The East Carolinian, October 12, 2006












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VOLUME 82, ISSUED
www.theeastcarolinian.com
YOUR CAMPUS NEWS
SOURCE SINCE 1925
THURSDAY OCTOBER 12. 2006
. V 7 83
Despite fall break,
the football team has
a 'statement' game
against defending
Conference USA
championship Tulsa.
The Pirates are
looking for revenge
after a 45-13 beating
last seasonPageA6
The flag football
intramural
championship was
held at Blount Fields
on Wednesday night.
Check out the story to
find out who earned
the t-shirt and was
crowned divisional
championsPage A6
Carbon Leaf's new
album provides
relaxation and
intreaguing lyrics.
For more about the
album, turn to
Page A5
The North Carolina
State Fair opens
Friday, Oct. 13 and
will stay through
Saturday, Oct. 22.
Find out what it
has to offer this
yearPage A4
2 5 9 4 8 6 3 7 11 3 4 2 9 7 6 8 58 6 7 1 3 5 9 4 2
5 2 4 6 3 8 9 1 79 7 3 4 5 1 8 2 66 1 8 2 7 9 4 5 3
1 9 57 4 83 2 6 5 8 1 7 9 4
7 4 2 8 6 33 6 9 5 1 2
Test your skills at
SuDoKuPage A9
NEWSPageA2
PULSEPageA4
SPORTSPageAB
OPINIONPage A3
COMICSPageA9
CLASSIFIEDSPageA9
Hall Stars for the Homeless
Tabetha Pierce, Scott Carter with daughter Sarah, Gabe Dubis, Brandy Morris and Samira Rag
11
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- ' m 1 H - ' n ' A i
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jl
Samira Rag, Brandy Morris, Tabetha Pierce and Scott Carter wih daughter Sarah sit inside their cardboard shelter.
ECU community comes
out in full force to
support the cause
ADELINE TRENTO
STAFF WRITER
The Annual All-stars for the
Homeless event, which was held
to raise awareness and collect
donations for the homeless in
Greenville, was a huge success.
The event, which was spon-
sored by the resident advisors of
Umstead Residence Hall, began
at 3 p.m. on Tuesday outside of the
Blount house on 10th Street. For
the event, volunteers took turns
living in a cardboard "house" for
24 hours to collect donations for
local charities that help the home-
less in Greenville.
The fundraiser began on Tues-
day with a ribbon cutting cer-
emony by Amy Miller, a former
Umstead Hall Coordinator that
started this event six years ago.
Miller cut a yellow ribbon cov-
ering the door of the cardboard
home, signaling the beginning of
the 24 hour fundraiser.
Miller began this event when
she was the Hall Coordinator for
Umstead as a way to collect dona-
tions for the homeless and make
people aware of the homeless
problem in Pitt County.
"We started this event to
increase awareness about the
homeless population in our com-
munity, and also to collect non-
perishable items that would be
used to help a lot of people in our
area said Miller.
Many Students and ECU staff
came out to support the event, and
donations were given even before
the ribbon cutting ceremony was
finished. Six minutes into the
fundraiser, people had already
started to fill bags with clothing
and canned food.
Most students felt that having
volunteers live in a box for 24 hours
was a really good way to get the
message out there and get people to
notice the event-Many local people,
who were unaware of the fund-
raiser, saw the box on 10th Street
and came back with donations.
"It's a really different experi-
ence to have people live in a box
for 24 hours said Alva Navarro,
senior nutrition and dietetics
major. "We could always just
accept donations for a homeless
shelter, but I think it's very differ-
ent and gets more peoples atten-
tion to actually sit in a box and
wait for donations
Whether it was for a class,
volunteer hours or just a way to
give back to the community, a
lot of people volunteered to take
a shift living in the box. More
than 100 people volunteered to
sit in the box, and some shifts had
more than six people signed up to
spend time in the cardboard home
at once. RA's, dorm coordinators,
honor students, Residence Life
staff members and ECU students
volunteered their time and took a
shift in the cardboard home.
Many volunteers decided to
donate their time because they
see HOMELESS page A2
Jk&&
i t
THE LEAGUE
OF WOMEN VOTERS OF PITT COUNT
it WM
Organizations
participate in National
Fire Prevention Week
William Gheen, Adelcio Lugo, Robert Lee Maril, Jeremy McKinney and Leticia Zavala speak at the forum.
Local panel discusses immigration
Forum held in Brody .
Auditorium
ZACK HILL
STAFF WRITER
The Department of Sociol-
ogy and the League of Women
Voters of Pitt County held a forum
Wednesday night at 7 p.m. in
Brody Auditorium to discuss the
United States' immigration policy.
The forum consisted of a diverse,
five member panel moderated by
Annette Newell ofWNCT Channel.
Time limits and other restric-
tions were imposed on the panel-
ists to keep the dialogue from
turning into an argument.
"This is not a debate, this is
information sharing said Eva,
Rodgers of the Pitt County League
of Women Voters.
William Gheen, an ECV
alumnus and president of ALI-
PAC, an immigration political
action group was first to speak.
He said that immediate immi-
gration reform was necessary
because, "The current laws are
not being enforced by the execu-
tive branch
Gheen said that public safety
was being greatly diminished
because of illegal immigration.
"You cannot allow the import
of people from third world, anar-
chy countries said Gheen. The
loss of quality of life is substantial
and North Carolina is ground zero
because of our licensing policies
We are being forced and told that
we should accept rampant illegal
immigration in our communities
regardless of the law
Gheen went on to say that
amnesty and guest worker programs
were not the answer to the problem.
Next to speak was another
ECU graduate, Adelcio Lugo, a
mortgage loan officer with Self-
Help Credit Union.
He too called for comprehen-
sive immigration reform, saying
the current law, "Is not in synch
with reality. We need a law that
not only addresses the current
problems but also future problems
Lugo said that the native
population coujd not meet the
need for a supply of low cost labor
in the United States, and therefore
the economy could help sustain
those immigrants that might come
through legal channels.
Lugo also said there was a
need to address workers rights,
both legal and illegal.
"There are far too many hard
working immigrants subject to
abuse. This undermines conditions
for all workers said Lugo.
Robert Maril, professor of
sociology, followed Lugo and
took a different perspective on
see IMMIGRATION page A2
Unattended hairdryers left plugged in are on a long list of fire hazards
Sponsored by
Environmental Health
and Safety
Homecoming King and Queen candidates
Elizabeth Schuler, homecoming student chatty announced the top five King and Queen candidates for
rtorrtecdming 2006 last night, from left, Virginia Thompson (ECU Ambassadors), Erica Reid (Sigma Gamma:
Rho), Kerl Brockett (Campus Girl Scours), Dana White (SGA), Kirtsey Batts(ECU Cheerleading), Kevin
Berryfnan (Alpha Phi Alpha), Larry Cummitfs (Black Student Union), DeLaria Woodruff (NAACP), Chris
Welch (SGA, Sigma Alpha EpsHon) and Kyft-Dufrell Jblfflson (N.C. Teaching Wlows) are in the running
for this year's Homecoming Hjtapi.and Queen. Pictured far right is Jessica Mortenson, last year's Queen.
ZACK HILL
STAFF WRITER
The week of Oct. 8 - 14 is
National Fire Prevention Week. The
event is being sponsored at ECU by
Environmental Health and Safety,
the Student Chapter of the American
Society of Safety Engineers and the
Greenville Fire Department.
