The East Carolinian, November 1, 2006












EastCarolinian
VOLUME 82, ISSUE 24
www.theeastcarolinian.com
YOUR SOURCE
FOR CAMPUS
NEWS SINCE 1925
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 1, 2006
Midnight Madness draws crowd
Winter will be here
soon. Don't be the
only one wearing last
season's trends. Find
out what will make you
warm and fashionable
this winterPage A4
Road trips with your
friends can be some
of your best college
memories, but what
do you do when
your road trip takes
a terrible turn for
the worse? Find out
Page A4
hf g ! CSS Halloween festivities kicked off at 9 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center. This year, approximately two hundred students waited patiently for the doors of
LLnl It P : h,re pUdentS JUmpmgn the "ne that extended a" the wa t0 Green Residence Ha and weren't the only ones. "Over 2OQO.students attended Eatt
aht wh!t V Sa'd, Le2 BrT; aSS0C'ate dlreCt0r 0t the Student Activities Center at ECU- "We ePect the total t ' this year to be XTrrSPwhin aK
about what heir plans for the night were, many students reported that they were looking to experience' all Madness had to offer. "We're going to enter thT co tme cortest Then
htmarnegBe0foCreec ristm2 W iK V T' and CmPSltin Wh WaS dreSSed as the XfZZSZXSl
ZMn 1? m2? l , We etg0'ng ' avold 8in8 downtown added Sydney Lockant, sophomore French education major, dressed as Sally, also from Nightmare Before Christmas
finrfttlnHJn,ign "k TJ' Fl 2 down said Claudia Allen, junior elementary education major. "I had a bad experience downtown asfvear Although the
final attendance numbers had not been tallied as of press time, by 10 p.m Midnight Madness was already a popular alternative to roaming the downtown S fo? man students
Dowdy- Ficklen
Stadium could be
undergoing some
changes in the
near future. Read
our article to see
how soon stadium
upgrades will take
placePageA6
The club ice hockey
team beat conference
rival Richmond before
losing their first game
of the season. Check
out our update to
see how the men are
doing in their second
seasonPage A6
Up 'til Dawn fundraiser
held for St. Jude Hospital
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Test your skills at
SuDoKuPageA9
NEWSPageA2
PULSEPageA4
SPORTSPageA6
OPINIONPage A3
CLASSIFIEDSPageA8
Volunteers give 'Buck' a bath at the Humane Society location of the event.
Students participate
in the first Make a
Difference Day event
Students write letters to their friends,
Over 154 campuses
participated, $10
million raised last year
ADELINE TRENTO
STAFF WRITER
Last Thursday, Oct. 26, ECU
hosted a letter writing event as
part of Up 'til Dawn, a fund-
raising campaign for St. Jude
Children's Research Hospital.
The nationwide fund-raiser,
which aims to unite students with
the community and raise money
for the children at St. Jude, takes
place on 154 campuses across
the U.S. and has raised more
than $10 million for St. Jude.
Students who participated in
family and neighbors in an attempt to
the fundraiser were organized into
groups of about six people, and
each group member was asked to
send 50 letters to friends, family
and neighbors in an attempt to
receive donations for St. Jude.
Students were asked to sign and
address pre-written letters to
people they knew in hopes that
their friends and family would
donate whatever they could to
the cause.
Most students volunteered
their time to help with this event
because fundraising is critical
to the success of St. Jude. The
research hospital relies on dona-
tions because they offer free treat-
ment to sick children all over the
world.
St. Jude is also the only pedi-
request donations for the hospital.
atric cancer research center where
families are never asked to pay for
treatments not covered by their
insurance, and families with-
out insurance are never asked
to pay, according to Stjude.org.
Many sororities, clubs, honor
students and faculty members, as
well as groups of students just
wanting to help, participated in
this event. Students who took part
in this fund-raiser did so because
they thought it was a great cause.
"I decided to volunteer for this
event because I want to work with
children one day said Jamie Dan-
iels, junior elementary education
major. "St. Jude is an amazing place
see JUDE page A2
I
National day of service
recognized
CLAYTON BAUMAN
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Volunteer Center
held its first Make a Difference
Day volunteer drive this past
Saturday with hundreds of stu-
dents taking part in a variety
of community service projects.
Make a Difference Day is a
nationwide initiative that was
started by the news publication
USA Today. The fourth Saturday
of every October is the desig-
nated day around the nation.
Last year, nearly three million
volunteers were on record for par-
ticipating in community service.
According to Jason Denius,
director of the Volunteer and
Service Learning Center, 200
up to participate in the event.
"We are using this project
as a way to hopefully recruit
some folks who have never vol-
unteered before said Denius.
Students were placed in five
different service groups, each
going to different areas around
the Greenville community. These
areas were Third Street School,
Habitat for Humanity, Epees Rec-
reation Center and the Humane
Society of Eastern Carolina.
Once organized into their
designated groups, students were
bussed out to their respective
locations where they participated
in a variety of different activi-
ties dependent on their location.
According to the ECU Vol-
unteer Web site, ecu.eduvol-
unteer, students at the Third
Street School took part in
cleaning, painting, landscap-
ing and classroom organization.
Habitat tor Humanity Volun-
teers took part in building, organiz-
ingand cleaning in an effort to help
shelter low income families in need.
Humane Society Volunteers
took partin taking care of the
animals through cleaning ken-
nels as well as dog washing.
Epees Recreational Center vol-
unteers aided with cleaning, paint-
ing, landscaping and a food drive.
An additional project, Potato
Drop, was performed in conjunc-
tion with the Food Bank of cen-
tral and eastern North Carolina
see SERVICE page A2





News
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 1, 2006 PAGE A2
ANNOUNCEMENTS Wed TtlU
ni, n i Mn.r.nt fTh. Pate Conaway, Textiles Teaching with T

Dia De Los Muertos (The
Day of the Dead)
Wednesday, Nov. 1 from
5:30 until 7 p.m. at the
Newman Center on 10th
Street by Fletcher Music
Hall.
Come and help celebrate
this traditional Latino cel-
ebration with free food,
dancing and a pinata. All
are welcome to bring pic-
tures of loved ones who
have passed, where they
can be honored in a short
service before festivities
begin.
Pi Kappa Delta information
session
Wednesday, Nov. 1
Professional communica-
tions forensic service will
hold an information session
in Bate 1032 for all those
interested in the organiza-
tion. The fraternity is co-ed,
multi-disciplinary and is
seeking dedicated individu-
als committed to improving
their world while improving
communication skills.
For additional informa-
tion, contact the president,
Roger Allen Conner, Jr. C. ht
CPM or visit pkdecu.com
ECU'S Japan Center East
hosts Wellness Japan
Thursday, Nov. 2at 5:30 p.m.
ECU'S School of Nurs-
ing, Room 1102, Allied
Health Sciences Building
Acupuncture, Reiki and
other alternative health
topics are the focus of a sem-
inar and workshop offered
by ECU'S Japan Center East.
The cost of the program is
$12 for the general public;
$10 for senior citizens and
$7 for students. Registra-
tion begins at 5:15 p.m.
Visit ecu.edujapancen-
tereast or contact Chikako
Massey masseyc@ecu.edu
or 252-737-1352 for more
information.
Teacher Cadet Day
Tuesday, Nov. 7 in
Mendenhall Student Center
room 244 from 10:45-
11:15a.m.
The North Carolina Teacher
Cadet Program is an inno-
vative yearlong or semester
block activity based curric-
ulum for high school juniors
and seniors. The course
is designed to promote a
better understanding and
create interest in those stu-
dents who are considering
teaching as a profession.
It's an honors class that
details many components of
the education environment
and involves students in
content, application, obser-
vations and teaching.
English professor to hold
reading
Luke Whisnant, professor of
creative writing at ECU, will
read from his new collection
of short stories, Down in the
Food(Iris Books, 2006) at
8p.m. Nov. 9, at Bate 1031.
One of the stories, "How to
Build a House is included
in the anthology, New Sto-
ries from the South 2006
(Algonquin Press).
ECU Brewster Lecture
The annual Brewster
Lecture at ECU will fea-
ture historian Barbara J.
Harris at 8 p.m. Nov. 9, in
the Science and Technol-
ogy building room C207.
Harris, a professor of history
and women's studies at the
University of North Carolina-
Chapel Hill, will present "The
Fabric of Piety: Aristocratic
Women and Care of the
Dead, 1450-1550 Profes-
sor Harris's research focuses
on Yorkist and early Tudor
England, as well as politi-
cal and women's history.
New course - Spring 2007
The Department of Exer-
cise and Sport Science has
announce that it will offer a
new course this Spring 2007
titled: "Physical Activity and
Disease Prevention" three
credits, EXSS 2020. The
purpose of the course is to
help students understand
the underlying reasons why
being physically active helps
reduce the risk of develop-
ing chronic diseases. The
class meets MW from 4
- 5:15 p.m. The course is
designed for non-exercise
science majors. Contact Dr.
Peter Farrell, farrellpecu.
edu for more information.

Pate Conaway, Textiles
Exhibition Opens
Mendenhall Student
Center Gallery
Community Appearance
Commission Meeting
Third Floor Conference
Room of City Hall, 200
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Drive
5:30 p.m.
Russian Film Series:
"Prisoner of the Moun-
tains"
Movies have English
subtitles or dubbing.
6:30 p.m.
Bate 2011
Hard Core Concert
Featuring The Avengers,
Romeo is Bleeding, Your
name in Vain
Mendenhall Student
Center, Pirate Under-
ground
7 p.m.
Teaching with Tech-
nology "Think-In"
Mendenhall Student
Center
10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Folkfriends Concert
Tipsy TeapotParker-
Kennybrook Books,
409 Evans Street
7 p.m.
Dwayne Perkins
Comedy Show
Mendenhall Student
Center Multipurpose
room
8 p.m.
ECU English Reading:
Down in the Flood
Luke Whisnant, ECU
creative writing profes-
sor, will read from his
short story collection,
"Down in the Flood"
(Iris Press, 2006).
Bate 1031
8 p.m.
ECU's Brewster Lec-
ture in History
Science and Technol-
ogy Building, Room
C207.
8 p.m.
Campus & Community :
3 Fri 4 Sat
5 Sun 6 Mon 7 Tue
uii r. onnc ritu rMinril Mmatina Election D3V
REBEL Exhibition
Opening
Emerge Gallery, Evans
St.
6 - 9 p.m.
Sarin Featuring David
Condos Concert
Mendenhall Student
Center, Pirate Under-
ground
7 p.m.
Saturday cannot be
completely empty
Submit your events to
our calendar, online at
theeastcarolinian.com.
World Fest 2006
Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center
City Council Meeting
City Council Chambers
6 p.m.
Election Day
Cultural BINGO
$500 Cash in Prizes
Destination 360
9 p.m.
Redevelopment Com-
mission Meeting
Second Floor Board
Room of Bank
of America Build-
ing, 201 West First
Street
5:30 p.m.
The Caine Mutiny
Court-Martial
S. Rudolph Alexan-
der Performing Arts
Series
Wright Auditorium
8 p.m.
Featured Event:
Dia de los Muertos:
5:30 - 7 p.m. Newman Center on 10th Street by Fletcher Music Hall.
Come and help celebrate this traditional Latino celebration with free
food, dancing and a pinata.
BRIEFS
South Georgia town plagued
by bats
(AP) So many bats have
infested the town's historic district
that the sky turns black with each
sunset and the neighborhood is call-
ing on Batman to come to the rescue.
That's what the local bat remover
goes by. George Perkins often
makes public appearances in the
caped crusader's costume and
drives his own Batmobile, a retro-
styled Chrysler Prowler with bat
emblems. Callers to his office in
Kufaula, Ala known as Bat Cave
I, or Union Springs, Ala known
as Bat Cave 2, hear the "Batman"
TV show theme while on hold.
"They're perpetual crap machines
said Tripp Pouieroy, who moved to
the town of 17,000 in 19H9 to work
for Habitat for Humanity, which
has its global headquarters here.
In a letter to city officials, Harris
said free-tailed bats have apparently
expanded their range and number
in Georgia and have adapted to
roosting in buildings in many towns
across the state. There are many
other bat species, but it's the free-
tail variety that seem to be causing
the most problems here.
CDC probing salmo-
nella outbreak in 18 states
(AP) A salmonella outbreak
potentially linked to produce has
sickened at least 172 people in 18
states, health otFicials said Monday.
Health officials think the bac-
teria may have spread through
some form of produce - the list of
suspects includes tomatoes. But
the illnesses have not been tied
to any specific product, chain,
restaurants or supermarkets.
