary that
explores the historical
suppression of black
voters in the U.S. with
style and intelligence.
Hendrix Theater
8- 10 p.m.
BRIEFS
Man who pleaded guilty to
aiding Hamas released from cus-
tody
(AP) - The imam of a north
Georgia mosque who pleaded
guilty to providing material sup-
port to the militant group Hamas
has been released from federal
custody and will be electronically
monitored at home while awaiting
sentencing.
The charges and plea agree-
ment involving Mohamed
Shorbagi, 42, were filed Aug. 28
in federal court in Rome, but were
sealed until Oct. 13.
Shorbagi agreed to a maxi-
mum of 1.5 years in prison, pros-
ecutors said. His sentencing hear-
ing, scheduled for last Friday,
was delayed at the request of both
prosecutors and the defense A new
date hasn't been set.
He had attended Holy Land
Foundation meetings at which
high-level Hamas officials made
presentations condemning Israel,
and hosted high-level Hamas
officials at the Rome mosque at
which he served as imam, prosecu-
tors said.
Hamas gained control of
the Palestinian Authority after
winning elections in January.
S.C. Police investigate second
triple homicide this week
(AP) - A man suspected in
a triple homicide, the second in
the Columbia area in a week,
has been arrested on a highway
in Georgia, Richland County
Sheriff Leon Lott said Saturday.
William Harold Jenkins Jr
57, is charged with murder in the
shooting deaths at an apartment
near Fort Jackson, Lott said.
Jenkins turned himself in
about 3:45 p.m. to authorities
in Georgia less than two hours
after Lott held a news confer-
ence about a nationwide search.
Jenkins called the Cobb
County Sheriff's Office, said he
was wanted and waited on the
side of a road to be picked up,
Lott said.At least one of the vic-
tims, Robert Smith, 48, lived
at the apartment with Jenkins.
The woman is identified as
Rochelle Robinson, 25. She lived
about 10 miles from the crime
scene. The second male victim
remains unidentified, Watts said.
Tyesha Johnson, who lives
in the apartment complex, said
she knows three men lived in
the apartment but she didn't
know anything about them.
She said someone else
was shot and wounded
in the complex recently.
Lott said the most recent homi-
cides are not connected to the others.
"We live in violent times
he said. "There's a certain level
of fear we all should have
Couple robs bank to help pay
for funeral urn
(AP)-Federalagentssayacouple
robbed a bank in Tualitan to help
pay for an urn for a relative's ashes.
Authorities arrested Erica J.
Olson and her boyfriend, Darrel
R. Callier for the crime. Both
are 21. Agents say Callier
demanded cash from a teller and
walked out with nearly $2,000.
He and Olson went to a hotel,
wired some of the money to a
relative to buy an urn for Collier's
grandmother's ashes and Olson
took the rest of the money, police
say.
Olson then got her hair done and
played slot machines at a local store.
Investigators didn't link the duo
with the robbery until five days
later when, under questioning for
a series of residential and business
burglaries, Callier confessed to
robbing the bank.
Olson also confessed,
according to court records.
Callier said in a letter penned at
his arrest that he robbed the bank
a time when he was at his "all
time low" and that he has been
sick to his stomach ever since.
The pair were indicted this week
by a federal grand jury and are in
custody in the Clackamas County
Jail on burglary charges. Their
lawyers could not be reached for
comment.
Overseas Condom Production
Hurting U.S. Business
(AP) - Condom production
in the United States is facing
competition from overseas, put-
ting many jobs at stake, The
New York Times reported.
Most of the competition is coming
from Asia, where condoms can
be produced for a fraction of the
cost.
Through AIDS preven-
tion and other programs over-
seas, Alabama companies
have won federal contracts to
produce billions of condoms.
The U.S. government is the
largest donor of condoms in the
world. The Times reported in the
past two decades that more than 9
billion condoms have been bought
by the United States in response to
the worldwide AIDS crisis.
ECU implements new program to encourage diversity
M.A.D.E. for YOU has
first event
BENJAMIN CORMACK
STAFF WR1TKR
In an effort to encourage
more minority students to enroll
at KCU, the first Multicultural
Appreciation Day Kxperience,
entitled M.A.D.E. for YOU, was
held in Mendenhall Student Center
over the weekend.
High school students from
around North Carolina came to
ECU to learn more about the
university and consider it for their
own college education.
Highlights included perfor-
mances by Black Student Union,
S.A.L.S.A. and the ECU Gospel
Choir. A panel of current ECU stu-
dents was held in Hendrix Theatre
and they answered questions from
the visiting students about what
college life and ECU are like.
Academic Advisor Tara M.
Honesty coordinated the event and
was on the committee that planned
the event.
While this was the first time
for M.A.D.E Honesty pointed
out that it was not the first time
ECU has made an effort to appeal
to minority students.
"We normally have a piece
in conjunction with spring open
house, but we wanted to do some-
thing for the fall said Honesty.
"At this point a lot of students
still have not applied, they're still
undecided as to where they want
to attend, but we thought that we
could get a jump-start with them
in the fall to help put ECU in their
ear. We just want to continue to
make sure that we continually
keep our minority population in
the increase and we don't want it
toj decrease. We want a positive
increase
Among the school officials
involved in the event, several
students volunteered to help,
and be on a panel to discuss
their own experiences at ECU.
Leticia Ortega, a sophomore
interior design and social work
major, responded to a question
about ECU school spirit.
"ECU has a lot of school spirit,
no matter if we loose or win said
Ortega. "We're out there support-
ing our athletic teams, out there at
the football games I've been to
other cities where there's a univer-
sity, but you can't really tell what
university's actually there. But you
talk about ECU and you know it's
the Pirates, it's purple and gold,
and they're proud of it
Braxton Mercer, a sophomore
information and computer technol-
ogy major, told of his own experi-
ence growing up in a single-parent
home.
While his mother did go to
college, she did not finish. This
fact, he says, really motivated him
to succeed.
"It's always been my personal
motivation, ever since I was young
to make sure I was successful in
life. I set in my mind that I would
be successful in college, and that
I would be able to graduate, and
be able to provide for my future
family the things that I may not
have been able to receive as a
child
"In order for us to continue
to create this diversity on campus
that we have and to maintain it, it's
going to take programs like this
to step in, bring people to campus,
and show them that ECU really is
a great place
Brandon Moore, freshman psy-
chology major said, "By us being
minority students through
social stratification we've already
been marked-off because we can't
live-up to the standards of the
majority, which is mostly Cauca-
sian people. Which is a total lie.
Everyone is equal. It's how you
should make your life. If you take
the lessons learned from your life
and apply them to your life, you
can live as who you want to be.
What's vital to be a minority is
that it's very, very vital to us, our
community as well as ourselves to
educate ourselves about the issues
in society today. We have to prove
them wrong I've proven so many
people wrong. It's so nice to prove
people wrong because their face is
priceless
"A lot of other universities
Honesty said, "have specific things
where they bring in Latinos or
African Americans for that par-
ticular day. By being able to bring
everyone in at one point kind of
keeps it more family like and I
think that's what ECU, the com-
munity of ECU, is sort of like a
family. I'm just hoping that it will
take us to our goal of being able to
bring in more minority students
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian.com.
G
B
tr
g
ti





TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, -2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A3
Hi
Got tha
pty feelin
Get double Jam points for dropping $125 or more into your Pirate
Bucks account before November 9, 2006. The more you deposit,
the more points you get for clothes, electronics, sporting goods,
gift cards, USB accessories, and more.
. Stavve
B. Moot oW your Wnd
C. Rake m double Jar ?o'm&
www.ecu.edudining
ou
sliould:
: US. Cellular
PRESENTS THE GREATEST
UfliCE SCREENING OF jf
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2006
TIME:
7:00 PM
LOCATION:
HENDRIX THEATRE
TICKETS AVAILABLE AT:
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
ARRIVE EARLY! SEATING IS FIRST COME, FIRST SERVED!
FBI willing to go under cover
in Congress if necessary
BURRUS
(MCT) The new chief
of the FBI's Criminal Division,
which is swamped with public
corruption cases, says the bureau
is ramping up its ability to catch
crooked politicians and might run
an undercover sting on Congress.
Assistant FBI Director James
Burrus called the bureau's public
corruption program "a sleeping
giant that we've awoken and
predicted the nation will see
continued emphasis in that area
"for many, many, many years to
come
So much evidence of wrong-
doing is surfacing in the nation's
capital that Burrus recently com-
mitted to adding a fourth 14- to
80-member public corruption
squad to the FBI's Washington
field office.
In the past year, former
Republican Heps Duke Cunning-
ham and Boh Ney have pleaded
guilty to corruption charges. FBI
agents are investigating about
a dozen other members of Con-
gress, including as many as three
senators. The Justice Department
also is expected to begin seeking
indictments soon after a massive
FBI investigation of the Alaska
Legislature.
fconditions warrant, Burrus
said, he wouldn't balk at urging
an undercover sting like the
famed Abscam operation in the
late 1970s in which a U.S. senator
and six House members agreed on
camera to take bribes from FBI
agents posing as Arab sheikhs.
"We look for those opportu-
nities a lot Burrus said, using
words rarely heard at the bureau
over the last quarter century.
