The East Carolinian, October 19, 2006












EastCarolinian
VOLUME 82, ISSUE 16
www.theeastcarolinian.com
YOUR CAMPUS NEWS
SOURCE SINCE 1925
THURSDAY OCTOBER 19, 2006
SMU comes into
town riding high as
the Pirates celebrate
Homecoming, read
our previewPage A7
The time for action
is now. Rebel, the
student run art
publication is having
a call for entriesFor
more information turn
toPage A7
Conference USA
and Atlantic Coast
Conference games
have separated the
East Carolinian's staff
in their weekly football
predictions Page A12
Funny man Robin
Williams takes another
stab at an Oscar
winning film. Read our
review about his latest
attemptPage A7
Find out more about
the controversy
surrounding the
cancellation of CLAS
1300PageA5
6 3 4 9 2 7 5 187 5 1 4 8 3 2 6 99 2 8 1 6 5 7:4 3
2 5 9 4 8 3 7 j6 13 7 8 9 1 6 5 2 46 14 5)7:2 8,3 9
8 4 2 1 7 5 3 9 66 9 7 8 3 2 1 4 53 5 1 4 9 6 2 8 7
Test your skills at
SuDoKuPage A9
NEWSPageA2
PULSEPageA7
SPORTSPageBI
OPINIONPageA4
H0MEC0MINGPageB3
CLASSIFIEDSPageAII
New revitalization planned for downtown
The committee, composed of local architects, designers and many community members, is looking to make downtown Greenville a "destination" and help boost the local economy,
Local committee holds
meeting to discuss
plans for a better
downtown
ADELINE TRENTO
STAFF WRITER
A committee of local archi-
tects, designers and Greenville
enthusiasts held a meeting last
Wednesday, Oct. 11, to discuss a
revitalization plan for downtown.
The Downtown Design Guide-
lines Workshop, at the Sheppard
Memorial Library, was held to
gain public feedback about the
new ideas for making downtown
Greenville a more exciting place.
A volunteer advisory com-
mittee, which plans to clean up
the appearance of downtown and
encourage new stores, restaurants
and businesses to come to the area,
sponsored the meeting.
"Our goal is to really boost the
economy of downtown and create
a destination said committee
member Myriah Shewchuk. "We
want to meet the needs of the vari-
ous people in Greenville, from the
college students, to the retirees, to
the young professionals. We want
to make it a place for everyone to
get together and have something
to do. Our plan is to make down-
town something the community
can be proud of
The meeting gave Greenville
citizens a chance to ask questions
about the committee's plans and
give input on what they would
like to see in the community. The
consensus at the meeting was that
people in the community want
a cleaner, more family-oriented
downtown with restaurants, shops
and other places to go.
Many people at the meeting
felt that all the bars downtown
take away from the area and pre-
vent families from going there. One
Greenville man called the bars an
"abomination and even said that
the problems in Greenville come
from the "kind of traffic" these
bars bring downtown. Albrecht
McLawhorn, a local architect and
member of the committee, doesn't
necessarily agree. McLawhorn
feels that downtown can still be a
great place with both bars for the
college students and other places
for families.
"While the bars pose perhaps
the biggest reason for design
guidelines, they are also a vital
part to this city said Mclawhorn.
"There are numerous examples of
college bars in college towns that
add something to that city. I hope
we can work with bar owners and
find a middle ground. We want to
find a way to help them with their
businesses, so they, in turn, can
help us with the downtown that
we are all working toward
The committee would like
downtown businesses to follow
"design guidelines which would
enhance the appearances of build-
ings in the area. The guidelines
will address the appearance of
signs, entrances, facades, archi-
tecture and outside lighting of
businesses. The goal of these
guidelines is to make downtown
look more inviting and distinct.
"Our goal is to create these
design guidelines that will give
existing property owners and new
developers an idea of what they can
do with their property to make it
more fitting in the context of the
downtown said Shewchuk. "We
see DOWNTOWN page A3
Bringing calligraphy
straight from Japan
ECU offering workshop
again next semester
BENJAMIN CORMACK
STAFF WRITER
Students had the opportunity
last week to learn some of the
basics of Japanese calligraphy from
Nobuyoshi Asaoka, ECU's newest
Japanese instructor.
Students and other com-
munity members learned of
calligraphy's history and how it
arrived in Japan.
They were able to take a brush
in hand and learn various strokes
and techniques for calligraphy
and, in the end, were able to paint
the Japanese calligraphic symbol
of their choice.
Calligraphy can best be
described as artistic, elegant hand-
writing and can be found in many
different cultures and languages.
Originally from India, calligraphy
was brought to China and Korea
hundreds of years ago, and was
eventually brought to Japan where
it was practiced exclusively by
monks. Today, Japanese students
learn calligraphy from elemen-
tary school through high school.
There are even private instruc-
tors and institutions available to
coincide or go beyond the standard
educational level.
Asaoka, or Nobu as he prefers
to be called, has been practicing
calligraphy for nearly 20 years
and took private lessons from a
mentor in addition to his school
education. Originally from the
city of Fukuoka, Nobu studied
English at the University of Ari-
zona (though he did not graduate
from there), which gave him the
opportunity, as he described it,
to look at his home country from
a different point of view.
"I was kind of amazed to find that
lots of people are kind of interested
in Japanese culture and Japan said
Nobu. "Sometimes I found myself
kind of ignorant about Japanese
culture and stuff about Japan
Nobu returned to Japan where
he began studying Sosho, an
advanced styleform of Japanese
calligraphy. Eventually Nobu
came back to the United States
and attended the University
Students can find Peter Romary's office in Mendenhall, in room 125.
Where students go
for legal assistance
Calligraphy originated in India and is done in many countries and cultures.
of Wisconsin at Madison, gradu-
ating over the summer with a
MA. in Japanese Pedagogy and
Linguistics. He comes to ECU
now as a lecturer, and teaching the
Japanese language for the first
time as an instructor instead of a
teaching assistant.
The challenge of learning
Japanese, according to Nobu, is
that it is a very different language
from most of the other foreign
languages in the school cur-
riculum, and there are very few
opportunities to practice here
on campus.
"I really want to provide lots
of opportunities for my students
to speak Japanese said Nobu.
"I considered the fact that there
are not many Japanese students
see CALLIGRAPHY page A6
Meet the director of
student legal services
KIMBERLY BELLAMY
SENIOR STAFF WRITER
Legal services are available
to students on campus if they
find themselves in a predicament
that requires legal advice and
assistance.
Peter Romary, director of stu-
dent legal services, has an office in
room 125 of Mendenhall Student
Center so that he will be accessible
to students who need his help.
Romary has been providing
useful information about legal
issues that students should have
knowledge of in many of the
issues of the East Carolinian.
Some of the issues he provides
insight on include the alcohol
laws, date rape and sexual assault.
Romary has worked with many
students on a variety of issues and
is actively taking part in a pro-
gram that will help more students.
"The issues are as diverse
as the people I work with and
I love that said Romary.
According to Romary, he is
currently helping develop the
Student Safety and Awareness
plan at ECU.
Training on legal and safety
issues, legal advice and assistance
to students with issues rang-
ing from the civil arena includ-
ing landlord tenant and small
claims issues to speeding tickets,
drinking tickets and DWls and
more serious issues are some
of the things that he special-
izes in according to Romary.
While Romary does work pri-
marily for legal assistance to stu-
dents, he has the desire to work with
other resources on campus as well.
"I am especially keen to work
more with the victims advocate
and counseling services who are
and should be the first port of call
for students who have been victims
of crime Romary said.
Romary implied that he has the
desire to be able to help students
even more than he already has in
the past.
"With a number of new
restraining orders now available
in North Carolina and with more
and more avenues for legal rem-
edies available to victims, 1 hope
that I will be able to assist more
students Romary said.
Romary has been an attor-
ney for 12 years and managed to
help student in SGA by giving
them legal advice throughout the
years.
Some of the honors Romary
have received include the North
Carolina Bar Pro Bono award, the
National Law Journal Pro Bono
Award, and the National Crime
Victims Bar Association Cham-
pion of Justice Award according
to Romary.
Letters of recommendation
from the President of the United
States, Governors and Ambas-
sadors, and other high honors
are just a few of his many cre-
dentials.
Many students are unaware
of the superb legal assistance
that is available to them at the
university.
Crystal Toone, junior recre-
ational therapy major said, "I haven't
gotten into any legal trouble in my
time here at ECU but if 1 did, I
would consider using this service
To find out more legal advice
that is available, you can call 328-
5183 for an appointment with
Romary.
This writer may be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
V