Fire is no stranger to the ECU
campus. A bathroom in the Brew-
ster building was purposefully set
on fire last Friday and ECU student
Latasha Ann Isler was arrested
earlier this year for first degree
arson in connection with a fire in
the Clement Residence Hall. This
year's theme is "Prevent Cooking
Fires: Watch What You Cook
According to statistics on the
American Society of Safety Engi-
neers Web site, the leading causes
in dormitory fires are, in order of
frequency, cooking, careless smok-
ing and arson.
Arson is the leading cause of
fires in fraternity and sorority
houses. About half of those who die
in dorm or Greek house fires have
high blood alcohol contents.
Booths sponsored by the orga-
nizations involved have been placed
throughout campus during the
week to distribute information on
fire prevention.
In an e-mail, Assistant Direc-
tor of Environmental Health and
Safety Phil Lewis said, "Although
this year's theme involves cooking,
an escape plan is necessary for all
fires. Evacuation plans are already
in place for each department on
campus but what better time to
remind students, faculty and staff
of the need to make a fire escape
plan for their homes?"
The Greenville Fire Depart-
ment has been sending out its
fire trucks to local schoolchil-
dren in attempt to raise aware-
ness on the juvenile level.
Senior Fire Code Official Gary
Coggins said that the department
has responded to several fires set
in trash cans on and around the
campus. He hopes this week may
help curb incidents such as these.
"We wish the ECU students
wer.e a little more active, but I
think the general public is begin-
ning to come around a little bit
Coggins said. "All we can do is put
it out there
For more information on fire
prevention, visit nfpa.org.
This writer can be contacted at
newsCtheeastcarolinian.com.





News
THURSDAY OCTOBER 12, 2006 PAGE A2
Campus & Community
Announcements
Thursday, Oct. 12
From 6 - 8 p.m. at both
campus dining halls
Want a piece of
Homecoming 2006 before
any one else? Stop by a
campus dinning hall during
"Steak and Shrimp Night"
to grab a goodie!
ECTCECC Alumni Society
Reunion
Friday, Oct. 20, through
Saturday, Oct. 21
ECU alumni who attended
ECTC or ECC are invited to
attend the ECTCECC Alumni
Society Reunion. Activities
include a campus bus tour,
breakfast et the Alumni
Center on Saturday prior to
the parade, the Alumni Tail-
gate, and a reduced-price
football ticket. Following
the game, enjoy a reception
and dinner at Mendenhall
Student Center, and then
dance to the tunes of the
Collegians as you reminisce
and reconnect with friends
from your college days at
ECU. Our special honorees
this year are members of the
Class of 1956. These alumni
will be inducted as Golden
Alumni at the evening event.
For details, contact the East
Carolina Alumni Association.
Call (800) ECU-GRAD or
visit PirateAlumni.com.
Ticket required.
Homecoming Open House
Saturday, Oct. 21
9 a.m. at the Taylor-
Slaughter Alumni Center
Attend the Homecoming
Open House on Satur-
day, Oct. 21 from 9-11
a.m. Enjoy a continental
breakfast and a front row
seat for the homecoming
parade at 10 a.m
The event is free and open
to the public. For more
information, please contact
328-6072 or Homecoming.
PirateAlumni.com.
Technology Jobs Available
Oc. 2 - 23
Location: Allied Health and
Nursing Building
The SMART Classroom sup-
port team within the Infor-
mation Technology and Com-
puting Services department
(ecu.eduitcs) is looking for
student employees who can
work mornings, beginning
at 8 a.m in the new Allied
Health and Nursing building
on ECU's West Campus.
If you can work morning
hours and are interested,
please contact Tom Irons,
Jr. at ironsthmail.ecu.
edu. Classroom technology
experience is not required;
we will train enthusiastic
hard working students.
Campus Dining Survey -
Opportunity to Win an Apple
iPod nano or iTunes Gift
Card
Oct. 5 - 20.
Location: ecu.edudining
We are conducting a survey
to better understand your
campus lifestyle and pref-
erences. By sharing your
thoughts, we will gain valu-
able insight to help improve
your overall campus dining
experience. This online
survey will take 10 to 12
minutes and your responses
are confidential. Each par-
ticipant in the survey will
have the opportunity to enter
to win an Apple iPod
nano or iTunes Gift Card.
Click on this link to begin the
survey: collegediningsurvey.
comecu or ecu.edudining.
Hedda Gabler
Nov.16 to 21
Employing methods that
virtually defined the modern
psychological drama, this
masterpiece reveals the
conflicts and emotions that
lie below the surface of
daily life. Was it murder
or suicide? Originally, by
Henrik Ibsen, the adapta-
tion is being presented by
Christopher Hampton.
12
1 O
Thu u Fri
14
Sat
Sun
Mon
17lue 18
Wed
'Focus Group Session
Please come and share
your thoughts as they
relate to the current
collection of art housed
in the LWCC, recom-
mendations for change,
and suggestions for the
future.
Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center Gallery
3 p.m.
N.C. State Fair Opens
Ice Hockey
Bladez on Ice
104 Red Banks Rd.
across the street from
Overtons
3:45-8 p.m.
ECU vs. VCU
Freeboot Friday
Performing this week:
Parrotbeach (Jimmy
Buffett Cover Band)
Uptown Greenville
5 - 8 p.m.
Discover D.C Bus Trip
2006
Cultural Enrichment
Trip to Washington,
D.C. Sponsored by the
Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center. Please come
by the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center, Blox-
ton House or call 328-
6495 to sign up, total
cost of the trip $60
(not including food and
souvenirs). Deadine
date Wednesday, Oct.
11 at 5 p.m.
Bus Departing from
Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center 6 a.m.
Women's and Men's
Swimming
Minges Aquatic Center
12 p.m.
ECU VS. DAVIDSON
Football
HS Band Day, Scout
Day, Academic Suc-
cess Day
Dowdy-Ficklen Sta-
dium
3 p.m. i
ECU VS. TULSA
Women's Soccer
Bunting Field
1 p.m.
ECU VS. SOUTHERN
MISS
Fall Break
No Classes
SGA Meeting
SGA will meet at 5
p.m. in the Mendenhall
social rooms.
Fall Break
No Classes
Gilbert & Sullivan
Players: Pirates of
Penzance
For more informa-
tion visit ecu.edu
SRAPAS
Wright Auditorium
Banner Competition
Come support your
favorite student organi-
zations as they display
their spirit and artwork
as part of the Official
2006 Spirit Cup Com-
petition during Home-
coming Week!
Hendrix Theater
8:30- 10 a.m.
Russian Film Series:
"Tycoon: A New Rus-
sian"
Movies have English
subtitles or dubbing.
Bate 2011
NEWS BRIEFS
National:
S.C. teen asks governor to
stop transfer to adult prison
(AP) A South Carolina teen-
ager appealing his murder convic-
tion for killing his grandparents
when he was 12 asked Gov. Mark
Sanford on Tuesday to stop his
transfer to an adult prison.
But the governor's spokesman
said Christopher Pittman, now
17, should be treated just like any
other inmate.
The South Carolina Supreme
Court, which heard oral argu-
ments in the boy's appeal last week,
refused Tuesday to halt Pittman's
transfer. The coirt has not yet
rud on Pittman's appeal.
Pittman's attorneys have asked
the state Supreme Court to over-
turn the boy's conviction for the
s001 killings, saying he shouldn't
have been tried as an adult.
Attorney Andy Vickery said the
case should have stayed in juvenile
court, where a conviction would
have sent Pittman to a facility until
he turned 81.
Zoloft is a widely prescribed
antidepressant. In 2004, the Food
and Drug Administration ordered
Zoloft and other antidepressants
to carry "black box" warnings,
the government's strongest
warning short of a ban, about an
increased risk of suicidal behavior
in children.