"I would do it on Capi-
tol Hill. I would do it in any
state legislature If we could
do an undercover operation,
and it would get me better evi-
dence, I'd do it in a second
Philip Heymann, who over-
saw the Abscam investigation as
chief of the Justice Department's
Criminal Division during the
Carter administration, expressed
surprise to learn of the FBI's will-
ingness to attempt another con-
gressional sting after the outcry
from Capitol Hill over Abscam.
"It shows courage at the FBI
said Heymann, now a criminal law
professor at Harvard University.
He said he concluded, after watch-
ing a recent public television docu-
mentary and listening to experts,
that "there is more corruption (on
Capitol Hill) than I ever thought
imaginable" and that a single
FBI sting "might result in very
large numbers of prosecutions
But even without an under-
cover operation, Heymann and
other observers say they have
been pleased with the GOP-
controlled Justice Department's
willingness to pursue old-fash-
ioned investigations, even if
they hurt congressional Repub-
licans in Tuesday's elections.
Nationally over the last year,
(iOO agents worked 2200 public
corruption cases, resulting in
650 arrests, 1,000 indictments
and BOO convictions, Burrus said.
FBI Director Robert Mueller,
who listed public corruption as his
top criminal investigative priority
when he shifted the FBI's focus to
terrorism in 2008, said last month
that the surge in convictions
"sends the message that public
corruption will not be tolerated
Despite the realignment, the
number of agents working on public
corruption has remained constant.
Burrus argued that the
FBI is "uniquely qualified" to
handle such cases, pointing to
the bureau's political indepen-
dence, exemplified by Muel-
ler's 10-year term. Burrus said
that Alice Fisher, the politically
appointed chief of the Justice
Department's Criminal Division
with whom he confers weekly,
also has "an aggressive attitude"
about pursuing public officials.
"Operation Rainmaker the
FBI's broad investigation of a
Washington lobbying ring, has
already led to a handful of convic-
tions, including Ney's guilty plea
last month. The inquiry was one
reason for the resignation last
year of House Majority Leader
Tom DeLay, R-Texas, who also
faces state campaign finance
charges.
New program for class
registration starting in summer
Students won't have to
memorize registration
codes
CLAIRE MURPHY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
This week's SGA Senate
meeting mainly focused on the
upcoming changes in KCU's
registration systems.
Students are used to going to
their advisors, sitting in front of
the black screen with neon green
text, and getting into the classes
they desire. That will no longer
be the case by the time it is time
to sign up for summer sessions.
That program is no longer offered
as an option to universities.
According to the guest speak-
ers at the meeting, Associate Vice
Chancellor for Academic Services
Don Joyner, Registrar Angela
Anderson, and Elizabeth Han,
who is the training guru for the
new system, the program ECU
will he using is called Banner.
It is completely web-based, and
students will have to register for
classes by themselves. Anderson
has been working on Banner for
two years.
According to Joyner, "Banner
allows students hj audit classes
according to the appropriate
degree This means the system
can recognize a student's rank,
anil tell what classes are needed for
the necessary major according to
the catalog belonging to the year
the student entered the university.
Banner is paid for by stu-
dent technology fees, and will
be available through OneStop.
More advertisement for
Banner will be around campus
in the very near future. More
Information can be found at tili
sisbanner.com.
There were also speakers
on behalf of the Buccaneer, the
campus yearbook. Genev ia Hill,
who is the assistant director for
student media, and Mary Ruth
Helms, the Buccaneer yearbook
advisor, say that for the 2007 cen-
tennial issue, the staff is looking
for students to apply as writers,
as well as other positions. This
year's issue will be$49.95, includ-
ing shipping and handling.
SGA Secretary Keri Brockett,
a junior child life major, spoke
on a conference she went to at
Fmbry-Riddle University in Day-
tona Beach, Fla where attendees
were taught how to improve their
student government.
After Brockett spoke, Cole
Jones, president of the student
body, announced opportunities
fiir different campus events.
The meeting was concluded
under the authority of Speaker of
the House, Jon Massachi.
The next SGA meeting will
be held on Nov. IS, when they w ill
discuss student fees. Students are
encouraged to vote.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
The ECU Student Media Board
invites applications
for the position of
GENERAL MANAGER
WZMB91.3FM
for the 2006-07 academic year.
Applications are available in the Media Board Office
(Self Help Building, 301 Evans St. Suite 205A, Greenville NC)
The deadline for submitting an application is
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 2006
AT 5 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 32H-9236.





mion
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 7,2006 PAGEA4
RANT OF THE DAY
Keep your expectations low, your hopes high,
your drinks full and your true friends by your side.
Get one. They're free.
Why can't you just
wash you hands
Take the minute to sanitize yourself
CAROLYN SCANDURA
FEATURES EDITOR
Maybe it is because my parents are very clean
people. Maybe it is because I have been working in
healthcare since high school. Whatever the case, I think
that inadequate hand washing is the root of all illness.
There are so many times that I go into a public restroom
wondering why no one else's mom taught them how to
wash their hands. Not everyone had a mom at home,
so in that case, isn't this something that kids should be
learning in school?
Not washing your hands is disgusting. Next time
you think about walking out of the bathroom without
washing your hands, look around first because you never
know when I will jump out and embarrass you about
how unsanitary you are.
Washing your hands is not that difficult, but some-
times I feel like I am the only person on Earth doing it.
I am not just talking about washing your hands after
you go to the bathroom or if you are sick, but before you
eat, before you touch a child, before preparing food, after
touching a nasty desk in class, after you shake a stranger's
hand any time you are in contact with a surface that
could have germs on it. OK, to some washing your hands
this much may seem compulsive, but that minute or less
that you take to lather up or use your mini bottle of hand
sanitizer, you could be saving yourself from infection.
It is great that I am whining about people not washing
their hands, but maybe an example would be appropriate.
Imagine you are eating at your favorite restaurant
here in Greenville. You sit down for your mealjust as one
of the cooks is going to the bathroom. While that person
is in the bathroom, heshe defecates and walks back to
the kitchen without washing hisher hands, touching
the door handle to the bathroom, the swing door to the
kitchen and then all of your food. Your server, who has
touched that same swing door to the kitchen at least five
times since you have been there, goes and gets your food
that the cook had their hands in and puts it on your table
that was not properly sanitized after someone with the
flu sat there. How many times have you been exposed
to someone else's germs in that SO minute period? All
of that exposure and possible illness could have been
avoided if everyone took a minute to wash their hands.
Hopefully by now, you have thought about your
own hand washing practices and are wondering how to
improve them. Start by remembering that many other
people do not wash their hands and you should protect
yourself by not touching a potentially contaminated
surface. Use a paper towel to touch it instead. Carry a
small bottle of instant hand sanitizer with you if you
know you are not going to be able to make it to the
bathroom to wash your hands. If you are concerned
about the smell, get it from Bath and Body Works and
for the guys, try Purell brand
Last thought - think about where your hands have
been before you put them on your food or in your mouth.
Then think about where other people's hands have been.
Yeah, it is gross.
Some are still Christians
Responding to "Not everyone is Christian"
DANIEL CORBIN
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
The United States of America is a country founded
on Christian principles and beliefs; however, the free
choice of religion is available for every citizen. A citizen
acting on his or her freedom of religion may choose
to follow the faith and practices of Christians (which
includes Methodist, Pentecostal, Catholic, Baptist, etc.)
or he or she may act on this freedom by following the
faith and practices of other religious groups such as
Buddhism, Islam, Hinduism or others.
1 am a Christian student at ECU who is also a minor-
ity. The reason I am a minority is because I actively
practice my religion, unlike many on campus who may
claim to be Christians. This is also an individual choice.
Because I am a Christian, I do not agree with many
practices of other faiths; however, I would never commit
a hate crime against one of them. Let's take Jehovah's
Witnesses for example. Jehovah's Witnesses believe it
is wrong to salute the flag of the United States, or any
country for that matter. However, it would be disgusting
and very offensive if a Jehovah's Witness ever burned
a country's flag. I, as a Christian, would never burn
a Quran just because I don't agree with it, as this is
unethical and unnecessary.
It was pointed out that, "we are supposed to be
attending a secular public school and yet this is not prac-
ticed This is widely practiced. ECU is a public school.
A public place is a location where the public (every race,
both genders, both sexual orientations, transgender,
every religion and so forth) is welconie. Everyone in the
previous list has a freedom of speech in public places.
This means that homosexuals are allowed to speak out
and hand out flyers about a meeting, democrats are
allowed to talk about and hand out pamphlets about rea-
sons for becoming a democrat and Christians are allowed
to talk about and hand out materials about their faith.
As a Christian, it is my duty to talk to people about
the Bible and God. If I was told I could not do that any-
more, it would be in violation of my rights of freedom of
religion because I have the freedom to do that in a public
area. Nonbelievers also have the freedom to express their
beliefs. They even have the freedom to destroy materials
of another faith. Does this freedom then make it ethical
to annihilate a sacred text?
Every day, Christians are faced with pressures
from others to go downtown drinking. It is against the
( linstian faith to get drunk. Are we not pestered to do
things we do not want to do? Nonbelievers somehow are
"pressured" to join the Christian groups on campus. I
don't think so. Handing out a pamphlet is not pressuring
anyone to do anything, however colleagues' and peers'
nagging about how one doesn't go downtown with them
on Thursday nights is pressuring.