News
THURSDAY OCTOBER 19, 2006 PAGE A2
Campus & Community
Announcements
NPHC Homecoming Step
Show
Friday, Oct. 20
Location: Wright Audito-
rium, 8 p.m.
The NPHC 2006 ECU
Homecoming Step Show is
just around the corner. This
year's show is on Friday,
Oct. 20th at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. Alpha
Phi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi,
Delta Sigma Theta, Phi Beta
Sigma, Zeta Phi Beta and
Sigma Gamma Rho have
confirmed to compete for
prize money and bragging
rights!
Tickets are on sale now!
$15 for students in advance,
$20 for public in advance,
$25 the night of the show
You can purchase tickets
from the Mendenhall Box
Office or by calling 1-800-
ECU-ARTS. The official
NPHC Step Show after
party will be hosted at the
Dynasty. Cost is $10 for
studentsalumni and $15
for the public
ECTCECC Alumni Society
Reunion
Friday, Oct. 20, through
Saturday, Oct. 21
ECU alumni who attended
ECTC or ECC are invited
to attend the ECTCECC
Alumni Society Reunion.
Activities include a campus
bus tour, breakfast at the
Alumni Center on Satur-
day prior to the parade,
the Alumni Tailgate, and
a reduced-price foot-
ball ticket. Following the
game, enjoy a reception
and dinner at Mendenhall
Student Center, and then
dance to the tunes of the
Collegians as you reminisce
and reconnect with friends
from your college days at
ECU. Our special honorees
this year are members of
the Class of 1956. These
alumni will be inducted
as Golden Alumni at the
evening event. For details,
contact the East Carolina
Alumni Association. Call
(800) ECU-GRAD or visit
PirateAlumni.com.
Ticket required.
Homecoming Open House
Saturday, Oct. 21
9 a.m. at the Taylor-Slaugh-
ter Alumni Center
Attend the Homecoming
Open House on Saturday,
Oct. 21 from 9-11 a.m.
Enjoy a continental break-
fast and a front row seat for
the homecoming parade at
10 a.m
The event is free and open
to the public. For more
information, please contact
328-6072 or Homecoming.
PirateAlumni.com.
Technology Jobs Available
Oct. 2 - 23
Location: Allied Health and
Nursing Building
The SMART Classroom
support team within the
Information Technology
and Computing Services
department (ecu.edu
itcs) is looking for student
employees who can work
mornings, beginning at
8 a.m in the new Allied
Health and Nursing build-
ing on ECU's West Campus.
If you can work morning
hours and are interested,
please contact Tom Irons,
Jr. at ironsth@mail.ecu.
edu. Classroom technology
experience is not required;
we will train enthusiastic
hard working students.
Campus Dining Survey
Opportunity to Win an
Apple iPod nano or iTunes
Gift Card
Oct. 5 - 20.
Location: ecu.edudining
We are conducting a survey
to better understand your
campus lifestyle and pref-
erences. By sharing your
thoughts, we will gain valu-
able insight to help improve
your overall campus dining
experience. This online
survey will take 10 to 12
minutes and your responses
are confidential. Each par-
ticipant in the survey will
have the opportunity to
enter to win an Apple iPod-
nano or iTunes Gift Card.
To take the survey visit col-
legediningsurvey.comecu
or ecu.edudining.
19 Thu 20 Fri 21 Sat 22Sun 23 Mon 24 Tue 25
Wed
ACHIEVE:
Understanding the
Demands of
College Writing
Writing papers in
college can be very
different than writ-
ing papers in high
school. Come learn
about different writ-
ing and reference
styles as well as
what you need to do
to avoid violating our
academic
integrity policy.
Scott Hall Basement
2006 School of
Art and Design
Faculty Exhibition
Wellington B. Gray
Gallery
Woman's Golf
Lady Pirate
Invitational
Bradford Creek Golf &
Country Club
Volunteer Friday for
Habitat for Humanity
Mendenhall Brickyard
3 - 5 p.m.
Freeboot Friday
Performing this week:
Zydefunk Zydefunk
(Louisiana Grooves)
Uptown Greenville
5 - 8 p.m.
Women's Volleyball
Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum
7 p.m.
ECU vs. Rice
NPHC Homecoming
Step Show
Alpha Phi Alpha,
Omega Psi Phi, Delta
Sigma Theta, Phi Beta
Sigma, Zeta Phi Beta
and Sigma Gamma
Rho have confirmed
to compete for prize
money and bragging
rights! You can pur-
chase tickets from
the Mendenhall Box
Office or by calling
1-800-ECU-ARTS
Wright Auditorium
8 p.m.
Woman's Golf
Bradford Creek Golf &
Country Club
Lady Pirate Invitational
Men's Swimming
Minges Aquatic Center
11 a.m.
Women's Swimming
ECU VS. GARDNER-
WEBB
Minges Aquatic Center
11 a.m.
Football
ECU VS. SMU
Homecoming
Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium
3 p.m.
Woman's Golf
Bradford Creek Golf &
Country Club
Lady Pirate Invitational
Women's Volleyball
ECU VS. HOUSTON
Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum
12 p.m.
ECU Pirate Chase 5K
and 1 Mile
The Pirate Chase 5K is
a challenging and fun
3.1 mile run around the
ECU Sports Complex.
The double loop 5K
passes by the Bronze
Pirate, Clark-LeClair
and Ficklen Stadiums.
A one mile run or walk
starts at the same time.
Great event for specta-
tors also. Good food
and drink, and a few
other surprises. Com-
plete details and entry
forms available at East
Carolina Road Racing
Web site ecrun.org
Wards Sports Medi-
cine Building (Bronze
Pirate)
1 p.m.
Advising for Spring
Semester Begins
ACHIEVE:
Saving Time
Researching Your
Paper in Your Room
Researching your
paper does not have
to be a scary pro-
cess. Come find out
about all the tools
available through
Joyner Library and how
you can do the major-
ity of your research in
the comfort of your
own room!
Belk Hall Basement
7 p.m.
ACHIEVE:
What to Write Down
and When
Each class you take
probably has multi-
ple books as well as
the material covered
in lectures you will
have to take notes on.
' Come find out from
a professor, how to
take notes effectively
to help make studying
less stressful.
Fletcher Hall Lobby
Effective
Communication
A guest speaker from
the School of Com-
munication will pres-
ent on effective forms
of communication
pertaining to lead-
ers and members of
student organizations
Mendenhall, room
15
3:30 p.m.
Effective
Communication
A guest speaker from
the School of Commu-
nication will present
on effective forms of
communication per-
taining to leaders and
members of student
organizations.
Mendenhall, room 15
3 p.m.
Russian Film Series: "A
Cruel Romance"
Movies have English
subtitles or dubbing.
Bate 2011
6:30 p.m.
NEWS BRIEFS
Lawyers to drop contempt claim
against Georgia over voter letters
(AP) A legal team opposing
Georgia's voter-photo ID law said
Wednesday it will drop a contempt
charge against the state after the
approval of a mass mailing of more
than 300,000 letters to inform
voters they will not have to bring a
photo ID to the polls in November.
A contempt hearing was sched-
uled for Friday, where lawyers
planned to ask a judge to force the
state to send voters a letter similar
to the one approved Tuesday at a
special meeting of the State Elec-
tion Board.
"They have basically done
everything that we were asking for
in our motion for contempt said
Jennifer Auer Jordan of the Barnes
Law Group, headed by former
Georgia Gov Roy Barnes.
Jordan aid the lawyers planned
to fax a motion to dismiss to the
Fulton County Superior Court civil
clerk's office on Thursday morning.
In all, the election board con-
tacted by mail 305,000 registered
voters believed to lack state-issued
photo identification.
A sampling of editorials from
North Carolina newspapers
(AP) House Speaker Jim
Black has a lot of legal bills and
needs a way to pay them. That's
understandable.
What's not understandable is
his refusal to tell the public who's
giving money to his legal defense
fund. In an age when full disclo-
sure is the only way citizens can
know who's funding politicians,
that's outrageous.
The public wouldn't have known
about the Teamster PAC's $5,000
donation had it not been disclosed
in a 222 page filing with the Fed-
eral Elections Commission, reports
the Observer's David Ingram.
That donation caught many
by surprise. Several newspapers
had reported in March that the
legal defense fund's organizers
said they wouldn't accept contri-
butions from lobbyists and PACs.
Addison Bell of Matthews,
an organizer of the fund, said
he was incorrectly quoted by
three newspapers last spring.
He said he remembers saying
no lobbyists' contributions, but
says he didn't mention PACs.
Here's why disclosure is
important to the public: Can-
didates can't accept more than
$4,000 from any donor nor can
they accept a dime directly from
corporations or labor unions.
Country Singer Quit Reality Show
for Son
(KMTR) Country singer
Sara Evans said she quit the TV
show Dancing With the Stars for
the welfare of her son.
In a pre-recorded interview
broadcast during Tuesday's live
show, Evans said something very
personal and traumatic hap-
pened after last Wednesday's
results show, forcing her to
file for divorce because things
just went downhill at 100 mph.
She said family members told
her she couldn't leave her son
because he had been traumatized by
the situation. She said ifshe tried to
continue the show, "I think I would
have had a nervous breakdown
Evans accused her husband,
Craig Schelske, of adultery with
their nanny in divorce papers.
The nanny, Alison Clinton
Lee, however, told Inside Edi-
tion the allegations are false.
"He's a mentor, a really
good friend. Never once did he
make a pass at me Lee said,
adding she has no idea why
Evans is making the accusations.
"I thought it was a joke, I
really did. I was like, 'Are you
kidding me?' That is so far
from the truth that I don't even
know where it came from. I'm
devastated by this Lee said.
Humans' Sex Organs To Grow
Bigger By 3000
(KMTR) Men's penises will
be bigger and women's breasts will
be more pert by the year 3000.
New research predicts
some humans will be six and a
half feet tall, have coffee-col-
ored skin and live for 120 years.
The predictions appear in a
new report by evolution theo-
rist Dr. Oliver Curry, from the
London School Of Economics.
He spent two months inves-
tigating the ascent and descent
of man over the next 100 millen-
nia. He found that social division
nright'split humans into two
sub-species of giants and goblins.
The descendants of the genetic
upper class would be tall, slim,
healthy, attractive, intelligent,
and creative. But an "underclass"
will have evolved into dim-witted,
ugly, squat goblin-like creatures.
Search continues for missing boy
(AP) Searchers may get
a little help from mother nature
so they can start searching for a
missing 8-year-old boy by air at
Crater Lake.
Snow and low clouds have
hampered search efforts for Samuel
Boehlke, of Portland.
Samuel wandered away from
his father's car late Saturday after-
noon at a turnout on Rim Drive.
Nearly 200 searchers with dogs
and on horseback have joined the
effort. But the snow and low clouds
have prevented a helicopter from
taking part. It is equipped with a
sensor that can detect body heat.
Snow has been falling
since Samuel has been miss-
ing. The boy is wearing long
pants, hiking shoes and a jacket.
Wife's Weight Worth Beer, Bucks
in Race
(AP) The annual wif-car-
rying competition at the Sunday
River Ski Resortin Bethel, Maine,
fractures the phrase "behind every
great man stands a great woman
Men actually carry women on
their backs in the North American
Wife Carrying Championships,
which just completed its fifth
year of competition, the Lewiston
(Maine) Sun Journal said. Twenty-
seven teams competed in the event,
which ski resort officials said was
a record.
The course, all 278 yards of
it, includes a hairpin turn, a log
hurdle and a water trench that a
man must navigate with his wife
clutching him around the neck.
The prize is beer and money based
on the wife's weight.
This year's winners, first-time,
wife-hauler John Ferra and his
spouse, Tess, took home 12 cases
of beer and $675; five times Tess'
weight, the newspaper said. They
also received1,000 for airfare to
fly to next year's world champion-
ships in Finland.
"How the Pirates Won the West ECU homecoming 2006
CONTRIBUTED ARTICLE
The ECU Student Home-
coming Committee and Steering
Board prcudly announce the
ECU's 99th Homecoming, "How
the Pirates Won the West As
our own ECU Pirates gear up to
face-off against the Mustangs of
SMU there will be events across
campus for students and Pirate
Fans of all ages to show off what
it really means to be a Pirate.
On Thursday, Oct. 19 at the
bottom of College Hill from 5:30
- 8 p.m. will be the official Home-
coming pep rally. The events this
year will include a canned food
drive, a mechanical bull, DJ Nauta,
free food and free give-a-ways.
ECU students have been
busily collecting cans all semes-
ter long to donate to the Salvation
Army. Last year over 10,000 cans
were donated by students, and
this year's goal is to donate over
12,000 cans.
Also performing at the Pep
Rally will be the step show per-
formances by ECU students as
part as the NPHC Annual Kail
Step Show, ECU Cheerleaders,
Marching Pirates, Pee Dee the
Pirate and the football coaching
staff all out to get students excited
for Saturday's game.
"There's nothing more
valuable to ECU than the
support of our community!
We hope that Pirate fans,
both young and old will
come out and experience the
excitement of Homecoming"
ELIZABETH SCHULER
STUDENT HOMECOMING CHAIR
The next big Homecoming
event will be the traditional Home-
coming Parade.
On Saturday, Oct. 21, com-
munity members will gather as
the Parade begins at 9:45 a.m. and
proceeds down Fifth Street.
The Parade will feature
Greenville City Mayor Robert D.
Parrott as the Grand Marshall,
floats built by student organiza-
tions, the 2005 Homecoming
Queen, Jessica Mortenson and the
2006 Homecoming Court.
"There's nothing more valu-
able to ECU than the support of
our community said Fjizabeth
Schuler, student homecoming
chair.
We hope that Pirate fans,
both young and old will come out
and experience the excitement of
Homecoming
For more information about
ECU's Homecoming activities
visit ecu.eduuniversityunions
or contact Elizabeth Schuler at
328-4715.
Check out our special Home-
coming Section. It includes a
schedule of events, exclusive photos
and the inside scoop on this year's
celebration.
-I L
Nightly Dinner Specials $6.95
Monday- Chicken Parmesan
Tuesday- Country Fried Chicken
Wednesday- Spaghetti ft Meatballs
Thursday- Greek or Caesar Salad Chix
Friday- Fish ft Chips
Saturday- Meat or 5 Cheese Lasagna
Sunday- Fried Shrimp Plate
ALL DAY HANGOUT
758-2774 Take out
301 South Jarvis Street
12 Delicious Combos $5.69 each
-i i-
Daily Drink Specials
Monday - $1.75 Domestic bottles
Tuesday - $2.25 Imports
Wednesday - $1.25 Mug Bud Lt $4.50 Pitchers
Thursday - $2.50 House Hi-Balls $3 Wine
Friday - $2.50 Import of the Day
Saturday - $3 Lits ft $2.50 Import of the Day
Sunday - $2.75 Pints Guinness, Bass,
Stella Artois, Black and Tan
THURJ
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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A3
I
DOWNTOWN
continued from Al
Students not in a big
rush to tie the knot
A growing number of college students are finding faith in different ways,
Students find faith
The look of downtown Greenville will be undergoing some changes.
feel that these changes will do a
lot to help boost the economy and
get people to come downtown and
spend time
The committee's plans for
downtown also include adding
more trees to the streets and
creating a park for families.
Citizens at the meeting sug-
gested flower boxes, artwork
and outdoor furniture to enhance
downtown's appearance. The goal
is to encourage people to walk
around downtown, have coffee or
eat dinner outside, and basically
feel comfortable in the area.
Incentives will be offered
to local businesses that wish to
change the appearance of their
buildings in accordance with the
new design guidelines. Businesses
will be able to receive facade
improvement grants, renovation
tax credits and other incentives to
help with the cost of renovation.
"We hope that incentives will
encourage developers to come in
and locate their businesses down-
town as opposed to elsewhere in
the county or on the fringe of the
city Shewchuk said.
The committee plans to hold
more community meetings in
order to get as much feedback as
possible from business owners
and Greenville citizens. Students
are encouraged to keep a look-
out for future meetings so they
can voice their ideas about the
changes they would like to see
downtown.
This writer can be reached at
newstheeastcarolinian.com.
jo (MCT)When the Rev.
$ Robert L. Carpenter started a
j small, faith-based organization at
the University of Central Florida
fi four years ago, he never imagined
5; how big it would become.
Today, what began as a word-
of-mouth venture packs in stu-
dents at Sunday services and
boasts an e-mail list of nearly
2,000. Incoming freshmen seek
out University Christian Fellow-
ship when they arrive on campus,
not just the other way around.
Carpenter's group is just one
of many faith-based organizations
on local college campuses that are
reporting a recent jump in mem-
bership. A Harvard poll released
this year found that seven out
of 10 U.S. college students said
"religion is somewhat or very
important in their lives and 25
percent say they've become more
spiritual since entering college.
"With all the uncertainty in
the world with the war, bird flu,
hurricanes, students are look-
ing for some kind of faith con-
nection Carpenter says of the
boost. "They are searching for
something that is secure
And for some, that means
branching away from Greek life,
athletics and activities that bom-
bard them with peer pressure and
alcohol.
Nausheen Ansari, 21, sought
friends, and mostly understand-
ing, when she joined the Muslim
Student Association at UCF.
She feared backlash against the
Muslim community as the United
States fought in the Middle East.
"It's something that helps you
stay strong she says ofher connec-
tion to the Muslim student group.
Ansari says she has watched
as a growing number of incom-
ing students seek out connec-
tions to faithbased orga-
nizations, even students who
previously weren't religious.
"I feel (the increase in inter-
est) has a lot to do with finding
a group of friends that they can
relate to she says, "and often
high schools do not have the kind
of faith groups that you can find
on college campuses
see FAITH page A5
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(MCT) She has a master's
degree in education and a head
full of ambition.
By day, she's a teacher. By
night, she writes dramatic movie
scripts. She's also developing a
nonprofit tutoring organization,
so someday she can be her own
boss.
Her name is Thais Council,
J and at 26, she knows exactly
where she is going in the next
several years - and it isn't down
the aisle.
"I don't see myself getting
married until, maybe, when I'm
over 30 she said, pausing. "Well
over 30
Council and other 20-some-
things say the reason for this
delay is simple: nowadays, mar-
riage isn't the first step to adult-
hood, it's one of the last. Finishing
school, getting a good job, and
achieving financial and emo-
tional independence are now the
prerequisites - prerequisites that
they say are taking even longer
to achieve because of the soaring
cost of living, the generation's
tendency to cling to their parents
and their fears of divorce.
"I do feel pressure from my
grandparents; they think I'm
getting ancient. But I feel like I
need to be more established with
my career. I want to feel more
self-sufficient said Ronit Zargar,
27, who has a boyfriend but is in
no rush to tie the knot. "I look at
marriage as a final thing. There
is no divorce
Many young singles aren't
even looking for love. A recent
study by the Pew Research Center
found that more than one-third
of American singles 18 to 29 say
they aren't looking for a romantic
partner.
Some don't like the dating
scene. Many just don't have the
time. Council, for example, had
to get rid of her pet fox terrier
because she was always work-
ing. Her mother, who has more
old-fashioned values, was disap-
pointed.
"My mom said having a
pet dog is good practice for a
boyfriend Council said with a
laugh.
In 1970, only 15 percent of
Americans 25 to 29 were unmar-
ried. Now nearly half are, accord-
ing to 2005 census numbers.
Census statistics suggest
that young adults living in states
where there is a high cost of living
and a competitive career market
often wait longer to marry. Statis-
tics also show that today's voune
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adults are making less, when
adjusted for inflation, than people
their age did 30 years ago.
Washington, D.C has the
highest median age for marriage
in the nation: 30. Florida has the
oldest age of marriage for the
South (27 for men, 25 for women),
which doesn't surprise Ches
Kanno, 30, a Florida bachelor.
He says South Florida culture is
more about partying and climb-
ing the corporate ladder than
settling down.
"In South Florida, you gotta
love the women down here, but
they're kind of superficial he
said. "The older and more mature
1 get, the more critical I become.
1 don't want to make any com-
promises
College student Dayana Leon,
23, said the dating process has
become murky, with both genders
having to figure out whether a
partner is relationship material or
falls into the category of "friends
with benefits
"Nowadays? Forget about it.
Guys are just interested in mess-
ing around she said. "And with
all the feminism, you want to be
equal with the guys. "Well, if he
can do it, why can't I?
Delaying marriage has its
benefits; research shows. The
National Marriage Project at
Rutgers University reports that,
while divorce rates hover near 50
percent for all Americans, couples
cut that in half by waiting to
marry after 25.
Waiting also makes some
financial sense. A 2004 study by
the RAND Corp a California-
based research nonprofit, showed
that women who delayed mar-
riage increased their wages by an
extra 4 percent a year for every
year they remained single. The
reason, the report said, was they
were able to switch jobs easily,
speeding promotion.
It's not just a matter of money.
It's also about maturity.
David Wallace, director of
counseling at Florida Atlan-
tic University in Boca Raton,
said many of today's 20-some-
things are not ready for marriage
because they are deeply involved
in another relationship - with
their parents. His generation, he
recalls, rebelled against authority.
This generation is best friends
with Mom or Dad.
"There is a new electronic
umbilical cord, and it's called the
see UNWED page A6
Living together
The number of unmarried
couples in the U.S. who live
together has increased
dramatically during the past
four decades.
Co-habitating &.
couples
1960
2005
2006 MCT
Source: U.S. Census Bureau
Graphic: South Florida Sun-Sentinel
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THURSDAY OCTOBER 19,2006 PAGE A4
RANT OF THE DAY
Is it weird that I fantasize about cow utters?
THURS
Welcome Jane to Thursday
The inconvenience
ofkindness
CLAIRE MURPHY
ASSISTANT NKu's EDITOR
Have you noticed that so many people on campus
will slip in or out of a door without holding it open
lor you? That is so rude. I always make it a point to
pause for a second and hold the door for whoever is
behind me. It seems to be one of the most basic forms
of good manners.
In kindergarten, we all learn to share, not to hit
each other and so on. but are we ever told to hold
the door for one another? Probably not. However, it
really can make a difference in someone's day.
When I'm running through the rain on a Monday
morning to get to the Bate building as quickly as
possible and as I'm approaching the building, I find
the door slowly shutting in my face, it is another
straw on the camel's back for an already potentially
crappy day.
We all know those times where campus is hectic
- Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays during the
peak hours. It's usually about ten minutes before
the hour when chaos breaks loose. If you are going
to or coming from class at this time, I can pretty
much guarantee that there will be someone behind
you when you are walking through the door. You
usually don't even have to wait three seconds before
the next person comes along.
The situation reminds me of how impatient we
art- as a society in everything we do. We abbreviate
everything we can, we draw hearts instead of writ-
ing the word "love we want everything as soon as