No one has died in the outbreak,
which stems from a common
form of salmonella bacteria.
Eleven people have been hos-
pitalized, health officials said.
"We're very early in the inves-
tigation said Dave Daigle, a
spokesman for the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention.
The most serious outbreak, first
reported in September, involved
spinach tainted with E. coli bac-
teria that killed three people
and sickened more than 200.
Health officials estimate that more
than 1.4 million cases of salmonel-
losis occur in the U.S. each year.
About 1.3 million of those cases
come from food, Braden said.
Girl Freed From Life of Slaver
(AP) A California couple is facing
charges after allegedly paying her par-
ents in Egypt to "lease" a young girl.
Police say the girl was used for
two years to work 16 hours a
day cleaning the couple's home
and caring for their children.
The girl's parents were allegedly
paid $30 a month for her services.
The couple has been ordered to
pay back wages of $76,000 and
may face time in prison and
then be deported to Egypt.
Courtney Love Was
Rejected as Mouseketeer
Rock musician Courtney Love
was rejected as a Mouseketeer by
television's Mickey Mouse Club in
1976, her newly published "Dirty
Blonde" diary says. The book
also exposes her painful relation-
ship with her mother, therapist
Linda Carroll, Newsweek reports.
"When I get around (Carroll), I
feel so awkward and timid and
weak trying to prove to her
that I can make friends and be
popular a l'2-year-old Love writes.
Later letters come from
inside an Oregon prison.
Love's memoir hits the shelves
a week after her late husband,
singer-songwriter-guitarist Kurt
Cobain displaced Elvis at No. 1
on Forbess list of the top-earning
dead celebrities, Newsweek notes.
Part of that comes from Love, who
sold her 25 percent share in the
Seattle-based rock band Nirvana
catalog, and earned Cobain's estate
$50 million.
ECU explores Hispanic
culture through film
JUDE
continued from Al
and I think it's important to help
raise money for them so they can
keep helping so many children
The Up 'til Dawn letter
writing campaign was a huge
success at ECU with more
than 40 teams and 300 people
participating in the event.
More than 6,000 letters were
sent on Thursday and the goal is to
raise100,000 for St. Jude through
the letter writing campaign and
other events planned for the year.
"The letter writing cam-
paign is the biggest fundraiser
that Up til Dawn does said
Ashley Collins, member of the
Up til Dawn board. "So many
people are involved and we are
able to reach so many different
people with relatively little effort
Other events will be held
throughout the year in order
to raise even more money for
the children at St. Jude. A silent
auction, car wash, bake sale
and bowling tournament are
planned for the upcoming months.
At the end of the fundrais-
ing campaign, an event will be
held where participants will stay
"Up 'til Dawn" to honor the
children and families of St. Jude.
Anyone that wishes to
donate money to St. Jude Chil-
dren's Research Hospital can
do so at stjude.orgdonate.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
SERVICE
continued from Al
Students gather together to watch educational films that explore the history and culture of Latin America
Two films shown in
inaugural series
ZACK HILL
STAFF WRITKR
The first leg of the new His-
panic Film Series wrapped up
Thursday night in Hate 2011 with
a showing of Illummados pur el
Furgo(Enlightened by Fire), a film
about the conflict between Argen-
tina and Britain in the 1980s. It
was preceded in the series by a
September showing of Haheros, a
documentary about Cuban rafters
coming to America.
The series is being put together
by Juan Daneri and Jennifer Valko,
both professors in the depart-
ment of foreign languages and
literature s Spanish division.
They said that it is the first
Hispanic film series that they have
heard of at ECU
"We thought it was necessary
because of not only the changing
demographics in the state, but
also the fact that the university is
feeing more students with a His-
panic background said Daneri.
"It's a way to get people to
learn about other cultures not only
in terms of their differences, but
also the similarities and shared
experiences said Valko.
Before each screening, a pro-
feasor or faculty member gives
some background information and
puts the film in a context in which
the students can relate Afterward,
discussion is encouraged, though
not required.
"We are careful to avoid turn-
ing this into a classroom situation
Daneri said.
So far, turnout has exceeded
their expectations, with the
upstairs classroom in the Bate
building strained to hold the 40
to 50 students who have shown
up each time. Students from Pitt
Community College as well as
members of the Greenville com-
munity have also attended the
films.
Valko and Daneri hope that the
;
films expand students' perspec-
tives on Hispanic culture.
"A lot of people have a fairly
limited idea of what Hispanic cul-
ture is. They usually think about
it in terms of a single country.
Latin America is very diverse
and there are lot of things like
immigration, war and economic
and environmental issues that are
important both there and here
Daneri said.
The series will pick up again in
the spring semester, though dates
have not yet been set. Valko and
Daneri hope that the showings
will continue to be a success so
that funding may become available
to bring in a guest speaker, such as
a Hispanic filmmaker.
In the meantime, they are sat-
isfied with their progress so far.
"We want people to reflect
on what they've seen, and also
see some very good films Valko
said.
This writer can be contacted at
newstttheeastcarolinian.com.
It is Denius's hope that the people
who volunteer will see what
they do as a positive experi-
ence and will come out in the
future for more volunteer projects.
As a side project to the differ-
ent volunteer events, the Volunteer
Center had 15 students participat-
ing as site leaders.
These students supervised
their peers and encouraged them
during the day.
Students who missed out on
Make a Difference Day and want
to volunteer in the future have an
opportunity in the spring. On the
Monday holiday for Martin Luther
King's birthday, the volunteer
center is hoping to have a day of
service as well.
To keep up with future vol-
unteer events, visit ecii.eduvol-
unteer.
This writer can be reached at
newstttheeastcarolinian.com.
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inion
I beg to differ
WITN-TVmaking
the wrong decision
ERIC GILMORE
SPORTS EDITOR
The local NBC affiliate claims to be, "The
official television station of the ECU Pirates
Turn to the tubes this weekend and "the offi-
cial station" will be carrying Tar Heel football
during ECU's game at UCF.
Notre Dame has a national television con-
tract with NBC, the only of its kind, which
conflicts with the local interest of the WITN
affiliate. Notre Dame hosts UNC, which
overlaps with the ECU game, forcing WITN
management to make a critical decision. After
weighing their options, WITN has chosen
to broadcast a tape delay of the ECU-UCF
game starting after their 6 p.m. local news.
In other words, it values a probable blowout
between No. 11 Notre Dame and a 1-7 UNC
team over a pivotal conference match up with
an upstart Pirate squad looking for its first-ever
conference championship.
Notre Dame and UNC kickoff at 2:30 p.m.
while ECU-UCF start at 4 p.m. What if Travis
Williams has to make another game-saving inter-
ception in the end zone? While it's happening
live, ECU fans will be watching Marvin Dough-
erty deliver a Doppler 3000 weather forecast.
Some official station.
WITN has a contract with the Pirate Sports
Television Network to broadcast four games
each season. The agreement, which has been in
place since 1992, has aired nearly 100 games
throughout eastern North Carolina.
Billy Weaver, the WITN sports director,
serves as color analyst while weekend sports
anchor Brian Meador reports from the sideline.
When College Sports Television signed a con-
tractual agreement to control the majority of
television rights, WITN lost options.
CSTV, which is only available on digital
cable locally, has nationally broadcast the
Sept. 9 game at Navy, Oct. 7 contest against
Virginia and Oct. 28 game at Southern Miss.
"The UCF game was not on the original
schedule that we had set up with ECU said
WITN General Manager Mike Weeks in a radio
interview on Monday. "We'd like to have all away
games if we could because that would be of inter-
est to the largest group of potential fans
Weeks said WITN management never con-
sidered switching games midway through, saying
the option was "unacceptable WITN brass
interrupted the Southern Cal-Notre Dame last
season, a game with national interest last season
to start ECU's game at SMU. USC and Notre
Dame were ranked in the top-10 while neither
ECU nor SMU had a winning record. However,
Weeks did say that the broadcast at Rice on
Nov. 18 would preempt the Fighting Irish. He
said that interrupting the Notre Dame-UNC
broadcast could cause WITN a large fine for
diverting its national feed for a predetermined
number of hours.
He also considered carrying the game on
WITN's digital cable 7.2, but claimed he would
lose 80 percent of his audience. Why not carry
the game on digital cable live and still tape delay
the game on regular cable?
UCF controls the television rights and
despite WITN's requests, denied moving the 4
p.m. game time.
"We think this is a good game to be carried
and hope it doesn't inconvenience fans too much
Weeks understated.
WITN has already broadcast the game at
UAB and has plans to carry the Nov. 11 home
game against Marshall and at Rice on Nov. 18.
That is, unless, the Tar Heels are playing.
JUST ASK JANE
Need advice? Want answers? Just ask Jane.
Dear Jane,
I'm really concerned about one ofmy friends.
I think she has an eating disorder, but obviously,
that's not something I feel like I can just come out
and ask her about without possibly jeopardizing
our friendship. She's overly concerned with what
she eats and works out a crazy amount. More than
that, she's lost an astonishing amount of weight this
semester and I'm very concerned about her health.
Signed,
Astonished
Dear Astonished,
Eating disorders can be a tough topic to
tackle, so I understand why you seem hesitant
to approach your friend. However, she is put-
ting herself in an unhealthy state and if no one
intervenes then she may not realize that it is
a problem. People who have eating disorders
have a distorted mental picture of how they
appear to themselves and others around them.
If you are truly worried about your friends
well being then you should express your con-
cerns to her. You will not jeopardize your
friendship so long as you seem genuine and
you do not come off as being judgmental.
It is normal for both men and women to be con-
cerned about what they eat but if your friend is not
eating at all or is only limiting herself to lettuce and
celery then she has a problem that must be addressed.
There is an eating disorder center through the
Brody School of Medicine at ECU that you can refer
your friend to, if she agrees to go for counseling.
In many cases, a person with an eating disorder
does not realize that they have a problem. She obvi-
ously has a negative body image that has sprouted
from something. Somewhere down the line, she
developed this phobia, which will take time to
reverse, but if you remain a positive influence and a
good friend then she will have the support she needs.
I know it is scary to tell a friend that you think they
have a problem, but if they are never made aware
of it then they will not know to fix it. Good luck!
Sincerely,
Jane
UPeALS PfNPN6 OM PH0N CALLS To WtM INJ
PIRATE RANTS
I think one of my teachers is looking for
a new student to have relations with
to replace a student that graduated
last fall.
We beat Southern Miss! We beat
Southern Miss!
I love it when people chit chat very
loudly on the third floor in the library.
I mean, quiet study floor obviously
means people can talk however loud
they want. People are so smart.
Recreation and leisure is not easy!
I wish my roommate would stop
stealing my hat. Just because I let
you borrow it one time because you
wanted to cover up your greasy hair
for class does not mean it's yours
now.
ECU Parking and Transportation
must be run by the devil. For the past
three years, they have done every
thing in their power to ruin my life.
I'll write whatever I want on your
boyfriend's wall, he's still sleeping
with me anyway!
I wish I could believe that he always
cared - but I know that's not true.
Being bipolar makes functioning
in society the hardest thing ever
sometimes, especially when no one
understands.
I come to the library to study but all
I do is waste my time because I get
nothing accomplished.
Your bluetooth does not make you
cool Why do you insist on wearing
it in class? You sit on the front row,
so it is doubtful that you are going to
talk on the phone.
Quit trying to play your little mind
games with me. I'm not one of your
easily influenced minions. You forgot
that I am, and will always be, older
and wiser than you. Try listening
instead of arguing.
I'm sure you look cool in your
sunglasses when you're outside, but
you just look weird when you wear
them in class.
I have not had more than three
consecutive hours of sleep since
fall break.
Is it bad that I am turned off by girls
who are heading into careers that don't
make much money? i.e. teaching?
I can't tell if the guy sitting next to
me is adjusting himself or scratching
himself. Either way, five times every
two minutes is not healthy. Get that
checked pronto.
If you think the music sucks so bad
in the underground (which it does),
join the committee and voice your
opinions. Maybe then we wont have
Frail play five times a semester
and we can get some music worth
listening to.
Just because I wear big sunglasses
does not mean I am a skank. I just like
looking like I have bug eyes.
To the girt in marketing class who
wears skinny jeans and sandals
with socks -1 like it when you touch
my leg under the desk or hold my
hand where no one can see it. But
your mouth is filthy like a sailor's or
pirate's. When you learn to ask like a
lady I'll be your boy toy.
Enjoy life today, yesterday is gone
and tomorrow may never come.