As for the "oppressed" individual: Setting the Bible
on fire in the dorm is a fire code violation There is no
excuse for this behavior. Oppressed would have been
dismissed from Campus Living had he set his own
notebook on fire simply because of fire code violations,
not because of a religious issue.
Freedom of religion is available to all and should
be exercised by all. Unethical practices of one's beliefs
should be avoided, and fire code regulations should be
obeyed while violators should be penalized.
SCIENTISTS SflTELEPHANTS kWE
A DMiOPB) SENSE SBHKHTnt
DONKEYS, on ik OTHER HAND.
HEtJE$
WHO KEEK
STARING
BUNKCT
AT ME
IN THIS
WINDOW?
PIRATE RANTS
Why are you so in love with your
boyfriend? He doesn't feel the
same about you. He wouldn't
even let you go downtown with
him on Halloween. Oh, and
everyone knows you still sleep
with your ex too.
Please stop reading over my
shoulder - it drives me crazy!
I understand that you haven't had
anything to eat for three days
because you've been studying
arduously for that anthropology
test, but please, eat pudding
or yogvt, or anything except
crunchy cereal or chips while
the rest of us try to focus.
Guys in sweatpants and
hoodies are not sloppy or lazy,
they are hot!
What if the one you love also
happens to be your best friend?
What do you do then?
Park in-between the lines.
To the staff that keeps the
Rivers building so clean, all of
you are the nicest people I've
ever met. Everyday you tell me
hello and to have a nice day! We
students appreciate all of you!
You know you're a nerd when
you walk to class and think
about how much easier it would
be to get there if you had
teleport and then you realize
you're not at a high enough
level, or enough skill points for
that ability yet. And I'm a girl.
Some art senior should turn
Wright Fountain into a statue of
a nine foot tall unicorn punching
Ashlee Simpson in the jaw. ft
would be more useful that way.
Maybe people would even pay
more attention to the absence
of water.
I remember when politics wasn't
a farce that made the whole
world laugh at democracy. That
was back when Aristotle was
still around.
That's it! As of this morning, I go
off my medication! Homicidal
tendencies not withstanding!
I swear by all that is holy, if
you keep talking to me about
stuff that I either, already
know, or don't care about, I
will attempt to strangle you over
the Internet.
Everyone is a little bit racist
get over it.
Why do guys adjust themselves
in public? Do you think no one's
watching?
To any girl in any residence hall:
Please don't go in the bathroom
without your shower shoes on
you're going to catch something.
Why is it that boys always have
things in their room that smell
like feet?
Have you ever wondered if
your professors are conspiring
against you to make sure you
had tests every day for a week?
I wish my alarm clock would
just shut up.
I love you more. I just wish
you'd realize it, because you
need to stop lying to me.
Have you ever had one of those
days where you wish someone
would just run you over with a
dump truck and just end it all?
Have you ever wondered where
all the socks go that disappear
out of your laundry when they
go through the dryer?
I hate it when I realize that I'm
down to my lastpairof underwear.
I think I'm in love with the meat
guy at Wal-Mart.
My roommate is in love with a
gay guy How do I tell her that
he is gay?
I never had anything against
sororities until my so-called
best friend joined one. Now
she's a bitch and treats me
like crap. Thanks, I hope you're
money's worth it.
I hate my neighbors. Do you ever
sleep? Does your stereo have any
volume besides obnoxiously loud?
How many people do you fit into
your room each night? I can hear
every word of your conversations
and I'm not enjoying them. Shut up.
To the guy who keeps parking
his car in front of our mailbox
stop, it's annoying.
I put used kitty litter in your grill
after you pranked me I just
never told you!
The reason the TEC covers so
much about the Club Hockey
Team is because they win
games! Their record right now is
4-1! Keep up the great work guys.
I think that we have just about
the most beautiful campus in
the UNC system. People say
that Wilmington is great? They
just have lots of grass and
trees and buildings that look
alike! That isn't pretty, that is
uniformed space!
There is a huge difference
between a racially oppressive
group and a group that is
all about lifting people up.
The minority organizations on
campus are for the betterment
of a group of people, not the
supremacy.
Is it bad that we are in the
second half of the semester
and I still get lost trying to find
my classes? Does the fact that
they are all in the same building
give me any type of excuse?
If the student population is
25 percent minorities and 75
percent Caucasian on campus,
can someone explain why
Mendenhall Student Center is
75 percent minorities and 25
percent Caucasian? Something
fishy is going on in Mendenhall.
I thought my cold was gone.
Nope it just moved into my chest.
I'm so glad I have a big brother.
He rules.
My RA does her rounds with her
boyfriend. Real professional.
Does anyone besides me
get happy when there are
piles of crunchy leaves on the
sidewalks?
Captain Planet, he's our hero,
gonna take pollution down to zero.
I think Affirmative Action is
stupid. I like to think I got into
ECU because of my academic
merit, not because I am brown.
I like it when you sit next to me
in class.
Life isn't all about sex. You'd
think by this age people would
have matured past the point of
exclusive instinctual thinking
and behavior. Makes me sad.
JUST ASK JANE
Need advice? Want answers? Just ask Jane.
Dear Jane,
My friend just told me that she
has been self-injuring for a while.
What can I do to help her? I think
she's ready to stop, but seems to be
having trouble slopping. Any advice?
Signed,
Trying to be a good friend
Dear Trying,
I think you've already proved
you're a good friend by not judging
or abandoning your friend who is
injuring herself. Self-injury is scary,
not just for the person who harms
herself, but also for those who
see the results and struggle with
understanding the reasons behind
the wounds.
You write that your friend
seems ready to stop, but if she is
unable to take the first step, you
might have to be the catalyst in
getting her treatment. Talk to your
friend, talk to her family and try to
coerce her into seeking professional
treatment. Self injury is often a way
ofexpressing or coping with painful
feelings and not a suicide attempt,
but harming oneself can take on an
addictive quality and intensify over
time, or accidentally cause more
harm than originally intended. For
her health and safety, it is impera-
tive that a professional evaluate your
friend as soon as possible.
Remember that your friend's
self-destructive behavior has become
a habit for her and she needs your
support, love and good judgment to
help break the cycle.
Sarah
Editor in
Rachel King
News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Eric Gilmore
Sports Editor
Sarah Hackney
Head Copy Editor
Rachael Lotter
Multimedia Web Editor
Bell
Chief
Claire Murphy
Asst. News Editor
Sarah Campbell
Asst. Features Editor
Greg Katski
Asst. Sports Editor
Zach Sirkin
Photo Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Production Manager
Newsroom 252.328.9238
Fax 252.328.9143
Advertising 252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, the fasf Carolinian prints
9,000 copies every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
during the regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednes-
days during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. The fasf Carolinian welcomes letters to the
editor which are limited to 250 words (which may be
edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the right to
edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editor0theeastcarolinian.com or to the fasf
Carolinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, N.C. 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for more information. One copy
of the fasf Carolinian is free, each additional copy is $1.
Quit whining ?
and go vote
JUSTIN SUMMERS
OPINION WRITER
Today, Tuesday, Nov. 7, Americans will once
again head to the polls to exercise one of the most
important rights we possess, to be able to vote
and voice our agreement or disagreement with the
powers that be in our government. We have a chance
with this election for positive change, or we can "stay
the course" as the conservatives would put it.
Our nation is divided over so many serious issues
and it is crucial to vote even if it's only the midterm
elections. In this years elections we are voting on
who will fill 435 seats in the House, 38 in the Senate
and 36 spots are up for grabs as Governor. Also this
year we will vote on initiatives in 37 states, on such
issues as gay marriage, minimum wage and stem
cell research.
Most citizens, such as myself, are optimistic about
this November's election because we are hoping for
a change of control of congress. I am hopeful that
we will see the democrats obtain control of at least
the House of Representatives. The reason is not so
much that I think th democrats have all the answers
rather; I would like to see some oversight brought to
the executive branch of the government.
Bush's presidency has all but for about one year,
enjoyed same party congressional leadership in both
houses of congress. With this convenience, Bush has
had been able to get anything and everything passed
without any troubles and has used fewer veto's than
any president in history. In the media, they have
expressed a general confidence in the democrats to
win at least the House, and maybe the Senate.
Republicans are less than optimistic how-
ever. With the current state of things in Iraq
and a whole host of scandals weakening their
appeal to the Christian right we are not likely
to see the sort of turnout we did in 2004.
Regardless of how you vote, you should at
least get to the polls to exercise your rights.
Its seems that all too often, Americans
opt to sit on the couch rather than to vote.
In the 2004 election, a quarter of Americans
chose to sit at home, rather than to voice their opin-
ion on who should run the country. Out of a group
of 10 or so of my friends, maybe one is going to the
polls today. College students especially should be
energized to vote for the first or second time in our
lives and should make our voices heard. We are going
to be the new leaders of this country soon enough and
should start making an impact today. Whether you
are a republican, democrat or independent it doesn't
matter, just don't be a commie and not vote at all.
Home f i e 1 d
advantage
JESSE PENCE
OPINION WRITER
ECU student fans have taken a bit of a bad wrap
this year. In my experience here, it has been the first
time when an e-mail was sent out to all students
pleading them to clean up their language and show
respect for their opponent and their fans. However, I
attended the UCF game against ECU this past Satur-
day and let me tell you - ECU fans could be a lot worse.
