The East Carolinian, October 25, 2006












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EastCarolinian
VOLUME 82, ISSUE 22
www.theeastcarolinian.com
YOUR CAMPUS NEWS
SOURCE SINCE 1925
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 25, 2006
Find out more about
what kind of candy is
most popular, where
to score the coolest
costumes, what
events to attend and
how to throw a great
Halloween party all in
PulsePageA5
Ricky Stokes is happy
despite his team's
last place prediction
in Conference USA
according to the C-
USA coaches. Find
out how the nine new
faces are gelling so far
almost two weeks into
practicePage A7
The volleyball team
and coach Chris
Rushing are riding
high after six straight
conference wins.
Read our update
to find out about
the school's most
successful fall
sportPage A7
The men's and
women's swimming
and diving teams
are still undefeated
under the direction
of 25-year head
coach Rick Kobe.
Read our update to
see if the Pirates can
sustain their success.
Page A7
5 6 8 7 4 1 2 9 31 9 4 8 3 2 6 5 77 3 2 5 6 9 1(8 4
4 1 6 9 8 7 3 2 52 7 9 3 1 5 4 8 63 5 8 2 4 6 9 7 1
1 3 27 4 86 9 5
6 5 4 8 7 99 2 3 5 6 18 1 7 42 3
Test your skills .at
SuDoKuPage A9
NEWSPageA2
PULSEPageA5
SPORTSPageA7
OPINIONPageA4
CLASSIFIEDSPageA9
Wall of Hate expresses students' feelings
imj, Jewed
A student expresses her idea of a phrase that defines hate on the 'Wall of Hate' outside Ledonia Wright Cultural Center Tuesday. Other Hate Out Week events continue throughout the week.
Opening of display part
of "Hate Out Week"
ZACK HILL
STAFF WRITF.R
Hate Out Week, a time for
the ECU community to examine
aspects of hatred and discrimina-
tion that still exist today, is in its
inaugural run.
"This week was designed to
draw attention to the many -isms
that plague our everyday existence
such as genderism, racism and
oppression said Jessica Ledbetter,
emissary for the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center. "It is an attempt
or rather a consciousffort to edu-
cate and aware ECU students of
the effects of hate on others
The week is the brainchild of
LaQuesha Foster, Associate Director
oftheLedonia Wright Cultural Center.
"It's something I came up with
to go beyond celebrating diversity
and look at why we have to cel-
ebrate diversity said Foster. "We
need to look at all the issues
The week kicked off Monday
night with a workshop by Karin
Zipf and Kenneth Wilburn, both
of the history department, and
got into full swing Tuesday at
noon, when about forty students
and faculty members attended the
opening of the "Wall of Hate
The "Wall of Hate" is a chance
to express personal experiences
with hatred through a writing or
drawing.
"The wall is where you write
down any racial slurs or epithets
you've heard so people can look at
them and think about why they are
said, how many times they've heard
them and how they've reacted or
responded Foster said.
The wall will be open until
Friday, when it will.be torn down
as metaphor for "breaking down
the hate Paintbrushes and paint
will be available at the site all
week.
"This is a week that will shine
a light on and illuminate hatred
said Khadine McNeill, interim
director of the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center
"Embracing Change a forum
on ethnicity and how students
cope with coming from other
environments to ECU was held
on Tuesday night. The event was
coordinated by Jennifer Nnamani,
senior marketing major.
"To embrace change is the
only way to move ahead Nna-
mani said.
Wednesday's events include
"Realities of Hate a chance for
students who have been victim-
ized by racism, discrimination or
oppression to tell their stories in
a documentary that will be shown
on Friday before the wall is torn
down. BET's Jeff Johnson will also
speak in Hendrix Theater at 6 p.m.
Students have another chance to
share their experiences w ith hate
on Thursday with another session
of "Realities of Hate with the
events culminating on Friday with
a screening of the documentary
and the destruction of the wall,
followed by a potluck lunch.
Foster hopes that "Hate Out
Week" proves positive to ECU's
population.
"I think it's something ECU
needed. It's a way to push the
envelope and be cutting edge with
our programs. You can't always be
so nice. Sometimes there are ugly
sides to diversity and we need to
deal with them Foster said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Model UN celebrates
United Nations Day
Students and Project HEART members gathered outside of College Hill Suites Monday despite the cold breeze.
Project HEART holds benefit
dinner to help Katrina victims
These flags represent some of the nations that hold a place in the UN.
Celebration held in
honor of the formation
of the United Nations
Students come show
their support for Katrina
victims
CLAIRE MURPHY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
This Monday, the Project
HEART organization held a
fund-raiser outside of College Hill
Suites from 6 to 7:30 p.m. to raise
money and school supplies for the
schools in New Orleans who are
still suffering from the Katrina
tragedy.
Project HEART is a non-
profit organization that stands for
Helping Educate At Risk Teens,
and is officially sponsored by
AmeriCorps.
The Project HEART organi-
zation is a group of students who
go to different elementary and
middle schools, as well as Boy's
and Girl's Clubs in Pitt County
and surrounding areas three times
a week to promote literacy and
tutor students one-on-one.
Junior education major, Chris-
tina Yow said, "Project HEART
got an education award for all the
hours we complete
Many students came out to
show their support. Those who
came to donate were treated to
a buffet-style meal called the
Katrina Relief Dinner including
salad, spaghetti, bread, dessert and
beverages.
Senior broadcast journalism
and Hispanic studies and transla-
tion major, who is also the Ameri-
Corps leader of all service events
for Project HEART, Qwashanda
Staton, was busily organizing the
information table, donation tables,
and of course, the food tables.
Staton announced the goal they
are trying to reach with donations
is $2,000.
"Working for AmeriCorps'
Project HEART has opened up my
eyes to what the world is, and what
it could be with the help of others
who are willing to volunteer said
Staton.
The many volunteers involved
with this program had different
duties at the fund-raiser, such as
managing the information tables,
and serving the food.
One booth was accepting mon-
etary donations as well as any
school supplies that anyone could
spare, and was run by Shanda Bell
and Tierney Godfrey.
"You really have to have a
heart for kids Godfrey said.
Those who visited this table
got free candy in exchange for
their donations.
There was also an information
booth provided by AmeriCorps
with a timeline and pictures from
New Orleans' Katrina relief efforts.
see HEART page A3
PRESTON STANFORD
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
Oct. 24 passes by each year
with most people unaware of the
important history involved in the
day. The United Nations, as we
know it today, formed on Oct.
24, 1945, thus the day becoming
United Nations Day. To mark
the occasion, the Model United
Nations Club along with the
department of political science
held a panel discussion on non-
proliferation open to all faculty
and students. Three distinguished
faculty from the political science
and history departments were
invited to speak.
Dr. Nancy Spalding spoke
first on the history of the United
Nations, reform and the Non-
proliferation treaty. Specifically
brought up, Dr. Spalding described
how any mejnber state could volun-
tarily leave the Non-proliferation
treaty to restart a nuclear program
as thev voluntarily entered it.
Currently the other UN members
who have not signed the treaty are
Cuba, Israel, Pakistan and India.
Following her speech. Dr.
Jalil Roshandel spoke on Iran. Or.
Roshandel went over a shortened
history of the country, as well as
some differences between the Shan
and the Islamic Republic in terms
of their relations with the West
and Israel. Also mentioned, was
how Iran is mostly surrounded by
either nuclear states or U.S. troops.
The last of the three speakers
was Dr. J. Tucker who spoke on
North Korea. One of Dr. Tuck-
er's main points was on how to
handle the current situation of
nuclear testing from a global
perspective. Taking the side of
persuasion rather than force,
he made a connection between
the Democratic People's Republic
of Korea and U.S.Chinese rela-
tions. As there is a large trade
deficit between the U.S. and China,
at the same time the U.S. is helping
the Chinese economy grow, giving
them confidence and hopefully
turn China into more of a key
player in the world. He pointed
out the troubled past between
the Koreans and the Japanese
and their close proximity to one
another.
The hour-long discussion
capped off with a brief question
and answer period, where some of
the students had the opportunity
to respond to the panel.
This was ECU's first year cel-
ebrating United Nations Day and
with over 60 students in attendance,
the event was quite the success.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.





News
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 25, 2006 PAGE A2
WED!
Campus & Community
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Crime Stoppers Reward
The Pitt-Greenville Crime
Stoppers are offering a
reward for information
leading to the arrest and
conviction of individual(s)
who have set a series of
trash can fires at ECU. Two
trash can fires were set in
the Bate Building in July
2006. Trash can fires were
set at the Joyner Library
Annex and Brewster B, C
and D Wings in October.
Anyone having informa-
tion about these crimes
should contact the Pitt-
Greenville CrimeStoppers
at 758-7777, or Lt. Mike
Jordan, ECU Police, 737-
1519, or go to the ECU Web
sit, Administration, Index,
Police, Crime Reporting.
ECULoessin Theatre
Hedda Gabler
November 16 to 21
Employing methods that
virtually defined the modern
psychological drama, this
masterpiece reveals the
conflicts and emotions that
lie below the surface of
daily life. Was it murder
or suicide? Originally by
Henrik Ibsen, the adapta-
tion is being presented by
Christopher Hampton.
We are Hiring!
The East Carolinian is cur-
rently looking for news staff
writers, sports staff writers
and copy editors. If you
have a passion for writing
this opportunity may be for
you. The East Carolinian
requires that all employees
are currently-enrolled stu-
dents with a minimum 2.25
GPA. Apply at our office in
the Self Help Building on
the corner of Third Street
and Evans Street. We are
located on the first floor.
Get Involved!
Special Volunteer Pro-
grams
Help the Volunteer and
Service-Learning Center
recruit volunteers and plan
special events and national
service initiatives. For
more information, e-mail
volunteer@ecu.edu.