humanly possible. Does that really save any signifi-
cant amount of time? Absolutely not.
So, next time you think that split second of
being polite is going to ruin your day, take a deep
breath and slow down. It won't kill you to be nice
to a stranger.
DEMOCRATS' THREE-STEP PLAN FOR
FIXING REPUBLICAN SCREW-UPS
OTE 4L.
screw-ups m
T SCREW-UPS
KPLOPE "
SCREWUPS
Does the job define
the worker?
Being appreciative for who we have
working for us
AARON BORREGO
OPINION WRITER
Why do we scoff at workers on campus or abroad
who are doing their job? Why do we, as human beings,
feel the need to judge others based on an array of dif-
ferent facets? This is wrong.
It is wrong for anyone to do this and it was wrong
when I aw it happen recently. Some girl in a pink shirt
thought she was so much better than one of ECU's cus-
todial workers that she scoffed at the worker. She also
let out a "whatever" that would have angered Mother
Terete if she were alive.
What made this stick out in my mind was the simple
fact that the custodial worker only said, "Hi, do you
mind if I get here to sweep?" What is so wrong with
asking someone to move so you can finish your job?
I wasn't sure if I should have said anything to the
sow v ith a phone shoved into her ear This was so com-
pletely revolting, I didn't know even how to respond. It
jusi made nie cringe where I was standing.
This situation made me further wonder, why or
what would have caused this girl to react so poorly to
a simple situation? The only thing I could figure was
that we, as a society and as a people, give personal value
to people based on what jobs they do.
Everyone does this, including myself, which is
it ng Why are we si quick to judge others based only
on their job titles?
I would like to state that custodial workers,
lamlsi api'is and construction people are some of the
most fundamental and important jobs in this country.
Without these people working these jobs, our quality
of lift and our comfort, wouldn't be possible in any
sense of the word.
These people make up the basic infrastructure of
many institutions, businesses and universities Without
construction workers, where would we go to study or
eat? Without landscapers, would the campus look as
beautiful as it does here at ECU?
Without custodial workers, who would pick up
everything that the students and teachers leave behind
that needs to be thrown away? I sure wouldn't want to
do it, and I imagine that no one else does either.
I want everyone to imagine with me for just a
second that all these custodial workers decided not to
i nine to work Imagine they strike tor just a week and
no one does their job in their absence Does anyone
realize how terrible this would make the school look in
just one day? Would we notice how dire things would
become after a single week here at ECU?
The accumulating trash would more than likely
overtake campus in a short period of time. The school
would become a biological hazard zone resembling a
landfill It would be so hazardous that the piling trash
may actually cause the cancellation of school activities.
I admit, I am not the greatest fan of going to class,
but I don't want it to be because our campus is so filthy
that the area could cause illness Imagine that the main-
tenance people stopped doing their job too. As we all
know, things are bound to break or stop working.
So who would fix these things in their places?
Well, I don't really know how to do many of the things
maintenance, custodial and construction workers do
Even if I did know how to do them, I probably wouldn't
do these tasks completely right or efficiently. Maybe
everyone else reading this would be better at doing
some of these tasks than me, but I bet not manv people
would want to do it.
All I am saying is to appreciate these people for
what they do for us everyday. I have noticed these
workers around campus do their jobs with a smile and
a good attitude So why not smile back and be thankful
for their efforts to keep our school beautiful?
I personally want to say thank you to all our i usto-
dial, maintenance, construction, dining, student store,
lamlsi aping and student health workers for everything
they do lor the students. I want personally thank the
lady at the Croatan who tells me to have a great day
everyday I go through her line. She brightens my day
with her pretty smile.
PIRATE RANTS
I'll let you whip me if I
misbehave.
OK ladies The rubber,
mid-calf, rain boots with the
pink, teal or purple polka
dots. It looks like a smurf
ate a rainbow and vomited
on your footwear. They're
dumb looking. Please throw
them away.
I dare you to go out in
public, for an entire day,
without your cell phone.
To lift your head when you
walk, instead of looking at
the ground. To smile at a
stranger, instead of pushing
your lips together and
sticking your nose in the air.
To be confident in yourself,
instead of talking about
how fat you are, or how you
don't like your nose. To not
gossip about anyone, it's
trashy. To cover yourself
up, instead of wearing the
most revealing outfit that
you own Just one day.
I wish my roommate would
take showers more often.
Honey, taking one once a
week isn't enough!
Is it bad that coffee affects
me more than alcohol now?
Why aren't there more
opportunities for me to use
the word "procreate?"
I want to be an ECU
secretary Then I can
paid to play solitaire and
surf the net.
Is it really fair to give an
exam the first day back
from fall break?
Just so everyone is clear:
The signs on the highway
that say "Slower traffic keep
right mean that if you are
going to go the speed limit
or just a little above, get the
hell out of the left lane.
Pete and Polly Promiscuous
- thank you for making
my day! That article was
hilarious, just what I needed
to get me through this last
freakin' exam before break!
Why does it always seem
that everything I buy from
UBE shrinks down a size?
I follow the washing care
instructions and it still
shrinks their clothing.
I just can't do anything right.
Can I?
If ECU were in another
location, I'd be enjoying
myself. Too bad Greenville
sucks unless you're
intoxicated.
Fifteen dollars for step
show tickets? Who do you
think we are, A&T? Please
get serious!
OK so, ECU football was
blown away by Tulsa on
Saturday, but I would like
to mention ECU ice hockey
blew away ODU 6-2 on
Friday and VCU 12-2 on
Saturday. Why don't you
come see a winning team
for once?
How do moms know
everything?
Two of our roommates
suddenly moved out of our
four bedroom apartment. I
felt sad and dejected at first,
but life with one roommate,
a huge apartment and the
absence of petty fights is
like heaven!
I have two friends that
definitely should be dating
they are always crazy
flirting.
Terry Holland wanted a
quiet, respectful, polite
ECU Football crowd. Well
guess what he got it during
Saturday's crushing Loss
to Tulsa in the most silent
stadium ever. This one's on
you T.H.
School isfun. XBox is morefun.
To the guy in my marketing
class, who made the
comment about his "good
smelling vanillaie laundry
I can't stop thinking about
you, and I don't even know
your name
Glasses are sexy.
Seriously, if you say you
are going to do me a favor,
keep your word and do it.
If you don't want to, don't
go behind my back to get
out of it, just say so to my
face. I am so sick of relying
on someone who never
finishes what they promise
they will do.
You make me want to barf
little chocolate hearts!
What is up with our football
team? Can we win one
game against a team worth
a darn? Come on, guys,
you sucked Saturday.
How come I can see State,
UNO Wake Forest, Duke
and even Appalachian play
football on TV, but I can't see
ECU football on TV when I
live less than three miles
from the stadium? Maybe
Mr. Holland should stop
worrying about students
being "mean" to opposing
fans, and get Pirate football
on TV instead.
Smile every once in a while,
I promise it's OK.
It's betterto cheatthan repeat.
You just can't live in that
negative way. Make way for
the positive day.
The article titled "Don't
Let the Man Keep You
Down" was by far the best
article I have read in the
paper in the last eight
years I have been here.
You are the funniest guy I
have ever met and I think
you're really handsome.
Get over your ex-fiance
already and ask me out,
I'm waiting.
To people who put "knitting
and baby-sitting" into the
"special skills" section
on a job application at a
restaurant. Are you out of
your mind?
Why is finding a good guy
so hard? Some days I feel
like no one will ever love me.
I did not see any article
that gave a review of
Chicago. It was a really
good play but I guess the
people at TEC don't know
anything about good art!
Go go Power Rangers!
Just because the leggings
and skirt may not be
fashionable and make me
look fat, it's not my fault I was
born in the wrong decade.
I'm an 80's child at heart.
The advantage TV stations
have over newspapers is
immediacy. Newspapers
provide something TV
cannot - detail. If you see
an ECU story on TV, then
see it in the East Carolinian
the next day, that's normal
for any newspaper. Plus,
remember that TEC only
comes out three times a
week. TV and newspapers
are apples and oranges,
and not competing media.
Stop posting ignorant rants
because the responding
rants will just makes you
look like an idiot.
Sarah Bell
Editor in Chief
Rachel King
News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Eric Gilmore
Sports Editor
Zach Strkin
Photo Editor
Rachael Utter
Multimedia Web Editor
V
Claire Murphy
Asst. News Editor
Sarah Campbell
Asst. Features Editor
Sarah Hackney
Head Copy Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
252.328.9238
Advertising 252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, the East Carolinian prints
9,000 copies every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
during the regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednes-
days during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the
editor which are limited to 250 words (which may be
edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the right to
edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editor@theeastcarolinian.com or to the East
Carolinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, N.C. 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for more information. One copy
of the East Carolinian is free each additional copy is1.
JUST ASK JANE
Need advice? Want answers? Just ask Jane.
Dear Jane,
1 have never done this before. Usually I am the
type to keep my feelings inside but I feel the need to
share and hopefully get some guidance. I have been
with my fianc now for five years. We have a child
together (a three year old little girl). My problem is
not with my soon to be husband, but it is with his
sister. I think I might be in love with her. I have never
had feelings like this for another woman before. I am
worried and confused. Please help.
Signed,
Freaky Feelings in Greenville
Dear Freaky Feeling,
This has not been the easiest column to write
because your situation involves many factors that play
a major role in your life and your personal identity.
First of all, you're battling your inner feelings
regarding love and your sexual orientation, which is
a big deal, to say the least. Then you throw into the
mix a child and the promise of marriage to someone
you may not be in love with anymore and you've got
quite a lot to ponder, but not to worry (at least, not
to death). All is not lost.
Firstly, if you think you are in love with someone
else, no matter who or what they may be, you cannot
possibly commit yourself to your fiance. It would be
unfair and just plain wrong to deceive him that way
and it would be unfair to you to lock yourself into
something you aren't fully invested in for the rest
of your life.
So, my suggestion is to tell him that you cannot
marry him and to tell him why But perhaps not
every little detail as to why. He has a right to know
what's going on in your head but divulging too much
will hurt him more. Perhaps you should let him know
that you are trying to figure out who you are and
what you really want from life, and while that figures
him in as the father of your child and a dear friend,
it would be unfair to the both of you to go through
with this marriage.
There are many other possible approaches to take
with telling him how you feel, and whatever you decide
to say is up to you. I'm sure there are more particulars
to this story that I don't have to be able to really say,
This is exactly what you should tell him so, unfor-
tunately, you're somewhat on your own there. I most
definitely would not tell him that you might be in love
with his sister, though. Now is not the time and it will
only serve to complicate the situation.
No matter how you tell him, if your heart's not in
it 100 percent, don't do it! Next, give it all some time
to sink in and look toward finding a solution to the
custodychildcarefinancial issues associated with
your daughter. Her well-being should certainly be
high priority here.
All this is going to take quite some time, I should
think, but after it is all said and settled, you will be
free to figure out whether or not A) You love his sister
or B) You want to be with someone else entirely or C)
Anything else that's going to make you happy.
If you do still believe you are in love with his sister,
you'll have to sort that out then, but first priority
should be the wedding-bells in your future and the
little girl that looks up to you and her father. 1 wish
you the best of luck.
Sincerely,
Jane
252.328.9143 t
Opinion WritersiWanted!
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OPINIONS CO UNHEARD
Consider writing for
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where all of campus will
hear your voice every week.
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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
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Pictured above (left to right) is Tyler Pake, Matt Whaley, Perry McKenzie and Trey Sloan. These students, along
with Krisiti Carrington (not pictured) managed the "Save Cerutti" table in front of Wright Plaza Wednesday.
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Some students speak
out in favor of Steve
Cerutti's class
Students petitioning to keep
a class taught by Steve Cerutti,
associate professor of foreign
languages and literature, in his
hands set up a table in Wright
Plaza on Wednesday.
The course, CLAS 1300, is not
scheduled for next semester, which
has made some students angry.
"He took subject matter that
could have been very boring and
made it one of the most interest-
ing classes I've had in my four
years said Trey Sloan, senior
exercise physiology major.
Sophomore history and clas-
sical studies major Perry McK-
enzie set up a group on the Web
site Facebook.com called "Save
Cerutti" to garner support for
the class. By Wednesday evening
it had 450 members.
"I think the class could help
anybody and I would like to see
more people in it McKenzie
said.
She said that around 500
people signed the petitions.
Kristi Cunningham, senior
marketing major, made t-shirts
reading "Save Cerutti" for her and
McKenzie to wear at the table.
"They're taking away from
the students. We're the ones suf-
fering Cunnningham said. "We
have a right to say what classes are
Frank Romer, chair of the
foreign languages and literature
department, said that the class
was not slated for the spring
roster because of scheduling
problems.
"I am surprised by the stu-
dent reaction since course sched-
ules obviously change in every
department from time to time,
and typically on a semester by
semester basis said Romer.
"Course scheduling is a com-
plex matter and not a simple
question of the popularity of any
one course. No one is taking away
CLAS 1300. That course remains
on the books, just as we have other
courses on the books that also
need teaching. CLAS 1300 can be
taught again when appropriate in
the future Romer said.
Cerutti said he did not under-
stand what the scheduling prob-
lems could be.
"I've made it known that I
would teach that class as overload
at any time in any room. It just
makes no sense for the chair of a
department to cancel a class that
has so much student support and
causes that much of an outcry
said Cerutti.
"There is something wrong
with that picture. It's like telling
the Rolling Stones they could
perform in concert but not play
'Sympathy for the Devil
Keep reading the East Caro-
linian for updates on this story.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
FAITH
continued from A3
Just like other student groups,
spiritual gatherings span a wide
range at UCF, according to a list
of registered student organiza-
tions. There are 24, ranging from
the Knight Circle, which cel-
ebrates "traditional, modern and
symbolic beliefs of earth-based
and neopagan religions to the
Women's Prayer Band and Hillel,
a Jewish student group.
The university's Office of Stu-
dent Involvement estimates a 25
percent increase in membership
in campus ministries since the
2001-02 school year.
At Rollins College in Winter
Park, Fla Campus Crusade for
Christ brings about 30 students
together. On Monday nights, they
gather in the Campus Center,
singing to words in a PowerPoint
presentation. Two young men
strum guitars at the front of the
room. The students are dressed
in T-shirts, jeans and flip-flops,
and some bring their own
Bibles.
David Aguilar, 19, gives a
sermon on faith and actions.
"Through our faith we have a
lot of little bonds with each other
Aguilar tells the group. "(Christ
is) the one thing that holds us
together
After the hourlong session,
they gather at a local pizza
place.
"I think everyone is seek-
ing fellowship and to intimately
know the Lord says Karin
Wakas, 21.
Based in Orlando, Campus
Crusade reports an increase in
chapters throughout the country.
In 2000, the organization reached
885 campuses. By 2005, it was
present on 1,298 of them.
Never, never, never give up.
COMMITMENT
Pass It On. www.liiilirllrililiniK
CALL US AT
The ECU Media Board
welcomes applications
DAY STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVE
(A student living off campus and not a member of a fraternity or sorority.)
Tlie board is seeking fM-time students interested in serving as the
day student representative on the Media Board, the 11-person board
which governs the media at ECU, WZMB, The Rebel, The East
Carolinian, and Expressions, Web Media and The Buccaneer.
The day representative is one of nine students on the board and is
expected to attend a late afternoon meeting monthly.
For information, contact:
ECU Media Board Office
205A Self Help Building
301 S. Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27858
328-9200
Deadline for Applications due Friday, October 2(1 at 5p.m.
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PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, -2006
CALLIGRAPHY
on campus. So, I present that
most of the students don't have a
lot of option to speak Japanese
outside the classroom
Nobu hopes to develop a stron-
ger Japanese language learning
curriculum and program at ECU
by focusing more on the speak-
ing aspect in class and focusing
outside of the book
The calligraphy workshop is
a part of that locus.
"I want my students who are
taking Japanese to come to my
workshop because penmanship
has been very much appreciated
in Japan Nobu stated. "Since
I'm teaching Japanese, I feel
obliged to introduce this aspect of
Japanese culture So, I want
them to expose themselves
to more aspects of Japanese
culture. Also, I Would like to
attract more people to come
and I hope they become inter-
ested in Japanese language.
continued from Al
so that they may take Japa-
nese language next semester
perhaps. I'd like to also contribute
to the community, not only the
campus. The workshop is actu-
ally open to everybody, including
the community
Those who missed the cal-
ligraphy workshop will have
another opportunity in the spring
semester when Nobu will hold
another calligraphy workshop.
"I enjoy having the callig-
raphy workshop here because it
also allows me to practice my own
calligraphy Nobu said.
"To me, the best part of cal-
ligraphy is when you make a
straight line; you're not thinking
anything. You're just concentrat-
ing on making a straight line.
My focus is only on that line my
mind is basically wiped out
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Five facts about
Japanese calligraphy
o The symbols for Japanese
calligraphy are based on Chinese
characters.
o The word for "calligraphy"
in Japanese is "Shodo" meaning
"the way of writing
o There are five styles of Chi-
nese character calligraphy, and
in Japanese they are known as:
Tensho, Resiho, Kaisho, Gysho
and Sasho.
o The tool used for calligraphy
is an ink brush, and the work is
often done on rice paper.
o Ninety-five percent of Japa-
nese companies accept only hand-
written resumes.
UNWED
continued from A3
cell phone. They are calling their
parents eight, 10 times a day
he said.
Some children are particularly
close with a parent if they nave
lived with them through a divorce
Not surprisingly, these young
adults are cautious when it conies
to their own romances and taking
a vow that can lead to heartbreak,
said Nick Wolfinger, an associate
professor at the University of
Utah and author of "Understand-
ing the Divorce Cycle
The nation's divorce rates hit
an all time high in 1981 - about
the time many of today's 80-
somethings were babies. Overall,
Wolfinger said, children of divorce
are not only more likely to delay
marriage, but they are a third
more likely to never marry.
"They view marriage less
favorably because they see where
it got their parents he said.
Keisha Witherspoon, '2ti, said
her parent's split had another effect:
Until recently, she had no idea what
a healthy relationship looked like
Asa result, it took several years for
her to learn "how to treat men, how
to talk to men, how to respect them
and value them
"I was very bitter and upset
that my dad was never around,
and I was taking it out on them
she said.
For those young adults think-
ing about marriage and the risk
of divorce an increasingly popu-
lar baby-step is living together.
"It's almost like a trial mar-
riage. You see the bad and the
good days said Amy Tomas, (
whose parents divorced when she
was a child.
Until recently, Tomas lived
with her long-time boyfriend.
She's glad they didn't marry
because they ended up splitting
over "trust" issues.
Between 1990 and 2004, the
number ofnon-eame-aoi cohabitating
couples almost doubled in the United
States, census data show Compared
to 1970 estimates, the practice is up
1,200 percent Alxwt a quarter of all
unmarried women '2! to SO are living
with a partner and another quarter
have lived with a partner some time
in the jiast, according to a '2(X).r) rexrt
by the National Marriage Project.
But there are pitfalls, said
David I'openoe, co-director of
the National Marriage Project at
Rutgers University.
fflUIHTED
HEALTH
A Halloween Safety
Awareness Event
Free Food &
Giveaways
Wednesday, October 25
Mendenhall Student Center Social Room
5:30pm - 8:00pm
Presented by the Healthy PIRATES
CAMPUS
RECREATION
& WELLNESS
(252) 328 -6387
dividual requesting accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Axl lA
should contact tiic Department for Disability Support Services al Icasl iK Hours
prior to the event ji l2Si).)2S.(r')1) nii'ie(2l.U8.0'W TIV
Send Us Your Pirate Rants!
F
CONNECT TO WIN!
ATTENTION ECU STUDENTS,
FACULTY AND 5TAF
Take our DiningStyles survey
Tell us how Dining Services meets your needs
Enter to win an iPod- nano or an iTunes gift card
GRAND PRIZE
iPod nano
attend our upcoming workshop on
Saturday October 21 st from
9:30-1 pm in room SRC239 with
Guest Instructor, Kathleen Cusicl
The workshop will be from
9:30am- 1:00p
FIRST PRIZE
$50 iTunes gift
SECOND PRIZE
$25 iTunes gift card
Survey Available At:
www.ecu.edudining
Kathleen Cusick teac
style, qigong, push-hands, san
shou, and taiji staff with the
Magic Tortoise School.
We will be working on Yang Long
form movements.
Tai Chi club meets in the
Student Recreation Center during the week.
Please join us at the times listed below.
Tuesday at 7:00 am
Wednesday at 7:05 pm
Thursday at 7:00 am
Staurday at 9:30 am
ra
CAMPUS
RECREATION
a WELLNESS
(252) 32S 6387
www.KU.tduci-itud.ntlirvcrw