A group of my fifteen fraternity brothers and
some other close friends all went to the tailgate
outside the Citrus bowl, UCF's stadium, about four
hours before kickoff. Nothing out of the ordinary
really happened. People cursed and screamed at
us all the way from where we parked on the street
to our tailgating spot. Instead of bothering me,
it made me feel more like a celebrity since every-
one was noticing me more than anything else.
Inside the game however, was a completely dif-
ferent story. Now I am not saying that fans shouldn't
heckle visiting fans. Its part of the game and should
be expected by every visiting fan who comes into a
game. It also adds to home field advantage when the
home fans scream during plays.
We were all booed inside the game by the loyal
UCF fans, even when ECU was clearly dominating
the game. Even ECU fans were yelling and screaming
and cheering with language that would make their
mothers blush; but hey, that's college football. The
competitive banter continued until the 3rd quarter
when people began to throw things at us. Everything
from French-fries, to empty cups, to empty plastic
beer bottles (which are sold at the game).
So, in the realm of college football games, ECU
does not seem to be too terribly bad when it comes to
the treatment of visiting fans. The cheering and verbal
abuse of visiting teams and fans is no different here,
than it is at UT, where the Athletic Director, Mike
Hamilton, also asked fans to clean up their "embar-
rassing language Whenever young people and com-
petitive sports interact there is going to be events
like the ones seen at both UT and ECU this year.
Any visiting fan needs to go into an away game
experience knowing they will be heckled, knowing they
will be cursed at and just hoping they won't get things
thrown at them that will cause permanent damage.
Letter To The Editor
As an ECU student, I was disturbed by the article
"Not Everyone is a Christian Alex LaRocca did a horri-
blejob of proving any point at all. Mis ideas were skewed,
mixed up and often times wrong. He referred to the first
amendment, which he quoted in his article, incorrectly.
This is a university, not a middle school. Your
authors should know better than to quote something
that they have clearly never seen before. And, it really
upsets me to see that this newspaper would publish
a person who supports arson at all, but especially on
the school campus. Do you think that people in this
dorm were bothered by the fact that someone was setting
fire outside of it? Absolutely.
Beth Nettnin
Undergraduate Student
Criminal Justice
TUES





PAGE A4
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A5
ling
te
East Carolina University
9
FIND OUT ABOUT SUMMER STUDY ABROAD.
Summer Study Abroad Information Session
Monday, November 13, 2006
Mendenhall Great Room 7:00 p.m.9:00 p,m.
Refreshments will be provided.
Meet the professors leading Summer Study Abroad trips,
Find out where you can go and what classes you can take.
EAST
CAROLINA
I MYmsITY
Tomorrow starts here.
For more information, call the Summer Study Abroad office at 328-9218, or e-mail dunnca aecu.edu.





Pulse
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 7, 2006 PAGE A6
TU1
Campus Scene
Horoscopes:
Arias
You're in a good mood, and
that's helpful. There will be a few
awkward moments. Something
you thought would go one way is
more likely to go the other.
Taurus
You're in the center of the
controversy. Listen carefully but
don't budge an inch. Let them
compromise to you.
Gemini
Keep watching the big picture
but don't stumble over the
details. Don't be discouraged if
you have to do something over
again; it's good practice.
cam
You're happy but don't throw your
common sense out the window.
Be practical. If you're in the right
relationship, the other person will
love you more for it.
iM
Don't let your head be turned by
fancy promises about things you
don't need. Keep your priorities
straight, and your values in the
right places.
Virio
Stick with the routine you've
established; you'll make better
time that way. This includes
doing two or three tasks
simultaneously.
Libra
Take a moment to daydream
about the far-away places you'd
love to see. Then get back to
work so you can afford to take
the trip.
Scorpio
Decide what you want and how
much you'll spend before you
meet with the salesperson.
Caution is advised.
Sagittarius
A lot of what's being said is fluff
or spin. You can appear to trust
but then verify everything.
Capricorn
There are temptations you know
you should resist, and you can.
If at first you don't succeed, try
and try again. Don't learn too
much of this stuff the hard way,
it hurts.
Aquarius
A person you admire is under
a lot of pressure. Don't suggest
taking risks, offer security.
Provide encouragement for one
who's wondering if he can do
what's being asked of him. He
needs your help.
Piscts
There's a lot going on, and some
of it is totally unnecessary. Try to
keep from being the one doing
that. Take time to edit your lists.
Campus Events:
Tuesday, No. 7
-ACHIEVE: Preparing to apply for
graduate school
College Hill Suites Conference
Room at 7 p.m.
-Cultural Bingo
Destination 360 at 9 p.m.
-L.A. Theatre Works:
The Caine Mutiny Court Martial
Wright Auditorium
Wednesday, No. 8
-Last Conservative Concert
featuring FRAIL
Mendenhall Pirate Underground
at 7 p.m.
-Russian Film Series
"The Diamond Arm"
Bate 2011 at 6:30 p.m.
Thursday. No. 9
-Teaching with Technology
Mendenhall 10 a.m. -2 p.m.
-Freshman Roundtable 2
Ledonia Wright Cultural Center
3:30-4:30 p.m.
-Gideon Yago
Hendrix Theatre 8 - 9 p.m.
Mendenhall
Movies:
World Trade Center
Wednesday 1108 at 7 p.m.
Thursday 1109 at 9.30 p.m.
Friday 1110 at 7 p.m.
midnight
Saturday 1111 at 9:30 p.m.
Sunday 1112 at 7 p.m.
Scoop
Wednesday 1108 at 9:30 p.m.
Thursday 1109 at 7 p.m.
Friday 1110 at 930 p.m.
Saturday 1111 at 7 p.m.
midnight
Sunday 1112 at 9:30 p.m.
'Hedda Gabler to show at McGinnis Auditorium
See what the School of
Theatre and Dance have
cooked up this time
STACY DAIL
STAFF WRITER
A deceiving, yet courageous, woman
mixed with power-hungry men competing
over a job isn't something that ECU stu-
dents experience everyday while walking
around campus.
This will change from Nov. 16-21 when
the ECULoessin Playhouse will present
Hedda Gabler at McGinnis Auditorium.
The play was written by world-famous
playwright Henrik Ibsen and will be per-
formed in a new translation written by
Christopher Hampton.
Hedda Gabler takes place as she and
her husband arrive back from their hon-
eymoon to find that Hedda's former alco-
holic lover, Eilbert, is not only back in
town, but equipped with a brilliantly
written essay that could have Hedda's
new husband competing for a job at their
local university.
After hearing that Eilbert has lost
his "masterpiece Hedda, in fear of her
husband's downfall, encourages her ex to
kill himself. Unfortunately, the plan wasn't
foolproof, and the gun that he used to carry
out the act is quickly traced back to her.
Hedda is left with the dilemma of what to do
in order to avoid getting caught and facing
the consequences of her actions.
John Shearin and Jeff Woodruff help
to direct and produce this story that is
expected to keep its audience on edge while
asking themselves the question of how far
they would go to escape punishment.
Originally written in 1890, Hedda
Gabler was first performed in Germany
in 1891, but didn't reach American audi-
ences until 1898 when it opened in New
York. Since then, there have been 17 films
and multiple productions of the critically
acclaimed play.
Last month's production of Chicago was
a huge success, and November's showing
of Hedda Gabler is expected to be just as
good.
Performances will run from Nov. 16-21,
and will start at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Friday,
Saturday, Monday and Tuesday, and at 2 p.m.
on Sunday. If bought in advance, ticket prices
range from $12 for the general public, $10
for senior citizens and $8 for children and
ECU students with a OneCard. Advanced
tickets may be purchased by calling 328-
6829, or by visiting ECUARTS.com.
ECU students and faculty are encour-
aged to come out and see the performance
of Hedda Gabler, and in case it's a last minute
decision, don't worry; tickets will be sold at
the door for $12.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcaroliniain.com.
This week in Health
Insomnia: sleep
deprivation at its worst
KORRI-LEE SMITH
STAFF WRITER
Have you ever wondered
whether those sleepless nights
are the result of insomnia? Well,
as a matter of fact, insomnia is
much more common than you
may have expected. Fortunately,
there are several known causes of
this disorder, many of which are
treatable.
According to the U.S. Depart-
ment of Health and Human Ser-
vices, approximately 60 million
Americans suffer from insomnia
each year. This number is the
highest among other developed
nations. Unfortunately, insomnia
tends to increase ith age and
affects about 30 percent of men
and 40 percent of women.
By definition, insomnia is
characterized by the inability to
sleep andor being incapable of
remaining asleep for an extended
period of time. Insomniacs often
complain about not being able to
close their eyes or rest their minds
for more than a few minutes at
a time. The causes of this sleep
disorder have been linked to fear,
stress, anxiety, medications, herbs
or caffeine, an overactive mind and
physical pain. It is often neces-
sary to pinpoint the cause of one's
insomnia before it can be treated.
Three different types of insom-
nia have been identified and sepa-
rated by level of intensity. Tran-
sient insomnia is the lowest level
of this disorder, lasting from one
night to a few weeks. This is the
most common of the three, often
due to jet lag or short-term anxi-
ety. Acute or short-term insomnia
is the inability to consistently sleep
well for a period of three weeks
to six months. Though the sleep
isn't great, a person suffering from
acute insomnia does not experi-
ence insomniac episodes. Insomnia
is considered to be chronic when it
persists nearly every night for at"
least a month or longer.