Officials: State Fair will be
ready for thousands of visitors
(AP) Getting about 110
rides ready to pass safety inspec-
tions will be a challenge, but the
new operator of the State Fair
midway said everything will be
up and running when thousands
of people arrive for opening day
Friday.
That would be a dramatic
change from last year, when just
42 of 111 rides had passed the
state's stringent standards on the
eve of the fair.
"I think we're ahead of
the game for the first time in
the history of the fair said
Les Powers, owner of Powers
Great American Midways.
On Tuesday, rides were still
being set up and officials were just
starting the inspections.
New lighting and planters
were added to the midway, making
the area more attractive and
offering people places to sit, said
state Agricultural Commissioner
Steve Troxler. There's also a new
services building with restroonis
and public safety offices. The
improvements this year cost about
$4 million, Troxler said.
"Anything that has 'fry' to the
name is popular, but I think it's a
personal preference he said.
Grade schoolers with cell
phones in school
(AP) Just as in high schools
a few years ago, more pupils are
going to grade school with cell
phones. And some principals say
that's OK, so long as the phones
are silenced.
Principal Tim Smith of
Periwinkle Elementary in Albany
says he knows that safety is a
justifiable reason that parents
might want to send off a student
with a cell phone.
Smith's sentiment was typical
of those at 10 schools the Albany
Democrat-Herald surveyed. But
his sentiments weren't universal.
At Green Acres Elementary
School in Lebanon, Principal
Kevin Bogatin asks arriving
students to check their phones at
the office. They can have them back
at the end of the day.
He says if a parent needs to
get hold of their children at an
elementary school "they can easily
contact us
Bogatin says he doesn't need
kids "text-messaging across
the building
Drunken Bear Released
After Sleep-Off
(AP) Wildlife officials
used a tranquilizer dart to
bring down a bear stumbling
drunk through Lyons, Colo as
children set off for school.
Around 7:30 a.m. Tuesday,
a woman watering her backyard
said she was startled by the female
bear, estimated to be about 4
years old, KCNC-TV, Denver
reported Wednesday.
Deputies responded quickly,
as many children would soon be
on the streets headed for Lyons
Elementary School, the televi-
sion station said. Those already
at the school were herded into the
gymnasium as a precaution.
The deputies fired a beanbag
projectile at the bear in hopes it
would set off on its own but it kept
meandering near the school. State
Division of Wildlife officers shot
the bear with a tranquilizer dart.
They said the bear had
most likely been eating rotting
apples in preparation for winter
hibernation, which made it drunk,
the report said.
The bear was tagged for its
first offense and Wednesday was
taken to a higher elevation for
IMMIGRATION
continued from Al
HOMELESS
continued from Al
the forum.
"I'm interested in talking a
little bit more about the complex-
ity and history of immigration to
avoid racist stereotypes Maril
said, while reminding the audience
of the Irish and Asian influxes of
the lath century.
Maril is the author of "Patrol-
ling Chaos: The U.S. Border Patrol
in Deep South Texas a field study
of the U.S. Border Patrol. He spoke
to the House Judiciary Commit-
tee about the problems within the
Border Patrol and also helped to
author a Congressional bill to pro-
vide more resources to the patrol.
"I'm for any country controlling
its borders and at this point we don't
have control of our borders. One of
the reasons is that we have a dys-
functional organization that is pri-
marily responsible for it Maril said.
Jeremy McKinney, a lawyer in
the area of immigration and natu-
ralization for McKinney and Justin-
in Greensboro, opened by asking
anyone in the room to raise their hand
if they wanted illegal immigration.
"That'swhat I thoughtMcKin-
ney responded. "Everyone is against
illegal immigration. The discus-
sion should focus on how we can
fix a system we all know is broken
"Many Americans, while sym-
pathetic to the plight of undocu-
mented aliens, want a secure
border and accountability from
those who are here undocumented
McKinney said.
"Under the current law it
becomes wiser for that person to
stay here illegally than go back
voluntarily McKinney said. "The
system encourages rather than
prevents illegal immigration
Last in line was Letitia Zavala,
an organizer for the Farm Labor
Organizing Committee, an arm
of the AFL-CIO that represents
migrant farm workers. Her com-
ments followed in line with some of
Maril's closing remarks that "The
majority of undocumented workers
are fine, upstanding citizens
Zavala was an illegal immi-
grant when she came to the United
States from Mexico as an eight-
year old girl because her family,
"wanted to have an opportunity
to pay for education and become
something important
She stressed that simple eco-
nomic factors were the main cause
o! immigration.
"It's not just lack of enforce-
ment of the law, it is also labor
laws that make it attractive to
hire us undocumented immigrants
instead of you as citizens who
might demand a little more or
know how to defend themselves a
little better said Zavala.
Zavala blamed big business for
many of the immigration prob-
lems, and said the problem was
something that could be felt locally.
"In Greene County in 2004 a
grower was paying smugglers to
bring him about MO workers. He
paid for these workers and forced
them to work for free until they
paid back the $4,000 it cost to
get them here Zavala said. "We
should start asking for enforce-
ment from the government in
those areas as well
She also denounced the term
"illegal immigrant
"People are not illegal. We
label them as illegal by creating
laws that are unfair and illogical
Zavalas said.
The audience was given note
cards and pencils to jot down
questions for the panel. Students
of Dr. Rebecca Powers' Sociol-
ogy and Immigration class were
on hand to collect the questions.
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian.com.
thought this was a great way to get
people aware of the problem and
help the homeless in Greenville.
"There are just so many home-
less people around here said
Navarro. "A lot of times people
don't want to donate money
because they don't know where the
money will be going to. They don't
know if the money will be used to
buy drugs or if it will actually be
used to buy food. I think accept-
ing donations and giving it to an
agency that will actually give it to
these people and help them is the
best thing we can do
At the end of the Annual
All-stars for the Homeless event,
fifteen bags of clothing, twenty
bags of nonperishable items and
more than forty dollars had been
donated, but even after the event
was officially over donations were
still coming in. All of the proceeds
from the fundraiser were donated to
the Greenville Community Shelter
and the First Born Organization.
"The event was very success-
ful said Reotis Anderson, junior
Umstead R.A.
"We had a ton of people come
out to support us and everyone
brought donations. We were able
to give a lot to the charities and
w ith these donations they will be
able to help a lot of people in Pitt
County
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
ertising Representative
tHe WeeR
Julia Kyle
Got into the game
& made it happen!
Keep up the good work!
Nightly
Monday-
Tuesday-
Wednesday
Thursday-
Friday-
Saturday-
Sunday-
Dinner Specials $6.95
Chicken Parmesan
Country Fried Chicken
Spaghetti ft Meatballs
Greek or Caesar Salad Chix
Fish ft Chips
Meat or 5 Cheese Lasagna
Fried Shrimp Plate
ALL DAY HANGOUT
758-2774 Take out
301 South Jarvis Street
012 Delicious Combos $5.69 each
NEWLY REMODELED OUTDOOR PATIO
Daily Drink Specials
Monday - $1.75 Domestic bottles
Tuesday - $2.25 Imports
Wednesday - $1.25 Mug Bud Lt $4.50 Pitchers
Thursday - $2.50 House Hi-Balls $3 Wine
Friday - $2.50 Import of the Day
Saturday - $3 Lits ft $2.50 Import of the Day
Sunday - $2.75 Pints Guinness, Bass,
Stella Artois, Black and Tan
II





THURSDAY OCTOBER 12,2006 PAGE A3
inion
Home of the Pirate Rants
Stereotyping makes
the world go round
Why we always feel the need to
judge others
ELIZABETH LAUTEN
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
As members of society, we walk fine
lines everyday. It's a tricky job, balancing
work and responsibility against the power-
ful desire to procrastinate and play. When
you throw into the mix the emotions and
snap-judgments we make about people, it's
a wonder we accomplish anything.