You are an insignificant bleep in
our lives. Yet you still proceed to
create drama. Go back to studying or
quitting jobs and rot. Thanks.
I really do love my North Face. It
keeps me warm and it is fashionable.
But I hate that when I wash it, the next
day it still has lint all over it. Does
anybody else have that problem?
You're the one that decided to transfer
schools, so don't get upset when I
can't come see you when you want
me to. I have a life too.
It's just not right for a professor to
give a test at 8 a.m. the day after
Halloween. Give me a break! I want
to go out and celebrate!
Christmas break - I can't wait!
It's a woman's world, might as well
face it, they get what they want. Men
buy the drinks, girls call the shots.
There was a couple in the hall last
night arguing about a message on
Facebook, how superficial can you
get honestly?
If the male cheerleaders aren't
hooking up with the female
cheerleaders, then they are dating
one of them.
When you start showing that you care
about the things I do, I'll start caring
about the things you do.
I saw this girl Wednesday afternoon
attempt to parallel park her car about
10 times on Jarvis. She kept doing
the same thing every time before
finally giving up and dnving off. It was
funny, but I felt bad for her and wanted
to help. I almost walked up and said,
"Just get out and let me do it She
probably doesn't deserve to have a
driver's license.
The Brody School of Medicine is
awful. All you pre-med people be
forewarned to choose a different
school.
To the girl who sits next to me in my
9 a.m. - May I suggest trying a new
perfume? Please, you smell like a
grandma.
I love crunching acorns.
To the girl I met downtown last week
- My intentions were completely
honorable and I wish I knew how to
find you.
Why can't every day in Greenville be
as nice as it was on Saturday?!
Why must you get in the shower stall
right next to me when there are six
other ones open?
Please stop. Stop interfering. Stop
creating unnecessary drama. Stop,
stop, stop. And while you're at it Get
your own life!
Pee-Dee's Pet Peeve 1: People who
answer their cell phone and then say:
"Oh hey can I call you right back?"
Why even answer the damn phone.
Pee-Dee's Pet Peeve 2: Rainbows.
They've had their moment. They are
cool. We get it - you don't care what
you look like, you're late for class,
you're from eastern North Carolina,
love the beach, etc. When my lips
are chapped, I don't want to see
your crusty feet and toes. Break out
the Clarks. Pee-Dee's Pet Peeve 3:
Pirates that don't vote.
Soap operas remind me that my life
isn't as crazy as it could be. I love
Luke and Laura!
On Halloween girls can dress like
sluts. It happens all the time. It doesn't
mean that we are sluts, maybe we
dress up for fun. I'm sorry that your
boyfriend can't keep his eyes off us!
Get over it!
Sometimes I am really hateful.
Trust me? The last time you said that
I wound up with a Coyote Ugly.
After copying down pages of notes
for at least an hour, one of my
classmates asks the teacher to turn to
the previous slide. The teacher does
but replies with a smart comment,
"You guys need to learn how to write
faster I'm sorry my hand is about to
fall off, I will try to write really fast next
time so I can't read my notes, would
that be better for you?
I frequently feel the overpowering urge
to run to my classes, not because I'm
late but because it feels like walking
takes for-ev-er.
John Mayer, I just want to kick him.
I just want to be man of moderate
intelligence who wears a suit, so I'm
going to business school.
And that's how I saved Halloween,
Maybe in six beers.
Wow, who knew the way I walk could
be so distracting to others. Next time,
try focusing on looking forward, not
sideways.
Who stole the cookies from the
cookie jar?
Since when is a human being too
good to flush after they go to the
bathroom? I go in every single day
and flush an average of three toilets
because others won't. It does begin
to smell worse and worse if you do
that!
My friend never comes to class,
but expects me to just give her my
notes every single day. What's up
with that?
Did anyone notice the purple "Visitor
Parking Sign" on Fifth Street? ECU
should invest in many more.
I wrote a Pirate Rant about my
roommate and he actually pointed it
out to me and we laughed about it.
That moment was probably the best
moment of my entire life.
I do everything at my job and I can't
wait to see it fall apart when I leave
next year.
I'm glad you feel bad about
breaking up with me. In fact, it
makes me really happy. So stop
trying to talk to me, it only makes
you look even more pathetic.
The NAACP is as racially biased
as the groups they supposedly
stride against. They act like they
are fighting for equality but as the
name states they only care about
the advancement of one group. Does
anyone using their brain really think
that black-only groups like BSU are
any less immoral than the white-
only groups of the past that were so
obviously wrong? Give me a break
and stop being two-faced. You're
creating more racial separation than
the people for whom you are unjustly
mad at.
That CPS article makes me mad. It
makes me remember that I had to buy
two of those stupid things because
they are all a little bit different, and
neither one of my classes used them
even once.
I'm glad that BET speaker came and
told black people why everybody
hates them and for good reason.
How come black people yell at other
black people for not being black
enough? Black is a color of skin not
a type of personality.
I hate having so much to do that I just
want to cry all the time. Life is rough.
Sarah Bell
Editor in Chief
Rachel King
News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Eric Gilmore
Sports Editor
Zach Sirkin
Photo Editor
Rachael Letter
Multimedia Web Editor
Claire Murphy
Asst. News Editor
Sarah Campbell
Asst. Features Editor
Sarah Hackney
Head Copy Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
252.328.9238
252.328.9143
252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, the East Carolinian prints
9,000 copies every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
during the regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednes-
days during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the
editor which are limited to 250 words (which may be
edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the right to
edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editor@theeastcarolinian.com or to the fasf
Carolinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, N.C. 27858-
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of the fasf Carolinian is free, each additional copy is $1.
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 1,2006 PAGE A3
RANT OF THE DAY
My feet dangle as I sit on the toilet.
Election issues in
the land of the free
Gay marriage an important issue for
many Americans
JESSE PENCE
OPINION WRITER ,
Elections after election, candidates seeking our
approval to represent our views and opinions, to become
our voices, discuss key issues important to the American
public. In life, we are all different; our country is a vast and
developed meltingpot ofculture, religion and beliefs cre-
ating one of the most unique topographical tapestries of
people - that should be cultivated rather than segregated.
As 1 get older and more mature, I start to wonder
what my future will be and who is going to create the
future I would like to see. With the coming elections,
my key issues would have to be new processes for the
cultivation of energy, environmental protection and
finally gay marriage.
To some the topic of gay marriage seems over
dramatized, unimportant or the next step in an equal
society. Marriage has so many diverse definitions. For
some cultures it is a business arrangement, a sign of
unconditional loyalty or a tax break, among countless
other manifestations.
One definition of marriage, by Dictionary.com is "a
blending or matching of different elements or compo-
nents One ofmy best friends is an out homosexual. He
has those same dreams that many of us in college seek.
To earn a degree and maybe, just maybe, meet that some-
one that he is supposed to be with the rest of his life.
It is that "American Dream" to be evolved enough to
give yourself entirely to another behind a white picket
fence played countless times in American Cinema.
Our President refers to marriage as "a sanctity and
religious institution Now, as I recall from Law and Poli-
tics classes and U.S. History classes from high school, the
government is to be far removed from any one particular
religion as our country is diversified. To sponsor one
religion would be to negate one reason for our formation,
freedom of religion. By the standards of which I was
taught on the separation of Church and State, it would be
apparent that all marriages officiated by a Justice of the
Peace or other governmental council should be null and
void - it is a religious celebration and therefore should
be kept apart from our governing body.
Marriages should offer no legal contract, as all religions
and denominations of religions have different interpreta-
tions within their mythologies. The government should
offer all people seeking partnered benefits a civil union,
the joining of two parties and the collaboration of finances.
Our government has rules, laws and regulations
about protecting its citizens from others and themselves.
Any part of a religious belief that threatens the safety of
her citizens is not applicable to our freedom. For instance,
within the Holy Bible stoning was used as punishment. If
this practice were to reoccur in our own time, our gov-
ernment would be required to intervene. Just because
you're religion believes something does not mean you
automatically have the freedom to do so. Our Bill of
Rights clearly defines that I am an individual able to
make my own decisions and not be forced like many of our
ancestors to practice one specific set of religious beliefs.
By this standard, your beliefs might say, "Well
no, a gay marriage is a sin as it says in the Bible You
are allowed to believe this and followers of your reli-
gion can respect this, however, your religion should
not supercede the decisions of our forefathers in
determining what America was built upon. America
is nothing more than a fantastic idea, a glorious
experiment constantly changing, where any person
with any belief and any idea would be respected,
where no one has any right to force beliefs beyond
inherent ethical and inherent moral codes upon you.
"Marriage" is just a word. The audience determines
the definition of marriage. Change the word to "civil
union "partnership" or "domestic beneficiaries" they
all mean the same thing, the implication is there. By our
President's former statement said a year or two ago, "pro-
tect the sanctity of marriage he did nothing more than
contradict previous court decisions separating religious
opinion from governmental process. If two people of the
same sex are not to be married by the court, then neither
should any couple of the opposite sex. So many people are
confusing personal belief with ethical behavior, blurring
boundaries that were set into effect many years ago. All
people of any diversity are equal as clearly defined by
our constitution. To define marriage through religion
should remove it from our legal system.
The other walls of hate
JUSTIN SUMMER
OPINION WRITER
Last week's "Wall of Hate" set up by the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Society was a success on campus and hopefully raised
some awareness to the problems created by racism. What may
be surprising to some of you is that the "Wall of Hate" set up
in the brickyard was not the only place on campus covered
with racial slurs and epithets on campus. In the library, for
instance, the stalls in the men's bathroom are covered in
obscenities, both racial and homophobic. People find the need
to scribble "KKK" and phony Web sites and phone numbers
to call "for a good time For years, I have seen this sort of
immature and liatefiil graffiti on display in public bathroom
stalLs, but it is a completely absurd for college students to be
doing it on campus.
I don't understand how itis acceptable for people to express
theiropinionson lathroom walls. Maybe people think it is cool
because otJier people have done it; kids did it in middle school
and no one cared. But, things should be different in college as
I m sure things are different at other colleges. Why is this sort
of behavior still tolerated at ECU?
These rarist, hateful andor offensive comments written
in bathnxims do not bother me that much because I am white
and don't spend too much time in the bathroom at Joyner. But I
would bet that the many black, gay or Jewish students would be,
not to mention tile people wlx) clean the badirooms of Joyner.
I think that this sort of thoughtless aixl immature behavior
should not be tolerated here at ECU. I'm not too sure of what
ran be done about the problem but we should at feast address it.
At the football game a few weeks ago, people were appar-
ently shouting obscenities in front of children and being drunk
and offensive After the game, we all received the e-mail that
was dioroughh effective at making us Pirates feel ashamed of
our behavior. If being drunk and loud in front of an opposing
fan Ls offensive and merits a campus-wide e-mail and guilt trip,
why is this BS in the BR tolerated?
Once again, I must stress the fact that we are college
students and should act like it. Writing on bathroom stalls
might be amusing in elementary school, but things should be
different in a college 'atmosphere.





EastCarolinian
VOLUME 82, ISSUE 24
www.theeastcarolinian.com
YOUR SOURCE
FOR CAMPUS
NEWS SINCE 1925
I
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 1. 2006
Midnight Madness draws crowd
Winter will be here
soon. Don't be the
only one wearing last
season's trends. Find
out what will make you
warm and fashionable
this winterPage A4
Road trips with your
friends can be some
of your best college
memories, but what
do you do when
your road trip takes
a terrible turn for
the worse? Find out
PageA4
Last nights Midnight Madness Halloween festivities kicked off at 9 p.m. in Mendenhall Student Center. This year, approximately two hundred students waitedriu7n7thD 1
the center to open with more students jumping in the line that extended all the way to Green Residence Hallfand they weTenr the only ones Se2 0$ftaMatalw Lm
Madness last year said Levy Brown, associate director of the Student Activities Center at ECU. "We expect the total number fo this vLr trIh.Z,t th.of attended Midnight
KfaSKfl lVht night were'many studen,s reported that they were lookinto & mSLSMfliAVfSSlSZ tin
Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium could be
undergoing some
changes in the
near future. Read
our article to see
how soon stadium
upgrades will take
placePageA6
The club ice hockey
team beat conference
rival Richmond before
losing their first game
of the season. Check
out our update to
see how the men are
doing in their second
seasonPage A6
Up 'til Dawn fundraiser
held for St. Jude Hospital
6 1 9
4 3 2
7 5 8
7 2 4
9 5 8
6 3 1
4(817
5 1 2
3j69
2 9 6
1 4 5
8 7 3
3 5
6 1
2 4
21 9
6 4 3
5 8 7

4 5 8
3J7J2
Test your skills at
SuDoKuPage A9
NEWSPageA2
PULSEPageA4
SPORTSPageA6
OPINIONPage A3
CLASSIFIEDSPageA8
Volunteers give 'Buck' a bath at the Humane Society location of the event.