19, '2006
s!
Pulse
THURSDAY OCTOBER 19, 2006 PAGE A7
Horoscopes:
Mm
If you've been used to making do
and getting by, it might be kind of
uncomfortable to have too much.
Don't feel guilty, you've earned
it. Save it.
Taurus
You can do what you promised
with what you have, and there'll
be left-overs. This may seem to
be impossible but it's not. Keep
the faith.
Gemini
This has not been an easy
assignment. Soon you'll feel
much better. Tell a loved one
your wins and losses, and get
on to the next project.
Cancer
You're so cute; you can get away
with almost anything. If you don't
do something you promised,
however, there will be trouble. .
Leo
Take care of the most important
things first. Put your earnings
in a safe place. More study is
required before you can spend
wisely.
Virgo
Pay attention to the details.
That's where you'll find the
answer. Use something you
might have thrown away, and
you'll earn extra points.
Libra
Some of the stuff you've been
saving has actually increased in
value. Don't just toss it; find out
what it's worth first.
Scorpio
If they think you have a lot, they'll
naturally want you to share.
That's why it's best for them to
think you don't
Sagittarius
You're on thin ice, so don't try
anything funny or even amusing.
Don't even let your eyes twinkle,
if you can possibly help it.
Capricorn
Delegate the errands to others,
and save yourself some time.
Have what you want delivered,
instead of racing all over town.
Aquarius
Others are beginning to notice
that you're cool when things get
hot. The excitement isn't quite
over yet, so postpone relaxation.
Pay attention.
Pisces
A person with more experience is
always good to have around. Be
helpful, and you'll save yourself
a lot of work and trouble.
Arts & Entertainment
Rebel seeks
entries in 20
art categories
Robin Williams plays comedian Tom Dobbs, an unlikely candidate for the President in the film Man of the Year.
Local concerts: Identity crisis for the 'Man of the Year
Zydefunk will be performing
Uptown for Freeboot Friday on
Friday, Oct. 20 from 5 - 8 p.m.
Side Project will be performing at
Dr. Unk's on Friday, Oct. 20.
The Red Rooster will play host to
Purple School Bus on Saturday,
Oct. 21.
Dr. Unk's will offer live music
from Hydrafx on Saturday, Oct.
21.
Aerosmith along with Motley
Crue will perform at the Alltel
Pavilion in Raleigh on Monday,
Oct. 23 at 7:30 p.m.
The Crown Center of Cumberland
County will host The Charlie
Daniels Band on Monday, Oct.
23 at 8 p.m.
Mendenhall
Movies:
Superman Returns Thursday 1019 at 9:30 p.m. Friday 1020 at 7 p.m. and midnight Saturday 1021 at 9:30 p.m. Sunday 1022 at 7 p.m.
Cltrttsll Thursday 1019 at 7 p.m. Friday 1020 at 9:30 p.m. Saturday 1021 at 7 p.m. midnight Sunday 1022 at 9:30 p.m.8
Fun Facts:1
Williams' only bright spot
in genre-confused movie
BEN HARRIS
STAFF WRITER
As most everybody knows,
false advertising is against the law.
It creates a monumental problem
for consumers because it leads
them into thinking a product is
very different from what it actually
is. I've experienced this demon of
the advertising industry many
times when it conies to movies.
A trailer will make a movie come
off as one thing and then I see the
movie and it is completely differ-
ent. One familiar example of this
is The Village. I went into that
two-hour nonsensical waste of cel-
luloid thinking I was going to see
a genuinely scary monster movie.
What I got was a stern preaching
by an Alfred Hitchcock wannabe
on the dangers of not accepting
change.
Any man who went to see Pearl
Harbor knows the anger and frus-
tration felt when instead of seeing a
war movie ahout Pearl Harbor; we
were treated to an extremely long
love fest complete with bad acting
and bad dialogue.
The point I'm getting at is that
false advertising in movie trail-
ers ruins the whole movie-going
experience lor the audience as well
as destroys credibility in the film-
maker. Certainly Man oftie )'ears
no exception.
The trailer makes the movie
seem to be another great Robin
Williams comedy. The truth is
all the funny moments, with the
exception of two, happen in the
trailer. The movie is actually a
serious, albeit-thinly disguised,
attack on the entire American elec-
toral system. The movie centers
on political comedian Tom Dobbs.
see YEAR page A9
Out with Justin, in with Mozart
New York's Central Park is
nearly twice the size of the entire
country of Monaco.
Another name for a Microsoft
Windows tutorial is 'Crash
Course
The first product that the toy
company Mattel came out with
was picture frames.
25 percent of your bones are
located in your feet.
Classical music has
arrived in Greenville
STACY DAIL
STAFF WRITER
The classical stylings of Mozart, Beethoven and
Puccini aren't something that Greenville radio listen-
ers are familiar with, but times have changed, and
classical music is now available to grace the cars of
all Greenville radio listeners.
WCPE, "The Classical Station based out of Wake
Forest, now has an affiliate station in Greenville at
97.3 FM, which will offer classical music to radio
lovers all over eastern North Carolina.
You won't hear "Promiscuous Girl or any other
of today's popular jams; the station plays non-stop
soothing classical sounds 24 hours a day, seven days
a week. Forget ahout commercials or talk radio,
the only thing listeners will hear is music, which
is always introduced by live announcers.
Unlike many popular radio stations known
to Greenville, WCPE is a non-profit station,
and doesn't receive any financial help from
the government.
"We believe that classical music is an integral
part of the quality of life in our communities, and
our mission is sharing great classical music avail-
able to the public 24 hours a day said station
manager Deborah Proctor.
The station has been in operation for the past
2H years, and oxer the years they have really devel-
oped a passion for classical music, and offering
it to the community.
WCPF is even available online at theclassi-
calstation.org. With six audio formats, it is easy
for classical music lovers to listen wherever they
see MOZART page A8
Call for entries Oct. 26
and 27 at Emerge Gallery
SHANNON DAVIS
STAFF WRITER
ECU is filled with talented
students in all departments on
campus. Whether a student is in
the art department or not, many
people have artistic gifts. Writ-
ers, poets, painters and musicians
alike all have the common ground
of creativity. Rebel is looking for
this creativity.
Rebel is ECU's literary arts
publication and is a division of
ECU Student Media. Rebel holds
a competition in the fall each year,
and is currently advertising a call
for entries for Oct. 26 and 27 at
Emerge Gallery.
This year's publication is the
49th edition of Rebel. Each year,
Rebel accepts and awards cash
prizes to some of the most talented
students at ECU. Rebel consis-
tently wins national pacemaker
awards for innovative and excep-
tional design and content.
The various types of art
accepted for the contest are anima-
tion, book arts, ceramics, drawing,
fiction and non-fiction literature,
graphic design, illustration, inter-
active design, metal design, music,
painting, photography, poetry,
print making, textile design,
video and film art, and wood
design.
Literary entries should be
submitted as both a hard copy
and digital copy on a compact
disc in Microsoft Word format
Musical entries must be submitted
on a CD and must be Macintosh
compatible files.
According to senior art major
and Rebel editor Ed McKim,
"Rebel seeks to serve the students
of ECU by exposing them to the
art that their colleagues create.
Each year we strive to find and
give light to the most talented
students at ECU. Rebel has been
in publication since the late 1960s,
and has always showcased some of
the most talented students ECU
has produced
The cost is three dollars per
entry, but each contender has an
unlimited number of entries they
are allowed to submit. The drop-
off is at Emerge Gallery located
on 404 South Evans St. For more
information about the Emerge
Gallery, visit emergegallery.com.
This contest is an opportunity
for ECU students to present their
creative works in a notable gallery.
For more information about Rebel
itself, please visit rebel.ecu.edu.
This writer can be contacted at
pulseatheeastcarolinian.com.
The Green Lantern
The bar at The Green Lantern Irish Pub and Bar located on Evans Street.
Dobbs is essentially another John
Stewart. He has his own comedic
news program and is more popular
with the American people then any
serious news journalist. Someone
suggests to Dobbs that he should
run for president. Some brilliant
American actually suggested
that a comedian run for the most
powerful office in the world. This
surprisingly gets to Dobbs and he
decides to run.
Being a funny man, Dobbs is
expected not to take the campaign
seriously. It surprises everyone
when Dobbs actually begins to
tackle serious issues and propose
solutions. I found myself agree-
ing with everything Dobbs said
because in actuality, the issues
he brought up are real problems
facing America that Congress just
doesn't seem interested in fixing.
I'm not going to go on a big
A new venue for a
change of pace
AARON BORREGO
STAFF WRITER
The Green Lantern Irish Pub
and Bar opened about three weeks
ago, much to the delight of its
already fond patrons. It is located
at 409 South Evans St next to the
Tipsy Teapot bookstore.
The new pub is in a state of
planning events and adding some
new menu items, which should
become a reality in the near future.
There are many things that future
customers and patrons need to
know about the restaurant before
their first visit.
While the name may invoke
a certain idea of traditional Irish
food and drink, one might be
surprised to see what is actually
served. There really isn't any
traditional Irish fare or even
music playing in the new estab-
lishment.
Instead, one could order an
array of hot or cold sandwiches,
soup, chili or a special salad.
While their food obviously isn't
Irish, it is great nonetheless.
Some of the sandwiches offered
on the menu are the rueben, roast
beef, smoked ham and cheese and
chicken salad.
Other interesting offerings
on the Green Lantern's menu
are its coffee store products.
Espresso, lattes and cappuccinos
are just a few of the coffee products
offered.
The restaurant also offers
catering for a variety of functions.
They are able to cater business
functions, and also sport a banquet
and conference facility.
The Green Lantern was actu-
ally a small coffee shop before it
became what it is today. Therefore,
it seems only natural to keep some
of the original establishment in its
present menu.
As everyone has surmised
already, this establishment is a
deli-style restaurant. Everyone
may still be wondering, "How do
you get any Irish feeling from this
see LANTERN page A8
Return of X-Fest
A concert not to be missed
JENNY AYERS
STAFF WRITER
In two weeks for just 20
bucks, you can see a few top-
notch bands, ICWF wrestling,
a sideshow and girls rolling
around in oil. Where can all
this be found, you ask? Well
of course it's X Fest, spon-
sored by WXNR 99.5, the X.
On Saturday, Oct. 28, the
all-day festival will take place
at the Kinston Drag Strip and
will include many interesting
and random festivities. As men-
tioned, there will be ICWF" pro
wrestling, Tyler Fyre's lucky
devil sideshow and some sort of
amateur wrestling that is best
left at that description.
The highlight of the event
is obviously the music, and the
lineup this year has all of the
rock bases covered. The second
stage at the event will fea-
ture regional bands that were
voted on by their fans, while
the main stage will host big
names everyone is familiar with.
Saliva, Shinedown, Red
Jumpsuit Apparatus and Plain
White T's will all be performing
this year, and there's no doubt
there will be a large turnout.
Obviously it's all rock music,
but each band has their distinct
sound. I'll be going mainly
for the latter two, but I'll take
rock any way I can get it, and I
expect this event is going to be
rockin for lack of a better term.
I recommend buying tickets
early at 995thex.com since they
are five dollars more at the
gate. Take a mini-road trip to
Kinson for this mega concert.
This writer can be contacted at
pulsetheeastcarolinian.com.





PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 8006
Heavy Rotation: The Rx Bandits Greg Laswell's latest album
New album reinvents the
standard in ska and punk
JOHN BOSCO
STAFF WRITER
Ska sucks. It's a source of all
these goofy, theatre type kids in
bands with 50-piecehorn sections
singing about the most topical
things. And plus, their song titles
are too funny and long.
It's for middle-schoolers, and
every song sounds the same.
Well maybe that's the percep-
tion that many college-age music
listeners have, but anyone who
thinks that is overlooking the key
values behind the music.
Everyone I know (OK, not
everyone, but a lot) went through
some sort of ska phase in middle
school. From Reel Big Fish to the
Mighty Mighty Bosstones and
Less Than Jake - I, too, am no
stranger of ska music.
This isn't an attempt to per-
suade anyone to listen to ska. This
is just to show that every genre
has its high points.
While the Rx Bandits can't
exactly be classified as 100 per-
cent ska music, the hints of it are
definitely there.
On their new album And
The Battle Began, the Bandits are
showing a much more progressive
side of their ska-punk sound.
I know it might be hard to, but
imagine the Mars Volta meets the
horn section from the Reel Big
Fish, and everyone has equal input
on each track.
This album is where you'd
expect the Rx Bandits to he push-
ing themselves to based on their
past few releases. Lyrically, the
album is still pushing a familiar
"personal politics" concept that
deals with how popular sub cul-
ture youth deal with the pressures
in an American society they've
been forced into Tracks like "In
Her Drawer" attack our over-
prescribed youth and the ease of
choosing a pill and treating it like
a mood ring -just take whatever
color makes you feel how you
want to feel.
What most of these songs
have that hold them all together
are strong vocal tracks. Vocalist
Matthew Embreedoes a great job
of keeping the tracks together.
His whisper to wail (not scream)
is reminiscent of a Sublime-esque
style of singing (though I'm not
claiming anyone's that good).
The horn section on this
album is great for the same reason
the Rx Bandits' horns have always
ruled: They're not always the
S, focal point of a tune, and like the
1 track, "A Mouth Full of Hollow
1 Threats the horns don't over-
power anything else - they create
" a lush background to the soft,
clean vocals on the track.
More progressive tracks like
"Epoxi-Lips "Tainted Wheat
and "Crushing Destroyer show
the band's knack for being able to
transition from all-out shredding,
prog-like guitar riffs cleanly into
slower sections that are sure to
take the crowds from moshing
to nodding.
The vocal harmonies are
there, the guitar playing is out-
standing, and the creative force
behind this album is huge. Some
of the excess noise used to fill
space between tracks could be cut
out, but compared to the Mars
Volta, maybe there's not enough.
This album winds up being
another great Rx Bandits disc.
And unlike so much ska music,
there's never a time when you
get just a little tired of listening
to horns.
Grade: B
This writer can be contacted at
pulsetheeastcarolinian.com.
Through Toledo
is on the spot
AARON BORREGO
STAFF WRITF.R
Through Toledo is the newest
album from artist Greg Laswell.
He not only is an artist but he is
also a producer and song writer.
All of these tal-
ents were discovered
by this San Diego
boy when making
this album, which
was his first for
Vanguard
Records.
As most music
listeners have
noticed, pain
makes for some
of the best songs.
Well, at least it
makes for the
best motivation
for artists as they
write songs. This
notion was taken
for an 11 song
ride by Laswell.
Laswell's wife
had left him which
was apparently
totally unexpected by Laswell as
it often is by many men. His inspi-
ration came from this personal
heartbreak from which he wrote
the album basically as a response.
Normally, this type of album
would border on the realms
of being whinny or self suf-
ficing, but jt is an album for
reflection. This album is an
emotional ride with the likes
of songs such as "Amazed"
and "Long way around
The emotional con-
nection that Laswell makes
with his listeners is uncanny.
Honestly, the listener is com-
pelled to feel the exact mood
and moment of this music.
His lyrics are as compelling
to move people to notice the
meaning in his story and feeling
behind his singing. The haunt-
ing singing style is just one way
Laswell shows his passion for the
moment exemplified in the song
"Come Undone
If you like bands such as
Coldplay and Snow Patrol, this
is a band made just for you.
Well actually, Laswell plays
every instrument on the album
except for the violin on a few
songs. So maybe you would
like his playing and singing.
This multi-talented man
produced, recorded and mixed
this album by himself In San
Diego, Calif. Oh, did I mention
that he also had a say in the final
design concept for the album?
Now, don't think every
single song is slow and sad.
Actually, the first song is
titled, "Sing, Teresa Says
This upbeat and somewhat happy
song was inspired by
his grandmother.
He recently said
in a press interview
that he had a dream
in which his grand-
mother told him to
sing happy songs.
Well, this song is
pretty happy and
pretty nice sound-
ing as is the major-
ity of this album.
Muchofthisman
was put into writing
this album and such
be listened to at least
once by everyone.
This album will be
well received and
liked the world over
for its capacity to
grab the emotional
strings of listeners
and never let go.
The album will receive an A
for the great melodies and won-
derful instrument play shown
by Laswell. Hopefully his life
is a bit better after pouring
a nice piece of it in an album
for the world to listen to.
This writer can be reached at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
MOZART
continued from A7
LANTERN
continued from A7
place?"
Simple, when you go into the
Green Lantern, it seems as though
you were magically in an authen-
tic pub in the Irish countryside.
The detail of the hardwood floors
and well-maintained table area
lend a rustic Irish country feel to
the place.
One great thing about
the Green Lantern i tint it
is a non-smoking establish-
ment. Yes indeed folks, snioke-
free for all those inclined to
shy away from bars, which
are basically cigarette central.
While still offering great
food and great drink specials, the
Lantern offers something most
bars cannot. What is so special
about The Green Lantern is the
idea that this is a bar to go to have
a nice and quiet bite to eat and
not have to deal with the rigors
of downtown crowds.
Check out one of the newest
establishments in the down-
town eatery scene with a few
friends. See what they have to
offer Greenville and you.
,This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
go. The Web site also features
play lists, announcer informa-
tion and interviews with cur-
rent classical musicians. Viewers
are also presented with an Arts
Calendar to inform them about
local performances.
Aside from playing nonstop
classical music 24 hours a day,
WCPE is also the home of pro-
grams such as WCPE Opera
House on Thursday nights and
WCPE Saturday Evening Request
Program, which gives listeners
the opportunity to call in and hear
the song of their choice.
In addition to these programs,
the station also offers Preview! on
Sunday evening that showcases
the most current releases, and
previews classical events coming
soon to the area.
By now most people have
heard classical music stations
come and go, but this isn't the
case for Greenville's new station.
"Many stations that once
played classical have changed
formats because they think there's
more money to be made in country
or pop. Since we are listener-
supported, we play what the
public wants to hear, and there
are many people who love the
beauty and serenity of classical
music. We tell our listeners we
will never alter our dedication
to playing classical music,
and only classical music
Proctor commented.
WCPE is currently available
in eastern and central North
Carolina, as well as southern
Virginia. Students are encouraged
to give the radio station a chance,
and enjoy arrangements from the
greats, as well as the classical
musicians of today.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Lease Today - Get "FREE" Rent! CALL 551-3801)
THURSI
YEAR
Laura Linney
political rar
that to the
shown in thi
the presidei
what it see
woman, Ele
in and influi
presidency,
makes one
American (
mocks the f
are actually
people like E
leaders.
It is not t
movie overtl
into thinkin
the movie ha
deciding exa
be. It consta
comedy to d
a dramrillec
as more of i
the underlyi
Dobbs as h
presidency.
Man oftl,
Barry Levins
known for G
Jand the gre
vehicle Rain.