Candemonium 2006
You've never seen a food
drive quiet like this! Now
recruiting teams of 4-6
people! Construct a sculp-
ture of non-perishable food
items, that you have col-
lected, based on the theme
"Take Out Hunger Contact
the Volunteer and Service-
Learning at 328-2735 or
volunteer@ecu.edu for an
information packet. Dead-
line to register Monday,
Oct. 31!
Family Fun Night Event
Thursday, Oct. 26 from
2:30 to 5:30 p.m. (possi-
bly 7:30 p.m Wintergreen
Primary School)
Eight volunteers are needed
to set-up, make cotton
candy, facilitate activities.
Wintergreen Primary School
is located on County Home
Road in Winterville. Contact:
Waz Miller, millerc@ecu.
edu or 328-4926.
Make A Difference Day
Saturday, Oct. 28,9 a.m. to
1 p.m Greenville
Don't Miss Out! One proj-
ect still available. Register
online for this National Day
of Service at ecu.eduvol-
unteer. Click on the Make
A Difference Day link.
Frights & Pipes - Fall Fair
and Organ Concert
Saturday, Oct. 28, Starting
at 3 p.m. 401 E. Fourth
St. at St. Paul Episcopal
Church
Volunteers needed to set-
upclean-up, face paint,
run booths and other activi-
ties. Event benefits the Pitt
County AIDS Service Orga-
nization (PiCASO). Aaron
Lucier, 328-2758.
Fall Festival
Saturday, Oct. 28 from 4
to 8 p.m. at 'A Place For
Me' in Winterville. 1-2 Art
students needed to volun-
teer to do face painting at
a fall festival. Contact: Jes-
sica Thomas, 756-4404 or
lltomas@bbandt.com.
25 Wed 26 Thu 27 Fri
Sat
29 Sun 30 Mon31 Tue
ECU Ceramic Guild
Annual Mug Sale
The ECU Ceramics
Guild Mug sale is an
annual fund-raiser.
All mugs are hand-
made by Ceramic Guild
members. With each
mug purchase you will
receive your choice
of coffee, tea or hot
chocolate. All pro-
ceeds benefit the ECU
Ceramics Guild.
Jenkins Fine Art Build-
ing Foyer
8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Effective Communica-
tion
A guest speaker from
the school of commu-
nication will present
on effective forms of
communication per-
taining to leaders and
members of student
organizations.
Mendenhall, Room 15
3 p.m.
Russian Film Series:
"A Cruel Romance"
Movies have English
subtitles or dubbing.
Bate 2011
6:30 p.m.
The Realities of Hate
Tearing Down the Wall
of Hate
Wright Plaza and MSC
Brickyard
Hispanic Film Series:
"lluminados por el
fuego" (Enlightened
by Fire)
Argentina, 2005, 100
min. Directed by Tristin
Bauer
Bate 2011
5:30 p.m.
One Fair in Two Loca-
tions
Minges Coliseum & New
Health Sciences Build-
ing
10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
ASO Free Movie Night
Admission is free.
Snacks are available
to purchase. Hosted by
the Anthropology Stu-
dent Organization
Flanagan Building,
room 265
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Graduate and Profes-
sional School Fair
Mendenhall Multi-Pur-
pose Room
Ice Hockey
Bladez on Ice
ECU vs. Richmond
9:30 p.m.
Hate Out Week
The wall will be pulled
down by human hands
in a symbolic repre-
sentation of humanity
toppling the walls of
hate and injustice, thus
allowing passage to a
proud and bright future.
Mendenhall Room 244
and Ledonia Wright Cul-
tural Center Yard
1 p.m.
Multicultural Potluck
Please bring a dish to
share. Beverages and
table service will be
provided.
Ledonia Wright Culture
Center
2 p.m.
Women's Soccer
ECU VS. UTEP
Bunting Field
3 p.m.
Women's Volleyball
ECU VS. SOUTHERN
MISS
Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum
7 p.m.
Men's Cross Country
C-USA Champion-
ships
Overton's Lake Kristi
Woman's Cross Coun-
try
C-USA Champion-
ships
Overton's Lake Kristi
Ice Hockey
Bladez on Ice
3:45-8 p.m.
Women's Soccer
ECU VS. COLORADO
COLLEGE
Bunting Field
12 p.m.
Women's Volleyball
ECU VS. UCF
Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum
1 p.m.
Registration For Spring
Semester 2007 Begins
Halloween
Midnight Madness
Mendenhall Student
Center from 9 p.m.
to 1 a.m. Events
will range from palm
readers to hypno-
tists, trick-or-treat-
ing to free billiards
and bowling. Students
remember to bring
your OneCard. One
guests may be admit-
ted with students with
valid ID.
BRIEFS
Liquor store deaths blamed on
suspect in Southern crime spree
(AP) Tennessee authori-
ties said Monday that the sus-
pect in a Southern crime spree
was the assailant who killed
two liquor store employ-
ees during an armed robbery.
The Tennessee case is among
a series of crimes tied to William
Tom Ashby during a weeklong
string of violence that left at least
four people dead and another
seriously wounded. Ashby, 37,
of Savannah, Ga killed himself
during an Oct. '2 standoff with
Florida officers.
TBI spokeswoman Jennifer
Johnson said agents found bullet
shell casings at the crime scene,
which matched those at crime
scenes that Ashby was linked to
in other states.
The car Ashby was traveling
in was also seen at the store before
the murders.
One of Ashby's victims was
University of Virginia graduate
student Elizabeth Halter, 22, who
was found in Waynesburo, Va
near a car Ashby is believed to have
stolen in Effingham County, Ga.
An Effingham convenience store
clerk was shot in the head before
the car was stolen but survived.
Authorities in South Carolina
say Ashby is also linked by bullet
fragments to the death of l
year-old man found shot to death
last month inside his fruit stand
One Fairfield officer killed, one
wounded in shooting
(AP) A police officer sent
to check on a suspicious vehicle in
a Birmingham area neighborhood
was fatally shot as she stepped
from her patrol car Monday, and a
backup officer was wounded as he
arrived at the scene seconds later
Officer Mary Smith, who
joined the Fairfield Police Depart-
ment a lew wicks ago after retir-
ing from the police force in
neighboring Birmingham, was
responding to a citizen's call
about a suspicious vehicle about
10:15 a.m. when she was shot.
Officer Eric Burpo, who
arrived on the scene a few seconds
later, was shot in the leg before he
exited his car.
A brother of the wounded offi-
cer attends Miles, Lee said.
The shooting occurred a few
miles from the scene of a shooting
that claimed three police officers
from neighboring Birmingham in
June '2004.
Ceremony marks end of formal
search for Portland boy
(AP) The family of a miss-
ing Portland boy gathered at
Crater Lake over the weekend to
recognize that the formal search
for their son is over.
Kirston Becker, the mother
of Sammy Boehlke, 8, stressed
that the small ceremony was not
a memorial service.
The group gathered on Rim
Drive, near the spot where Sammy
was last seen October 14th. It
included about a dozen family
members and six Klamath Tribes
ceremonial drummers.
Becker said, "The land here is
very beautiful, but nature takes
away. It looks like, this time, it
took Sam
Friday marked the last day
of regular ground patrols in the
attempt to find the boy. He had
been missing for a week, and
nearly 200 searchers failed to find
a trace of him.
A tribal elder recited a tribal
blessing and drummers performed
several songs.
Flying red bra causes acci-
dent
(AP) Emily Davis, 17, of
Bowling Green, was charged with
one cqunt of littering for putting
her red bra on the antenna of a car
traveling on 1-75 on Sept. 2G with
three other teenage girls inside.
The bra, which reportedly had
been frayed because it was chewed
by Davis' dog earlier in the day,
flew off the antenna. The Ohio
Highway Patrol said a trailing
car with two Toledo men inside
swerved into the grassy median
to avoid the object, flipping over
several times.
An arraignment hearing for
Miss Davis is scheduled for Nov. 1
in Wood County Juvenile Court.
In a civil suit filed against
the four girls in Wood County
Common Pleas Court, James
Campbell, 37, the driver of the
2006 Dodge Neon that crashed,
blamed the flying bra for trig-
gering the accident. Campbell,
who was thrown from the vehicle,
suffered a broken vertebra in his
neck and a fractured thumb. His
passenger, Jeff Long, 40, suffered
some broken ribs.
Tim Atkins, an assistant
county prosecutor, said a convic-
tion on the littering charge is
punishable by community service,
a fine, and possibly probation. He
said he plans to recommend that
Davis pay the fine and court costs,
as well as perform some commu-
nity service.
"The message needs to be sent
that we can't have people rolling
down the window of a car and
throwing stuff out Atkins said.
0T YOU
HAVEM'TTOID
www.shareyouilit org
1-800-355-SHAHE
U.S. Cellular" gets me so I can always get the score.
Dodgeball Team Registration
Men's, Women's, and Co-Rec
Monday, November 6
10:00am-6:00pm
SRC 207
Basketball Shooting Challenge
Monday, November 6
7:00pm
SRC Courts 1 & 2
RSI CAMPUS
RECREATION
U U a WELLNESS
www.eu.tduci-udntllfcrw
T US. Cellular . 9tuKsc com
' We conne, t with yo. 1"888-buy-USCC





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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
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'Project Runway1 spurs the itch to sew cool duds
People everywhere are now picking up sewing needles thanks to the show.
(MCT) Until lour years ago,
Kerry Szymanski had never spent
a minute at a sewing machine
But in 00'2 she decided
the best way to meet
people was to take a class
"I started taking sewing les-
sons said Szymanski, of l'ort I.au-
derdale, "and tell in love with it
So much so that she now owns
Sassy BB, where her MBA and
marketing background meets her
newfound sewing skills. Along
with sewing the purses that her
customers design, Szymanski,
S7, gives lessons to a generation
of women and men discovering
the joys of bobbins and seam
allowances.