Students participate
in the first Make a
Difference Day event
Students write letters to their friends,
Over 154 campuses
participated, $10
million raised last year
ADELINE TRENTO
STAFF WRITER
Last Thursday, Oct. 26, ECU
hosted a letter writing event as
part of Up 'til Dawn, a fund-
raising campaign for St. Jude
Children's Research Hospital.
The nationwide fund-raiser,
which aims to unite students with
the community and raise money
for the children at St. Jude, takes
place on 154 campuses across
the U.S. and has raised more
than $10 million for St. Jude.
Students who participated in
)
family and neighbors in an attempt to
the fundraiser were organized into
groups of about six people, and
each group member was asked to
send 50 letters to friends, family
and neighbors in an attempt to
receive donations for St. Jude.
Students were asked to sign and
address pre-written letters to
people they knew in hopes that
their friends and family would
donate whatever they could to
the cause.
Most students volunteered
their time to help with this event
because fundraising is critical
to the success of St. Jude. The
research hospital relies on dona-
tions because they offer free treat-
ment to sick children all over the
world.
St. Jude is also the only pedi-
request donations for the hospital.
atric cancer research center where
families are never asked to pay for
treatments not covered by their
insurance, and families with-
out insurance are never asked
to pay, according to Stjude.org.
Many sororities, clubs, honor
students and faculty members, as
well as groups of students just
wanting to help, participated in
this event. Students who took part
in this fund-raiser did so because
they thought it was a great cause.
"I decided to volunteer for this
event because I want to work with
children one day said Jamie Dan-
iels, junior elementary education
major. "St. Jude is an amazing place
see JUDE page A2
I
National day of service
recognized
CLAYTON BAUMAN
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Volunteer Center
held its first Make a Difference
Day volunteer drive this past
Saturday with hundreds of stu-
dents taking part in a variety
of community service projects.
Make a Difference Day is a
nationwide initiative that was
started by the news publication
USA Today. The fourth Saturday
of every October is the desig-
nated day around the nation.
Last year, nearly three million
volunteers were on record for par-
ticipating in community service.
According to Jason Denius,
director of the Volunteer and
Service Learning Center, 200
up to participate in the event.
"We are using this project
as a way to hopefully recruit
some folks who have never vol-
unteered before said Denius.
Students were placed in five
different service groups, each
going to different areas around
the Greenville community. These
areas were Third Street School,
Habitat for Humanity, Epees Rec-
reation Center and the Humane
Society of Eastern Carolina.
Once organized into their
designated groups, students were
bussed out to their respective
locations where they participated
in a variety of different activi-
ties dependent on their location.
According to the ECU Vol-
unteer Web site, ecu.eduvol-
unteer, students at the Third
Street School took part in
cleaning, painting, landscap-
ing and classroom organization.
Habitat for Humanity Volun-
teers took part in building, organiz-
ing and cleaning in an effort to help
shelter low income families in need
Humane Society Volunteers
took part'in taking care of the
animals through cleaning ken-
nels as well as dog washing
Epees Recreational Center vol-
unteers aided with cleaning, paint
ing, landscaping and a food drive
An additional project, Potato
Drop, was performed in conjunc
tion wuh the Food Bank of cen
tral and eastern North Carolina
.
see SERVICE page A2





News
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 1, 2006 PAGE A2
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dia De Los Muertos (The
Day of the Dead)
Wednesday, Nov. 1 from
5:30 until 7 p.m. at the
Newman Center on 10th
Street by Fletcher Music
Hall.
Come and help celebrate
this traditional Latino cel-
ebration with free food,
dancing and a pirtata. All
are welcome to bring pic-
tures of loved ones who
have passed, where they
can be honored in a short
service before festivities
begin.
Pi Kappa Delta information
session
Wednesday, Nov. 1
Professional communica-
tions forensic service will
hold an information session
in Bate 1032 for all those
interested in the organiza-
tion. The fraternity is co-ed,
multi-disciplinary and is
seeking dedicated individu-
als committed to improving
their world while improving
communication skills.
For additional informa-
tion, contact the president,
Roger Allen Conner, Jr. C. ht
CPM or visit pkdecu.com
ECU'S Japan Center East
hosts Wellness Japan
Thursday, Nov. 2at 5:30 p.m.
ECU'S School of Nurs-
ing, Room 1102, Allied
Health Sciences Building
Acupuncture, Reiki and
other alternative health
topics are the focus of a sem-
inar and workshop offered
by ECU'S Japan Center East.
The cost of the program is
$12 for the general public;
$10 for senior citizens and
$7 for students. Registra-
tion begins at 5:15 p.m.
Visit ecu.edujapancen-
tereast or contact Chikako
Massey masseyc@ecu.edu
or 252-737-1352 for more
information.
Teacher Cadet Day
Tuesday, Nov. 7 in
Mendenhall Student Center
room 244 from 10:45-
11:15 a.m.
The North Carolina Teacher
Cadet Program is an inno-
vative yearlong or semester
block activity based curric-
ulum for high school juniors
and seniors. The course
is designed to promote a
better understanding and
create interest in those stu-
dents who are considering
teaching as a profession.
It's an honors class that
details many components of
the education environment
and involves students in
content, application, obser-
vations and teaching.
English professor to hold
reading
Luke Whisnant, professor of
creative writing at ECU, will
read from his new collection
of short stories, Down in the
Food(Iris Books, 2006) at
8 p.m. Nov. 9, at Bate 1031.
One of the stories, "How to
Build a House is included
In the anthology, New Sto-
nes from the South 2006
(Algonquin Press).
ECU Brewster Lecture
The annual Brewster
Lecture at ECU will fea-
ture historian Barbara J.
Harris at 8 p.m. Nov. 9, in
the Science and Technol-
ogy building room C207.
Harris, a professor of history
and women's studies at the
University of North Carolina-
Chapel Hill, will present "The
Fabric of Piety: Aristocratic
Women and Care of the
Dead, 1450-1550 Profes-
sor Harris's research focuses
on Yorkist and early Tudor
England, as well as politi-
cal and women's history.
New course - Spring 2007
The Department of Exer-
cise and Sport Science has
announce that it will offer a
new course this Spring 2007
titled: "Physical Activity and
Disease Prevention" three
credits, EXSS 2020. The
purpose of the course is to
help students understand
the underlying reasons why
being physically active helps
reduce the risk of develop-
ing chronic diseases. The
class meets MW from 4
- 5:15 p.m. The course is
designed for non-exercise
science majors. Contact Dr.
Peter Farrell, farrellpecu.
edu for more information.

1
Wed
2
Thu
Campus & Community
3 Fri 4 Sat
5 Sun 6
Mon
Tue
Pate Conaway, Textiles
Exhibition Opens
Mendenhall Student
Center Gallery
Community Appearance
Commission Meeting
Third Floor Conference
Room of City Hall, 200
Martin Luther King, Jr.
Drive
5:30 p.m.
Russian Film Series:
"Prisoner of the Moun-
tains"
Movies have English
subtitles or dubbing.
6:30 p.m.
Bate 2011
Hard Core Concert
Featuring The Avengers,
Romeo is Bleeding, Your
name in Vain
Mendenhall Student
Center, Pirate Under-
ground
7 p.m.
Teaching with Tech-
nology "Think-In"
Mendenhall Student
Center
10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Folkfriends Concert
Tipsy TeapotParker-
Kennybrook Books,
409 Evans Street
7 p.m.
Dwayne Perkins
Comedy Show
Mendenhall Student
Center Multipurpose
room
8 p.m.
ECU English Reading:
Down in the Flood
Luke Whisnant, ECU
creative writing profes-
sor, will read from his
short story collection,
"Down in the Flood"
(Iris Press, 2006).
Bate 1031
8 p.m.
ECU'S Brewster Lec-
ture in History
Science and Technol-
ogy Building, Room
C207.
8 p.m.
REBEL Exhibition
Opening
Emerge Gallery, Evans
St.
6 - 9 p.m.
Sarin Featuring David
Condos Concert
Mendenhall Student
Center, Pirate Under-
ground
7 p.m.
Saturday cannot be
completely empty
Submit your events to
our calendar, online at
theeastcarolinian.com.
World Fest 2006
Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center
City Council Meeting
City Council Chambers
6 p.m.
Election Day
Cultural BINGO
$500 Cash in Prizes
Destination 360
9 p.m.
Redevelopment Com-
mission Meeting
Second Floor Board
Room of Bank
of America Build-
ing, 201 West First
Street
5:30 p.m.
The Caine Mutiny
Court-Martial
S. Rudolph Alexan-
der Performing Arts
Series
Wright Auditorium
8 p.m.
Featured Event:
Dia de los Muertos:
5:30 - 7 p.m. Newman Center on 10th Street by Fletcher Music Hall.
Come and help celebrate this traditional Latino celebration with free
food, dancing and a pinata.
BRIEFS
South Georgia town plagued
by bats
(AP) So many bats have
infested the town's historic district
that the sky turns black with each
sunset and the neighborhood is call-
ing on Batman to come to the rescue.
That's what the local bat remover
goes by. George Perkins often
makes public appearances in the
caped crusader's costume and
drives his own Bat mobile, a retro-
styled Chrysler Prowler with bat
emblems. Callers to his office in
Eufaula, Ala known as Bat Cave
1, or Union Springs, Ala known
as Bat Cave '2, hear the "Batman"
TV show theme while on hold.
"They're perpetual crap machines
said Tripp 1'ouieroy, who moved to
the town of 17,000 in 1989 to work
for Habitat for Humanity, which
has its global headquarters here.
In a letter to city officials, Harris
said free-tailed bats have apparently
expanded their range and number
in Georgia and have adapted to
roosting in buildings in many towns
across the state. There are many
other bat species, but it's the free-
tail variety that seem to be causing
the most problems here.
CDC probing salmo-
nella outbreak in 18 states
(AP) A salmonella outbreak
potentially linked to produce has
sickened at least 12 people in 18
states, health officials said Monday.
Health officials think the bac-
teria may have spread through
some form of produce - the list of
suspects includes tomatoes. But
the illnesses have not been tied
to any specific product, chain,
restaurants or supermarkets.
No one has died in the outbreak,
which stems from a common
form of salmonella bacteria.
Eleven people have been hos-
pitalized, health officials said.
"We're very early in the inves-
tigation said Dave Daigle, a
spokesman for the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention.
The most serious outbreak, first
reported in September, involved
spinach tainted with E. coli bac-
teria that killed three people
and sickened more than 200.
Health officials estimate that more
than 1.4 million cases of salmonel-
losis occur in the U.S. each year.
About 1.3 million of those cases
come from food, Braden said.
Girl Freed From Life of Slaver
(AP) A California couple is facing
charges after allegedly paying her par-
ents in Egypt to "lease" a young girl.
Police say the girl was used for
two years to work 16 hours a
day cleaning the couple's home
and caring for their children.
The girl's parents were allegedly
paid $30 a month for her services.
The couple has been ordered to
pay back wages of $76,000 and
may face time in prison and
then be deported to Egypt.
Courtney Love Was
Rejected as Mouseketeer
Rock musician Courtney Love
was rejected as a Mouseketeer by
television's Mickey Mouse Club in
1976, her newly published "Dirty
Blonde" diary says. The book
also exposes her painful relation-
ship with her mother, therapist
Linda Carroll, Newsweek reports.
"When I get around (Carroll), I
feel so awkward and timid and
weak trying to prove to her
that I can make friends and be
popular a 12-year-old Love writes.
Later letters come from
inside an Oregon prison.
Love's memoir hits the shelves
a week after her late husband,
singer-songwriter-guitarist Kurt
Cobain displaced Elvis at No. 1
on Forbess list of the top-earning
dead celebrities, Newsweek notes.
Part of that comes from Love, who
sold her 25 percent share in the
Seattle-based rock band Nirvana
catalog, and earned Cobain's estate
$50 million.
ECU explores Hispanic
culture through film
JUDE
continued from Al
and I think it's important to help
raise money for them so they can
keep helping so many children
The Up 'til Dawn letter
writing campaign was a huge
success at ECU with more
than 40 teams and 300 people
participating in the event.