Insomnia has also been clas-
sified into primary or secondary
sleep disorders. Primary insomnia
is sleeplessness that is not attribut-
able to a medical or environmen-
tal cause. Secondary insomnia
occurs when a person experiences
sleep problems as a result of
something else. Health condi-
tions, such as generalized anxiety
disorder, may be considered the
cause of secondary insomnia. The
most common causes of insomnia
Not being able to sleep at night because you have too much on your mind can be a huge disruption to your life.
include circadian rhythm sleep
disorders, parasomnia, gastro-
esophageal reflux disease, mania
or hypomania, certain stimulants,
lack of exercise and dehydration.
Insomnia is also a common side
effect of some medications. Stress,
emotional upheaval, physical or
mental illness, dietary allergy
and poor sleep hygiene have also
been attributed to the causes of
insomnia.
One common misconception
that many people have is that
the amount of sleep required
decreases as they age. Conversely,
the ability to sleep for long peri-
ods rather than the need for
sleep appears to be lost as people
get older.
In many cases, insomnia is
the result of another disease or
psychological problem. In this
type of circumstance, medical or
psychological help may be ben-
eficial. Unfortunately, sedative
drugs have the potential of causing
psychological dependence where
see INSOMNIA page A7
Spotlight on Dr. Carey Martin Choosing the right minor
Mastermind of communication
SHANNON DAVIS
STAFF WRITER
ECU has a plethora of excellent professors who
go above and beyond to make sure that learning
takes place in their classroom. Carey Martin is an
associate professor in the school of communication
who has continued to contribute his time and efforts
to give students an innovative education and bring
broadcasting opportunities to ECU.
Martin received his PhD In communication from
Florida State University and has taught at ECU for
four years He said he was attracted to ECU because,
"It's a growing program and when I started, we had
just officially become a school apart of the College
of Fine Arts and Communication. I was attracted to
help build something new
Martin currently teaches writing for the elec- '
tronic mass media, history of the moving image, and
has taught video production and advanced writing for
television. He said lie became interested in the movie
and television field when he was five, when his parents
took him to see The Sound of Music, which hooked him
especially on movies. He worked in all different forms
of media all the way through college, and afterward,
he worked for television stations, cooperate videos,
radio and film He said he was always fascinated with
the media outlets
His two favorite movies are Casablanca and The
U'amors. Casablanca is his "intellectually respectful"
pick while The If arriors is the reason he says he hung
in with this profession for as long as he has.
Martin is the advisor for ECU's National Broad-
casting Society. NBS goes beyond the classroom to
prepare college students and entry-level professionals
for careers in electronic media Martin explained that
the "National Broadcasting Society is, as its name
implies, a nationwide organization of students who
are interested in any form of the mass media, which
is entirely student run. The advantages of NBS are
that here locally at ECU, we bring in speakers from
the local media communities to talk about what's
going on in the market and real world. We provide
opportunities for students to do leadership by being
an officer in a student group and keeping it going.
On a national level, we have the national convention,
which allows people to hear from national media
figures, for example Bob Costas who spoke at one of
1 ibbbbbbsbbbbbbbI
our national conventions. It is also an opportunity
for students to network with future employers
because employers do come to the NBS conven-
tions and will talk with students about what they
might have available that interests the students.
There is also a national award show for student
productions, so if you're a member of NBS and have
done something for class that is particularly note-
worthy you can submit it and it may be recognized
nationally
Martin is also the area coordinator for broad-
cast. This title comes with the responsibilities of
creating schedules for classes to be taught and
representing the broadcast area to the faculty as
a whole to the school of communication. He is also
chairing the committee that is putting together the
guiding curriculum.
Within the last four years, Martin has been
mainly responsible for the progress of the media
production major Video cameras have been
upgraded and fundamental editing programs
have been added to the computers, such as final
cut pro and pro tools. Martin has improved every
aspect of the media production experience at ECU
and is gjified to see results that come from his
efforts.
This writer can be contact at
pulse@t heeastcarolinian.com.
The wide variety of minor
options offered at ECU
STACY DAIL
STAFF WRITER
After hanging out in col-
lege for a year or so, not really
knowing why you're here or what
kind of degree you're trying
to earn, the time has come to
finally declare a major and get
to work on becoming a success-
ful young something or another.
Students are offered just about
anything to major in here at ECU,
but what many students don't
know about is the minors that
go with it. Many students' ques-
tion would be why would I want
to minor in something when I
already have enough work as it is
with a major?
The answer is simple: Knowl-
edge is power. The more you know,
the more successful you will be.
Studies have shown that college
graduates with more than one
degree make more money than
those with a degree in one specific
thing. So there you go, minoring
in something equals more money.
Enough said.
It's possible to minor in just
about anything, ranging from typ-
ical things such as biology, politi-
cal science or English, to more
not so common things such as
international studies, nutrition or
forensic science which just became
available to students last fall.
When deciding on a minor,
although it is good to have one
in anything, there are certain
options that would go better with
a specific major, so not only would
a student make more money, but
the minor would actual help them
throughout their career.
For a student majoring in com-
munication, popular minor options
include business administration,
English, hospitality management
and art and design.
Those working for a degree
business or education, a minor in
any foreign language, sociology
or communication studies may
be helpful.
No matter what you're major,
minors in things such as history,
English, economics or political
science could always be beneficial
in the long run.
According to a former business
advisor, students who graduate
with any kind of degree in a for-
eign language, specifically Span-
ish, will automatically make about
$10,000 more a year than those
who have no foreign language
degree. In addition to the higher
salary, a graduate with a foreign
language degree will have a better
chance at getting a job even when
the position is competitive.
Most minors require anywhere
from 24 tc 30 semester hours, in
addition to some pre-requisite
classes. In order to get a real idea
of what minor may be helpful
to a specific major, students can
I
see MINOR page A7





PAGE A6
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
PAGE A7
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Brittany
Major at ECU:
Business
Hobbies:
Surfing the web
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Send us your pirate rants!
World War II drama
to be performed
LIZ FULTON
SENIOR WRITER
There's a hip new band enti-
tled "TV (in the Radio Interest-
ing concept, eh? On Tuesday,
November 7, the S Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts
Series is going to present some-
thing a wee more old school than
that: "Radio theatre on the stage
L.A. Theatre Works presents The
Caine Mutiny Court-Martial, in
Wright Auditorium.
The play, adapted from
Herman Wbuk's Pulitzer Prize-
winning novel, is about the effects
of war. It provides insight into the
relationships in the chain ot mili-
tary Command and the pressures
of war on ordinary citizens.
The Caine Mutiny Court-
Martial is a courtroom drama that
extends beyond the era of World
War II and can easily be applied
to the situation in Iraq today. The
play relies heavily on the power
of the spoken word and examines
thoroughly the theme of dissent
in wartime. The plot centers on
events happening prior to the
trial concerning Captain Queeg,
a battle-fatigued, paranoid man,
and his naval crew, who engage
in a tumultuous escapade.
The naval crew soon becomes
cynical of the captain and his
leadership abilities, leading to
intense drama and taut emotions.
The play takes place on Febru-
ary 1945, largely in the Gen-
eral Court-Martial Room of
the Twelfth Naval District, San
Francisco.
It is presented in a radio-
theatre format with actors at
microphones and scripts in hand,
supported primarily by sound
effects, costumes and lighting
rather than a fully-staged set.
Audience members will be
astounded by The Caine Mutiny
Court-Martial's ending, and will
be posed with questions concern-
ing war, including the media's
ability to cover it and the insa-
tiable appetites of those at home
who want news.
Small mutinies in the soldiers'
ranks are occurring at a rate greater
than the ordinary citizen knows.
The Caine Mutiny Court-Mar-
tial is performed by L.A. The-
ater Works, a group of highly
respected actors and directors
whose purpose is to enrich the
The ECU Media Board
welcomes applications for
DAY STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVE
(A student living off campus and not a member of a fraternity or sorority.)
f The board is seeking full-time students interested in
serving as the day student representative on the Media
oard, the 11-person board which governs the media
at ECU, WZMB, The Rebel, The East Carolinian,
Expressions, Web Media and The Buccaneer.
The day representative is one of nine students on the board and is
expected to attend a late afternoon meeting monthly.
For information, contact:
ECU Media Board Office 205A Self Help Building
301 S. Evans Street Greenville, NC 27858 328-9200
INSOMNIA
continued from A6
an individual cannot accept the
fad that they can sleep without
drugs. Sedatives such as benzodi-
azepines and non-benzodiazepine
drugs can also cause physical
dependence, which can poten-
tially manifest into withdrawal
symptoms. Benzodiazepines are
the most commonly used class of
hypnotics prescribed for insom-
nia. These medications can be
addictive, especially when they're
taken over long periods of time.
Non-benzodiazepine prescrip-
tion drugs, such as Ambien and
Lunesta, appear to similarly
cause psychological and physical
dependence. Though their list of
side effects may be shorter, these
drug.s can cause the same memory
and cognitive disturbances as
the benzodiazepines along with
morning sedation.