Blame "Project Runway the
hit Bravo reality show that airs
at 10 p.m. Wednesdays. It has
done for sewing what "Sex and
the City" did for well single
women living in Manhattan.
"Project Runway" turns cut-
ting, draping and transforming
fabric behind a C'onsew industrial
sew ing machine into high drama.
In other words, sew ing doesn't
mean a first Communion dress or
formal draperies. Instead, the
national Home Sewing Asso-
ciation reports today's .S million
sewing enthusiasts are "embel-
lishing" and "adapting
"It's not like we're making
clothes from scratch said Allison
Whitlock, the thirty-something
host of "Uncommon Threads a
daily show on DIY Network.
"What girls and guys are
doing is going to vintage stores
and buying that shirt where
the collar is a little too big or
the fit isn't quite right. And
then we're reconstructing
them and adding our own flair
to them, updating the style
Will BretO, a hairdresser from
Hollywood, Fla starting taking
sewing lessons with Szymanski
just after Labor Day.
"I needed a hobby said BretO,
k. w Ik has watched his seamst ress
mother sew since he was a kid.
He recently saw a pair of $17.5
designer jeans that featured a
rip and visible patches. With his
new found sew ing skills, Breto re-
created the look with a pair of $'20
jeans from Target and a dip into
his mother's fabric scraps.
Sew ing was once a necessary
life skill, not unlike cooking and
caring tor kids.
Professor promotes black-owned South African wines
(MCT) Wine is usually not
the first thing that comes to mind
when thinking of South Africa,
but a Macalester College profes-
sor hopes wine drinkers w ill soon
think of that country's pinot noir
along with Nelson Mandela and
De Beers diamonds.
Bill Moseley, a Macalester
assistant geography professor
conducting field research on land
reform in South Africa, has begun
promoting wines produced by
black-owned wineries to wine
shops.
"South Africa is at a very
interesting juncture in its his-
tory he said. "It's a little tenuous
right now
The wine industry as a whole
is wildly successful. But the suc-
cess of this subsector, the black
co-owned, is an open question. "I
can definitely see that there are
markets for that said Paul Wen-
tzel, co-owner of the Wine Thief
in St. Paul. "The Twin Cities are
probably far ahead of other areas
in wanting to support that type
of thing
Moseley's main research
focuses on the agricultural and
winery workers who, under apart-
heid, were the poorest of the poor;
illiterate laborers often paid by the
white owners with alcohol to keep
them subservient.
Since apartheid ended in 1994,
thousands of these laborers have
handed together with govern-
ment grants to buy land anil start
wineries, which are some of the
first black-owned businesses m
the country.
But while the South African
wine industry has blossomed into
the ninth largest in the world,
behind Germany and just ahead
of Portugal, the dozens of black-
owned wineries have not enjoyed
the same success, Moseley said.
He worries that if the black-
owned wineries fail it might lie
seen as a sign that the African
National Congress, which took
power in 1994, is not serious about
redistributing SO percent of the
privately held land to the black
majority as promised.
Moseley said that these win-
eries, with names such as New
Beginnings and Winds of Change,
hope to tap into the $lr bil-
lion world market for fair-trade
products.
"We buy free - trade coffee,
why not free - trade wine?"
Moseley said.
The black - owned wineries,
a few of which are fair - trade
certified, sell wine in England,
Holland and Japan. But they have
not made much of an inroad in the
United States.
That could soon change.
Tiffany Tompkins, a St. Paul
woman who started a fair-trade
import company called Etica last
year, in October will receive more
than 16,000 bottles of free-trade
South African wines, making
her one of the first U.S. import-
ers of the free-trade wine in the
country.
"This is definitely a trend that
will keep going she said. "The
first black-owned winery, aptly
named New Beginnings, began
in 1997 when a white fanner sold
a small piece of land to a group of
farm workers.
The move was heralded as a
bold venture for black economic
empowerment, said Victor Titus,
manager of the operation.
"The New Beginnings experi-
ence was an attempt to show the
rest of South Africa that have-nots
could become haves, that black and
white could work together Titus
said in an email. "It grabbed the
attention of the whole world
A key factor in the success of
these enterprises w ill be the qual-
ity of the wines they produce.
Warren Gregory, a wine col-
umnist and distributor, said South
African wines have been improv-
ing, especially the pinotage wines,
created in South Africa in 1925.
"They're turning out a lot of really
pleasant wine that's balanced
he said.
Wentzel, the wine shop owner,
heard from Moseley about the
blackowned wineries. He said
he'll stock them if he can find a
distributor, and if the wines are
good enough. "The bottom line
in wine is quality he said. "There
area small number of people who
will buy fair trade because it is
fair trade. But it also has to be
something they are going to enjoy
drinking as well
m HEART
continued from Al
"Service projects are our way
of looking at the community both
locally and nationally, and then
deciding what is needed, and where
they need us the most Staton said.
Many volunteers from all of
AnieriCorps' nationwide proj-
ects have done, and are doing
similar things to help with the
Katrina disaster, as well as other
catastrophic events that have hap-
pened anywhere in the country.
"When the hurricane hit,
there were AnieriCorps mem-
bers down at the Gulf that
donated their time and efforts
to help rebuild something that
was irreplaceable Staton said.
A live performance was given
by two members of the local band.
Assembly Required; David Huff-
man, a junior bio-chemistry major
at ECU, and Bobbie Johnson who
will be attending ECU next fall.
With Huffman on guitar, and
Johnson on vocals, the crowd
really seemed to have a good
time. An ECU graduate, Thomas
Lewis, donated his time to 1)1
the event, and was extremely
appreciated. People also stopped
to listen to the performance
given by the ECU Gospel Choir.
Students who live in Col-
lege Hill Suites were able to
receive "suite silver" for attend-
ing the event. "Suite silver" are a
type of fake money given to the
residence to collect by attending
different events. When enough
are collected, they can be used
to "purchase" offered items
Another Project HEART
event w ill be held this Friday from
'2 until 4 p.m. at the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center. Students are
invited and encouraged to attend.
"AnieriCorps project members
want to thank Todd Dining Hall
staff for their assistance as well as
College Hill Suites coordinator,
BAs and residents Staton said.
This writer can be contacted at
neWs@theeastcarolinian.com.
Life is calling.
How far will you go?
800.424.8580
peacecorps.gov
Peace Corps at
East Carolina University
Visit with a recruiter to leam how
Peace Corps might fit into your future.
Overseas experience can make a differ-
ence in the lives of others in a developing
country - and in yousl
Thursday, October 26
Information Session
3:30 - 4:30 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Room 242
For information, contact: amooraOpeacecorps.gov
CMS
about what you want to do
What about a career looking for CLUES?
Do you like biology, chemistry and laboratory work?
Does finding solutions to problems intrigue you?
Do you desire guaranteed employment opportunities?
Do you want a major with all the requirements for Med School?
If SO,
CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE
is the degree for you!
m
CAIOLINA
SCHOOL RALLIED
HEALTH SCIENCES
Want to know more?
Call
Dr. Rick Bamberg
744-6060
www.ecu.educlsc





mion
Never enough
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 25,2006 PAGEA4
RANT OF THE DAY
I passed out in jail. My mother
would be so proud!
Don't dwell upon
a skin tone
Students need to stand together
STACY DAIL
OPINION WRITER
When many people think ahout racism, thefirst thought in
their head is white people discriminating against black people.
Yes, I've seen this to be true a lew times, but the reverse Is what
I've seen more of!
Before I go on, I'd like to put out there that I have no prob-
lem w rfji peopk-of any race, and some ex" "my closest friends are
of dirferent races. I'm simply stating what I have observed over
the past few years, and I'm rxit saying that every person is guilty,
lately it seems that no matter what a person does, some-
how the answer always comes back to racism. A few weeks ago,
Iwwitintowcx1csaklhcJktoeveryoneaixJga?mygrandnia
a hug. A few minutes later, I was toki in a rude tone that "Just
because I'm black doesn't mean you don't have to give me a
hug Excuse me for giving nry grandmother a hug and not
you and tlie other U employees there.
Recently in class, I saw a girl come in who usually sits in the
back, take a seat up frt Hit. Imn lediatdy c me of the black students
who was sitting in the area she usually sits in accused her in a
exxideseaxliiigwayeif'sittiiig in the front just because shedidn't
want to sit in the lack with him and his black friends.
For a minute I thought this oxild haw been true, until I
heard her tell her frier id that she was sitting up front because she
didn't haw her contacts in. Hrst, there was no need to yell this
in front of the entire class and secondly, excuse her for needing
to sit dose to the screen so diat slie can see clearly and learn
In an episode of'House Foreman, a black clx-tor, talks to
a lilack patient who dexssit want to take a medication simply
because lie thinks that people are just trying to test the medicine
on black people to make sure it's OK fix- everyone's use.
In response, Foreman says what I think is one ol'the nxst
truthful things I have ever heard: "The problem with black
pciok-dx'days is that dxy don't knejw uieciilieraicebetween
racism and everybody gets screwed
Yes, I do realize tliat cxir nation's history of slavery is
shameful. I think America as a whole is ashamed and lias
lamed from tliat part ofhlstory, Ixit it I time tofct goof 'the past.
White peopk' ct ixx" owe black peopk fix' what tlxir aixtstors
did aixl there is no need to blai every little thing on racism.
It is just a fact of life that eventually everyone is going to get
screwed over in one way or another.
Another thing I wixikl like to point out is die use of the
"n word" anxxig black peopk Personally, 1 hate the word aixl
I think it is demeaning when someone is calkd that. Some
people have IX) problem referring to tliemselves and each
i itlxr using tliat term, but when a white person spits it exit, all
hell lircaks loose. On tlx' contrary, I've lieard .someone refer
to a white person as a "cracker but the clay gexs on and ixi
one gets beat up.