More than 6,000 letters were
sent on Thursday and the goal is to
raise100,000 for St. Jude through
the letter writing campaign and
other events planned for the year.
"The letter writing cam-
paign is the biggest fundraiser
that Up til Dawn does said
Ashley Collins, member of the
Up til Dawn board. "So many
people are involved and we are
able to reach so many different
people with relatively little effort
Other events will be held
throughout the year in order
to raise even more money for
the children at St. Jude. A silent
auction, car wash, bake sale
and bowling tournament are
planned for the upcoming months.
At the end of the fundrais-
ing campaign, an event will be
held where participants will stay
"Up 'til Dawn" to honor the
children and families of St. Jude.
Anyone that wishes to
donate money to St. Jude Chil-
dren's Research Hospital can
do so at stjude.orgdonate.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
SERVICE
continued from Al
Students gather together to watch educational films that explore the history and culture of Latin America
Two films shown in
inaugural series
ZACK HILL
STAFF WRITER
The first leg of the new His-
panic Film Series wrapped up
Thursday night in Bate 2011 with
a showing of lllummaiios por el
h'urifo(Enlightened by Fire), a film
about the conflict between Argen-
tina and Britain in the 1080a. It
was preceded in the series by a
September showing of Halsrros, a
documentary about Cuban rafters
coming to America.
The series is being put together
by Juan Damn and Jennifer Valko,
both professors in the depart-
ment of foreign languages and
literature's Spanish division.
They said that it is the first
Hispanic film scries that they have
heard of at ECU.
"We thought it was necessary
because of not only the changing
demographics in the state, but
also the fact that the university is
seeing more students with a His-
panic background said Daneri.
"It's a way to get people to
learn about other cultures not only
in terms of their differences, but
also the similarities and shared
experiences said Valko
Before each screening, a pro-
fessor or faculty member gives
tome background information and
puts the film in a context in which
the students can relate. Afterward,
discussion is encouraged, though
not required.
"We are careful to avoid turn-
ing this into a classroom situation
Daneri said.
So far, turnout has exceeded
their expectations, with the
upstairs classroom in the Bate
building strained to hold the 40
to 50 students who have shown
up each time. Students from Pitt
Community College as well as
members of the Greenville com-
munity have also attended the
films.
Valko and Daneri hope that the
i
films expand students' perspec-
tives on Hispanic culture.
A lot of people have a fairly
limited idea of what Hispanic cul-
ture is. They usually think about
it in terms of a single country.
Latin America is very diverse
and there are lot of things like
immigration, war and economic
and environmental issues that are
important both there and here
Daneri said.
The series will pick up again in
the spring semester, though dates
have not yet been set. Valko and
Daneri hope that the showings
will continue to be a success so
that funding may become available
to bring in a guest speaker, such as
a Hispanic filmmaker.
In the meantime, they are sat-
isfied with their progress so far.
"We want people to reflect
on what they've seen, and also
see some very good films Valko
said.
This writer can be contacted at
newsOtheeastcarolinian.com.
It is Denius's hope that the people
who volunteer will see what
they do as a positive experi-
ence and will come out in the
future for more volunteer projects.
As a side project to the differ-
ent volunteer events, the Volunteer
Center had 1.5 students participat-
ing as site leaders.
These students supervised
their peers and encouraged them
during the day.
Students who missed out on
Make a Difference Day and want
to volunteer in the future have an
opportunity in the spring. On the
Monday holiday for Martin Luther
Kings birthday, the volunteer
center is hoping to have a day of
service as well.
To keep up with future vol-
unteer events, visit ecu.eduvol-
unteer.
This writer can be reached at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Jane





inion
I beg to differ
WITN-TVmaking
the wrong decision
ERIC GILMORE
SPORTS EDITOR
The local NBC affiliate claims to be, "The
official television station of the ECU Pirates
Turn to the tubes this weekend and "the offi-
cial station" will be carrying Tar Heel football
during ECU's game at UCF.
Notre Dame has a national television con-
tract with NBC, the only of its kind, which
conflicts with the local interest of the WITN
affiliate. Notre Dame hosts UNC, which
overlaps with the ECU game, forcing WITN
management to make a critical decision. After
weighing their options, WITN has chosen
to broadcast a tape delay of the ECU-UCF
game starting after their 6 p.m. local news.
In other words, it values a probable blowout
between No. 11 Notre Dame and a 1-7 UNC
team over a pivotal conference match up with
an upstart Pirate squad looking for its first-ever
conference championship.
Notre Dame and UNC kickoff at 2:30 p.m.
while ECU-UCF start at p.m. What if Travis
Williams has to make another game-saving inter-
ception in the end zone? While it's happening
live, ECU fans will be watching Marvin Dough-
erty deliver a Doppler 3000 weather forecast.
Some official station.
WITN has a contract with the Pirate Sports
Television Network to broadcast four games
each season. The agreement, which has been in
place since 1992, has aired nearly 100 games
throughout eastern North Carolina.
Billy Weaver, the WITN sports director,
serves as color analyst while weekend sports
anchor Brian Meador reports from the sideline.
When College Sports Television signed a con-
tractual agreement to control the majority of
television rights, WITN lost options.
CSTV, which is only available on digital
cable locally, has nationally broadcast the
Sept. 9 game at Navy, Oct. 7 contest against
Virginia and Oct. 28 game at Southern Miss.
"The UCF game was not on the original
schedule that we had set up with ECU said
WITN General Manager Mike Weeks in a radio
interview on Monday. "We'd like to have all away
games if we could because that would be of inter-
est to the largest group of potential fans
Weeks said WITN management never con-
sidered switching games midway through, saying
the option was "unacceptable WITN brass
interrupted the Southern Cal-Notre Dame last
season, a game with national interest last season
to start ECU's game at SMU. USC and Notre
Dame were ranked in the top-10 while neither
ECU nor SMU had a winning record. However,
Weeks did say that the broadcast at Rice on
Nov. 18 would preempt the Fighting Irish. He
said that interrupting the Notre Dame-UNC
broadcast could cause WITN a large fine for
diverting its national feed for a predetermined
number of hours.
He also considered carrying the game on
WITN's digital cable 7.2, but claimed he would
lose 80 percent of his audience. Why not carry
the game on digital cable live and still tape delay
the game on regular cable?
UCF controls the television rights and
despite WITN's requests, denied moving the 4
p.m. game time.
"We think this is a good game to be carried
and hope it doesn't inconvenience fans too much
Weeks understated.
WITN has already broadcast the game at
UAB and has plans to carry the Nov. 11 home
game against Marshall and at Rice on Nov. 18.
That is, unless, the Tar Heels are playing.
JUST ASK JANE
Need advice? Want answers? Just ask Jane.
Dear Jane,
I'm really concerned about one of my friends.
I think she has an eating disorder, but obviously,
that's not something I feel like I can just come out
and ask her about without possibly jeopardizing
our friendship. She's overly concerned with what
she eats and works out a crazy amount. More than
that, she's lost an astonishing amount of weight this
semester and I'm very concerned about her health.
Signed,
Astonished
Dear Astonished,
Eating disorders can be a tough topic to
tackle, so I understand why you seem hesitant
to approach your friend. However, she is put-
ting herself in an unhealthy state and if no one
intervenes then she may not realize that it is
a problem. People who have eating disorders
have a distorted mental picture of how they
appear to themselves and others around them.
If you are truly worried about your friends
well being then you should express your con-
cerns to her. You will not jeopardize your
friendship so long as you seem genuine and
you do not come off as being judgmental.
It is normal for both men and women to be con-
cerned about what they eat but if your friend is not
eating at all or is only limiting herself to lettuce and
celery then she has a problem that must be addressed.
There is an eating disorder center through the
Brody School of Medicine at ECU that you can refer
your friend to, if she agrees to go for counseling.
In many cases, a person with an eating disorder
does not realize that they have a problem. She obvi-
ously has a negative body image that has sprouted
from something. Somewhere down the line, she
developed this phobia, which will take time to
reverse, but if you remain a positive influence and a
good friend then she will have the support she needs.
I know it is scary to tell a friend that you think they
have a problem, but if they are never made aware
of it then they will not know to fix it. Good luck!
Sincerely,
Jane
UPeKAL5 Pf6NPNG OM ?H0VB CALLS To WiM IN
PIRATE RANTS
I think one of my teachers is looking for
a new student to have relations with
to replace a student that graduated
last fall.
We beat Southern Miss! We beat
Southern Miss!
I love it when people chit chat very
loudly on the third floor in the library.
I mean, quiet study floor obviously
means people can talk however loud
they want. People are so smart.
Recreation and leisure is not easy!
I wish my roommate would stop
stealing my hat. Just because I let
you borrow it one time because you
wanted to cover up your greasy hair
for class does not mean it's yours
now.
ECU Parking and Transportation
must be run by the devil. For the past
three years, they have done every
thing in their power to ruin my life.
I'll write whatever I want on your
boyfriend's wall, he's still sleeping
with me anyway!
I wish I could believe that he always
cared - but I know that's not true.
Being bipolar makes functioning
in society the hardest thing ever
sometimes, especially when no one
understands.
I come to the library to study but all
I do is waste my time because I get
nothing accomplished.
Your bluetooth does not make you
cool Why do you insist on wearing
it in class? You sit on the front row,
so it is doubtful that you are going to
talk on the phone.
Quit trying to play your little mind
games with me. I'm not one of your
easily influenced minions. You forgot
that I am, and will always be, older
and wiser than you. Try listening
instead of arguing.
I'm sure you look cool in your
sunglasses when you're outside, but
you just look weird when you wear
them in class.
I have not had more than three
consecutive hours of sleep since
fall break.
Is it bad that I am turned off by girts
who are heading into careers that don't
make much money? i.e. teaching?
I can't tell if the guy sitting next to
me is adjusting himself or scratching
himself. Either way, five times every
two minutes is not healthy. Get that
checked pronto.
If you think the music sucks so bad
in the underground (which it does),
join the committee and voice your
opinions. Maybe then we wont have
Frail play five times a semester
and we can get some music worth
listening to.
Just because I wear big sunglasses
does not mean I am a skank. I just like
looking like I have bug eyes.
To the girt in marketing class who
wears skinny jeans and sandals
with socks -1 like it when you touch
my leg under the desk or hold my
hand where no one can see it. But
your mouth is filthy like a sailor's or
pirate's. When you learn to ask like a
lady I'll be your boy toy.
Enjoy life today, yesterday is gone
and tomorrow may never come.
You are an insignificant bleep in
our lives. Yet you still proceed to
create drama. Go back to studying or
quitting jobs and rot. Thanks.
I really do love my North Face. It
keeps me warm and it is fashionable.
But I hate that when I wash it, the next
day it still has lint all over it. Does
anybody else have that problem?
You're the one that decided to transfer
schools, so don't get upset when I
can't come see you when you want
me to. I have a life too.
It's just not right for a professor to
give a test at 8 a.m. the day after
Halloween. Give me a break! I want
to go out and celebrate!
Christmas break - I can't wait!
It's a woman's world, might as well
faceit.theygetwhattheywant Men
buy the drinks, girts call the shots.
There was a couple in the hall last
night arguing about a message on
Facebook, how superficial can you
get honestly?
If the male cheerleaders aren't
hooking up with the female
cheerleaders, then they are dating
one of them.
When you start showing that you care
about the things I do, I'll start caring
about the things you do.
I saw this girt Wednesday afternoon
attempt to parallel park her car about
10 times on Jarvis. She kept doing
the same thing every time before
finally giving up and dnving off. It was
funny, but I felt bad for her and wanted
to help. I almost walked up and said,
"Just get out and let me do it She
probably doesn't deserve to have a
driver's license.
The Brody School of Medicine is
awful. All you pre-med people be
forewarned to choose a different
school.
To the girl who sits next to me in my
9 a.m. - May I suggest trying a new
perfume? Please, you smell like a
grandma.
I love crunching acorns.
To the girl I met downtown last week
- My intentions were completely
honorable and I wish I knew how to
find you.
Why can't every day in Greenville be
as nice as it was on Saturday?!
Why must you get in the shower stall
right next to me when there are six
other ones open?
Please stop. Stop interfering. Stop
creating unnecessary drama. Stop,
stop, stop. And while you're at it Get
your own life!
Pee-Dee's Pet Peeve 1: People who
answer their cell phone and then say:
"Oh hey can I call you right back?"
Why even answer the damn phone.
Pee-Dee's Pet Peeve 2: Rainbows.