Just now for instance, I was outside
talking on my cell phone when a guy
walked up to me in rather shabby cloth-
ing, and frankly scared the hell out of me.
Considering the part of town I work in, I
felt the safest thing to do was to walk away
and avoid all interaction.
I felt like a fool when a business woman
from down the street passed him by, only
to find out that he was trying to get direc-
tions back to a main road.
Why was there the need to judge him
at all? His physical appearance aside, he
gave me no indication that I should be
concerned with anything about him.
I know I'm not the only one who makes
these judgments though - we all do. It has
become commonplace in our society to
decide whether or not the people around
us are "on our level" enough to talk and
interact with.
We all read Pirate Rants everyday
where students call each other out based
on the clothes on their backs and the orga-
nizations that they're a part of. Yet, how
often are we correct in our assumptions?
I know plenty of fraternity men who go
against the grain of stereotypes and are
nothing like what you expect them to be.
And I have friends who look gothic and act
like Suzy-sunshines. Where's the truth in
snap-judging those people?
I can't help but wonder why we've let
stereotyping take over our society the
way that is has. We've all been told "that
you can't judge a book by its cover but it
hasn't seem to have really set in.
Maybe it's time that we stopped being
so judgmental and actually tried to give
people a chance. Because I'm pretty sure
for every time we're right in our assump-
tions, we're wrong twice.
Remember the Taliban?
JUSTIN SUMMERS
OPINION WRITER
With so many terrorist organizations and so-called ter-
rorist groups we now know and fear; Hezbollah, Hamas, Al
Qaeda, to name a few, it is easy to forget a couple along the way.
One most people surely have forgotten is the Taliban,
the very first Islamic fundamentalist group slated for anni-
hilation by the Bush regime. On this weekend five longyears
ago, the first bombs were dropped from B-52 and stealth
bombers into Afghanistan in order to eliminate the Taliban,
as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. Just weeks after
9-11, these were the first of thousands ofbombs to explode in
the Middle East as part of Bush's crusade against terrorism.
Afghanistan was Bush's success story; we successfully
eradicated the Taliban and were on our way to finding the
other forgotten terrorist, Osama Bin Laden. However, five
years later suicide bombings are up 600 percent, and Opium
and poppy cultivation are at record highs, U.S. and NATO
forces are suffering from the worst casualty rate in five years
and the Taliban is making a comeback.
The United States of America invaded Afghanistan
five years ago in an attempt squash Al Qaeda terrorists
and the Taliban. We invaded in order to bring "freedom
to the Afghanis and more importantly to the Afghan
women. Maybe you can remember seeing the specials on
the news prior to invasion about the horrible repression
of the Afghan women under the Taliban, or remember
some of Laura Bush's rhetoric of how we would free them.
Well when we did effectively remove the Taliban
from parts of Afghanistan, it was assumed that every-
thing would just get better for the Afghanis, however
this was fallacy. Sure, on paper, the women of Afghani-
stan havejnore freedoms and this is evident in Kabul,
the capital of Afghanistan where things have definitely
improved for women and men alike. However, outside of
the capital things are very much the same if not worse.
Women are found, killed and tortured for cooperating
with U.S. forces, and in the West women set themselves on
fire to escape from the repression and misogyny of Afghan
fundamentalists.
What we did do, was clean up and cordon off Kabul,
and push the warlords we opposed of out of the countiy,
and empowered the Northern Alliance warlords to help us
get rid of the remaining Taliban in southern Afghanistan.
Weare using brutal tactics to capture and kill suspected
terrorists and in doing so are creating more opposition to our
occupation of their land. Originally, the people in Afghani-
stan were tolerant toour occupation, but widi fighting in the
south getting more and more out ofhand, we are letting the
Taliban or a new spin off of the Taliban gain in popularity.
The war in Afghanistan has been called the "just" war,
the "war worth fighting" by democrats, people such as Bill
Clinton and John Kerry feel that we sliould be concentrating
our efforts in Afghanistan, not Iraq.
On the other hand Republicans are saying that
Afghanistan was a success and that all is well. How-
ever, neither party has a clue as to what is going on in
Afghanistan, or as to what lias to be done there. Pump-
ing more troops and rounding up more "terrorists" is
the current manifesto and so far, it is only creating more
problems. The solution to the problem in Afghanistan
is unclear and right now, the people of Afghanistan are
in limbo waiting to see who will prevail in the conflict,
the new and improved Taliban or U.S. and UN forces.
Until then, maybe the answer would be to bring food
and education to the people of Afghanistan, who are some
of the poorest and hungriest on earth.
In addition to dying from U.S. and Taliban attacks,
Afglian women have an average lifespan of46 years, and the
highest maternal mortality and infant mortality rates in tlie
world today. Maybe if we match the amount in tons ofbombs
to tons of food and books we could gain some popularity in
the region, until tlien we are just creating more enemies.
PIRATE RANTS
To the people that smoke on campus
and throw their cigarette butts on the
ground: If you just take a second to
look around, you may be able to find
a designated spot for your butts.
Our campus is starting to look like
a big ashtray.
Just because you have bangs and a
spray tan doesn't mean you're hot.
To Frustrated Bill Payer, from
Ask Jane: If I were you, I would
anonymously, or at least unknowingly
to your roommate and his girl friend,
fall the landlord or rental management
company and inform them of this third
party violating the lease agreement,
perhaps even mentioning the dog.
To the pretty lady in my class that
never smiles, I noticed you the first
day of school and have yet to see a
smile. I think you would be so much
more attractive if you did.
If you can't stay awake in class,
want to whistle while the professor
is teaching or click your pen
continuously just to annoy everyone
else, then just leave class. Some of
us are actually trying to graduate
next semester and not just wasting
time in school.
Candy corn can totally kick real
corn's butt.
To the person in the stall next to me
in the bathroom today, there's nothing
so important that you have to text
someone while in the bathroom.
I don't even bother checking
the weather anymore I just
assume it's going to rain.
I am so tired of being asked out on
Facebook. Facebook is not a dating
service. Try actually talking to me.
That would help your case.
Why do people give me so much crap
for picking my nose? I don't care what
anyone says, everyone does it! Not
everything in your nose is blowable!
To the people who ranted about being
hit with a chicken patty, I too was
smacked in the back and in the side
by two patties at same time while
skateboarding to the library, what
is going on?
I loved the BMX article! Way to
cover something besides football
and volleyball.
To the couple that has been together
for two years and don't sleep together:
I applaud you both for respecting
each other enough to control yourself
and wait. Thank you for being proof
that not everyone is "doing it
To the cute girl who used to ride my
bus: I miss you. Where have you gone?
The saddest thing about fall break
is that when it's over you are just
counting down the days until
Thanksgiving break, then Christmas
break. I think we all need more breaks.
Umm Greensboro is not the greatest
city in North Carolina. One of many
nicknames is Greensboring. I'm not
saying Greenville is much better.
I am not attracted to inland guys.
I'm from the beach, and I just can't
stomach the popped-collars and
preppiness that comes with the
cockiness of inland boys.
Over the shoulder backpacks are not
attractive for guys to wear!
To the sexy SAE that walks around
campus everyday you're the only
reason I go to class.
Is it weird that I take my cat for walks?
I don't remember signing on for a
fourth roommate. So your boyfriend
needs to leave. I am tired of him
sleeping, eating, showering and doing
his laundry at my house. Seriously,
it's time to go!
I think I have a stalker now.