In today's world, it has beconx? a common goal to
eliminate racism aixl think of everyone as equal. 1 think
this is a wonderful idea considering race doesn't define
a person, it just decides the skin tone that they have.
Wliat I don't uixkTstaixl is if we are making against
dividing up raw, why d xs ECU liave a Black Student Union,
evn thcxjgh thesrhcxil already has anonnal Sttxfent Union in
which all students, Ixack, white, purpk- cr whatever, can join.
Tlx' goals of each grcxip are basically tlx- sanx except Sir the
fart tliat in tlx- Bkxk Stixknt Unkn, only black students benefit
frexn dx- ex-ganizatjon.
In today' xiety, white aixl Ixack pei ipfe are supposed to
be- kxikeel at MOM in tlx- sanx- aixl slxxild be given the sanx;
opprx-hinities So ifblack ECU students get tlxir own stixlent
Unkn, tlxii why not make- exx- k the white stixjents, the
Asians, tlx-1 lisiwiiioi aixl any cxIkt nee KC'U has.
Ilx- fxxnt of tins whole artxk- is to show eerytxTe tliat
racism still exists, and to show my viewpoint frexn wliat I liae
ohsenwl aixl lxanl. I xng littk- things such as giving a certain
gnxip a special x-ganizatk xi x- title isn't helping anything. We
assnxluitwlxiliasxallyciwiitlx-tutiinixwltr)wxkt()getlxT
to get ridof the hostility and specialized gnxfxiig because there-
is ix ixl fix- it. Race is race, aixl it slxxildn't be confused with
character aixl wliat really defines us as individuals.
AWTHBWTPEBCEIVEP
FT A STUDENT-
EjjRBgp mkt be
mrWBE KNOWN
-CAN K PEALT WTIH IMMEDIATELY
hVfflONtf-
IRS ,
A5SOCAT1QN.
Ifihtort-
Opinion WritemWanted!
DON'T LET YOUR
OPINIONS GO UNHEARD
Consider writing for
The East Carolinian,
where all of campus will
hear your voice every week.
Call us at 328-9238
or email opinion@theeastcarolinian.com
PIRATE RANTS
I wish the workers at The
Galley would come to work
not high for once. Oh, and
stop flirting with the girls
in line! It's gross and we all
just want our food! We don't
need you to tell us how fine
we are!
Does anyone else get annoyed
by that little chirp sound
when people walkie-talkie
each other on their phones?
Water fights on the second
floor of Aycock are always fun!
I love how my hall
coordinator's wife feels like
she can just bust up in our
room and yell at us for being
loud when it is not even quiet
hours!
Why is it when I go to the rec
center and use the track that
people who are walking block
the entire track for those of
us who run or walk faster?
Move over!
"Paint it Purple Too bad
the ECU campus has little to
no purple anywhere.
I love this cold weather.
I wish my roommate would
stop sending in Pirate Rants
about me and just say it to
my face.
Stop texting me! If you want
to talk to me, call me. Having
a verbal conversation takes
up way less time then going
back and forth texting. I have
a phone for a reason and if I
wanted to send messages to
everyone I know I would carry
around my laptop.
My roommate is not in a frat
and he gets laid more than
an entire fraternity. What do
you need a fraternity for?
Nothing!
Do guy cheerleaders ever get up
with the female cheerleaders?
Or is that too weird?
I don't worry about going
straight to the pirate rants
because that's what everyone
else does. They read the rants,
read the rest of the paper,
then read the rants again.
"Chain Hang Low" is quite
possibly the most annoying,
ridiculous song ever released.
Why the hell can't I stop
singing it?
Dear boyfriend, stop playing
video games all day with the
boys and come hang out with
your girlfriend. Seriously,
before you lose her.
I'm a girl gamer and proud
of it! In fact, if you checked
Facebook you would see we
aren't hiding at all!
I congratulate Keri and
Chris on their homecoming
accomplishments! Good job!
I think ECU's reputation
would change if the majority
of the students GPA's were
higher than the number of
sixers they down in a night.
How is it that it dropped
to at least the mid-thirties
Monday night, and the heat
in my building still isn't on?
Thanks for stealing my
unique Halloween costume
idea, friend. You just lost
every bit of the little respect
I still had left for you.
My roommate and her
dumber than a box of rocks
boyfriend, just need to move
in together so I don't have
to see him at my apartment
every single night. I seriously
feel like I lose brain cells just
by looking at him.
No, the reason ECU games
aren't televised is because
ECU is a school that hardly
anyone outside Greenville
knows or cares about.
Did you ever think that girls
don't smile back at you
because you're a two? Maybe
even a one?
"Cuz we got sauce?'
don't get it.
still
Since this was the last home
game before Halloween, I
was fully expecting to see
the Marching Pirates do
their usual costume skit at
halftime. I was really letdown
when all I got was the same
old Homecoming BS. The
costume skit was thoroughly
missed this year
Sometimes I wonder what it
would be like if my ex and
I were still dating. Then I
think, oh yeah it would be
horrible.
I mean seriously pictures of
someone taking a beer bong
are so high school. Please stop.
I really didn't mean to ditch you
after you bought me that beer.
I compare every guy to my
ex-boyfriend and no guy
compares to him.
I am a nursing major who has
no life. Help!
Anyone else think that guys
should be banned from
playing video games?
Why is it the Pirate
Underground committee
sucks so terribly? They are
given a lot of money to
entertain us, yet I haven't
been rightfully entertained in
one and a half years. There
are too many rad bands that
would play here for a small
price. Get serious.
The bus doesn't stop wherever
you feel like getting on or off.
Be at the stop or I will leave
you!
People always say negative
things about SGA, and
neglect to mention all the
positive things they do. Does
anyone know what life would
be like without SGA? Scary
thought. Please remember
they are students like us.
I loved you once, it could
happen again.
To the girl in my English
class. When you do show up
please don't look like you
have something that smells
bad under your nose all the
time. It really is starting to
disrupt the class.
I miss running three miles a
day. Cross Country anyone?
I agree with Mr. Cobey's
article. I also believe that it is
much easier for the guy to get
a condom then it is for the
girl to get on birth control.
I however also believe that
if a girl really wants to be
protected she should be on
birth control and also have
her guy wear a condom.
I'm tired of people hating.
Get a life.
I wonder sometimes, do you
sit around and think about
me, like I sit around and
think about you?
I hate that my boyfriend has
a specific ring tone for his
ex-girlfriend. Please set it to
general ringer, even if it was
set before I came along.
Are y'ou ready for Thanksgiving
break?
I saw the scariest Skittles
commercial ever last night
- the one with the singing
rabbit. It's so creepy!
Sarah Bell
Editor in Chief
Rachel King
News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Eric Gilmore
Sports Editor
Zach Sirkin
Photo Editor
Rachael Lotter
Multimedia Web Editor
Claire Murphy
Asst. News Editor
Sarah Campbell
Asst. Features Editor
Sarah Hackney
Head Copy Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
252.328.9238
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Serving ECU since 1925, the asf Carolinian prints
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during the regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednes-
days during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
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editor which are limited to 250 words (which may be
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Abominations fly
out of Kinston
JUSTIN SUMMERS
OPINION WRITER
Last Wednesday in Washington DC the Institute
for Policy Studies presented its 30th Annual Letelier-
Moffitt Human Rights Awards. One ol'the main award
winners was Maher Arar, a Canadian citizen who until
recently was being held in a Syrian prison where he
endured over ten months of torture and horrific condi-
tions. Mr. Arar was not locked up in Syria for commit-
ting a crime or for any reason at all; he was flown there
to be tortured under the direction of the CIA.
Mr. Arar's story began in JFK international airport
in 2002 while returning from a family vacation with
his wife and children. In the airport, Mr. Arar was
interrogated by FBI officials and then was detained in
Teterboro, N.J. He was then flown to Italy and then
to Jordan where he was severely beaten before being
driven over the border into Syria.
Once into Syria Maher was taken to the Palestine
Branch, one of the worst interrogation centers in the
world. Maher was tortured and beaten on an almost
daily basis until he was forced to admit he had trained
for Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan and was an A)-Qaeda
operative. Of course, these statements were not true
and upon his release back to Canada, both U.S. and
Canadian officials declared his innocence.
Maher Arar is not alone, there have been hundreds
of innocent people kidnapped and detained under the
direction of the CIA in countries all over the world like
Morocco, Libya and Afghanistan. Mr. Arar however, is
one of the first victims to live to tell the story of what
the CIA calls the "Extraordinary Rendition Program
The rendition program is not new and has long
been used to capture people who flee the country to
avoid sentencing. However, after 911 the Bush admin-
istration put an "extraordinary" twist on the program
and has been extracting people from various countries
not to bring them to be sentenced, but to be tortured
in countries who do not uphold the laws of the Geneva
Convention.
The company who flies and directs the kidnap-
ping and extraction is called Aero Contractors and is
based out of Kinston, N.C. of all places. Even though
the Supreme Court has put pressure on the Bush
administration to uphold the Geneva Convention,
Aero Contractor is still operating out of the Kinston
Regional Jet Port.
This sort of practice is an abomination and a dis-
grace to all Americans who still believe in the United
States as a free and humane country. Why is it that
instead of detaining and sentencing suspected terror-
ists on our soil we are flying them to foreign lands to
be tortured and avoid sentencing?
Currently, there are 911 suspects that were
involved in the WTC bombing being tortured in
foreign facilities instead of being tried for the crimes
they committed. These sorts of barbaric practices are
only worsening our relations in the Middle East and
all over the world.
Currently lawyers in Italy and Germany are
pressing criminal charges against the CIA operatives
involved in kidnappings in their countries. In addition,
the actual terrorists are following our example and using
our brutality as fuel for the flame of Islamic extremism.