They've had their moment. They are
cool. We get it - you don't care what
you look like, you're late for class,
you're from eastern North Carolina,
love the beach, etc. When my lips
are chapped, I don't want to see
your crusty feet and toes. Break out
the Clarks. Pee-Dee's Pet Peeve 3:
Pirates that don't vote.
Soap operas remind me that my life
isn't as crazy as it could be. I love
Luke and Laura!
On Halloween girls can dress like
sluts. It happens all the time. It doesn't
mean that we are sluts, maybe we
dress up for fun. I'm sorry that your
boyfriend can't keep his eyes off us!
Get over it!
Sometimes I am really hateful.
Trust me? The last time you said that
I wound up with a Coyote Ugly.
After copying down pages of notes
for at least an hour, one of my
classmates asks the teacher to turn to
the previous slide. The teacher does
but replies with a smart comment,
"You guys need to learn how to write
faster I'm sorry my hand is about to
fall off, I will try to write really fast next
time so I can't read my notes, would
that be better for you?
I frequently feel the overpowering urge
to run to my classes, not because I'm
late but because it feels like walking
takes for-ev-er.
John Mayer, I just want to kick him.
I just want to be man of moderate
intelligence who wears a suit, so I'm
going to business school.
And that's how I saved Halloween.
Maybe in six beers.
Wow, who knew the way I walk could
be so distracting to others. Next time,
try focusing on looking forward, not
sideways.
Who stole the cookies from the
cookie jar?
Since when is a human being too
good to flush after they go to the
bathroom? I go in every single day
and flush an average of three toilets
because others won't. It does begin
to smell worse and worse if you do
that!
My friend never comes to class,
but expects me to just give her my
notes every single day. What's up
with that?
Did anyone notice the purple "Visitor
Parking Sign" on Fifth Street? ECU
should invest in many more.
I wrote a Pirate Rant about my
roommate and he actually pointed it
out to me and we laughed about it.
That moment was probably the best
moment of my entire life.
I do everything at my job and I can't
wait to see it fall apart when I leave
next year.
I'm glad you feel bad about
breaking up with me. In fact, it
makes me really happy. So stop
trying to talk to me, it only makes
you look even more pathetic.
The NAACP is as racially biased
as the groups they supposedly
stride against. They act like they
are fighting for equality but as the
name states they only care about
the advancement of one group. Does
anyone using their brain really think
that black-only groups like BSU are
any less immoral than the white-
only groups of the past that were so
obviously wrong? Give me a break
and stop being two-faced. You're
creating more racial separation than
the people for whom you are unjustly
mad at.
That CPS article makes me mad. It
makes me remember that I had to buy
two of those stupid things because
they are all a little bit different, and
neither one of my classes used them
even once.
I'm glad that BET speaker came and
told black people why everybody
hates them and for good reason.
How come black people yell at other
black people for not being black
enough? Black is a color of skin not
a type of personality.
I hate having so much to do that I just
want to cry all the time. Life is rough.
Sarah Bell
Editor in Chief
Rachel King
News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Eric Gilmore
Sports Editor
Zach Sirkin
Photo Editor
Rachael Lottar
Multimedia Web Editor
Claire Murphy
Asst. News Editor
Sarah Campbell
Asst. Features Editor
Sarah Hackney
Head Copy Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Production Manager
Newsroom
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Advertising
252.328.9238
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Serving ECU since 1925, the East Carolinian prints
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WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 1,2006 PAGE A3
RANT OF THE DAY
My feet dangle as I sit on the toilet.
Election issues in
the land of the free
Gay marriage an important issue for
many Americans
JESSE PENCE
OPINION WRITER
Elections after election, candidates seeking our
approval to represent our views and opinions, to become
our voices, discuss key issues important to the American
public. In life, we are all different; our country is a vast and
developed melting pot of culture, religion and beliefs cre-
ating one of the most unique topographical tapestries of
people - that should be cultivated rather than segregated.
As 1 get older and more mature, I start to wonder
what my future will be and who is going to create the
future I would like to see. With the coming elections,
my key issues would have to be new processes for the
cultivation of energy, environmental protection and
finally gay marriage.
To some the topic of gay marriage seems over
dramatized, unimportant or the next step in an equal
society. Marriage has so many diverse definitions. For
some cultures it is a business arrangement, a sign of
unconditional loyalty or a tax break, among countless
other manifestations.
One definition of marriage, by Dictionary.com is "a
blending or matching of different elements or compo-
nents One of my best friends is an out homosexual. He
has those same dreams that many of us in college seek.
To earn a degree and maybe, just maybe, meet that some-
one that he is supposed to be with the rest of his life.
It is that "American Dream" to be evolved enough to
give yourself entirely to another behind a white picket
fence played countless times in American Cinema.
Our President refers to marriage as "a sanctity and
religious institution Now, as I recall from Law and Poli-
tics classes and U.S. History classes from high school, the
government is to be far removed from any one particular
religion as our country is diversified. To sponsor one
religion would be to negate one reason for our formation,
freedom of religion. By the standards of which I was
taught on the separation of Church and State, it would be
apparent that all marriages officiated by a Justice of the
Peace or other governmental council should be null and
void - it is a religious celebration and therefore should
be kept apart from our governing body.
Marriages should offer no legal contract, as all religions
and denominations of religions have different interpreta-
tions within their mythologies. The government should
offer all people seeking partnered benefits a civil union,
the joining of two parties and the collaboration of finances.
Our government has rules, laws and regulations
about protecting its citizens from others and themselves.
Any part of a religious belief that threatens the safety of
her citizens is not applicable to our freedom. For instance,
within the Holy Bible stoning was used as punishment. If
this practice were to reoccur in our own time, our gov-
ernment would be required to intervene. Just because
you're religion believes something does not mean you
automatically have the freedom to do so. Our Bill of
Rights clearly defines that I am an individual able to
make my own decisions and not be forced like many of our
ancestors to practice one specific set of religious beliefs.
By this standard, your beliefs might say, "Well
no, a gay marriage is a sin as it says in the Bible You
are allowed to believe this and followers of your reli-
gion can respect this, however, your religion should
not supercede the decisions of our forefathers in
determining what America was built upon. America
is nothing more than a fantastic idea, a glorious
experiment constantly changing, where any person
with any belief and any idea would be respected,
where no one has any right to force beliefs beyond
inherent ethical and inherent moral codes upon you.
"Marriage" is just a word. The audience determines
the definition of marriage. Change the word to "civil
union "partnership" or "domestic beneficiaries" they
all mean the same thing, the implication is there. By our
President's former statement said a year or two ago, "pro-
tect the sanctity of marriage he did nothing more than
contradict previous court decisions separating religious
opinion from governmental process. If two people of the
same sex are not to be married by the court, then neither
should any couple of the opposite sex. So many people are
confusing personal belief with ethical behavior, blurring
boundaries that were set into effect many years ago. All
people of any diversity are equal as clearly defined by
our constitution. To define marriage through religion
should remove it from our legal system.
The other walls of hate
JUSTIN SUMMER
OPINION WRITER
Last week's "Wall of Hate" set up by the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Society was a success on campus and hopefully raised
some awareness to the problems created by racism. What may
be surprising to some of you Ls that the "Wall of Hate" set up
in the brickyard was not the only place on campus covered
with racial slurs and epithets on campus. In the library, for
instance, tlie stalls in tlie men's bathroom are covered in
obscenities, both racial and Iximophobic. People find die need
to scribble "KKK" and phony Web sites and phone numbers
to call "for a good time For years, I have seen this sort of
immature and hateful graffiti on display in public bathroom
stalls, but it is a completely absurd for college students to be
doing it on campus.
i don't understaix) how it us acceptable for peopk-to express
their opinions on bathroom walls. Maybe people think it is cool
because otlier people have done it; kids did it in middle school
and no one cared. But, things should be different in college as
I'm sure things are different at other colleges. Why is this sort
ofbehavior still tolerated at ECU?
These racist, hateful andor offensive comments written
in bathrooms do not bother me that much because I am white
and don't spend ttm much time in die bath room at Joyner. But I
would bet that the many black, gay or Jewish students would be,
not to mention die people wlx clean the bathrooms of Joyner.
1 think that this sort of thoughdess and immature behavior
should not be tolerated here at ECU. I'm not too sure of what
can be done about the problem but we should at least address it.
At die football game a few weeks ago, people were appar-
ently shouting obscenities in front of children and being drunk
and offensive. After the game, we all received the e-mail that
was Uioroughly effective at making us Pirates feel ashamed of
our behavior. If being drunk ami loud in front of an opposing
fan is offensive and merits a campus-wide e-mail and guilt trip,
why is this BS in the BR tolerated?
Once again, I must stress the fact that we are college
students and should act like it. Writing on bathroom stalls
might be amusing in elementary schcxil, but things should be
different in a college atmosphere.
I V





Pulse
WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 1, 2006 PAGE A4
Pirate Buzz
Horoscopes:
Aries
If you need extra cash to pay your
bills, finish what you've started.
Odds are good you'll discover
a treasure you'd forgotten all
about. If you are really desperate,
try using your creative talents to
your advantage.
Taurus
Others are looking out for you. so
relax and don't worry. Let your
team do the work and somebody
else drive the car. Relax. This is
not something that happens very
often, enjoy it.
Gemini
The way you'll get to the top is
one step at a time. Don't think
about how high the mountain
is; think about what you're doing
and where you will be when you
get there.
Cancer
Plan a special time to spend
with the people and person you
love. It might be far away, or in
the privacy of your own home,
whichever works for now.
Leo
You always like to get the best,
and you find ways to afford it.
This does not preclude getting a
good deal. Put in the extra effort
and search for what you really
want the good stuff.
Virgo
A person who, at first appears to
be borderline crazy, actually has
a good idea. Take notes and help
achieve it. You may even learn
something from them.
Libra
You've done a lot that got neither
notice nor payment in return.
Today, that is not the case. You'll
be well rewarded for your efforts
and finally get the attention and
credit that you deserve.
Scorpio
You're a very powerful person,
especially when you're in love.
You can move mountains, and
the odds are good you will.
Sagittarius
Caution is required, as you
tackle a difficult project. Don't
be foolish, but don't be stopped,
either. You and yours can do it.
Capricorn
You've been doing a lot of
reading lately. Don't hide what
you've discovered. Pass it along
to a friend who can use it to get
something good for you both.
Aquarius
Sure, you can be wealthy and
still be a good person. The one
doesn't exclude the other at all.
Be a role model for the masses.
Do something good with your
money by helping those who
really need it.
Pisces
You should be in a marvelous
mood and full of great ideas.
Write them down and make a
list. This assignment is going
to be fun. Don't wait to begin,
start while the creative juices
are flowing.
Drink Recipes:
Champagne Punch
1 can (20-ounce) crushed
pineapple in heavy syrup
1 cup fresh lemon juice
1 cup maraschino cherry juice
1 cup dark rum
12 cup brandy
1 bottle (750 ml) chilled
inexpensive brut Champagne
In a large punch bowl or
pitcher, stir pineapple, lemon
juice, cherry juice, rum, and
brandy to blend. Refrigerate for
30 minutes. Add Champagne
just before serving.
Mendenhall
Movies:
Wlideti Nights
Wednesday 1101 at 7 p.m.
Thursday 1102 at 9:30 p.m.
1103 at 7 p.m.
midnight
1104 at 9:30 p.m.
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
1105 at 7 p.m.
lohn Tucker Must Die
Wednesday 1101 at 9:30 p.m.
Thursday 1102 at 7 p.m.
Friday 1103 at 9:30 p.m.
Saturday 1104 at 7 p.m.
midnight
Sunday 1105 at 9:30 p.m.
Winter fashion: Vital do's & do not's
A guide to keep our campus looking
good this season
r
JENNY AYERS
STAFF WRITER
Now that we are coming upon the colder of
North Carolina's seasons, it's time to break
out the layers and bundle up. So I'm here
to tell you what to wear and what not to
wear. I'm no fashionista, but I've con-
sulted a few helpful Web sites that will
hopefully get the Pirates into tip-top
fashion shape.
The first site that I came upon in
the way of fall fashion assistance is per-
sonalshopper.com where you can search
among many labels from DKN Y to Dolce
& Gabbana Of course as college students
the price tags may seem a bit intimidating at
first but you can browse the discount section and get
designer clothes at a decent bar-
gain. Even if you don't plan on
buying the big names, you can
scan the shelves of the online
store and get some ideas for
your own look.
According to the
Internet and its infinite
wisdom, there are sev-
eral must-haves for the
ladies this season. First
of all, please keep
in mind that appar-
ently gold is back in.