If the idea of using medica-
tions to treat insomnia has scared
anyone, behold, there are other
options. Some traditional rem-
edies fro insomnia have included
drinking warm milk before head-
ing to bed, taking a warm bath in
the evening, exercising vigorously
for half an hour in the afternoon,
eating a large lunch and then
having only a light dinner at least
three hours before bed, avoiding
mentally stimulating activities
in the evening hours and making
sure to get up early in the morn-
ing and to retire to bed at a rea-
sonable hour. Pomegranates are
also believed to be useful in help-
ing insomniacs sleep. The more
relaxed a person is, the greater
the likelihood is of them getting
a good night's sleep. Relaxation
techniques, such as meditation
have been proven to help many
people sleep. Such techniques can
help individuals lower the stress
levels of their mind and body
which can lead to a deeper, more
restful sleep.
If you feel that your sleep-
less nights could be attributed
to insomnia, it would be a good
idea to seek some sort of inter-
vention.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
cultural life of the national com-
munity through the use of inno-
vative technologies: to produce
and preserve significant works of
dramatic literature on audio; and
to assure the widest public access
to these great works.
The production was heard
in over 50 nations last season
on Voice of America stations.
This performance is vital for any
student studying American or
military history as well as those
taking political science, literature
or communication classes.
Students can buy advance
tickets at the Central Ticket
Office in Mendenhall-and select
their seats-for10. Students may
also purchase rush tickets on
the evening of the performance
between 7:00 and 7:20 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium's lobby.
Students interested in rush
tickets should bring a valid stu-
dent ID and $5 exact change.
Dust off your theater duds and
enjoy quality entertainment for
the price of large popcorn.
For more information, contact
Michael Crane at cranemi@ecu.
edu or 328-5386.
' This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com
MINOR
continued from A6
visit their advisor to find out the
specifics including information
such as how many hours and what
classes it requires.
Many students also may not
be aware that some degrees actu-
ally require a minor. According
to the undergraduate catalog,
all BA degrees require a minor,
unless a choice of concentration
is available.
In some cases, even if a degree
requires a student to declare a
concentration, there is still a
minor requirement.
Weather it is alcohol and drug
studies, indigenous peoples of
America, or neuroscience, students
are encouraged to talk to their
advisors about choosing a minor.
Taking a few more classes
and having to do a little more
homework isn't such a bad thing
when thinking about the benefits
of a higher paying, better all
around job.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
Improve your leadership skills al ibis week long.
intensive leadership development experience!
Learn about this exciting opportunity
at the information sessions on:
November 9, 2000 I 1:00am 12:00pm, MSC 244
November 14, 2000 3:30-4:3()pm, MSC 244
OPEN TO FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORES
The ECU
LeaderShape:
Institute
March 12-17,2007
Caraway Conference Center
Asheboro, NC
For additional information
or to submit an application please visit:
http:www.ecu.educs-
studentlifestudentexperiencesLeaderShape.cfm
Institute is open to Freshman and Sophomores and there is
no cost to participate
Deadline to apply is November 21, 2006
LeaderShape
AT EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY1






Sports
128
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 7, 2006 PAGE A8
ECU's Inside Source
New career-high for Brandon
Fractious, who set the mark
on 23 attempts against UCF;
Fractious' previous career high
was 107 rushing yards on 10
attempts against UCF last
year, although Fractious made
a costly fumble that would have
put the Pirates up by two scores
1,551
lotal number of receiving
yards Aundrae Allison has
in his career; Allison passed
La.Mont Chappell (1,507
yards) for seventh on the
ECU's all-time receiving
yards list with his 67 yards
on eight catches against UCF
Defense leads the way again
2
Number of forced turnovers
by the ECU defense in eight
of the last 11 games; Kasey
Ross' 51-yard interception for
a touchdown and Markeith
McQueen's interception
gives the Pirate defense 20
takeaways (12 interceptions
and eight fumbles)
5
Pirates hold UCF to 58
rushing yards
RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
Skip Holtz said a week ago that
he wanted his defense to win foot-
ball games. For the second straight
week, the ECU head coach got his
wish as Kasey Ross intercepted a
Kyle Israel pass and returned it
51 yards for a touchdown to sea
a 23-10 ECU will on Saturday at
Central Florida.
Ross said Holtz reminded him
before the possession that UCF
had been throwing a lot of come-
back routes. The 6-foot senior
stepped in front of the Israel pass
intended foi Javid James and took
it to the house for his second pick-
six of the season with 50 seconds
remaining in the game.
"It hit me as I was going in
said Ross of his game-clinch-
ing interception. "It's just an
exciting feeling.
Holtz said he felt "extremely"
relieved when Ross made the pick,
and was equally excited.
"I know how hard these play-
ers have worked and they want
to win said Holtz. "That's why
I was really excited for them
got excited for Kasey, a senior,
to see him make the play he did,
and I was excited because going
up by two scores at that time, I
felt really good with the way our
defense was playing
The interception was the first
of two ECU aerial thefts in the
final minute as Markeith McQueen
caught a Hail Mary attempt
in the end zone in the game's
waning seconds.
Ross' third interception of
the year capped a stellar defen-
sive performance in consecutive
weeks as the Pirates (5-4, 4
Conference USA) held UCF to
263 yards of total offense and just
58 rushing yards in winning their
third straight game. The Golden
Knights (2-7, 1-4 C-USA) entered
the game averaging better than
150 yards on the ground.
"We came to work said junior
defensive tackle Mark Robinson.
"Last year we came up short of a
lot of the goals we set and this year
we're just real hungry to get it. So
we just come out to play humble
and hungry every week
The defense, which was
thought to be the weak link of the
team entering the season, is ranked
second in C-USA and total defense
Number of times that the
volleyball team has won 19
or more games dating back
to 1978 after ECU's win over
Memphis, improving their
overall record to 19-10; the
Pirates won 19 or more matches
in 1978-1979, 1982 and 2005
1,837
Number of minutes ECU
women's soccer goalkeeper
Amber Campbell played in goal
this year; Campbell tallied up
1,917 minutes in goal in 2005,
placing her first on the school's
all-time list for a single-season
They said it
"We've now won two in a
row. I'm really proud of this
team with the way we com-
peted, the passion and the
hunger. The enthusiasm and
the intensity that they played
with was great. One thing
you can be concerned with is
the team feeling good about
themselves and you go in and
in this league everyone has a
pretty good football team. It's
like NASCAR, everyone has
the same engine and it comes
down to who does the best
job in driving the car every
week. Right now, these play-
ers are playing really hard
and they are doing a nice job
-Skip Holtz, ECU head coach
"Defensively I was really proud
of the way this team played,
the way they competed. I
think this defense is really
starting to grow up. They're
really starting to accept the
role that they've been given.
They're starting to get excited
about being a great defen- g
(3
sive football team and they're S
taking a lot of pride in stopping 8
people I couldn't be more g
pleased with the focus and the
mental approach this team has Nicole Moore, a sophomore defender who started a
taken each and every week
-Skip Holtz, ECU head coach
Junior defensive tackle Mark Robinson wraps up Javid James along the sideline in the first half of ECU's 23-10 win over UCF on Saturday afternoon.
and pass defense It has gobbled
up opposing offenses over the last
month and has made up for an
inconsistent offense to help the
Pirates move into first place in
C-USA's East Division.
"I enjoy being around this
team right Holtz said. "They're
fun to coach. They've got smiles
on their faces and they feel good
about themselves. They're doing
things the right way and working
extremely hard and starting to see
the fruits of their labor
While ECU was able to move
the ball fairly well against UCF,
the Pirates offense stalled near
the red zone and settled for three
Robert Lee field goals. Lee won
the kicking competition last week
over freshman Ben Hartman after
Hartman missed a 42-yarder
against Southern Miss. Lee missed
two field goals, from 41 and
51, but made a pair of 42-yard-
ers and a 31-yard kick to put
ECU up 3-0 midway through the
first quarter.
"It was a game-time decision
Holtz said of the kicking move.
"With it being extremely windy, I
felt like with General Lee having
a little bit of a stronger leg, we'd
kick Robert
UCF needed just two minutes
to respond to the Lee field goal,
marching 73 yards on six plays
and going up on a Kevin Smith
3-yard run. Smith had rushed for
over 100yards in his previous four
conference games, but was limited
to 50 yards on 18 carries.
see FOOTBALL page A9
Volleyball's winning
streak snapped at UAB
Trish Monroe, far, has helped ECU move into third in the C-USA standings.
20 games is one of 23 Pirates who will return in 2007.
Obviously from a media stand-
point, from a fan standpoint,
from a student standpoint,
everybody's going to start
to speculate. Then you start
looking at the match-ups in
the other conference. I think
that's great. I think it's excit-
ing. It creates a lot of interest
in the program. But right now,
as I keep telling this football
team, we can't fall into that
trap. That doesn't have any-
thing to do with us going
and taking care of our job
-Skip Holtz, ECU head coach
ECU women's soccer pointed
in the right direction
Pirates season ends
with double OT loss to
Memphis
TOMMY GRAHAM
STAFF WRITER
Unlike last season, ECU failed
to get out of the first round of the
Conference USA Tournament,
bowing out to Memphis 2-1 in a
heartbreaking double overtime
loss last Thursday evening.
"Our girls played their hearts
out tonight and I am really proud
of them said ECU Head Coach
Rob Donnenw irth.