To the person who wanted a dating
rule book. Rule number one: There
are no rules.
Marcus Tooker is hot! I love to watch
him working outside his house on
10th Street. Thanks for having his
picture on the front-page yesterday!
Why do people pop their collar? I'm
curious. Where I grew up, I was never
fortunate enough to see this fashion
nightmare, so I just want to know.
Does it make you cooler or more
popular? Because wake up, we're in
college now. Popularity status should
not be an issue anymore.
I have heard about this Hyphy
movement sweeping through
Greenville and completely endorse
it. So, this weekend everybody should
go "dumb "ghost ride da whip
and tell the people that "40-Water"
is back.
Whoever designed the dorms must
not have thought that maybe the
students would rearrange their
furniture. I have rearranged our
room about seven times already this
semester, and we finally have it set.
The only way for there to be decent
floor space is to bunk the beds. I
hate that!
To the guy at Todd Dining Hall - stop
using your fingers to grab croutons!
That's gross!
I had so much fun at Sun Up to Sun
Down! Thanks KA!
My biology professor has a nice butt,
if only the rest of him looked as good
as his butt.
TEC should be the first to report
university news and news involving
students, but the local TV news
stations has stories about ECU and
their students' weeks before it ever
appears in the TEC.
Roommate you are stupid. If you ask
me to spell one more word for you, I
might hit you.
If 10,000 people say a stupid thing,
it's still a stupid thing.
I think there is nothing hotter than
a girl dressed in your favorite teams
sports apparel.
Chicago was amazing! If you didn't go
see it, you really missed out.
If you're going to sit in the GMAT
review course and mumble everything
you writedown don't sit next to me!
I go to class every day and am doing
worse than people who go once a week.
Wearing leggings with sweaters
and skirts does not make you look
fashionable it makes you look fat.
I just want to get married and have
babies.
My brother has had more successful
relationships than I have and he's 16.
To the know-it-alls that raise their
hands all the time: 1) No, you're
not always right. 2) You don't know
more than the professor. 3) You really
need to give other students a chance
to learn. You're not the one with the
PhD, the rest of the class just hates
you and you're annoying-ness.
I wish my roommate would stop
leaving her crap everywhere.
A guy I know is really sarcastic all the
time. It's really annoying. So, if you're
reading this, stop being so sarcastic
all the time. It's actually kind of mean
and makes me not want to hang out
with you anymore.
I know a girl who is a big fan of "What
Not to Wear The funny thing is, I really
want to nominate her for the show.
When there are 10 minutes left in
class, why does everyone automatically
decide that class is over and they
should start packing up their books?
The professor is still talking, yet you
insist upon being the first out the door.
Does anybody else shake like a dog
before getting out of the shower? I do,
and I have to tell ya, you get dry quick.
I wish someone would study for me!
Due to an overwhelming amount of Pirate Rants in regards to this subject,
here are two, which encompass the views of many others submitted.
I can't believe that ECU is taking
away CLAS 1300 from a certain profes-
sor. The class is one of the most suc-
cessful at ECU and is full with over 110
students every semester and summer
session. Students obviously love this
professor and since we pay professor's
salaries, shouldn't we, as students, have a
say in who's teaching a course? This pro-
fessor was the one who started the Clas-
sics program and he's even the author of
six books! Tell me why ECU would have
anyone else teach this class?
Any professor who lies on the floor in
,the fetal position for two minutes to try
to embarrass another student shouldn't
be teaching at a respected university. It's
enough that he uses choice four letter
words every class he teaches (I've had
three of them now, so I can say that), but
he also crosses boundaries in the things
he discusses. I think he's very educated
and is a brilliant professor, but do I think
he's right for ECU? Certainly not. I'm
glad ECU has the sense to finally do
something about it.
Sarah Bell
Editor in Chief
Rachel King
News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Eric Gilmore
Sports Editor
Zach Sirkin
Photo Editor
Rachael Lotter
Multimedia Web Editor
Claire Murphy
Asst. News Editor
Sarah Campbell
Asst. Features Editor
Sarah Hackney
Head Copy Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
252.328.9238
252.328.9143
252.328.9245
Advertising
Serving ECU since 1925, the East Carolinian prints
9,000 copies every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
during the regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednes-
days during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. The fasf Carolinian welcomes letters to the
editor which are limited to 250 words (which may be
edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the right to
edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editor@theeastcarolinian.com or to the East
Carolinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, N.C. 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for more information. One copy
of the East Carolinian is free, each additional copy is1.
Don't let the Man
keep you down
Pirates gotta fight for their right to party
DANIEL BROCK
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
When did ECU and Greenville become such
a buzz kill? I'm just trying to go through col-
lege in a self induced haze, and all of the sudden
the powers that be have to break bad and rain
on my parade.
Everywhere I go nowadays I'm
being told what to do, where to do and
how to do. Enough is a freakin' nough.
You want examples? Oh, I've got examples.
Let's start with the City of Greenville. In August
they, along with ECU officials, passed out
brochures depicting "Good Pirate, Bad Pirate"
scenarios acted out by skeletons. The brochures
were fairly condescending and less than hilarious,
and decried such behavior as playing music loudly
and "docking" your car on the grass.
Hey, City of Greenville, I live on Fifth Street,
not Sesame Street.
Recently Greenville's public information
officer Steve Hawley was quoted in a Daily Reflec-
tor story weighing in on the issue. "We want
you to feel welcome. But, understand, there are
some guidelines you need to live within said
Hawley.
That's super, but I think the people of
Greenville need to understand that without
ECU their town would be Kinston. No hospital,
no cheap labor force, no economic stimulation,
no Pirate football. When you consider all that,
finding some kid passed out in your front yard
every once in a while doesn't seem like such a
high price to pay.
Moving along, two words: Parking situation.
On campus, off campus, it doesn't matter. You
can't park anywhere. Heck, I was eating tots at
Sonic the other day and I almost got towed. It's
a freakin' drive in. Alright, that didn't happen,
but you get the point. Greenville's meter maids
seem to get a perverse pleasure from scrawling
out tickets and calling in tow trucks. If only
everyone that works for the University and City
of Greenville did their job with such tenacity and
thoroughness
Anyway, that's enough about parking. It's
been a problem forever, and I'm just ticked off
that I was towed from Third Street recently.
E-mail. Long the source of dirty jokes and,
ahem, performance solutions, it has now become
a sounding board for lectures and scoldings.
After we beat Memphis, ECU Athletic Director,
His Excellency Terry Holland, sent a rambling
note about sportsmanship to the entire student
body. Apparently, according to some Memphis
fans, our behavior was "obnoxious and possibly
dangerous and that they had never "experi-
enced such rude, drunken behavior" ill 20 years
of away games as they did at Dowdy-Ficklen.
Whatever, man. Sounds like they're just sore
losers who caught a beat down. Too bad Terry
didn't see it that way. After Holland's e-mail,
my boy Skip Holtz sent a correspondence of his
own encouraging everyone to "represent the
university with class" at the next game. I was a
little confused by that one though. I was under
the impression ECU did not offer classes on the
weekend.
What about campus? Surely there's a nice
quiet spot to throw a frisbee or gawk at the ladies.
Well there was, until a preacher showed up last
week calling all the girls "whores" and the guys
"perverts" (although if the shoe fits). One dude
took exception to the perv comment and probably
had the best line of the day when he said, "Hey
I'm a THE. I'm not a perv
So what? A lot of people here at ECU get wasted
and get it on. Pete and Polly Promiscuous are
already eaten up with crabs. They don't want to hear
about their "transgressions" on the way to bio lab.