Every designer is using it
and sometimes, over
using it. As for styles,
the tunic sweater is at the
top of the list and looks snazziest when paired with
slim pants or "skinny "jean. As you've probably seen
around campus, wide belts worn over the clothes
are definitely in right now and make a great
addition to the tunic sweater, accentuating the
waistline and hips.
Reverting back to the 1980s, pencil
pants (slim-fit, tailored trousers with
form fitting fabrics) are also hot this
season Think stirrup pants minus the
stirrups and slightly less unsightly.
The snug pants look great tucked
into boots and accompanied by a
tunic top.
If you're feeling a little sassier, day
dresses paired with pencil pants or
leggings are also hot right now. Or
there are the romantic tops with rich
flowy fabrics that haven't yet finished
their stint on the fashion scene. For
the fall season you can wear these alone
with an ever trendy fitted jacket or go
for the layered look.
As for shoes, one of the major perks
of cold weather is the excuse to wear tall
boots. You can make a statement and
wear high contoured boots with a skirt,
over jeans, or once again bring in the
pencil pants to create a very fashion
conscious ensemble.
sories. You can find
everything from
If the tall boots are little
too extreme for you, ankle
boots are also a popular and
hot addition to any outfit.
Jeans, skinny pants, leg-
gings, skirts, they look good
with whatever and anyone can
pull them off But why would
you want to when they look so
good on?!
The ballet flat is still reign-
ing as one of the favorite footwear acces-
all types of styles with
bows to lace adorning
pers. And of course
they can work with
any outfit, beefing
up the simplest styles.
At fashion.about,
com they answer the
question that's been
plaguing me for years,
how does one layer? Not
everyone can pull of the layered look like the
models, but have no fear, there are a few helpful
hints at how to look good and still stay warm.
Layer lightweight skirts and dresses over
jeans. This look works best over skinny jeans
and with skirts that aren't too full or long.
Layer funky T-shirts over long-sleeve white (or
other solid) T-shirts. Get a fitted jacket in denim,
corduroy or velvet that looks good with
any ensemble. Layer the bottom half of your
body with tights worn under knee-high
boots. For a polished, professional look you
can layer a matching shell and cardigan.
For a more stylish look, mix fabrics by
putting a sequined shrug over a T-shirt
or a denim jacket over black jersey.
For the latest info on the hottest
deals and styles, check out thebud-
getfashionista.com where they have
online coupons, sales alerts and
advice on how to get styling. To
increase your fashion quo-
tient and shop for
designer duds,
there's fashioniq.
com where you
can find tons of
name brands
and even catch
some bargains.
All the
fashion pages
agree that you
can achieve
the fashion-
able look with-
out having to
break the bank.
Most department
stores and even
bargain retailers
(i.e. Target) are fea- turing the! a t e s t
styles at an affordable price. This fall
winter no one should have an excuse not to
be up to par with the fashion standards of
the season. Even if you'd ratlier just wear a
sweatshirt to class, you could always spiff it
up with some ballet
cold weather scene,
fun with fashion.
fiats or those pencil pants that are evidently all over the
Don't forget to wear what you look good in and have
This writer can be contacted at pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
Project road trip: Gone wrong
Cedar Point in Sandusky, Ohio has some of the best roller coasters in the US
How to salvage your
trip even if you can't
salvage your car
JENNY AYERS
STAFF WRITKR
Our little adventure begins
when three North Carolinians
and a I'ittsburgher decide to take
a weekend road trip to Sandusky,
Ohio to visit the world's best
amusement park. Cedar Point.
On Friday, Oct. 20, three friends
and I piled into my 1994 Nissan
Sentra for a weekend excursion
that would turn into a test of sur-
vival skills
After Alex's (the I'ittsburgher)
introduction to the fabulousness
that is Bojangles, we were on
our way north. About the time
we reach West Virginia, I real-
ize all eight of our entry tickets
into the park are still sitting in
Greenville. We're talking $300
worth of paper here After a mini
breakdown, I call my roommate
who saves the day by over-night-
ing the tickets to our hotel. One
crisis down, many more to go.
Thanks to my NASCAR-like
driving skills and minimal stop-
ping, we are making excellent
time. After being on the road tor
just seven hours, we're merely 100
miles from our Lake Erie destina-
tion. My enthusiasm wanes when I
start to hear an unfamiliar sound
coming from beneath the hood.
As I pull on to the shoulder, my
car shuts ofTand emotional break-
down number two accompanies
the automotive breakdown.
After some rest for the car and
encouragement from my crew,
I decide to start her up and get
off on the next exit and hope to
goodness it's just a spark plug.
So we roll into New Philadelphia,
Ohio (yeah, I have never heard of
it either) where luckily there's a
garage nearby.
Well of course it isn't just a
spark plug, that'd be way too easy.
The fact is I need a new engine.
That's exactly what you want to
hear when you're 400 miles from
home. Commence breakdown
number three.
After plotting, thinking and
calculating, we come up with the
obvious solution: We'll rent a
U-Haul! We be-bop over to the
rental place and of course they're
fresh out. They do, however,
have a 1985 Monte Carlo sitting
out front but they say $200 just
won't cut it.
So we cruise (I use the term
loosely as my car was ready to
give way any second) on over to a
nearby car rental place and hope
they'll be able to rent something
to three broke college kids. Unfor-
tunately, if you're out of state, you
have to have a credit card and
the only one of us with one is my
friend Alex, a 19-year-old with an
expired Australian driver's license.
So that's a no-go and here comes
breakdown number four.
Finally, they take pity on us
and (illegally) give us a car. Two
hundred dollars later, we are on
our way again in a 2000 Grand
Am. Quite the upgrade. There's
just one catch, we have to return
the car to the same rental place
by Monday, which means we need
another way home. Oh well, we'll
cross that bridge when we get
there. Except with our luck, the
bridge will crumble into pieces
just as we're about to cross.
We spend three relatively
stress-free days at "America's
Roller Coast Cedar Point. With
over 68 rides and attractions,
including 16 (soon to be 17) roller
coasters, it certainly made up for
all the breakdowns.
Then comes Monday - the
second longest day of my life
(the first being two weeks prior
when I managed to dislocate
my shoulder on 1-40 coming
back from Greensboro). With
bus tickets in hand, we trek
Don't be bored, play
some board games
see ROADTRIP page A5
Fun for people of all
ages
SHANNON DAVIS
STAFF WRITER
Board games have been
around for centuries. In 400BC
a Babylonian board game was
played that is much like the
common day games chess and
checkers. From there, games
have evolved into what we now
consider the classics. Milton
Bradley, Parker Brothers, Disney
and Playskool are among the
most recognized game creators,
known worldwide.
Many adults think that board
games are just for kids. This fal-
lacy is proven wrong when games
specifically designed to entertain
and challenge adults such as Cra-
nium or Trivial Pursuit are played.
When asked what she thought
of board games senior Biology and
Chemistry double major Gauhar
Dhillon said, "They are awesome
and a safe avenue for good, clean
fun. My favorite game is Jenga
Beth Faircloth, junior Reha-
bilitation Studies major had
similar thoughts on board games,
J "They are fun and interactive.
With the right people and the
perfect game, a good time is never
out of reach. My favorite game is
Cranium
Cranium co-founder Richard
Tait is on record saying, "I love
making games. I make them
for kids, families and adults, for
fun and for living Every year,
Cranium donates a percentage
of the company's profits to char-
ity. Through the Cranium Fund,
they try to bring spirit to kids
and adults in challenging circum-
stances, helping to discover and
celebrate hidden talents and allow-
ing every participant to shine.
Board games allow friends
and family to connect through
laughter and fun. The most recent
Trivial Pursuit game is 90s Triv-
ial Pursuit. It relives the decade
of grunge. President Clinton and
the Y2K paranoia.
Jill Arvisais, a sophomore
finance major said, "I like
games. Trivia games refresh
your memory. Monopoly is clas-
sic even though it takes like 10
hours to finish the game and
any game is competition. Since I
used to baby sit a lot when I was
home, I loved to play Candy Land
with my cousin and her friends,
it used to be my favorite when I
was little too
Senior Broadcast Journal-
ism major Bill Dinicola thinks,
"Board games are cool but video
games have taken their place for
that form of entertainment. They
can be good when you have a
large group together though
Kelly Farrell, sophomore
International Relations major
had a different point of view on
see GAMES page A5
WEDNES1
Pi
For 1
Sen
i





WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER l, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
PAGE A5
Hard Core
Concert
Sponsored By Student
Union
TONIGHT
Featuring
The Avengers,
Romeo is Bleeding,
Your name in Vain
Pirate Underground 7pm
For More Information Call 328-4715.
The City Hotel & Bistro
Entertainment Galore
SARAH CAMPBELL
ASSISTANT FEATURE EDITOR
Living in Greenville there
are tons of dining options tor any
occasion, hut if you are looking
for something a hit out of the ordi-
nary, you may want to plan your
next meal at The City Bistro.
When first stepping into The
City Bistro, I was in awe of how
relaxing, mellow and romantic
the atmosphere was The dim
lighting and the elegant candles
lit on every table added a splash
of old time charm that la rare at
other establishments.
I instantly felt like I was step-
ping hack in time to an era when
music was made for listening
and clubs were fashioned for the
enjoyment of such music.
After taking my seat, a wait-
ress shortly approach with a
friendly smile and wide-eyed
eagerness written all over her face.
It was a nice occasion to he privy
to someone who didn't hate their
job, hut on the flip side loved it.
Now I have to warn you that
the food prices at the City Bistro
cfcfilSTE
Conferences Wefdtngs
were a hit high, hut it was worth
it to dine in such a warm and
inviting atmosphere for a change.
I also have to admit that the food
was a bit overpriced considering
the quality; it lacked the flavors
that were expected after read-
ing the description on the menu.
My favorite part of the eve-
ning was listening to the jazz
music that was being played live
on the stage in front of us. The
music was refreshing compared
to the amount of junk that is
played on the radio these days
and I dare say it was the best live
performance I've seen in months.
They offer a full service bar
with nightly drink specials to
cater to those who just want to
enjoy the music before heading
home after a long day at work.
Nn that I've found this gem
there is no doubt that The City
Bistro will be a vital part of my
entertainment options.
Log on to thecitybistro.com,
for a band schedule, menu and
listing of drink specials.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
ROADTRIP
continued from A4
through the newly arrived
snow to return our rental car.
After junking my car and
calling a taxi, we make it to the
bus stop just as the bus is ready
to pull out. There begins our
iO-hour journey hack to North
Carolina. Sure we could have
flown, but we don't have that
kind of money and we would
have missed out on our highway
tour of the northeastern United
States.
At our first stop, we befriend
some Amish folks who are cer-
tain North Carolina has to
be in Canada. Based on this
logic, they can't understand
how we are "Southerners" so
they determine we are from
Texas. We just go with it.
Then comes Pittsburgh where
a passenger manages to dump a
40 ounces beer on the floor and
all over my friend's belongings.
In her frenzy, she unknowingly
drops her cell phone, which is
of course picked up by a fellow-
passenger and never returned.
Breakdown number five.
Kn route to Baltimore, we
are awoken by what smells like
burning plastic. After many
complaints and coughs, the driver
turns on the lights to reveal a bus
full of smoke. We pull off for a
little while to air it out and then
collectively decide to turn off the
heat. I'd rather have a heatless
bus in 30 degree Pennsylvania
weather than lungs full of smoke.
But one passenger decides she
wants off because the thing is
sure to blow But I say I'd rather
keep on trucking than make this
a two-day bus ride. What's that,
breakdown number six?
The rest of the trip through
Baltimore, D.C. and Richmond
is relatively uneventful minus an
unexpected three-hour layover in
Virginia. The important thing is
that we finally made it back, how-
ever in debt and car-less I may he.
What I learned from all
this is that no matter what kind
of road trip you're taking, you
have to be mentally and finan-
cially prepared for anything. You
never know where you'll be
when your car starts to act up
or when you'll have a break-
down, but as long as there are
friends, patience and maybe a
few Amish people in the mix,
any trip can be a successful one.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
GAMES
continued from A4
Send Us Your Pirate Rants!
games, "I think board games are
old fashioned and a lot of people
don't play them anymore. It's
great for younger kids because
a lot of games can teach them
things, but as far as I'm con-
cerned, I'm bored. I would rather
play an interactive game on the
computer or TV
Board games can he fun and
educational for people of all ages.
Although many games have lost
their nostalgic place in American
society more modern games are
climbing the pole of popularity.