If it is our goal to bring democracy to the Middle
East, what are we doing kidnapping and torturing? Am
I the only one who feels ashamed to hear what's going
on in our own back yard?
JUST ASK JANE
Need advice? Want answers? Just ask Jane.
Dear Jane,
My boss has to be the rudest person that I have ever
met. She constantly tries to embarrass me in front of
my co-workers and she seems to go out of her way to
make me miserable. It's an amazing job that will help
me in the future, but I'm ready to quit just to get away
from her. What should I do?
Signed,
Stressed Out
Dear Stressed Out,
Firstly, you have to decide how important this job is
to you. What kind of hours do you work? How serious
is it? Does this bad job experience bleed over into the
rest of your day or is it something you can live with?
Obviously, it has adversely affected you or you wouldn't
have written to me.
So I now pose a question to you: Is there another job
opportunity in a related fieldoffice that you could take
that would satisfy your career ambitions? If you look
around and think you may have an alternative, apply there.
Begin looking for another, perhaps similar, position
that will make you happy. Also, if you feel comfortable
doing it or if you realize that you really can't leave this
job, consider scheduling a meeting with your boss to
speak to her about how you feel.
Many times, people in leadership positions walk a
fine line between helping you become a better employee
and being overly authoritative or condescending. The
last thing you need at work is someone to patronize
you or belittle you in front of others.
I suggest a straightforward approach. Tell her that
you feel that she treats you differently, but be prepared
to cite specific incidences in which she has made you
feel this way. A complaint is not much good if there
is nothing to back it up. If she seems responsive, then
hopefully, your work environment will become a much
more pleasant place. If nothing comes of it or she's
simply unresponsive or argumentative, you may want
to consider looking for another job or, as a last resort,
giving this one up.
A final word of caution: In the future (if you quit
this) do not, by any means, tell your potential employer
that you couldn't stand your current boss. No employer
wants to hear a potential employee badmouth previ-
ous employers and, since they won't know what really
happened, it's best to avoid it altogether. Cite another
reason for leaving anything. It can be something like;
"I simply did not have the time to serve that company
in a way that best suited its needs It's nice and safe
and no one can tell you that it wasn't true for you at
the time.
Good luck!
Jane





PAGE A4

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Pulse
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 25, 2006 PAGE A5
Horoscopes:
Pirate Buzz
Aries
This whole month has been
about learning to be cautious,
practical and secretive where
money is concerned. Hopefully,
you know pretty well how to do
those things by now. Continue
to practice.
Taurus
Don't be the first one out over
the mine field. Send something
mechanical and dispensable
instead. The smarter you are, the
less pain you'll suffer.
Gemini
Try not to let your emotions
cloud your thinking, if you can.
Make sure your partner knows
what you want, and what you
definitely don't.
Cancer
Temptations are intense, but you
don't have to turn them all down.
Set up a date for when after the
work is done.
Leo
The very best kind of love,
as you know, is built around
commitment. You're not afraid
of that. Be patient if your loved
one is.
Virgo
Squabbles may break out but
don't let yourself be distracted.
The others only see what's on
the surface. You're after more
than that.
Libra
The subject to study now is
shopping, and how to do it well.
This does not mean you get to
buy two of everything you like,
however.
Scorpio
Patience is one of your virtues,
as is a steely sort of calm. Be like
that with somebody who's quite
annoying now.
Sagittarius
Every time you turn around,
there's something else to finish.
Your brains feel scrambled but
that's just a new idea bubbling
up from beneath.
Capricorn
If you find yourself facing a stack
of unpaid bills, crank up your
money machine again. There's
no shortage of lucre out there.
Aquarius
You advance imperceptibly for
many years, then burst through
into a completely new universe.
Bon voyage.
Pisces
Keeping your word is a habit
that's worth building. It gets
easier the longer you do it, and
you become more successful,
too.
Drink Recipes:
Vampire Blood Drink
1 gallon cranberry juice
1 gallon orange juice
1 cup raspberry sorbet
1 quart seltzer
Body Part Ice Cubes, recipe
follows
Mix the juices together. Add the
sorbet, softened, and stir until it
disappears. Add the seltzer.
Before serving, chill with the
Body Part Cubes of floating face
and hands.
Pour into glasses and stir with
glow stick swizzle sticks.
Body Part Ice Cubes:
12 cups cold'water
2 to 3 drops green food
coloring
Special Equipment:
1 roll packing tape
1 roll plastic wrap
2 plastic gloves
1 plastic Halloween face mask
Color the cold water with enough
green food coloring to make it
stand out against the background
of the punch.
Use packing tape to seal off the
eyes, nose and mouth openings
of the mask. Line the inside of
mask with plastic wrap to prevent
leaking. Place it in a bowl that
will hold the mask as still as
possible while freezing. Fill with
the colored water up to the line
of the mask, making sure not to
spill over if possible. Place bowl
in freezer to solidify, at least
24 hours. Fill two food service
gloves with colored water and
twist and knot opening closed to
make a tight seal. Freeze gloves
for 12 to 24 hours.
When frozen, cut plastic gloves
off. Take ice out of mask, putting
hot water on the outside of the
mask, if necessary, to help it
come out easily.
Carefully float the face and
hands in the punch.
Trick or an incredible treat?
A Halloween candy
best and worst list
JOHN BOSCO
STAFF WRITER
Last year, the per capita candy consumption in
America was 26 pounds of candy per person, accord-
ing to the United States Census Bureau.
Not surprisingly, a sufficient amount of those pounds
are believed to be consumed around Halloween time.
In 2005, the Census Bureau also estimated that
nearly 36.1 million kids across the country
were legally eligible (between the
ages of five and 14) to go trick-
or-treating. This estimate
doesn't even take into
consideration those
who are older and
younger who still
go trick-or-treat-
ing.
Talk about
a lot of candy.
In 2004,
there were
1,241 U.S.
manufactur-
ing estab-
1 ishments
producing
chocolate and
cocoa prod-
ucts. Combine'
that with the
515 establish
ments that pro-
duced non-choco-
late confectionery
products in 2004, and
we're talking 1,756 estab-
lishments that are probably
working overtime right now to
churn out enough candy to keep kids
going door to door in search of their favorite
Halloween treats.
But what makes a treat the best? There are mil-
lions of candies - M&M's, Snickers, Hershey's Bars,
Mary Janes, Smarties, Sugar Daddys, Sweet Tarts,
Tootsie Roll Pops, Almond Joys and pardon me for
stopping there, but the list goes on and on forever.
With so much candy out there, finding the per-
fect candy might seem difficult at first, but it's not
that hard.
It all boils down to what the person eating the
candy wants to eat. Some people are chocolate fanat-
ics, and others, like ECU senior Enoch Merchant,
don't want to have anything to do with chocolate.
"Licorice is disgusting said Marchant, "But If
you give me a plain Hershey's bar, I'm ticked. I'm not
a huge chocolate fan, so no thanks
Others, like Gina Elmore, a child development and
family relations graduate student at ECU, couldn't
disagree more.
"I love chocolate. My favorite
Halloween candy is Halloween
" style M&M's. I'm keeping it
gf basic, but they're my favorite
said Elmore. But there's plenty
of Halloween candy that she
finds more of a trick than
a treat.
"You know what I
hate? Those Mike
and Ikesthey're
disgusting. Those
and Good and
Plentys are
really gross
Elmore said.
When
you find
you rself
on the
prowl for
the perfect
Halloween
treat, just
ask yourself
what you like
and don't like.
And if you don't
go trick-or-treat-
ing, there's plenty
stocked on store
shelves for your sweet
tooth to find some comfort.
And if you're passing out
candy this year, stay away from those
candies thatyou wouldn't be caught dead eating.
Remember, you don't always have to break the
bank to get your sugar fix this Halloween, either.
Cheap treats can be just as rewarding as the most
expensive bar in your candy bag.
It's like Enoch Marchant told me, "Give me some
candy corn and I'm in hog heaven, man
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
Popular children's costumes like this will probably not be seen much at ECU.
It's beginning to look
a lot like Halloween
Dress it up
with not-so-spooky
Halloween costumes
Party on fright night
Halloween
happenings in and
out of the club
SARAH CAMPBELL
ASSISTANT FEATURES
EDITOR
Sure, hanging out in the
middle of the street downtown
. on Halloween night is fun for,
oh, about five minutes, but the
excitement usually mounts
when you see the first string of
many ridiculous costumes.
Eventually, the groping
from strangers and the outright
incessant noise begins to slowly
chip away at any bit of sanity
you have left. This year, why
not take advantage of other
places to enjoy the festivities?
Whether this is your first
Halloween in Greenville or
your fifth, the excitement asso-
ciated with the night of Oct. 31
is mounting and people every-
where have begun searching for
the hottest party in town.
Almost every venue in
Greenville is offering some
sort of party in order to
cater to the abundant ECU
student clientele.
Several downtown venues
will be hosting Halloween par-
ties, which often equate with
increased cover charges and
crowds. For those willing to brave-
either of these, you can head
to clubs such as Lucky's to
remember the Wild West in the
Haunted Saloon, The Other Place
or Still Life.
If you are still heading
downtown, but hope to avoid
the club atmosphere, you may
want to stop by restaurants such
as Boli's, Chico's and Buffalo
Wild Wings.
If entertainment is what you
are searching for, Chefs 505 will
play host to Big Rick and the
Bombers, Ham's will have live
music from Sin for the Fallen,
Brad Benson and Katharsis
will play at Scores, and Dr.
Unk's Oasis will host Dragon
Seeks Path.
If you are thinking about
staying out of Greenville all
together, try looking up haunted
hayrides on the internet or ask
around about urban legends to
go visit.