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
PAGE A9
YEAR
continued from A7
Ani Difranco's latest release: 'Reprieve'
A mellow alternative to the top 40
JENNY AYERS
STAFF WRITER
Ifyou're like me, sometimes you just need a break
from the poppy, funky, sometimes garbage-like
music that makes its way on to the radio. Sure rock,
rap and pop are all very enjoyable musical genres, in
moderation. Ani Difranco's newest album, Repreive,
is just that - a reprieve from mainstream mayhem.
Before picking up this album, I hadn't had much
exposure to Difranco's work but after giving the
album a listen, I was pleasantly surprised. While I
was at first expecting a bit of a snooze fest, the mate-
rial is actually a nice mix of smooth vocals, on-point
guitar, and very straightforward, moving writing.
This album is mostly a soft, melodic mix that is a
useful winding down tool, but there's certainly more
to it than that. Difranco was playing the guitar and
performing before most of us had even made it to
the first grade, with her first album release in 1990.
Soyeah, she's no spring chicken, but her music is all
the better because of it.
Difranco's life experiences, political views
and personal feats all. come through in this album
making it a very revealing, candid work.
Some of the lyrics may sound a bit off at first,
such as the lines from "Nicotine "I hate you some-
times but 1 love to be your queen, you are my muse
o got me smokin' nicotine Once you hear these words
5 and combined with the music, the artists' meaning
hits you and skepticism is a little harder to achieve.
Other lines make their mark even without the
musical accompaniment, as in the song "Subcon-
scious "Step up and forfeit your frontal lobe to the
sexed up strobe of celebrity. Never mind that the
nanoseconds in between are some of the darkest
darkness you've ever seen
It is lines such as this that make the album a
personal and political statement, with Difranco's
opinions and views explicitly on display. Not quite
the "Promiscuous Girl" or the "Sexy Back" we're
used to being fed through the airwaves. Difranco
doesn't necessarily have an agenda but her words
are effective in exposing her views on world, live
and love issues.
No, the music isn't anything you will hear down-
town or be able to thrash around to in your car, but
it is still very enjoyable and pleasing to the ears.
Composed mostly of soft strings and equally soft
vocals, it's definitely a CD you can listen to when
you're curled up at home with your loved one. Or, in
my case, with your stuffed cow or teddy bear.
Overall, Reprieve is a very pleasant, relaxing
listen that is a nice escape from the cluttered, busy
'pieces that seem to be more and more popular today.
I'm not looking to join the Ani Difranco fan club any
time soon, but it is definitely refreshing to know that
there are still artists out there who remember what
the music is about, art.
This writer can be contacted at
pulsetheeastcarolinian.com.
Laura Linney plays Eleanor Green another key player along side Robin William's character Tom Dobbs in the film.
EKEFS31
IliumIllII-
political rant though; I'll leave
that to the opinion section. As
shown in the trailer, Dobbs wins
the presidency, but it's not all
what it seems as an unknown
woman, Eleanor Green, conies
in and influences Dobbs and his
presidency. The movie basically
makes one big jo.ke out of the
American political system. It
mocks the fact that Americans
are actually willing to vote for
people like Dobbs instead of true
leaders.
It is not that the trailer for this
movie overtly misleads the public
into thinking it is a comedy, but
the movie has a very difficult time
deciding exactly what it wants to
be. It constantly fluctuates from
comedy to drama to thriller; it's
a dramrilledy. It presents itself
as more of a drama because of
the underlying struggle within
Dobbs as he faces winning the
presidency.
Man of the Tear is directed by
Barry Levinson who is previously
known for Good Morning, Vietnam
Jand the great Dustin Hoffman
vehicle Rain Man. Like the movie,
Levinson's directing is mediocre
and he does the best with what he
has. After all, he isn't trying to
secure a best picture nomination.
The movie also sports many well-
known actors, the brilliant Robin
Williams plays Tom Dobbs.
Williams, who is without a
doubt the most improved actor in
history, shines in both the comedic
and dramatic roles in the film. The
viewer simply cannot take their
eyes off him. Williams is one of the
greatest comedic actors as well as
a terrific, Oscar-winning actor.
The always-superb Christo-
pher Walken plays Dobbs' man-
ager Jack Menken. I would like
to see Walken take more serious
roles than he has been taking
because he has too much talent to
waste his time with small parts in
comedies. Anyone who has ever
seen The Deer Hunter knows how
good of an actor Walken is.
The other major player,
Eleanor Green, is played by
the strangely attractive Laura
Linney. I haven't seen Linney in
many movies, but from what I
have seen I believe she has con-
siderable talent.
The only other recognizable
name in the film is Jeff Goldblum.
Goldblum, probably best known
for The Fly and Jurassic Park,
plays a very small role as an evil
lawyer.
As you can see, the film
includes an incredible cast and
certainly the acting was the high-
light of the movie. Man of the Tear,
while schizophrenic, manages to
come off as your slightly better
than average fall film.
I doubt the film will win any
awards or be touted as one of the
biggest films of the year, but it
will no doubt entertain and make
good use of a lazy, cold afternoon.
1 predict the movie will make
about $60 million with even more
coming from rentals. My main
hope is that Williams will con-
tinue to make the great comedies
like he did in the past for many
years to come.
k Outstanding
Worthy effort
? So-so
A bomb
r
New
review
I 1 5 1
6
Alex Rider
Vi
All the King's Men
7,
The Departed
Vl
Employee of the Month
rThe Grudge 2
Infamous
o
till tt I
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PAGEAlo
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2006
FO
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Bartenders w
Open to All Majors
One rair In Two Locations:
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UNIVERSITY
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P
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19, 2006
Classifieds
Want it, get it! Only in our Classifieds.
THURSDAY OCTOBER 19,2006 PAGEA11
FOR RENT
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Close to ECU, on ECU bus route,
great amenities. Call 752-9995.
FOR SALE"
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Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting 14-
18 part-time youth basketball
coaches and officials for the
upcoming basketball program.
Applicants must possess a good
knowledge of basketball skills
and have the ability and patience
to work with youth. Applicants
must be able to coach young
people ages 5-18 in basketball
fundamentals. Hours are from
4 pm to 9 pm, weekdays with
some weekend coaching. Flexible
with hours according to class
schedules. This program will run
from November 27 through the
beginning of March. Salary rates
start at $6.50 per hour. For more
information, please contact the
Athletic Office at 329-4550,
Monday through Friday, 10 am
until 7 pm. Apply at the City of
Greenville, Human Resources
Department, Martin L. King Dr.
Phone 329-4492.
GREEK PERSONALS
Thanks so much to Chi Phi for a
fun social! We had a great time,
as always Delta Zeta
OTHER
The Unitarian UniverSalist
Congregation of Greenville
welcomes ECU students. Our
services are on Sundays at
10:30am. For more information:
call 355-6658 or go to
uugreenvillenc.org.
20th Anniversary with Sunsplash!
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For more info contact Student
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PAGEA18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2006
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19, 2006
Sports
THURSDAY OCTOBER 19, 2006 PAGE B1
ECU's Inside Source
41-10
ECU's all-time record (.804)
when playing Homecoming
games since 1995; the Pirates
have struggled recently
dropping three of their last
four
9
TH
National ranking of teams
that are penalized the least, the
Pirates have drawn 4.33 flags
per game and trail Stanford
(4.29) who is in eighth while
three teams are tied for fifth
14-1
SMU's record when they score
24 points or more in the last
five seasons, including a 3-0
mark in 2006
.283
Winning percentage in Phil
Bennett's fifth season (15-38)
at SMU; Bennett went 3-24
in his first 27 games including
a winless 2003 season; the
Mustangs rebounded with a
5-6 record in 2005
71
Career-high assists mark
by senior setter Heidi Krug
who recorded the feat against
Southern Miss on Friday while
adding 12 digs en route to
being named the C-USA Setter
of the Week
20
Kills notched by Kelley
Wernert in a sweep over UCF,
which was the volleyball team's
fourth straight Conference
USA victory
17-6
Scoring margin that the
women's soccer team is
outscoring opponents in the
second-half despite being
outshot 87-72
10
Amount of women's soccer
players that have tallied at
least one goal in 15 games; five
have netted at least three goals
17-4
Combined score of the club
ice hockey team's two games
on Friday and Saturday;
the men moved to 3-0 after
drilling Old Dominion 6-2 and
Virginia Commonwealth 11-2
in consecutive days at Bladez
on Ice
12 p.m.
Time of the annual men's
basketball Purple-Gold
scrimmage to be held inside
Williams Arena at Minges
Coliseum on Saturday before
the football game; practice
started on Oct. 13
38
Number of players on the
club baseball roster, which
was dwindled from 83 who
first tried out; the team will
hold a three-game intrasquad
scrimmage tabbed the Purple-
Gold Club Team World Series
on Oct. 27 and Oct. 29-30
FOOTBALL PREVIEW
SMU VS. ECU
SMU SCHEDULE
SEPT. 2AT. TEXAS TECHL, 35-3
SEPT. 9AT. NORTH TEXASL, 24-6
SEPT. 16VS. SAM HOUSTON ST.W, 45-14
SEPT. 23VS. ARKANSAS ST.W, 55-9
SEPT. 30AT. TULANEW, 33-28
OCT. 7AT.UTEPL. 24-21
OCT. 14VS. MARSHALLW, 31-21
OCT. 21AT. ECU3:00 PM
OCT. 31VS. UAB7:30 PM
NOV. 11VS. HOUSTON3:00 PM
NOV. 18VS. TULSA 3:00 PM
NOV. 253:00 PM
Pirates look to ecu schedule
tame the Mustangs
SMU
1. Field Position:
SMU's Jessie Henderson leads the C-USA in kickoft
returns while ECU is ranked eighth in kickoff cover3'
age. The dangerous Henderson can be a field shifter
for the Mustangs.
2. Pressure Pickney:
The Mustangs lead the conference in sacks and pres-
suring Pinkney could force the senior into mistakes,
and possibly turnovers. Pinkney has two lost fumbles
and four interceptions this year.
3. Red-zone conversion:
SMU has scored on 22 of its 26 red-zone possessions
with 17 touchdowns. This could be the difference
maker as the Pirates have struggled inside the red
zone with scores on 16 of 22 possessions, but only 11
touchdowns and two missed field goals.
SMU brings a 4-3 record
in first trip to Greenville
BY RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
Following a frustrating 31-10
loss to Tulsa, ECU will welcome
SMU to Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium
Saturday for homecoming.
The Pirates (2-4, 1-2
Conference USA) face a 4-3
Mustang team that has won four of
its last five and head coach Skip Holtz
said the schedule doesn't get any
easier with SMU coming to town.
"The only game they've lost
in their past five was the one they
suspended their quarterback Holtz
said. "Defensively, they're first in
tfie conference in stopping the run.
Everybody else in the league is
giving up four yards per carry or
more and they're only allowing 2.8.1
think they're the best'defensive team
in the conference and obviously the
statistics prove that
Holtz said the same thing
last week about a Tulsa
defense that held ECU to
241 yards of total offense.
SMU (4-3, 2-1 C-USA),
off to its best start since
1986, has the number
one rush
defense
in the
conference. The Mustangs are
allowing 86 yards per game. They
are giving up over 260 yards through
the air, which could be good news for
ECU quarterback James Pinkney,
who threw for a season-low 92 yards
against Tulsa.
Despite the poor performance
against the Golden Hurricane,
Pinkney, who had thrown for 200 or
more yards in 15 of the previous 16
games, is still averaging 227 yards
through the air.
"He's a passer and a runner
SMU head coach Phil Bennett said
about Pinkney.
"He's started 31 straight games.
That's pretty impressive. That's a
lot of starts. He's thrown for a lot of
yards and he beat us here last year
ECU won on the road-inDaMas
last year, 24-17, behSHee
Pinkney touchdown rurtS'to'Triap
a 10-game road losing streak. The
Pirates converted five SMU turn-
overs into 17 points, something
the Pirates have been inconsis-
tent in doing this year. ECU was
unable to convert two Tulsa
turnovers into points
Saturday.
SMU starts
freshman quarter-
back, Justin Willis,
SEPT. 2AT NAVYL, 28-23
SEPT. 9AT UAB1,17-12
SEPT. 16VS. MEMPHISW, 35-20
SEPT. 23VS. WEST VIRGINIAL, 27-10
OCT. 7 OCT. 14 OCT. 21VS. VIRGINIA VS. TULSA VS. SMUW, 30-21 L, 31-10 3:00 PM
OCT. 28AT SOUTHERN MISS8:00 PM
NOV. 4AT UCF4:00 PM
NOV. 11VS. MARSHALL1:00 PM
NOV. 18AT RICE3:00 PM
NOV. 25AT N.C. STATE1:00 PM
!l.ltfiWji
ECU
1. Score Quickly: ,
The Pirates have scored first in just two games this
year. Getting off to a fast start will be important for ECU
against a stern SMU defense that is the best in C-USA
against the run and leads the conference in sacks and
tackles for a loss.
2. James Pinkney:
Pinkney ran for three scores in last year's 24-17 win over
SMU in Dallas and passed for 225 yards. Coming off the
worst performance in his last 17 games, Pinkney must
rebound and play well for the Pirates to earn the win.
3. Capitalize on Turnovers:
The Pirates converted five turnovers into 17 points last
year against the Mustangs, but have been unable to find
the same success this season. SMU has allowed 15 sacks
and has turned the ball over 13 times in seven games.
"ECU Is good team. James Pinkney has
started 31 straight games - that's pretty
impressive -and last year, he beat us. They
played West Virginia about as well as anyone
has Ms year We are in the second half of
the season now. We finished the first half 3-3.
Our focus has to be on one game at a time.
We have to be able to find a way to go out,
play well and win. We are In position, if we
keep winning, to have a chance to compete
for a championship - And that's our goal
"Things don't get any easier They're
the best defensive team in the conference
and obviously the statistics prove
thatThis team is embarrassed by the
way we played Saturday and we need
to worry more about the type of game
we play rather than the SMU team,
because if we don't play our best we
can't beat a team like SMU right now
BENNETT
HOLTZ
1