Things aren't any rosier for Greeks. With
Ion Outterbridge at the helm, the fun quotient
in Greek Life has been in steady decline. One
wonders why Mr. Killjoy, uh, Outterbridge is
even in the position of Director of Greek Life as
he continually makes decisions that adversely
affect Greek organizations. Perhaps he's taken
Dean Wormer's words from Animal House to
heart, "No more fun of any kind
Finally, let's not forget the menacing keg laws
looming on the horizon. Under the new rules
anyone buying a keg has to obtain a permit from
the vendor, which allows authorities to track
the beer. Also, anyone under 21 with alcohol in
their system could face misdemeanor charges.
Currently the law only prohibits purchasing or
possession of alcohol by minors.
Here's a bit of perspective on these new
laws. In North Carolina, any citizen over
IS with no criminal history can purchase a
shotgun or long rifle without any paperwork
or a permit. That's right, starting in Decem-
ber (just in time for the Holidays) it will be
easier to buy a gun than to buy a keg. What?
Actually, come to think of it, since it's so easy
to buy firearms now, I might pick one up so I
can shoot myself in the face.
On our Web site we now have an Opinions blog.
There we will share our evolving thoughts on a
variety of issues, and answer your questions.
Check this site this weekend for our first entry.
I Opinion Writers(vVantedtj
! DON'T LET YOUR I
; OPINIONS GO UNHEARD
i Consider writing for i
The fast Carolinian,
where all of campus will
hear your voice every week.
Call us at 328-9238
or email opinion@theeastcarolinian.com





Pulse
THURSDAY OCTOBER 12, 2006 PAGE A4
Horoscopes:
Arits
You can't do everything
simultaneously, no matter how
good you are. Some ot it, maybe,
but not all of it. Set priorities and
stick to them. First, delegate.
Taurus
It's no sin to be wealthy, it you
don't let it go to your head.
Frugality is a virtue, and so is
intelligent shopping. Practice
both now.
Arts & Entertainment
Tell the truth about what you
want to accomplish while you're
here. You'll become best at
the subject you really want to
practice.
You can be obsessive about
details when you want to be.
That's suggested now, because it
looks like something's not right.
Lm
Schedule significant private time
for early next week. Meanwhile,
make sure your team knows
exactly what to do.
Virgo
There's a down-side to being in
demand. Business cuts into your
private life, but don't despair.
There's less of this once you have
the routines all worked out.
Libra
You try to understand everyone.
It's good to make the effort, but
don't be too hard on yourself if
it isn't possible.
Scorpio
Go into stores intending to only
get the best deals. You may be
able to get out before you go over
your limit.
Sagittarius
Toss the ball to your teammates.
One of them will be able to score.
It doesn't matter who closes the
deal, as long as it gets closed.
Capricorn
Your routine needs modification
to carry a heavier load. Ask for
help, but still try to anticipate
anything that can go wrong.
Aquarius
It seems like everybody wants a
little bit of your time. Be nice to
your fans and followers, but don't
let yourself get distracted.
Piscis
You'd like to help your friends get
along, and maybe you actually
can. If you wait until they request
your advice, they're more likely
to listen.
Local Concerts:
Sonia and Disappear Fear will be
performing Uptown for Freeboat
Friday on Friday, Oct. 13 from 5
-8 p.m.
Brad Benson and Katharsis will
be performing at Dr. Unk's on
Friday. Oct. 13
The Red Rooster will play host to
Guta on Friday, Oct. 13.
Dr. Unk's will offer live music
from Trainwreck on Saturday,
Oct. 14.
On Saturday, Oct. 14, Toby Keith
will be performing at the Alltel
Pavillion in Raleigh at 7:30 p.m.
Aerosmith along with Motley
Crue will performance at the
Alltel Pavillion in Raleigh on
Monday, Oct. 23 at 7:30 p.m.
The Crown Center of Cumberland
County will host The Charlie
Daniels Band on Monday, Oct.
23 at 8 p.m.
Top 10S:
Top 10 Movies:
1. 77ie Departed
2. The Texas Chainsaw Massacre:
The Beginning
3. Open Season
4. Employee of the Month
5. The Guardian
6. Jackass: Number Two
7. School for Scoundrels
8. Jet Li's Fearless
9. Gridiron Gang
10. The Illusionist
Top 10 Songs:
1. "Too Little, Too Late JoJo
2. "Lips of an Angel Hinder
3. "Chain Hang Low Jibbs
4. "Smack That Akon
5. "SexyBack Justin Timberlake
6. "London Bridge Fergie
7. "Say Goodbye Chris Brown
8. "Ring the Alarm Beyonce
9. "Call me when you're sober
Evanescence
10. "SEX Lyfe Jennings
'Departing from typical movie mold
Jack Nicholson and Matt Damon star in the new release The Departed.
Scorsese scores again with
another excellent thriller
BEN HARRIS
STAFF WRITER
One thing every moviegoer
looks forward to is a new release
by his or her favorite director.
Some people wait years to see a
new release by Quentin Tarantino
or just wait a few months to see the
new release by Spielberg. I usually
live my cinematic life waiting very
patiently any new release by Tim
Burton or the subject of this review,
Martin Scorsese.
Scorsese is without a doubt one
of the top three best filmmakers in
history and my personal favorite.
Despite being robbed constantly by
the Academy Awards, Scorsese has
time and time again proven himself
by directing such monumental clas-
sics such as Taxi Driver, Raging
Bull and Goodfellas. If you haven't
seen Goodfellas get up right now
and go by the nearest rental store
and get it. Skip class if you have
to! It is just that good.
Anyway, I didn't hear much
about Scorsese since his last
great movie The Aviator, so I was
about to burst with overwhelm-
ing anticipation over what great
movie he was working on next.
What he graciously gave me and
the entire movie-going world was
The Departed.
The Departed is set in Boston
and focuses on Billy Costi-
gan, Colin Sullivan and Frank
Costello. Billy Costigan is a
badass cop forced to go under-
cover in order to nab orga-
nized crime boss Frank Costello.
Costello is a very charismatic
but sadistically evil man who
makes friends only to sell them
out. Colin Sullivan is Costello's
mole within the Boston police
department. Sullivan comes off
as one of the most despicable and
evil characters to hit the screen
in a long time. I can't think of
any antagonist in any movie I've
ever seen that deserved what
was coming to him as Colin Sul-
livan did.
The movies premise is fairly
simple. Costigan spends his time
trying to nab both Costello and
Sullivan while Costello and Sul-
livan spend their time trying to
figure out who the mole (Costi-
gan) is in their outfit. The movie
offers many twists, especially
in the last act. One great thing
about Scorsese movies is that
you can never go into one of his
movies thinking you know what
will happen. Despite having
similar visual styles, his movies
never have anywhere near similar
story lines. Unlike throwaway
directors such as Michael Mann,
whose movies are almost always
identical because they consist of
nothing more then good guy, bad
guy shootouts where the good
guy wins, Scorsese makes sure his
material stays fresh and unique.
The only majon complaint I
have with the movie is that it is
fairly slow. With a run time of an
hour and a half, Scorsese makes
sure every aspect of the story
is told but at the same time he
sacrifices the viewer's attention
spans because this movie isn't
filled with non stop action like his
earlier films. However, as any fan
of Scorsese will tell you, Scorsese
movies are almost always long.
Like I mentioned earlier, he is a
director who makes sure every
part of the story is told.
One thing I love about Scors-
ese movies is his ability to secure
only the best actors for his pic-
tures. Most of the actors in his
movies are his regulars and this
is a formula that works. If the
cast isn't broken, don't fix it.