Catchphraae, Cranium, Trivial
Pursuit, Taboo, Scene It and others
are among the favorites of adults.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
f
Student Fees It's Your Money
Want to know more about your Campus Tuition and Fees?
Are you concerned about your Student Fee Dollars?
Do you want to influence where your money is going?
Then come voice Your opinion at the
STUDENT FEE FORUM
?
A
Hendrix Theatre
Thursday November 2nd
5:30pm - 7:00pm
For more information about the forum please contact:
252-328-4SGA or sga@ecu.edu
i






WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 1, 2006 PAGE A6
ECU's Inside Source
4 A Dowdy-Ficklen facelift?
WEDNES
Number of verbal commit-
ments for the men's basketball
team from the high school
class of 2007; Daquan Joyner,
a 6-foot-6, l200 pound, power
forward from Goldsboro H.
S made a commitment to the
team Monday joining Jamar
Abrams, Jontae Sherrod and
Brock Young
6'10"
Height of men's basketball
center Chad Wynn, who will
redshirt during the 2006-2007
season announced by Ricky
Stokes on Friday, it leaves
Stokes with just three players
over 6-foot-6
$300,000
Total cost of the original Fick-
len Stadium, which included the
permanent stands on the south
side, a press box, and a lighting
system; the stadium hosted its
first game on Sept. 21, 1963, as
ECU beat Wake Forest 20-10
6
Seed of the women's soccer team
in the 2006 Conference USA
Women's Soccer Tournament,
which begins today and leads up
to the final on Sunday; the tour-
nament will be hosted by SMU,
who had an 8-1 conference
record and received the top seed
303
Weight of true freshman left
guard Sean Allen, who played
in his first game against South-
ern Miss, Allen recorded a
fumble recovery and adds depth
backing up fellow freshman
Cory Dowless
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium could potentially look like the above picture after future stadium upgrades take place. Renovations could include bowling in the scoreboard side, adding a second
deck to the press box side, along with a six-story facility housing new locker rooms and a new press box. ECU's last stadium renovation was in 1999 when the club level seating was added.
57
Record setting home run total
for the softball team in 2005
under the guidance of offensive
coach Natalie Kozlowski; she
was promoted to associate head
coach Tuesday
10-9
Record of the UCF football
team since losing 17 consecu-
tive games from 2003-2005;
The Golden Knights went to
the C-USA championship game
last season
Plans to upgrade
athletic facilities in
place
RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
ECU's athletic facilities could
have a different look to them iffuture
renovations go through as planned.
The school will hire one of
three competing design firms as
early as this week as the initial
stage in a plan to make upgrades
to Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium, as
well as the Softball field and Bag-
well Field.
"The design firm will develop
feasibility studies for improve-
ments to all athletic facilities
including expansion of Dowdy-
Ficklen, luxury suites, new office
space for coaches, locker rooms for
teams and end zone seating Ath-
letics Director Terry Holland said.
According to ECU's Assistant
Athletics Director of Internal
Affairs, Gary Overton, the plans
include adding luxury boxes to
the press box side of the stadium,
moving the athletics offices to new
facilities on that same side and
placing permanent bleachers on a
temporary basis at the open south
scoreboard end of the field.
"Our dream is to bowl in the
scoreboard end of the stadium and
create as many lower level seats as
possible Holland said in an Oct.
4 radio interview. "End zone is
great seating for former players,
people who really care about the
game, who like to watch the block-
ing schemes, particularly ifyou have
access to the video replays and the
video screens so that you can spot
the ball. It's hard to tell where the
spot's gonna be in terms of the
chains, but other than that, that is by
far the best spot to watch the game
The improving football pro-
gram and expected home sellouts
in 2007 against North Carolina
and N.C. State with the expanded
seating will be used as criteria to
validate eventually closing in the
scoreboard end of the stadium.
"We'd like to create as many
seats as we possibly can in that end
zone Holland said. "We intend to
try to get that done, at least on a
temporary basis, by next season.
Then, put in as many seats as we
can. With temporary seats, you
can probably put about 50 to 60
percent of the number you'd like
to eventually have there
The foreseen changes for the soft-
ball and soccer facilities are adding
possible lights and expanded seating.
"We are in great need for
locker room space, particularly for
our women's sports Holland said.
"We are in great need for office
space and what I think what will
eventually happen, and we need a
professional to tell us how it can be
done and how much it's gonna cost,
we'll figure out what ECU needs
for the next 10 or 15 years as best
we can tell at this stage, and then
start building those facilities
Holland added that he envi-
sions a new press box, a "consider-
able building under the stands" on
the press box side to house locker
rooms, athletic offices and luxury
box suites at the top level.
The plans are still in the pre-
design stage, and no timeline has
been set for completion.
This writer can be contacted at
sportstheeastcarolinian.com.
Club hockey downs Richmond,
drops game against Loyola
15
Finish by freshman Ana Maria
Puche who posted a final round
even-par score of 72 at the
Edwin WattsI'almetto Inter-
collegiate in Kiawah Island,
S.C it was the second consecu-
tive top-15 placement for I'm he,
who shot a nine-over par 225
(80-73-72) to pace the Pirates
They said it
"Coach Holt, made a great
point. He said climbing up the
mountain, you have to keep con-
centrating on your steps. You
get relaxed and you look up for
the prize, you slipand fall We've
got to stay humble and hungry
and take one day at a time"
-C.J. Wilson, ECU freshman
deftnsivt end
"Robert Eta has" been real
supportive of me. He's been
like a brother to me. If he's
struggling one day, I try to
point out what he might be
doing wrong or vice versa. He's
always there He's been a real
good person. I've enjoyed every
minute of it
-Ben Hart man, ECU freshman
kicker
ECU and Richmond scrum for the puck in front of the Spiders' net.
Hopes of undefeated
season gone
JARED JACKSON
STAFF WKITKR
The club hockey team entered
this past weekend's games unde-
feated and after a 1-3 thriller with
Richmond on Friday, they lost a
hard fought battle against Loyola
on Saturday
On Friday, the KCV men's
hockey team took on Richmond
who came in with an undefeated
record and atop the Northeast
Din islon of the Blue Ridge Hockey
Conferebc Things didn't look
so bright for ECU after the
first period.
ECU went into the first inter-
mission down 3-0 against Rich-
mond Tyler Falcon, a sophomore
forward scored the first goal
for ECU in the second period
on a power play a little over 14
minutes into the period. Nathan
Buhr, a junior forward scored next,
less than two minutes later on
even strength. ECU went into the
second intermission down a goal.
Shortly into the third period,
Falcon added another goal barely
five minutes into the period. The
game winner came from Buhr with
only 1:10 left in the third period.
After getting down three goals,
ECU scored four unanswered,
winning -3.
'file game was revenge for the
Pirates from last year's BRHC finals
when ECU lost 6-4 to the Spiders.
On Saturday, ECU took on
Loyola in a non-conference game.
Once again ECU fell behind early
and after the first period was
down 2-0. Less than five minutes
into the second period, Loyola had
distanced its lead to 4-0.
The first goal for ECU came
from senior defenseman Jordan
Meyers with 9:07 left in the second
period. ECU would pull within
two after a goal from Zach John-
ston with 3:25 remaining in the
second period. The crowd finally
got back into the game after being
shocked by a 4-0 start by Loyola
ECU (4-1, 4-0 BRHC) would
draw even closer with another
goal by Johnston, a freshman
forward with 13:58 to go in the
third period. Loyola would answer
with 7:35 left with another goal to
increases its lead to 5-3. Less than
two minutes later, Corey Fleitz,
a junior forward and co-founder
scored to bring ECU within a goa
After many opportunities in the
waning minutes, ECU could not
score giving Loyola the 5-4 win.
After the game, ECU Head
Coach Wayne Cox was upset about
the loss, but also optimistic that it
would only make the team better.
"I think we were moderately
successful said Cox. "I think we
had a great win last night against
Richmond, but I think that look-
ing at how we lost tonight, they
didn't beat us, we beat ourselves.
We clearly beat ourselves. It prob-
ably was necessary for us to lose to
get better, and hopefully the guys
will take a message back from this;
that even though you have better
skills than the other team, you can
still lose the hockey game because
you do bonehead things when you
shouldn't. All in all, the kids are
playing, and I'm proud as heck of
After six years, softball assistant Natalie Kozlowski will receive a raise.
Softball assistant
promoted to
associate head coach
see HOCKEY page A7
(SID) Natalie Kozlowski,
who has served as an assistant
on the ECU softball staff for
the past six seasons, has been
promoted to associate head coach
according to an announcement by
Pirates' Head Coach Tracey Kee
on Tuesday.
Kozlowki has been on the
ECU staff for six years, serv-
ing as the offensive and outfield
see SOFTBALL page A7






WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER l, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE A7
HOCKEY
continued from A6
In Conjunction with ECU School of Communication
'O -
November 9-1 6
1 l9 Gideon Yago MTV News Correspondent
Hendrix Thea.ter S-IOPM I
1110 Harlen Beats Hip Hop Tradition i
Pirate Underground 9-1 IPM T
1110 Si Kahn, Grassroots Leadership Speaker
MSC 244 7-4PM
H13 Pate Conaway . Organic Textiles Workshop
MSC An Gallery 4-6PM
1113 "American Blackout" Film Screening
Hendrix Theater 8-10PM
1.114 Roger Tucker, Middle East Peace Speaker i
MPR 8-10 PM '
I II4 Voting Trends in African Americans (
LWCC 5-7 PM
1115 Dr. Maurice Godwin, Profiling KVil Minds Speaker
MSC 241'4-6 PM
I 11'6 Defining "Consent" Workshops
MSC 24 1 4-6 PM
III6 Nancy Hulse. Breaking Down the Walls of :
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Freshman defender Dan Duda goes on the offensive attack during a 4-3 conference win over Richmond.
them, but I really feel that some-
times our emotions can obscure
our skills
Cox cited the BRHC record for
penalty minutes that his team set
last year with an unprecedented
392 minutes inside the box.
Fleitz, a 6-foot-4, 810 pound
forward thought the team showed
of heart in the two games but also
admitted the games made for a
tough weekend.
"We had a tough weekend
said Fleitz. "Against Loyola
things were just far and away. It's
a turning point in our season. We
are going to go up from here. We
had a lot of heart
ECU moves to second in
the Southwest Division within
the BRHC, trailing Clemson
by two points. The Pirates are
undefeated in the BRHC, having
defeated William & Mary, Old
Dominion, Virginia Common-
wealth and Richmond.
Cox also shared his thoughts
on the season up to this point.
"The season so far has been
right on the mark as to what
we wanted to accomplish the
second-year head coach said. "We
were two goals away from being
exactly where we want to be. We
want to be undefeated. We wanted
to run the table. I thought that
if we could have won two games
this weekend, we could have gone
undefeated for the season. Basi-
cally, we were two goals short
of being perfect for where we
are. I still think we are a work in
progress, with respect to what we
are going to have to do to consis-
tently win hockey games
The club hockey team returns
to the ice on Nov. S to play at
Christopher Newport in Newport
News, Va. The team returns to
Greenville on Jan. 19 to face
Appalachian State.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
SOFTBALL
continued from A6
coach throughout her time with
the Pirates. Kozlowski also had
the responsibility as recruiting
coordinator, scouting director
and conditioning coach during
her tenure at ECU.
Kozlowski's squads dominate
the ECU record book as she is
responsible for teams ranked first
or second in 10 out of 11 catego-
ries. Offensively, her squads rank
number one in games played, at-
bats, home runs, base on balls,
hits, RBI and doubles. They are
ranked second in batting average
and stolen bases.
Kozlowski guided the Pirate
offense to its highest home run
total in school history in 2005
with 57, shattering the previ-
ous record of 40 set in 1999.
Last season the ECU offense
led Conference USA in SAC
bunts with 89, while finish-
ing third in doubles, second in
Sacrifice flies and second in
stolen bases. Kozlowski has
coached sixteen all-conference
members at ECU.
Kozlowski was an assistant
to Kee when she was awarded
Conference USA Coach-of-the-
Year in 2005. The Pirates have
amassed a record of 252-147
with Kozlowski as an assistant,
including the school record 60-
win season in 2000.
"Being able to retain Coach
Koz for seven years has made a
direct impact on our program's
success said Kee. "She's a
tireless worker with an uncanny
teaching ability. Working
side by side with a coach who's
loyal, driven and completely
committed to our program
and university is priceless. Her
impact on the development
of our student-athletes has
been and will be felt for many
years to come
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 1, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 01, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1936
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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