PACK Ba
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2006
The East Carolinians staff predictions
Gilmore
SMU
Rice
Marshall
UTEP
Southern Miss
Tulsa
UNC
Georgia Tech
Texas
N.C. State
ECU
UCF
UAB
HOUSTON
VIRGINIA TECH
MEMPHIS
IHCilNIA
CLEMSON
NEBRASKA
MARYLAND
Last Week: 7-3 Overall: H-18
Xbox
SMU
Hire
Marshall
UTK1'
Southern Miss.
Tulsa
UNC
Georgia Tech
Texas
N.C. State
ECU
UCF
UAB
HOUSTON
VIRGINIA TECH
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA
CLEMSON
NEBRASKA
MARYLAND
Last Week: 6-6 Overall: 47-13
Jackson
SMU
Rice
Marshall
UTEP
Southern Miss.
Tulsa
UNC
Georgia Tech
Texas
N.C. State
ECU
UCF
UAB
HOUSTON
VIRGINIA TECH
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA
CLEMSON
NEBRASKA
MARYLAND
Last Week: 5-5 Overall: 84-16
Bell
SMU
Rice
Marshall
UTEP
Southern Miss
Tulsa
UNC
Georgia Tech
Texas
NX, State
ECU
UCF
UAB
HOUSTON
VIRGINIA TECH
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA
CLEMSON
NEBRASKA
MARYLAND
Last Week: 7-3 Overall: 83-17
.i .ih.ini
SMU
Rice
Marshall
UTEP
Southern Miss.
Tulsa
UNC
Georgia Tech
Texas
N.C. State
ECU
UCF
UAB
HOUSTON
VIRGINIA TECH
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA
CLEMSON
NEBRASKA
MARYLAND
Last Week: 4-6 Overall: 88-18
Clements
SMU
Rice
Marshall
UTEP
Southern Miss.
Tulsa
UNC
Georgia Tech
Texas
N.C. State
ECU
UCF
UAB
HOUSTON
VIRGINIA TECH
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA
CLEMSON
NEBRASKA
MARYLAND
Last Week: 6-4 Overall: 87-13
Biddix
SMU
Rice
Marshall
UTEP
Southern Miss.
Tulsa
UNC
Georgia Tech
Texas
N.C. State
ECU
UCF
UAB
HOUSTON
VIRGINIA TECH
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA
CLEMSON
NEBRASKA
MARYLAND
Last Week: 8-8 Overall: 84-16
Johnson
SMU
Rice
Marshal
UTEP
Southern Miss.
Tulsa
UNC
Georgia Tech
Texas
N.C. State
ECU
UCF
UAB
HOUSTON
VIRGINIA TECH
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA
CLEMSON
NEBRASKA
MARYLAND
Last Week: 8-8 Overall: 83-17
Robol
SMU
Rice
Marshall
UTEP
Southern Miss.
Tulsa
UNC
Georgia Tech
Texas
N.C. State
ECU
UCF
UAB
HOUSTON
VIRGINIA TECH
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA
CLEMSON
NEBRASKA
MARYLAND
Last Week: 3-7 Overall: 88-18
Sirkin
SMU
Rice
Marshall
UTEP
Southern Miss.
Tulsa
UNC
Georgia Tech
Texas
N.C. State
ECU
UCF
UAB
HOUSTON
VIRGINIA TECH
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA
CLEMSON
NEBRASKA
MARYLAND
Last Week: 8-8 Overall: 15-85
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IN THEATRES OCTOBER 20