Nearly every part in the movie is
filled with well known and well
respected actors. Frank Costello
is played by Jack "you can't handle
the truth" Nicholson. Nicholson
is one of the greatest actors in
film history. His performance in
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
is constantly ranked as one of
the top ten performances of all
time. Nicholson certainly doesn't
disappoint in The Departed and he
does an outstanding job coming
off as a sadistic gangster.
Leonardo "I'm the king of
the world" DiCaprio plays Billy
Costigan. DiCaprio has surpris-
ingly proved himself to be an
excellent actor. He has come a
long way from his Titanic days as
showcased brilliantly in another
Scorsese picture, The Aviator. It
is only a matter of time before
DiCaprio scores an Academy
Award and it is going to be very
interesting to see where he takes
his career from here. Another
established actor, Matt Damon
plays the part of the despicable
Sgt. Colin Sullivan. Damon
proved himself to be a good
actor in Good Will Hunting and
lives up to Scorsese standards
very well. It boggles the mind
to think of why he ever partners
see DEPARTED page A5
The Killers 'Sam's
Town' won't disappoint
It's not hip-hop, it's electro
LIZ FULTON
SENIOR WRITF.R
I have been waiting a long
time for The Killers follow up to
Hot Fuss. Unlike the many slaves
to pop radio or those who rely on
"TRL" for their new favorite band,
I discovered The Killers long
before they had captured the hearts
of America. Hot Fuss was the type
of debut album that is too few
and far between - a release where
every song blends into the next
and tells a
jumbled story
that stays
with you long
after it lays
to rest in its
case amongst
the ruins of
a dirty car
floor.
Sopho-
more albums
have a nasty
habit of fall-
ing short of
expectations
or trying to recreate the magic
of their predecessor thus stifling
the creativity of the artist and
sending them down the dark road
of failure.
So, as I tore into my copy
of Sam's Town, I was terrified
The Killers were not going to
top Hot Fuss and that I would feel
the same let down after purchasing
Incubus' A Crow Left of the Murder.
I had already recorded
their "Saturday Night Live appear-
ance" and was impressed with
their performances of "When You
Were Young" and "Bones The
moment that I put Sam's Town into
my CD player, I mentally kicked
myself forever thinking that this
album was going to disappoint.
Sam's Town is similar to
Hot Fuss as there is a recurring
theme throughout the album.
Equipped with an "interlude" wel-
coming the listener and "Hoping
KlL.LRs6
they enjoy their stay even if
it's just for the day" the album
resonates with the down-hearted
resolve and, at the same time, the
beauty of living in a small town
where there is no way out. In
the title track, "Brandon Flow-
ers" laments that "Nobody ever
had a dream round here, but I
don't really mind a sentiment
that is all too true of the twenty-
something's who were never able
to escape their hometown.
Track seven, "Uncle Johnny"
an ode about cocaine is interest-
ing to listen to for its Tom Petty
influences.
Without the
synthesiz-
ers, it almost
sounds like
a lost verse
from "Into the
Great Wide
Open
The
upbeat song,
"Bones" is by
far the most
radio friendly
next to
Sam's Town.
Accompanied by a brass lineand the
unapologetically inviting lines,
"Don't you wanna feel my skin, on
your skin? It's only natural more
than a few girls will be swooning
over the whole package that is
"Brandon Flowers
Sam's Town is an album
that attempts to capture the
small-town, every-man dreams
of America. The lyrics are
reminiscent of what Bruce
Springsteen spread to the world
about simple struggles we all go
through.
As you listen to it again and
again, there conies the realization
that The Killers have taken us
on a journey through the lives of
luckiest heroes that inhabit us all.
Thank you Killers, for making
an album with meaning.
This writer can be contacted at
pulsetheeastcarohninan.com.
Children enjoy the games on the midway at last years North Carolina State Fair, which will begin tomorrow.
N.C. State Fair opens Friday
What you need to know
before you go
KORRI-LEE SMITH
FEATURES WRITER
Fun rides, interesting exhibits,
games, entertainment and a whole
lot of good food; what more could
anyone ask for? It's hard to believe
October is already here, and with
it comes The State Fair. The
North Carolina State Fair will be
in operation from Friday, October
13 through Saturday, Oct. 22. The
fairground gates will open daily at
8 a.m. and close at midnight. If you
plan to attend the big event, there
are several things you may want
to know beforehand.
First, admission tickets may be
purchased online for a discounted
price or at the door for regular
price. For adults age 13, tickets
are $5 online and $6 at the door.
Military families will be admitted
free on Military Appreciation Day,
Wednesday, Oct. 18 with a current
military ID.
For those civilians short on
cash, Thursday, Oct. 19 is the day
to go. On this day, Food Lion's
Hunger Relief Day will be held to
benefit the Food Bank of Central
and Eastern North Carolina. By
donating four cans of Food Lion
brand food, fairgoers can get free
admission into the fair. Each year,
this day acts as one of the largest
one-day canned food drives in the
state.
For those of you interested
in riding rides, I have both good
and bad news. Unfortunately,
the N.C. ;State Fair does not offer
unlimited ride bracelets. However,
if you purchase your tickets in
advance, you may get ride books
at a discounted price. The books
may be the best deal consider-
ing the amount of tickets needed
per ride. The kiddy rides are
typically two to three tickets,
the bigger rides vary from three
to five and the "spectacular" rides
are up to six tickets each. Although
ride tickets do not have to be pur-
chased in advance, you may find
this to be the most convenient
option. The rides' hours of opera-
tion are 10 a.m. to midnight.
As many of you know, The
State Fair also hosts a variety of
live concerts. This year, audiences
can enjoy an assortment of artists
ranging from Nashville stars to
contemporary Christian bands.
Concert tickets will be available
in advance only through The State
Fair's Web site. Once the fair has
begun, concert tickets will con-
tinue to be sold online as well as
at the Dorton Arena Box Office
as long as tickets are available.
The prices of the concerts vary
and range from $5 -15 each. If
you plan to attend any of the con-
certs, it is important to remember
fair admission is also required.
If all of this talk of rides and
concerts hasn't gotten your atten-
tion, perhaps some of the other
events will spark some interest.
A tractor pull will take place
Friday, Oct. 13 through Sunday, Oct.
15. The competition will require a
separate admission fee of $7. You may
purchase tickets for this event online
in advance or at the Grandstand
ticket booths.
On Friday, Oct. 20 and Sat-
urday, Oct. 21, demolition derby
competitions will take place. The
championship match will then ensue
on Sunday, Oct. 22. Again, separate
admission is required for a fee of $7.
Ticket sales for this event are the
same as that of the tractor pull.
A Keith King Bike Stunt Show
will take place daily at no extra cost
for viewers. Show times may vary
and should be checked in advance.
If nothing above has made you
the least bit interested, it is impor-
tant to remember that the fair also
see FAIR page A5
Nationally known artist to teach workshop at City Art Gallery
Learn techniques from one of the best
STACY DAIL
STAFF WRITER
David I l.iilm. a nationally acclaimed artist known for
his impressionistic landscapes, will be holding a workshop
hosted by City Art Gallery on Oct. 17, 18 and 19.
Marian graduated from Wichita State University
and is known nationwide for his works filled with
rich color and texture, as well as his unique way of
perceiving mood and emotion. a
The cost of this very valuable workshop is f
$325, which includes three full days of working M
with Harlan, learning techniques involving landscape .
and figurative painting. Those signed up will paint g
at City Art Gallery, as well as at the studio of Dr.
Tony Breuer, a neurologist who received his MFA in
painting two year ago from ECU.
Participants, mostly regional artist with "varying
levels of expertise will be paintingdifTerent landscapes,
including a cafe scene where a model will be present.