Even though the loss termi-
nated the Pirates season, Donneii-
wirth has to be happier than ever
heading into his eighth offseason
as the ECU coach. The team
steadily improved over the ladder
portion of the season, factoring in
experience with talent to w in four
of the final six games. All eight
losses were by a single goal and the
Pirates defense allowed the fewest
goals of any conference team.
Freshmen were four of the
top five point getters, including
the top two in double-digits. Six
freshmen started games, including
standouts Amy Szilard and Sarah
Kirk ley who started every game
they appeared in. Sophomore goal-
keeper Amber Campbell recorded a
record-setting season, backing up
her stellar freshman campaign.
The optimism surrounding
the young nucleus has the Pirates
poised for a breakout year in 2007.
Anastasia Nikas, ECU's assist
leader in 2003, returns from an
injury, causing her to redshirt
see SOCCER page A9
(SID) The ECU volleyball
team's eight game winning streak
was snapped by UAB on Friday
night. The Blazers won, 3-1 (28-
30, 30-20, 30-27, 30-22), giving
the Blazers their sixth straight.
The Pirates rebounded on Sunday,
winning nine of its last 10 downing
Memphis 3-1 (30-23, 30-17, 24-
30, 30-25), completing the season
sweep of the Tigers. The Pirates
improved to 19-10, 10-5 in C-USA.
Against Memphis, Kelley
Wemert recorded a match high
24 kills, adding 12 digs for her
18th double-double of the season
while also registering six total
blocks. Heidi Krug also tallied
a double-double with 49 assists
and 13 digs. In all, four Pirates
recorded double figure digs, with
Trish Monroe leading ECU with
20, while Hannah Fenker added 14
and Stephanie Turner had 12.
Against UAB, ECU was led
by Wemert who had 22 kills and
nine digs, Krug finished with 40
assists and four blocks. Mignon
Dubenion and Jamie Bevan also
finished in double figures in kills
with il and 12, respectively.
Game one was tightly contested
the whole way with a Dent kill
making it 14-all before UAB opened
up a three-point lead. The Pirates
then made their move, winning
seven-straight points, capped off
by Bevan's third-straight kill. The
ECU run was all that was needed
to distance itself, as it pulled out the
opening game, 30-28, handing the
Blazers a game one defeat.
In game two, UA B took an early
10-2 lead. ECU clawed back to 18-
14, but UAB won six of the last
eight points to win the game 25-15.
Game three remained tight
early on until the Blazers made
their move when leading 12-10,
rallying off seven points in a row.
UAB continued to push forward
and was able to hold off a late push
by ECU to claim the game, 30-27.
Leading 2-1 in the match, ECU
evened the fourth game at 7-7 follow-
ing a Turner kill. The Blazers took
a five-point lead and never looked
back, finishing off the Pirates.
F.CU has achieved 19 wins
only four times since the school
adopted the sport in 1977. The
team will try to tie 2005s win
total when they return to action
on Saturday, Nov. n as the team
travels to Huntington, W.Va. to
face Marshall in the Pirates' final
regular season match of 2006
Match time is set for 7 p.m.





TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 9006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE A9
SOCCER
continued from A8
what would have been her senior
season. The roster will be a year
older, causing many Pirate fans to
hope that the maturation process
will translate to wins.
Campbell will be a main
cog to the Pirates' future. The
sophomore set a school-record for
goals against average (.67), and is
chasing the all-time career mark
ofLindsiTroxler (1.30) set in the
2003-05 seasons. She also placed
second in school history in min-
utes played in goal (1,837), miss-
ing her freshman mark of 1,917.
Szilard, the freshman sniper
finished with eight goals on
the season, most of which were
recorded in the second half of the
season. If she continues on this
pace, her projected total after four
years would be SS, good for third
on the all-time goals scored list.
Kirkley, a midfielder led the
team in assists with lO, placing
her second in C-USA. Her .58
average assists per game mark is
second all-time in school history,
and is also second within C-USA.
If Kirkley continues her current
pace, she would he ECU's all-time
career assists leader.
The seniors' leadership and
tutelage to the younger players
has helped to the pave way for
what seems to he a solid future.
The trio ofTara Shaw, Rachel Hils
and Mary Puckett have endured,
namely the removal of the men's
team and the defeat ol perennial
power SMU in that same season.
In ECU's case, injuries, defec-
tions and three overtime losses
did not kill the 10-8-2 team.
Instead, it gave them a multitude
of returning players for next
year's team. If the Pirates improve
in the offseason on offense and
continue their stingy defense,
then 80071 finale should have a
different result.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Holtz keeping ECU grounded
entering Marshall game
FOOTBALL
continued from A8
(AP) When ECU struggled
earlier this season, coach Skip
Holtz didn't want the losing to
hurt his team's confidence
Now the Pirates are winners
again, and Holtz is monitoring
his players' self-esteem for an
entirely different reason.
"One of the things you're
concerned about as you start
winning, the playersj start
feeling pretty good about them-
selves Holtz said Monday.
"But in this league, everybody's
got a pretty good football
team
Maybe, but for the first time
in a while, the Pirates might be
one of Conference USA's best
teams. At the very least, they're
among the league's hottest.
ECU (5-4, 4-2 C-USA) cata-
pulted into first place in the East
Division after winning three
straight and four of five since
starting 1-3. The Pirates have a
half-game lead on Southern Mis-
sissippi and this week's opponent,
Marshall (4-5, 3-2 C-USA).
An ECU win would put the
Pirates on the brink of clinch-
ing the division title and a step
closer to earning a berth in next
month's league championship
game with a spot in the Liberty
Bowl at stake
All of which means perhaps
the most important task Holtz
faces this week is keeping his sud-
denly resurgent team grounded.
"1 think any time you
start to win a little bit, those
things become possibilities
Holtz said. "Obviously, from
a media standpoint, from a
fan standpoint, from a stu-
dent standpoint, everybody's
going to start to speculate.
And then you start looking at
the bowl matchups in the
other conferences, and I think
that's great. It creates a lot of
interest in the program.
"But as I keep felling the
team, we can't fall into that trap
he added. "That doesn't have any-
thing to do with us going in and
taking care of our job
The Pirates and Thunder-
ing Herd are meeting for just
the second time as C-USA
members, hut the programs have
an inextricable connection dating
back to Nov. 14, 1970, when the
DC-9 plane carrying Marshall's
players, staff and boosters home
from a loss at ECU crashed near
Ceredo, W.Va killing all 75
people on board.
Saturday's game will mark
Marshall's second visit to
Greenville since the crash, and
first since 1978.
The Herd and Pirates also
played the highest-scoring bowl
game of all time in 2001, with
Marshall rallying from a 38-8
half time deficit to beat the Pirates
64-fil in double overtime in the
GMAC Bowl in Mobile, Ala.
This year, Marshall also
turned its season around once
conference play began. The Herd
have won three straight after
starting 1-5 with a schedule that
included nationally ranked West
Virginia and Tennessee.
The Herd can stake a
claim to the division lead by
beating the Pirates.
"If they win out, they're going
to wyi the (division) Holtz
said. "I think they're going to
come in here and there will be a
lot of energy, a lot of enthusiasm
fin- this game
Aundrae Allison is tackled on one of his eight receptions by U(
While Smith struggled to
get the running game going
for the Golden Knights, Bran-
don Fractious had a career
day for the Pirates. The senior
from Rancho Cucamonga,
Calif, ran for a career-high 128
yards on 23 carries and a 17-
yard touchdown in the second
quarter to put the Pirates back
up, 10-7.
"I just felt comfortable
running the ball and got
good blocking from offen-
sive line said Fractious, who
recorded his second 100-yard
game ofthe year and the third of
his career.
The Pirates needed the
running game as James Pinkney
struggled to get the passing
attack on track. Pinkney, who
entered the game 11th in the
nation in total offense, completed
just l(i-of-30 passes for 1.35 yards
and a pair of interceptions.
Fractious is confident that
Pinkney will "bounce back"
for ECU's final home game
against a Marshall team that
has also won three straight.
Both ECU and Marshall control
their own destinies for the East
Division crown and Fractious said
the Pirates need to "stay hungry"
in order to find that berth into
the conference championship
game on Dec. 2.
Half of Pinkney's completions
went to Aundrae Allison, who fin-
Johnson during the fourth quarter.
ished with 67 receiving yards.
"I just took advantage of the
opportunities that were given
to me Allison said. "We didn't
get to put up a lot of points,
but it still worked out perfectly
because we had a lot of big
third-down conversions
ECU was 9-of-17 on third
down while UCF converted just
five of its 14 third downs.
"We're working harder every
week Robinson said. "Our goal
is to be better than last week.
That's what we do every practice,
we come out with that mentality
to just go 1-0
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Swimming & diving loses to
West Virginia in quad-meet
(SID) The ECU men and
women's swimming and diving
teams improved each their over-
all teams records Saturday in a
quad-meet with Duquesne, Mar-
shall and West Virginia.
The Lady Pirates improved
to 7-1 with wins over Duquesne
(231-03) and Marshall (818-
88), while suffering its first
setback of the season to the
Mountaineers (140.5-159.5).
The men's team also defeated
Duquesne (196-96) to post its
fifth win of the year, while it
also suffered its first loss of the
year to WVU (101.5-195.5).