I 19,2006
t
ird!
r?
The East Carolinian
SCUH0HSQ0HM3
iW
I
The ECU defense will have to have the same focus and intensity as a high powered SMU offense rides into town. The Pirates are giving up 24 points per game.
Painting it to the extreme
for Homecoming
Paint it Purple Friday's
KIMBERLY BELLAMY
SENIOR STAFF WRITER
Special dates have been set aside to increase school
spirit for homecoming by doing extra activities for
Paint it Purple Fridays on Oct. 19 and 20.
Paint it Purple Fridays are days that has been
occurring for some time now to promote school
spirit in the occurrence of home games.
Marissa Phillips, spirit liaison of SGA said,
"Paint it Purple promotes students wearing purple
on Fridays to all home games
Part of the effect of wearing purple to the games
is visual it creates of a sea of purple from the field and
from the opposing side according to Phillips.
William Daniel,junior business major said try my best
to wear purple to all the home football games I attend
see PURPLE page B6
The cheerleaders hope to perform more stunts and have plenty to cheer about when ECU takes on SMU.
ECU quarterback James Pinkney might bounce back from a 92 yard passing effort against Tulsa.
Below, the Homecoming Court attends the Banquet on Oct. 11 at the Club Level of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.






PACK B4
HOMECOMING SPECIAL SECTION
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2006
Homecoming King & Queen
Candidates 2006
THUR
Virginia
Thompson
ECU
Ambassadors
Erica
Reid
Sigma Gamma
Rho
A
Kevin
Berryman
Alpha Phi Alpha
Larry
Cummings
Black Student
Union
Keri
Broeckett
Campus Girl
Scouts, SGA
De'Laria
Woodruff
NAACP
Dana
White
SGA
Kinsey
Batts
ECU
Cheerleading
Chris
Welsh
SGA, Sigma
Alpha Epsilon
Kyle
Johnson
N.C. Teaching
Fellows
ECU HOMSCOMIKG 2
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19TH
Canned Food Drive2:00 5:30pmBottom of College Hill
Pep Rally5:30-8:OOpmBottom of College Hill
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 20TH
Volunteer Friday
Lawn Competition.
Freeboot i riday
NPHC Step Show
3:00-5:00pmMendenhall Brickyard
3:00pmGreenville
5:00pmEvans St. Parking Lot
8:00pmWright Auditorium
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 21ST
Homecoming Parade10:00am5th St.
Pirates vs. SMU3:00pmDowdy-Ficklen Stadium
Campus Recreation & Wellness
celebrates
HOMECOMING
October 18-20
FREE Shoe Rental for Climbing Wall!
FREE Group Fitness Classes!
Wednesday
October 18
Membership Appreciation Day free snacks throughout the Day!
One FREE Guest Pass for SRC Members!
When Diets Fail What's Next? SRC 238. 5:30pm (Pre-Registration Required)
Kayak Roll Session src indoor pool 7:oopm
Friday
October 20
HALF-PRICE Off Tar River Canoeing Trip for Parents and Alumni!
Saturday
October 21
FREE ACCESS TO SRC for Faculty and Staff who
are not members if they display Pirate Pride by
wearing purple and gold apparel.
lTU i
CAMPUS
RECREATION
WELLNESS
I )WtI87
I www ocu duts-iludwntlllecrw
(
Jam gives you great stuff just for eating on campus.
Join Jam by October 25, 2006, to enter for a
chance to win a flat screen TV. If you're already a
Jam member, you're already entered in the drawing.
If you're not a Jam member, join now. It's free. And
there could be a flat screen TV in it for you.
"
at jamrewards.com
NO HIBCHASF NECf SSARV A PURCHASE All I HOI INCREASE YOUR CHANCES 01 WINNING IEGA1 RESIDENTS OF THE 50 UNITED STATES ID C I 17 YEARS AND
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am Spomor ARAMARK 1 dm ahonal Services Ira: HOT Market SI Itiiladclptiia PA tgin?

J.
I

IUIM





19, 2006
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2006
HOMECOMING SPECIAL SECTION
PAGE B5
1
Homecoming is already here!
The semester is flying by & the
need for a new home is near!
You don't have to wait
top by and see us
before it's too late.
About w Move-to Spec
Tar River Estates
1725 East First Street
Greenville, NC 27858
(252) 752-4225
TarRiverEstates@aimco.com
OR
Wilson Acres
1806 East First Street
Greenville, NC 27858
(252) 752-0277
WilsonAcresf2iaimco.com
fett!
GO PIRATES! TAME THOSE
MUSTANGS!
Go Pirates!
Refuse to
pay retail.
atalog
'onnection
U.B.E.
mown dri-i-m ilk Mr
210 E. 5" St. 758-8612 MON SAT 10 6 SUN 1-5
i
JjteinkcVs
MEN'S SH
Welcome home Pirate fans.
Shop our Homecoming Sale
through Saturday.
Alumni, don't miss our
"SHOW US YOUR RING-
SPECIAL!
Wear your ECU Class Ring
while you shop at Dowdy
Student Store during our
Homecoming Sale! Show
the cashier your ring with
class year on it and we'll
give you a discount on all
regular priced gifts and
apparel. For each year
youVe been away, you'll
get a 1 DISCOUNT. Not
been away long? We'll give
you a minimum of 5 OFF!
Been away a long time?
Sorry, we have to cap our
discount at 30.

FREE ECU GIFT
with purchase of
$20 or more
Paint It Purple
T-Shirts
Just $5.00
JOSTENS ring
representative in the Store
Lobby through Saturday
Student Football Ticket
Pickup through Thursday
10 am 7 pm'
Store Hours
Monday - Thursday: 7:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Friday: 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Special Homecoming Saturday Hours: 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Homecoming sale and specials valid 101806 - 102106. Prior purchases
excluded. No other discounts apply. 'Football ticket pickup is available
10am - 7pm, Tuesday through Thursday at the Student Store, while
supplies last, or until game time at the Minges Ticket Window. Free button
at the Student Store available with student tickets while supplies last.
JW Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support Scholars!
Wrisht Building www.studcntstores.ecu.edu 252.328.6731 1.877.499.TEXT
i
i





PAGE B6
HOMECOMING SPECIAL SECTION
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2006
thur:
PURPLE
continued from B3
Students participating
in Paint it Purple Friday's is
especially important during
homecoming.
"This game will be important
to show our pride because we are
celebrating alumni coming back,
the crowning of our homecom-
ing queen and king, and showing
everyone that purple and gold
said Phillips.
Two other days were already
designated in Wright Plaza on Oct.
5 and t from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. have
events for Paint it Purple Fridays.
It is normally broken up into
two days because Thursday is used
as a promotion day to hand out
flyers and getting people to sign
up for different SGA committees.
Additional promotional help
for Paint it Purple Friday's is
sometimes received by student
organizations and teams.
"Last Friday, we had Pee
Dee and the cheerleaders
helping us promote it Phillips said.
Some of the committees that
students have an option of serving
on include Spirit Committee, Stu-
dent Affairs and Elite Leadership
according to Phillips.
The students that agree to
sign up for one these committees
receive a SGA membership card.
"Throughout the year, we will
be giving away prizes to students
that have their SGA eards on
them Phillips said.
Prizes are also given away
each Friday to students that have
their SGA cards and that are
wearing purple.
Some of the possible prizes
or incentives include a week of
free tanning, Chico's restaurant
coupons, UBE cozies, footballs, t-
shirts, whistles, pens and various
others according to Phillips.
Phillips said that she
plans to continue having Paint
it Purple throughout basketball
season as well.
Alternating the colors that stu-
dents wear to home games from
purple one week to gold the next week
is another part of Paint it Purple that
Phillips is trying to initiate.
Students are encouraged to
wear purple on Fridays and to home
games to promote school spirit.
Members from SGA that are
promoting Paint it Purple will be
in Wright Place on Thursday and
Friday from 11 a.m - 1 p.m.
For more information about
Paint it Purple Friday's you
can contact Marissa Phillips at
mgp0802@ecu.edu.
This writer may be contacted at
newsOtheeastcarolinian.com.
Beat SMU!
Brittany
Major at ECU:
Business
Hobbies:
Surfing the web
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To buy clothes
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1 A NT
Tomorrow starts here. CAROLINA
I INlVERSm





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2006
HOMECOMING SPECIAL SECTION
PAGE H7
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Volunteer fridays

October 20
3:00-5:00p.m. MSC Brickyard
Help us help others.
We need you to SIGN UP to build a birdhouse.
www.ecu.educs-studentlifevolunteerVolunteer-Fridays.cfm
FREE FOOD FREE T-SHIRTS
On three Fridays this fall, you can help buildpaint birdhouses
to raise money for the ECU chapter of Habitat for Humanity.
All money earned will go towards the building of a Habitat
house in Greenville.
Meet new people, "tool around develop leadership skills,
and discover that volunteering isn't just for the birds.
All skill levels welcome. All tools and equipment will be
provided. Free food and music will also be available. Free
t-shirts will be given to participants.
Lowe's
East Carolina University
Volunteer fridays
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HAIUN t CIKCA INDUM-NDI Nl





PAGE B8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2006
SMU
continued from Bl
who has both coaches worried.
"He's still a little bit reck-
less with the ball Bennett said.
"That scares me to death, but he's
a guy that has the ability to make
plays
Willis, who was suspended
for SMU's 24-21 loss at UTEP,
is completing 71 percent of his
passes and has 16 touchdown
passes to just three interceptions.
Holtz recognizes Willis' play-
making ability, but his concern is
of a different origin.
"He's smart and very athletic
and when things break down
he's running around and making
things happen with his legs
Holtz said.
ECU got some good news,
and some bad news, this week on
the injury front. Standout wide
receiver Aundrae Allison "guar-
anteed" that he'd play Saturday,
but Bobby Good will not play and
will miss the next four weeks with
a broken foot.
Good broke the third metatar-
sal in his left foot during warm-
ups before the Tulsa game, and
still caught seven passes for 48
yards and threw a 23-yard pass
to Steven Rogers.
"I think it speaks volumes for
that young man and his competi-
tive nature on how hard he's will-
ing to push himself that he's will-
ing to play 60 plays with a broken
foot Holtz said. "Right now he's
really down. It makes me sick for
the young man, because he's such
a good young man. He brings
a toughness and a competitive
nature that we need badly
Allison has been out with an
ankle injury he suffered in a loss
to West Virginia on September
23rd. Lunar Bryant will miss
the next four to six weeks with
a thumb injury. Bryant required
surgery this week to repair liga-
ment damage he suffered during
the bye week.
The Mustangs are not without
their share of injuries. SMU will
be without starting defensive line-
men Cory Muse for the second
straight week. Muse, who has
three sacks on the year, injured
his knee against UTEP. Justin
Rogers, who injured his neck in
the same UTEP game and leads
C-USA with six sacks, will be
back after missing last week's 31-
21 win over Marshall.
With Allison coming back,
Holtz is hopeful that the senior's
ankle is fully healed and the
Pirates will be able to capitalize
on his breakaway speed to push
the ball down the field. ECU had
just two pass plays go for more
than 12 yards against Tulsa - a
21-yard pass to Phillip Henry, and
the Good-to-Rogers pass.
"You always want to be able
to hit the homerun, but with the
receivers out right now we don't
have a whole lot of speed on the
field Holtz said. "I can throw
it deep but 1 don't think we can
go run and catch it. I don't think
throwing the ball deep is the best
chance right now for success.
Tulsa defends the deep ball very
well so we were trying to throw
more screens and underneath
stuff. With SMU we'll just have
to look and see what they give us
but again we have to have a guy
that can go get it because you're
not going to find a guy wide-open
down the field
After playing "inconsistently"
against Tulsa, Holtz said his team
must play a near-perfect game
against an improving SMU team
that has won seven of its last ten,
dating back to last year.
"We've got some challenges
this week with SMU and a confer-
ence game Holtz said. "I think
this team is embarrassed by the
way we played Saturday and we
need to worry more about the
type of game we play rather than
the SMU team, because if we don't
play our best we can't beat a team
like SMU right now
Not only do the Mustangs lead
the conference in rushing, they
also lead the conference with 18
Dapper
Dan's
I el us ilirss on I hi-
Halloween
rv
i loth inn,
Kl liS( ill V
sacks with a very active front four
and a talented secondary led by
senior safety Joe Sturdivant and
junior cornerback Devin Lowery.
Lowery, a converted wide receiver,
was named C-USA Defensive
Player of the Week after nabbing
three interceptions in last week's
31-21 win over Marshall.
"What they do is take away
the run and get you into passing
situations Holtz said. "This is not
going to be a scheme game. This is
going to be a game of fundamental
football
Bennett has been equally
impressed with the ECU defense.
"They do a good job of dis-
guising their coverages Bennett
said. "They did a good job, better
than just about anybody, against
West Virginia
Special teams may be a differ-
ence in this game, especially with
ECU's inconsistency While Ryan
Dougherty is second in the confer-
ence in punting and booted a 72-
yarder versus Virginia, ECU place
kicker Robert Lee has struggled.
The senior from Longview, Tex
who missed just two field goals in
2005, has missed five already this
year - all at home, and all at the
open scoreboard end of the stadium.
Lee, who celebrated his 22"d
birthday Tuesday, said he talked
to Holtz about getting some time
inside the stadium to kick at that
south end zone this week.
SMU's Jessie Henderson, who
had a 103-yard kickoff return for a
touchdown in a win over Tulane,
leads C-USA in kickoff returns,
averaging nearly 37 yards a return
while ECU is eighth in kickoff
coverage. The Mustangs lead the
conference in kickoff coverage,
allowing just 16 yards a return.
SMU's kicker, Thomas Mor-
stead, will be without his normal
holder this week. Backup senior
quarterback and holder, Duke
Hasson, along with junior receiver
Zack Sledge, were suspended for
this week's game. The two were
arrested for public intoxication
following the win over Marshall
last Saturday. Sledge caught a
touchdown pass against the Herd.
Bennett said his team will
have to "play well" in SMU's first-
ever trip to Greenville, especially
since the conference races are far
from decided, in order to leave
with a win.
"There's a lot of parity in
Conference USA Bennett said.
"If you stay healthy, your quarter-
back plays well and you can play
defense, you have a chance. This
is their homecoming, so that's a
challenge for us
This will be the final game
of a five-game homestand for the
Pirates. Kickoff will be at 3 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at
sportsSeastcarolinian.com.
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 19, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 19, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1931
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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