Remember, if you want to
actually go to a party at a club
or anywhere in Greenville, get
there early, as space is limited
and almost everyone will be
looking for something to do.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
STACY DAIL
STAFF WRITER
Halloween: A time to put away
your inhibitions and break out
costumes that would be considered
a bit promiscuous if it were any
other day.
Yes, it sounds exciting and
fortunately for college students, a
night of Halloween fun and games
is finally about to arrive.
In order to participate in the
party, it's important to have a
costume, and for most college
girls, that means showing some
skin and dressing up in a bit of a
risque way.
Fortunately for them, this isn't
a problem, given that Greenville
has two specialty Halloween
stores, along with Party Makers,
Wal-Mart and Target.
Spirit Halloween, one of the
most popular Halloween stores in
the area, offers a wide variety of
costumes directed toward teenag-
ers and college-aged people. The
Spirit Halloween store is located
In Colonial Mall.
Among the best sellers this
year are firefighters, police offi-
cers and, shockingly, a banana. In
addition to these, students can also
pick up the usual French Maid or
Naughty Nurse costume.
If you are a more conservative
kind of girl, Supergirl, Betty Boop
and even "I Love Lucy" costumes
are available.
Halloween is a fun time for
girls, but we can't forget about the
guys. Spirit Halloween also offers
a wide selection of costumes for
their male customers as well.
Although not as much skin
is showing, these costumes defi-
nitely hold their own in the crazy
and unique category, An inflatable
ballerina, a ghastly ghoul and a
monster rider costume are some of
the most popular in the store.
A look can't be completed
with just a costume, so of course
make-up, wigs, fake teeth and even
shoes are available to make sure
customers get the most out of their
Halloween night.
Costumes range from $20
to $100, and accessories vary in
price. Spirit Halloween also offers
a selection of decorations for those
of you throwing your own Hal-
loween bash
The store is currently open for
regular mall hours, and will also
be open until midnight on the day
of Halloween for all of you last-
minute shoppers.
For those of you who like
the plan ahead, starting the day
after Halloween, all costumes
will be 50 percent off, so get your
costume cheap and early for next
year's festivities.
Halloween Express, the
other specialty Halloween
shop in Greenville is located
at the intersection of Fifth and
Tenth Streets in Greenville, a
short distance from campus. The
same kind of costumes can be
purchased there as well as some
exclusive favorites.
Don't forget to start planning
your costume now, if you didn't
start six months ago, and get out
there and have some fun.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
Project Road Trip: The Outer Banks
Winter is one of the best
times to visit the graveyard
of the Atlantic
JENNY AYERS
STAFF WRITER
While you may think summer-
time, surfers and sunscreen when
you think of the Outer Banks, there
is a surprising amount of non-sun
related fun to be had in the offsea-
son as well. Classy restaurants,
crazy bars and quaint shops all
await the eager road tripper just
two hours east in the historic
Outer Banks.
For the adventurous folks,
there are a few outdoor activities
that may be worth your while.
Kitty Hawk Kites in Kill Devil
Hills offers hang gliding over
the sand dunes, tandem glid-
ing to 2,000 feet, guided kaya-
king eco-tours, kite boarding
excursions, jet boat dolphin tours,
parasailing, rock wall climbing
and kite surfing.
If you aren't quite that adven-
turous but still enjoy the outdoors,
check out the Nature Conservancy
at Nags Head Woods. This mari-
time forest features more than
1,200 acres of forest that have
been protected as an ecological
preserve. The preserve is open to
the public for hiking, birding and
other nature activities.
There's also Jockey's Ridge
State Park, the tallest natural
sand dune system in the eastern
United States. Here you can run
around the desert-like landscape
aimlessly, have a cozy picnic
(complete with sandwiches) or
laugh at the people attempting to
hang glide.
Of course you can't forget the
ever-lovely Cape Hatteras and its
historic lighthouse. It's a mighty
long trek down the coast but if
you have the time and the means,
it's definitely worth it. From here e
you can check out Bodie, Hatteras
and Ocracoke Islands, which are
all rich in North Carolina history,
and while you're at it, you can A mini golf course engulfed by Jockey's Ridge State Park which has the tallest natural sand dunes on the east coast
check out a shipwreck or two.
If Mother Nature isn't really
your thing but you still want to
get out of the house, there are
also the trademark miniature golf
courses or go-cart tracks to pass
the time as well as several shops
full of beachy treasures. From For all your surferbeach bum can find great food at the Outer see OBX page A6
- ' V
: I
colorful wind chimes to every
flavor of fudge in the sun, these
shops have something that will
interest everyone. And really, you
can't leave the OBX without a box
of salt water taffy.
For all your surferbeach bum
gear, check out Gray's Department
Store. Take Wings, lose the fluo-
rescent lights, the cheap clothes
and motif, and the corporateness,
and you have Gray's.
Even in the offseason you
can find great food at the Outer
Banks. There are several moder-
ately priced restaurants to choose
from, all offering a variety of
options. Mako Mike's is a popu-
lar spot along with the infamous





PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2006
Throw a wicked Halloween bash
Party until the
sun comes up
SARAH CAMPBELL
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
If you are tired of spending
your Halloween out and about
looking for trouble downtown
or at local venues throughout
Greenville, than maybe this year
you should consider hosting your
own fright night shindig.
First thing's first: In order to
host a devilishly delightful Hal-
loween party you need to create
the right atmosphere. D6cor is
the perfect way to turn a boring,
cramped apartment or home into
a Halloween haven.
Decorations such as black
and orange candles, spider webs,
pumpkins, lights, balloons, bats,
ghosts and caldrons will add a
touch of festive charm to your place
without breaking your budget.
Next up, you may want to
enlist one of your more musically
inclined friends to produce a
soundtrack for the night. Playing
upbeat music such as hip hop or
techno will definitely keep your
guest on their feet. You may also
want to opt tor playing Halloween
themed songs such as the "Mon-
ster Mash" and "Thriller" to get
the party started off right.
After your guests are done
dancing the night away, some
may want to play a game such
as charades or Clue to wind
down. Both games allow
guests to tap into their creative
outlets while keeping with the
Halloween theme.
A costume contest among
guests for the most imaginative
costume is a good way to get them
to wear the most outrageous and
original attire possible. You can
solicit your friends to serve as a
panel of judges and make up a
rubric for scoring each costume.
Kveryone knows a party isn't
complete without the right types
of food and beverages on hand.
Prepare for the bash a couple of
days in advance in order to make
sure that you have all of the essen-
tial items that you desire.
As far as food goes, since
it is a party, no one will come
over expecting a meal so just
be prepared with snacks such
as chips, nachos, crackers,
vegetables with dip and the most
obvious treat, candy.
When deciding what bever-
ages to have on hand, you may
want to consider buying the
necessary ingredients in order to
mix Halloween inspired drinks
such as Zombies and Bloody
Marys. Pouring a mix of your
favorite alcoholic beverage, fruit
juice and Jell-O favoring into a
Halloween shaped mold provides
a festive twist on the old favorite
of Jell-O shots.
Remember to keep some non-
alcoholic beverages such as soda,
juice and water on hand for your
underage guests as well as the
designated drivers.
The most important ingredi-
ent to a wicked Halloween bash is
great people, so invite all of your
friends over and you'll have fun
no matter what you do.
This writer can be contacted at
pulsetheeastcarolinian.com.
OBX
continued from A5
Dick's Crab Shack, New York
Pizza and Mama Kwan's Grill &
Tiki Bar, to name a few. You can
find everything from seafood to
Thai food so no one should be
going home hungry.
One of my favorite spots is
Kelly's Restaurant & Tavern
in Nags Head. You can enjoy
fine dining at Kelly's but it's
also a great place to go for
fun after hours. On the week-
ends Kelly's Tavern is open
from 4:30 p.m. until 2 a.m. with
live bands and nightly drink
specials. The staff here is
awesome so be sure to leave
your waiter or waitress a nice
token of appreciation.
There you have it, folks. From
beautiful scenery and many an
opportunity for the outdoor
excursion to great food and good
shopping, the Outer Banks has
a lot to offer and is worth the
two-hour drive from Greenville.
So the next time you're sitting at
home bored on a Friday night, you
should take a spontaneous trip
to the history and culture-rich
Outer Banks.
This writer can be contacted at
pulseOtheeastcarolinian.com.
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Kelly's Restaurant & Tavern, located in Nags Head, is open all year.
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Sports
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 25, 2006 PAGE A7
ECU's Inside Source
7
Times that senior quarterback
James Pinkney has been
sacked in '2006; three starting
offensive linemen had never
played a collegiate game on
the offensive line
32
Knockdowns recorded by
junior guard Josh Coffman
in 468 plays in his first year
on the offensive line after
moving over from tight end
126
Consecutive passes by
Pinkney without an
interception, which ranks
second in the nation
behind Notre Dame's
senior quarterback Brady
Quinn who has tossed 144
consecutive passes to his
teammates
277.8
Judges score of Christie
Icenhower in the one-meter
board; Icenhower earned
the Conference USA Diver
of the Week honor after
winning the one-meter and
three-meter ('2.58.68) in a
tri-meet with College of
Charleston and Gardner-
Webb
3
RD
Fastest time in school history
swam by Jacquelynn Jones in
the 400 IM (4:29.31); Jones
also won the '200 breast
(2:23.75) and helped to win
the 400 medley relay in the
tri-state meet
5-2
Record by the club ultimate
Frisbee team in a tournament
held in Raleigh over the
weekend; ECU split with
Florida, the No. 1 seed and
last year's national champion
along with Virginia and
Richmond
They said it
"I don't customize myself
as a fumbler. Last week, I
put extra work in running
through the blaster, keep-
ing the ball high and tight,
teammates just walking up
behind me trying to strip
the ball from me It's kind
of fun, Jason (Brandon's
younger brother) played full-
back in high school as well.