"This was a very good
meet for us said Pirate head
coach Rick Kobe. "We posted
some very fast times today and
have a lot of confidence heading
into the Nike Cup
The junior diving tandem
of Ryan Hunt and Christie Icen-
hower continued their outstanding
seasons as they combined to
sweep all four ofthe diving events.
Hunt and Icenhower each
claimed first place scores
on the one-meter and
three-meter boards.
Four members of the
Lady Pirates won individual
events led by a pair of Greenville
natives, Rebecca Perry and
Megan Pulaski.
Pulaski won the 1,000-
yard freestyle with a time of
10:10.89, nearly two seconds
better than second place finisher
Lindsey Largo of West Virginia.
Perry claimed her first
non-50 or 100-yard freestyle
victory of the season,
winning the 200-yard freestyle
with a time of 1:51.09.
Senior Kate Gordon
posted the Lady Pirates' third
top finish ofthe meet, winning the
200-yard butterfly with a
time of 0:56.90, 0:00.22 better
than WVU's Taylor Stallings.
Freshman Jacquelynn Jones
turned in another first place
finish in the 200-yard IM with a
time of 8:07.78.
BC.U returns to competition
NovrT-lH at the prestigious Nike
Cup in Chapel Hill, N.C.
(
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PAGE A10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2006
REGISTRATION TIME IS HERE
October 30
November 8
Check
Here
For
Times
Once your registration window is
open, you may register during
operating hours listed any time
during the registration period and
until the last day of dropadd.
tlOI
(Wed)
1106
(Mon)
1107
(Tues)
1108
(Wed)
Registration Time Schedule
DateEarned Cr. Hrs. Earned Cr. Hrs.Earned Cr. Hrs1 Earned Cr. Hrs.Earned Cr. Hrs.Earned Cr. Hrs.Earned Cr. Hi

8:00 a.m.9:00 a.m.10:00 a.m.11:00 a.m.2:00 p.m.3:00 p.m.4:00 p.m.

1030Graduates
(Mon)2nd Degree Students Honors (60 hours) Teaching Fellows (60 hours) Nursing Scholars (60 hours)Honors (0-59 hours) Teaching Fellows (0-59 hours) Nursing Scholars (0-59 hours)130120-129113-1191109-112105-108

1031 (Tues)102-104199-101 96-9893-9590-9287-8984-86
80-83
77-79
-61
74-76
71-73
68-70
66-67
64-65
28-29
26-27
23-25
16-22
9-15
4-8
0 last digit 0 last digit 0 last digit 0 last digit
SID0
0 last digit
SID7
SH
0 last digit
SID8
SID2
0 last digit
SID9
SID3
0 last digit 0 last digit
SID4 SID5
1-3
0 last digit
SID6
The term hours indicates the total number of credit hours earned at the end of the previous semester
session. SID Student ID number
Telephonic and web registration
open from 7:30 a.m. Midnight
Selecting Courses Online
10 steps to selecting classes in your Course Cart
I. Plan your upcoming semester courses, review these with your academic advisor, and
receive your registration code.
2 Go to our ECU Onestop account, (https:onestop.ecu.edu)
3. Enter your Pirate ID and passphrase (click submit)
4. On the tools bar Go to Registration and then click on Course Shopper.
5. Select the correct semester (Spring 2007).
6. Select the course prefix and number,
click the submit button.
s Select a section based on class openings, (click update)
9, Submit the course- it then appears in your course curt.
II). Continue until you have all the courses in your course cart.
IMPORTANT: You are not registered for the classes in your course cart. Once your
registration window opens, you will then submit these courses for registration by follow-
ing the steps outlined on the back side of the card.
Registering for Courses Online
10 steps to registering for classes.
1. See your academic advisor to review your selected courses and receive your registration
code. '
2. Go to your ECU Onestop account, (https:onestop.ecu.edu)
3. Enter your Pirate ID and passphrase (click submit)
4. On the tools bar Go to Registration and then click on Course Registration. (Students are
encouraged to use a campus based computer)
5. Make sure to download the OPAL Browser which appears on the course registration
screen. Once installed, click on Course Registration
6. Your course list should appear. Enter your registration code (click submit).
7. Click Register Now.
8. Left click on the course name. A green v should appear to the left of the desired course.
9. Click GO button on the bottom right of the screen.
10. Your registration page will fill in as the course transactions.are completed.
IMPORTANT: Please verify your registration by going back to the tools page and clicking on
Course Grades and Schedules.
For more assistance with registering r to;
www.ccu.educs-acadaasclinderstanding-the-Retfistration-Process.cfin
Or contact your academic advisor.
i.
Registration assistance available at Campus Office Terminals
Visit the Office of the Registrar's website for terminal locations and operation times:
www.ecu.educs-acadregistrarTerminalLocation.cfm
For registration questions contact your academic advisor or the Office of the Registrar at 252-328-6524.






Classifieds
TUESDAY NOVEMBER 7,2006 PAGE A11
Want it, get it! Only in our Classifieds.
FOR RENT
$350 Each all inclusive 4 bedroom
Walk to campus! $350mo. each
INCLUDES Utilities, Cable, High
Speed Internet, and Phone with
Unlimited Long Distance! Washer
Dryer Included Call 258-4373
5 Bedroom, 4 Bedroom, 3 Bedroom
and Apartments with washer &
dryer for lease $400 to $1200
252-361-2138, 252-321-8958
BLOCKS TO ECU Newly renovated
1, 2, 3, 4, &5 bdrm houses
available with short-term lease
options. Includes all appliances
with washerdryer & dishwasher.
Lawn maintenance provided weekly.
Call 252-327-4433.
Blocks to ECU, 1, 2, or 3 Bdrm Homes,
Central HeatAC, Washer.Dryer,
Dishwasher, We mow the yard! Available
December to January; Call 321-4712, or
see at colleteuniversityrentals.com
Half Off First Month Rent SunChase
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appliances, water, sewer, cable,
high speed int and electricity
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Greenville EHO "Call office for more
details 252-758-8002
HOUSE FOR RENT 103 N. Eastern
Street, 2 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom,
StudyDen, washerdryer, large
backyard, hardwood floors, yard
maintenance included. $750 month
752-1369
One, two Brs. on-site management
maintenance Central heat air 6,
9, 12 month leases Water Cable
included ECU bus Wireless Internet
pets dishwasher disposals pool
laundry (252) 758-4015
WALK TO campus! 1 block from the
Library. 2 bedroom apartment with
hardwood floors and central heatair.
Washer, dryer, dishwasher, high-speed
internet, basic cable, water & sewer all
included. Available January 1st. Call Mike
439-0285.
ROOMMATE
WANTED
Roommate wanted to share a
4BD4BA all inclusive apartment
for $349mo. Male or female, Close
to ECU, on ECU bus route, great
amenities. Call 752-9995.
HELP WANTED
100 College Tuition, money for
books, and a monthly paycheck
while attending college full time
WWW.NCNGRECRUITER.COM
Bartenders wanted! Up to $250
day. No experience necessary.
Training provided. Call (800) 965-
6520. ext. 202
CHEERLEADING or Hip Hop or
Karate (Black Belt) Instructors
experienced needed Part-Time
in Greenville and Farmville for
Children's programs. Email address
for application to yoolin@bellsouth.
net
Do you need a good job? The
ECU Telefund is hiring students
to contact alumni and parents for
the ECU Annual Fund. $6.25hour
plus cash bonuses. Make your own
schedule. If interested, visit our
website at www.ecu.edutelefund
and click on JOBS.
Food delivery drivers wanted
for Restaurant Runners. Part-
time positions $100-300week.
Perfect for college students
Some lunchtime (llam-2pm)
Mon-Fri advantageous and weekend
availability required. 2-way radios
allow you to be anywhere in
Greenville when not on a delivery.
Reliable transportation a must. Call
252-551-3279 between 2-5pm
only. Leave message if necessary.
Sorry Greenville residents only.
Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting 14-18
part-time youth basketball coaches
and officials for the upcoming
basketball program. Applicants
must possess a good knowledge
dvertising Representative
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ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-18 in
basketball fundamentals. Hours
are from 4 pm to 9 pm, weekdays
with some weekend coaching.
Flexible with hours according to
class schedules. This program will
run from November 27 through
the beginning of March. Salary
rates start at $6.50 per hour. For
more information, please contact
the Athletic Office at 329-4550,
Monday through Friday, 10 am
until 7 pm. Apply at the City of
Greenville, Human Resources
Department, Martin L. King Dr.
Phone 329-4492.
GROUP FITNESS INSTRUCTORS-
Ladies Workout Express is seeking
outgoing, highly motivated group
fitness instructors. Call Vicki at
252-353-3488
Local sign company hiring
experienced graphic designer to
fill full-time position. Experience in
Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop andor
Flexi-Sign required. Must be able to
meet strict deadlines. Send resume
to lblount@signsmithinc.com
Professor O'Cools is now hiring wait
staff. Must be available for lunches
M-F, nights and weekends. Apply
after 2pm at O'Cools. No phone
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Warehouse help needed; Morning
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PAGE A12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 2006
?
4 8 1
3 7 2
6 5 9
7 1 6
2 4 5
9 3 8


Title
The East Carolinian, November 7, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 07, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1938
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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