His transition (from line-
backer to fullback) wasn't too
hard. He wanted to help the
team. We wanted to make
most of the opportunity
Brandon Simmons, ECU
sophomore running back
"Playing Division I-A
football was something I
always dreamed about. I sat
out for two years. I didn't
play last year and was very
discouraged in myself so this
summer, I made up in my
mind that I was going to be
in that starting rotation and
that I was going to play. I'm
sorry that Brandon Setzer
got hurt, but I just knew
that I had to step up to keep
everything going
Wendell Chavis, ECU defen-
sive lineman
"They've pretty much
had our number. As coach
Hudson stated today, it ain't
about what happened last
year, what happened 30 years
ago, what happened two
years ago. The only thing
that matters is what's going
to happen on Saturday
Van Eskridge, ECU sophomore
linebacker
Stokes pleased with team's progress
Fans get familiar with the nine new faces after Saturday's scrimmage.
Gold beat Purple in
annual scrimmage
RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
ECU men's basketball coach
Ricky Stokes said before fall prac-
tice began that he felt his team
would be a closer, faster and better
shooting team in 2006
Following Saturday's Purple-
Gold game, it looks like Stokes
may be right.
Darrell Jenkins hit a three-
pointer with under 40 seconds
remaining to lift the Gold team
to a 44-43 victory over the Purple
team as the two teams combined to
shoot .53 percent from the floor.
"It's been a long preseason,
and we were just excited to get on
the court said Jenkins, a junior
college transfer from Southern
Idaho. "We've been together since
the summer. We feel comfortable
playing with each other, and we
just do what the coaches tell us
to do and it carries over on to the
court. We feel confident and we're
ready to get started
In the women's Purple-Gold
scrimmage, all-conference for-
ward Cherie Mills netted 1.5 points
as the Purple team beat the Gold
squad, 39-35.
Stokes said he was pleased
with his team's offensive
productivity, but still found some
things to work on before the
Pirates head to Charlottesville on
Saturday for a scrimmage with the
Virginia Cavaliers.
"Looking at the stat sheet,
we did shoot the ball fairly well
said Stokes, who is entering his
second season at KCU following
an 8-20 campaign in 200.5. "It's
kind of like a double-edged sword.
You want to shoot the basketball
better. It's something we've been
stressing since day one. Shooting
the basketball, getting shots out of
the offense, and guys just relaxing
and putting the ball in, so we hope
we continue in that, and the ball
going in basket cures a lot of ills
Aside from his defensive con-
cerns. Stokes felt his team needs to
address other areas as well.
Must having a scrimmage after
one week showed us some things
we have to continue to work on
Stokes said. "I think our turnovers
are something we will have to
continue to limit. Rebounding the
see BASKETBALL page A8
Volleyball on six-game winning streak
Junior outside hitter Mignon Dubenion goes for one of her six kills against Rice during ECU'S win
Two Pirates combine at the net for one of the team's 11 blocks.
Bevan sets school-
record for career
blocks
BENJAMIN LLOYD
STAFF WRITER
Chris Rushing questioned his
team's heart during a non-con
ference loss midway through the
season. Six conference wins later,
the ECU volleyball head coach has
changed his tune.
The Pirates have won seven of
their last games, defeating Rice
3-2 on Friday and Houston 3-1
Sunday inside Minges Coliseum.
The volleyball team's wins
this weekend allowed the Pirates
to beat Houston for the first time
ever, advancing their consecutive
Conference USA win streak to six
games in a row, which is a school
record and gave the Pirates their
16 win. It ensured volleyball's first
back-to-back winning season for
the first time since 1977-78.
Friday night's game went
the whole distance, taking the
Pirates and Rice all five games to
decide the match. The first game
went to Rice 30-24; ECU took
the next two games 30-17 and
30-20. The Owls won the fourth
game 30-18 sending ECU to only
their second match of the season
to go the full distance. ECU won
the fifth and final game 15-12.
ECU's match up versus Hous-
ton proved to be less of a challenge
for the Pirate squad. The Pirates
dominated Houston in the first
game 30-22, when ECU had six
blocked attempts and 18 kills of
their own.
The second game went to the
Cougars 30-20 when they fought
back hard with 18 kills of their
own. ECU was flat-footed for the
start of the second game until
seniors Heidi Krug and Jaime
Bevan both blocked a spike to
give the Pirates momentum going
into the third game. ECU won
the third game 30-21 when they
contained Houston to 14 of 44 kill
attempts. The game was decided
when junior outside hitter Mignon
Dubenion blocked an attempt and
crushed Houston's hope.
The fourth game seemed to
be much easier for the ECU Vol-
leyball team, when the Houston
Cougars ran out of gas and just
couldn't keep up with ECU's
speed. ECU won the fourth game
30-27 when Jaime Beven had
the game winning kill right in
the middle of Houston's half.
ECU's stats for the whole
game definitely stood behind the
final score. With 17 blocks in the
game, 57 kills and 44 digs the
ECU Volleyball team took their 16
win this season with gusto.
Bevan also had an amazing
Sunday with 11 blocks of her own,
which might be here own personal
record, and 14 kills.
"We don't work together out-
side of practice Krug said of
Bevan. "We've just been together
for over four years, so we just are
The Pirates celebrate between points
kind of always clicking
Krug is the school's all-time
leader in assists while Bevan set
the school blocks record on Friday.
The two serve as a formidable duo
in ECU's front line.
Kelley Wernert tallied 16 kills
and six blocked spikes. Sophomore
co-captain Trish Monroe had 15
during their six-game hot streak.
digs and Krug had 54 sets during
their win on Sunday:
The Pirates are 16-9 overall
and 7-4 in C-USA while Houston's
record (ell to 15-11 overall and 6-5
in C-USA competition.
This writer can be contacted
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Swimming and diving still undefeated
Pirates down College
of Charleston,
Gardner-Webb
BENJAMIN LLOYD
STAFF WRITER
On Saturday ECU's football
team wasn't the only ECU team
defending their home turf. This
weekend alone the ECUwomen's
swimming and diving demolished
College of Charleston (154- 87)
and Gardner-Webb (142- 97). The
men beat College of Charleston
(145- 90) keeping both men's and
women's teams unbeaten.
In a swim meet, there are 13
events and the Pirates dominated
nine of them. The Pirates also
ran the board in diving, with
juniors Ryan Hunt and Christie
Icenhower both taking first in
the one-meter and three-meter
boards. The freshmen divers also
faired well this weekend being in
close second to their dominant
teammates while beating out
the other schools all together.
Junior Rebecca Perry is still
undefeated in the 5o-yard free-
style, recording a 23.55 second
time. Junior Megan Pulaski also
kept her unbeaten streak alive
while winning the 1,000-yard
free-style with a time of 10:28.23.
The women's swimming and
diving team took first in the
women's 400-yard medley relay,
400-yard IM, 200-yard Butterfly,
1,000-yard freestyle, 50-yard free-
style and 200-yard backstroke.
The men's squad also fared well
against the College of Charleston.
Greg Neville took first place in
the 200-yard backstroke with a
time of 1:55.87. Matt Donahue
won the 200- yard butterfly with
a time of 1:56.3.5, dominating his
closest competitor. The men took
home first in 400-yard medley
relay, 1,000-yard freestyle, 200-
yard freestyle, 50-yard freestyle,
400-yard IM, 200-yard butterfly,
200-yard backstroke and the 500-
yard freestyle.
Freshmen were a part of
six first place finishes. Blake
Briese finished first in the
500 (4:49.02) and 1,000-yard
freestyle (10:04.98) events.
see SWIMMING page A10
The women's team won two freestyle races including the 50-yard and 1,000-yard heats on Saturday.





PAGE Ak
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2006
BASKETBALL
continued from A7
basketball i a concern, but it was
pleasant to see the ball go through
the basket Overall, we made some
shots, which is a good thing"
The Pirates came out of the
scrimmage healthy, with junior
Jeremy Ingram and sophomore
Sam rltnnant coming back from
injuries, something Stokes said
was important to do. The former
Virginia Tech head coach said he
was pleased w ith the performance
of the seven freshmen.
"It was their first opportunity
to play in front of a crowd Stokes
said. "I'm sure they were a little
nervous, but overall, I thought
it was a good experience for all
of them. They played hard and
I'm sure they'll continue to get
better There was nobody I was
disappointed with. I thought all
the freshmen handled themselves ,
pretty well
Senior Courtney Captain said
he thought the freshmen handled
themselves well.
"They're all competing and
give it everything they've got
everyday said Captain. "When
they mess up, they want to learn
something and know what they
did wrong and try to get better
Captain added that, in the past,
that willingness to learn was some-
thing missing from the program
"In the past, if somebody
messed up, they'd get an attitude
and turn their head and they think
they already know what they did
wrong and they don't want to hear
it the 6-foot guard from Galves-
ton, Tex said. "But these guys,
they want to know. They come to
you and ask questions, I think it's
a different team from in the past
As the lone senior on a team
retumingjust four players, Captain
said that, coupled with his last name,
makes him the team leader by delimit.
"I'm the only senior: I've got
to be the captain Captain said
"My name's Captain and I've got
to be the leader
During the summer and early
fall, Stokes implemented manda-
tory team functions to promote
camaraderie. Minnant, who was
named to the Conference USA
freshman team last season, said
he feels the team is closer because
of those team functions, which
include obligatory team breakfasts.
"We're real close already and
the season hasn't even started
yet said the (-4 sophomore from
Charlotte. "We get to see each
other every morning. Waking up
tired and seeing each other every
morning, practice, weight room,
all that, study hall, all that, we see
each other all the time so I think
that's helping us on the court also,
by being together so much
The development on the
court was evident Saturday as
the Pirates shot 59 percent from
3-point range. While the team
shot the ball well from the floor.
Stokes said the shooting from the
charity stripe "must improve
"We have to shoot free throws
better if we want to be success-
ful Stokes said, who added that
he will have the team shoot more
free throws in practice.
Minnant knows the free-throw
shooting is a problem.
"That's something we need to
work on Minnant said, who tal-
lied l.S points to lead the Purple
squad. "That was a big disappoint-
ment we had last year, not making
free throws
Jenkins, who led all scorers in
the scrimmage with 19 points and
five 3-pointers, said conditioning
should improve the team's overall
performance,
"One thing that Coach Stokes
really stresses to get in exercise
at the practice Jenkins said.
"During practice we're constantly
shooting after we're done with
defensive drills. We get up a lot
ofshots, during practice and after
practice. We're definitely going to
be a running team so we need the
conditioning, we need the weights,
and we're just ready to go
-
- 5jP
The Pirates have nine freshmen and sophomores on the roster.
Captain knows the team has
things to work on, but feels good
about how the scrimmage went.
"We shot well, and the score
was close said Captain, who
scored 10 points. "The defense
wasn't too good because there
was too much scoring going on. It
was a positive scrimmage because
of the scoring, but we do need to
work on the defense because it
was a close game and those close
games will come down to the
defense. Who's gonna stop who?"
Captain added that, ultimately,
the goal is to get to the NCAA
Tournament, but the primary
goal for '2006 is to have a winning
season, and he's optimistic the
Pirates can achieve it.
"I think we're gonna have a
real good season he said.
EC.U's first game of the season
will be a home game on Nov. 11
versus Morgan State following
the final ECU home football
game against Marshall. The
Lady Pirates play a day later at
James Madison.
This writer can be contacted at
sportstheeastcarolinian.com.
Take a FREE practice test at this event and
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V
- r Ledonia Wright Cultural Center - U 1
Monday. ()ctober 23rd - 7 p.m. Thursday, October 26th Both Sides of the Coin: The Realities of Hate Privileue & Oppression Wright Plaza and MSC Brickyard LWCC Al1 Da Tuesday, ()ctober 24th - 12 noon Friday, October 27th MSC Room 244 and LWCC MSC Room 244 and 1 WCC Yard Wall of Oppression: The Building & 1 p.m. Writing on the Wall. LWCC Yard x Multicultural Politick Tuesday. (Jctober 24th - 7 p.m. LW( C Embracing Change 2 p.m. LWCC
Wednesday, October 25th - 6
Speaker: Jeff Johnson
For more Information about HATE OUT WEEK visit the
Ledonia Wright Cultural Center or isit us on the web at:
Student(
Student I
ent Association
iltural Awarness
www.ecu.edulwcc
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Classifieds
WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 25,2006 PAGE A9
Want it, get it! Only in our Classifieds.
FOR RENT
WALK TO campus! 1 block from
the Library. 2 bedroom apartment
with hardwood floors and
central heatair. Washer, dryer,
dishwasher, high-speed internet,
basic cable, water & sewer all
included. Available January 1st.
Call Mike 439-0285.
Blocks to ECU, 1,2, or 3 Bdrm Homes,
Central HeatAC, Washer.Dryer,
Dishwasher, We mow the yard! Available
December to January; Call 321 4712, or
see at collegeuniversityrentals.com
Half Off First Month Rent
SunChase ECU Apts. Now
Leasing! 2, 3, and 4 bedrooms
fully furnished, major appliances,
water, sewer, cable, high speed
int and electricity included.
2201 NE Greenville Blvd.
Greenville EHO Call office for
more details 252-758-8002
$350 Each all inclusive 4
bedroom walk to campus! $350
mo. each INCLUDES Utilities,
Cable, High Speed Internet,
and Phone with Unlimited Long
Distance! WasherDryer Included
Call 258-4373
One, two Brs. on-site management
maintenance Central heat air
6, 9, 12 month leases Water
Cable included ECU bus Wireless
Internet pets dishwasher disposals
pool laundry (252) 758-4015
ROOMMATE
WANTED
Roommate wanted to share a
4BD4BA all inclusive apartment
for $349mo. Male or female,
Close to ECU, on ECU bus route,
great amenities. Call 752-9995.
Roommate wanted in 2 bedroom
apartment 1 block from library.
$325month includes water,
garbage, cable, and DSL.
Available now. Please call 831-
566-2168.
FOR SALE
Cats and Kittens: We have been
rescued now we need a home.
Have all medical. $25 donation.
(252)746-8397 or (252)717-
5375
HELP WANTED
Bedroom & Sofa Plus is seeking
clean cut individuals for part
and full time delivery positions.
Please apply in person at 425 A
Greenville Blvd. (Next to CiCi's)
Bartenders wanted! Up to $250
day. No experience necessary.
Training provided. Call (800)
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Food delivery drivers wanted
for Restaurant Runners. Part-
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Perfect for college students
Some lunchtime (llam-2pm)
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weekend availability required.
2-way radios allow you to be
anywhere in Greenville when
not on a delivery. Reliable
transportation a must. Call 252-
551-3279 between 2-5pm only.
Leave message if necessary.
Sorry Greenville residents only.
Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting 14-
18 part-time youth basketball
coaches and officials for the
upcoming basketball program.
Applicants must possess a good
knowledge of basketball skills
and have the ability and patience
to,work with youth. Applicants
most be able to coach young
people ages 5-18 in basketball
fundamentals. Hours are from
4 pm to 9 pm, weekdays with
some weekend coaching. Flexible
with hours according to class
schedules. This program will run
from November 27 through the
beginning of March. Salary rates
start at $6.50 per hour. For more
information, please contact the
Athletic Office at 329-4550,
Monday through Friday, 10 am
until 7 pm. Apply at the City of
Greenville, Human Resources
Department, Martin L. King Dr.
Phone 329-4492.
CHEERLEADING or Hip Hop or
Karate (Black Belt) Instructors
experienced needed Part-Time
in Greenville and Farmville for
Children's programs. Email
address for application to
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Call for group discounts. Info
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Star of NBC's hit show ER
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10 Moist, sticky
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14 Nimble
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19 Surrounding
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20 All the rage
22 More lustrous
24 Considers
26 Reduce
27 Actressdirector
Lupino
30 Paulo
31 Bridge triumph
32 Tout's hangout
35 Machine-shop
machine
39 Pub offerings
40 Slow moving
mollusk
42 Shop item
43 Brooding places
45 Mistaken
47 Frosted
49 Shoe tip
50 Uno e due
51 Star quality
54 Item of value
56 Ribbed pasta
58 Wielded the
blue pencil
62 Protect illegally
63 Real looker
65 Writer McMurtry
66 "Auld Lang "
67 First lady of
scat
68 Obliterate
69 Touches
tenderly
70 Title paper
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DOWN
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21 Complete
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23 Tight closure
25 Lamented
loudly
27 Persia today
28 Valley
29 High cards
31 Circumvents
33 Body shop
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34 Motor vehicle
36 Blow the horn
37 Definite time of
day
38 If not, then
41 Set free
44 Aberdonian,
e.g.
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by Aaron Warner






PAGE A10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 2006
SWIMMING
continued from A7
Fellow freshman Jacque-
lynn Janet recorded the faateat
times in both the 400-yard I VI
(4:a9Sl) and (he M)0-yard free-
style (5:()7.9K). leffery Miller
also made an impression this
weekend, winning the 400-
yard IM with a time of fc:14.0g,
Also freshman Kristian Ram-
In ist placed second In the 800-
yard haekstroke anil helping
the Pirates eapture first in the
1-00-yard medley relay.
The Pin tea have road trips
to William and Mary and
Tow-son in consecutive days
followed by a dual meet with
Duquesne and Weil Virginia
in Huntington, W.Va. ECU
will then travel to Chapel Hill
for the Nike Cup and the U.S.
Open in West Lafayette, Ind
along with another road swine
"So well see how tough we
are said 85-year head coach
Rick Kobe. "On the road it's
different. On paper we're better
than these teams, hut when
you're swimming in someone
else's facility, anything can
happen
After the wins, both teams
are undefeated with the men at
8-0 and the girls at .1-0. Both
trains go on a long road trip that
doesn't end until the beginning
of 8007 when they come back c
home to face Virginia 'lech on ,q
Jan. i:l. &
This writer can be contacted at
sportsetheeastcarolinian.com.
Senior Matt Donohue and Geoff Handsfield finished first and second
Never, never, never
give up.
COMMITMENT
Rtss It On.
TNI FOUNDAIIOM Ul A IITTII LIM
www.forbettcrlife.org
Taize Service
At Hooker Memorial Christian Church
Peace for your Soul
Join us at 6:00 pm on Oct. 29th
For a Candlelight Taize Service
1111 Greenville Blvd. Greenville, NC
252-756-2275
Hours
J.Y JOYNER LIBRARY
At Joyner Library we are more than just a bunch
of books we are a boundless resource.
Contact information
We offer an array of services and resources that
support educational programs across every
academic department at East Carolina University,
both on and off campus. We provide group
study space and ample seating, electronic and
computer equipment, e-mail and chat reference,
247 online resources and an ever growing base
of other support materials. We develop and
provide cutting edge digital technologies. We
even offer coffee as you enhance your learning.
Online
Most importantly, we are-here to assist you
by providing full-text subscription databases,
research journals (online and print), instruction;
teaching resources, newspapers, magazines,
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When your studies become stressful or your
roommate too loud we have professional faculty
and staff to assist your efforts and provide a
comfortable atmosphere and furnishings where
you can relax and focus on efforts to make your
studies more productive.
Find it all at "the J.Y

Visit us at www.lib.ecu.edu to learn more.
I s I
Tomorrow starts here. CAROLINA
I MM RSm


Title
The East Carolinian, October 25, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 25, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1933
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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