Holding workshops is a new thing to City Art
Gallery, but their excitement can't be hidden.
"David Harlan is one of our best selling artist
City Art Gallery is a phenomenal learning environment for Harlan's workshop.
and we've worked with him ever since the gallery opened in
Greenville nine years ago. We thought it would be something nice and
different to offer the community said Peg Hardee, owner of City Art
Gallery.
Although the workshop has reached its maximum amount of par-
ticipants, ECU students who are interested are encouraged to call the
gallery for more information. If enough interest is
generated, it may be possible to add another day to
the workshop for other students to experience the
teachings of Harlan.
There are no more workshops officially scheduled
right now, but there are a few ideas in the works. In
the mean time, students are encouraged to come in
and look around the gallery.
Hardee, as well as other associates working at the
gallery, would love to show students, especially art
majors, the business side of getting their work out
there.
"We would love to talk to students about
their work, how to build a resume, and how
to present their work and portfolio
Hardee commented.
For those who are not participating in the David
Harlan workshop, don't worry you won't be left out.
David Harlan will be featured in an exhibit at City Art
Gallery at 511 Red Banks Road, which will open on
Thursday at 6 p.m in which all ECU students are
encouraged to come and see the work of a well-known
talented artist.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse9theeasstcarolinian.com.
TH1
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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
PAGE A5
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East Carolina University
Campus Recreation & Wellness
t
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Oct. 18- Dec. 15
Exercise Wisely for Faculty & Staff
MWF 12:05 - 12:50 pm, SRC 240
$25 SRC non-members
Oct. 18
When Diets Fail What's Next
5:30 pm - 6:30 pm, SRC 238
111 Dynamic Definition: Yoga & Pilates
I 1 Th. 5:30 pm - 6:45 pm, SRC 238
$35 SRC members $50 SRC non-members
)ct. 23 - Dpc. 4
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M. 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm, SRC 239
$35 for SRC members $45 for SRC non-members
Oct. 23 - 31
Frightfully Fit!
SRC 239
Oct. 24 - Nov. 30
Tai Chi
TTh. 12:05 pm - 12:50 pm, SRC 238
$25 SRC members $35 SRC non-members
Oct. 25
Haunted Health
5:30 pm - 8:00 pm
MSC Social Room
69
CAMPUS
RECREATION
& WELLNESS
(252) 328 - 6387
www.scu.educs-studentlifecrw
Check out the fall pocket guide,
the fall pocket calendar, or our
website for other activities!
DISCOVER
PlAYj
UVE
DEPARTED
continued from A4
with Ben Affleck to write and
star n movtet. In terms of acting
and overall intelligence that's like
pairing a Corvette with a Pinto.
The film also has several other
well-known actors such as Alec
Baldwin and Mark Wahlberg.
The best thing about the movie
is that every actor plays their part
extremely well and that every part
is original.
The Departed is without a
doubt one of the best movies of the
year. It is sure to be a powerhouse
when it conies time for the Oscars.
It is my hope that the movie will
finally get Scorsese the best
director and best picture Oscars,
but I'm afraid that the film's ultra
violent third act will scare the
voters away. The huge amount of
buzz surrounding the movie will
hopefully provide for a strong
opening weekend and maybe even
break the cataclysmic box office
slump that has been occurring for
the past few weeks.
Overall Grade: A
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
FAIR
continued from A4
offers exhibit halls that will be
open 9 a.m. - 9:45 p.m. On the
same note, it is essential that you
also remember how awesome fair
food can be. One can never have
enough cotton candy and nachos.
As you all anxiously wait for
tomorrow, remember to save your
sense of adventure and appetite
for the fairgrounds. I can think of
no better time to load up on fried
dough, fried Oreos, fried Twinkies
and turkey legs.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
Carbon Leaf's newest release
Album is sure to please
AARON BORREGO
STAFF WRITER
Because Carbon Leaf is my
first album review in my per-
sonal quest to find some
descent music to enjoy, I think it
went relatively well. This album
was released on Sept. 12th and has
been well received by many album
critics all over the country.
I must agree with many of
these critics and suggest that
everyone gives this group's many
albums a bit of play. I really enjoy
their melodic approach to song
delivery coupled with great lyrics
delivered by pleasant singing.
I must admit that this isn't the
music I typically listen to, but I
do find that I really like the well
thought out songs this band has
put together. Their songs can be
easily compared to things you
could potentially hear on college
radios across the nation.
I could honestly hear some
Dapper
Dan's
Let us dross you this
Halloween
modern influence in their
singing, which I would say,
resembles the band Switchfoot
with a pinch of country delivery.
While this album is very slow and
bass driven, it is a great listen and
relaxing album.
Just like in country music,
there are quite a few bittersweet
songs, which are reflecting upon
life tribulations of loss and love.
So from that point of view, the
title for the album is the perfect
label for an album such as this.
While most of these songs
are very scaled down musically,
they make up for in instrument
implementation and experimen-
tation. The poetic writing in this
is very deep but at the same time
understandable and easily acces-
sible to anyone who listens.
One point I will make about
the singing is that while sound-
ing a bit too simplified itself, it is
perfect that it sounds almost hyp-
notically entranced in emotional
detachment. It is this departure of
not trying to sing every note as if
it was your last is well reflected in
the songs having such extraordi-
nary feeling and passion.
The song I believe to highlight
the album is "The War was in
Color A haunting story of a man
who died in war so that others
could live in a world without suf-
fering gives the song a bittersweet
meaning and connotation.
I will not say that these guys
are breaking the mold, instead
they are trying to play to a dif-
ferent type notion, being lyrically
available while not compromis-
ing to standard arrangements
or sound.
This band has made a new fan in
me, one who will be looking forward
to listening to their music for some
time to come. I hope everyone who
hasn't listened to these guys, listens
to them for a few minutes and hears
what I hear, relaxing music.
Grade A' for the infectious
music and the unorthodox delivery.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Sports
THURSDAY OCTOBER 12, 2006 PAGE A6
ECU's Inside Source
34
Conference championships
in football that Tulsa has
recorded in 106 years of
competition including last
year's Conference USA title,
the Golden Hurricane has
tallied an overall record 538-
424-27 (.544)
5
Conference championships in
football that ECU has won in l
its 73 years of competition;
the Pirates won a North State j
Conference title in 1953 and
Southern Conference titles in
1966, 1973-1974 and 1977
2,795
Numbef of undergraduate
students at Tulsa, which is the
smallest among the 119 NCAA
Division 1-A institutions; the
next closest is fellow C-USA
member Rice who has 3,112
undergraduate students
1982
The last year that Tulsa
recorded a 4-1 start when
former Tulsa and Ohio State
coach John Copper was at the
helm; after losing the second
game, Cooper's team reeled off
nine wins
259
Receiving yards recorded by
Tulsa's Chris Penn in a cold
rain storm on Nov. 6, 1993,
which Tulsa won in Dowdy-
Ficklen 52-26, Gus Frerotte
threw 16 passes to Penn for a
16.2 yards per catch average,
which is a record for an ECU
opponent in receptions and
receiving yards
7th
Preseason Conference USA
ranking in women's basketball
according to the votes of all 12
head coaches; the Lady Pirates
were picked 10th in 2005, but
finished with its best record in
14 years (17-12) and won its
first ever C-USA Tournament
game
4-0
Women's soccer all-time record
against Southern Miss, which
the Pirates play Sunday, Oct.
15; the last game was a Pirate
2-1 overtime win on Oct. 16,
2005
They said it
"We're in the game halfway
through the third quarter and
things just started going south.
We want to get some redemp-
tion. They're conference cham-
pions. They blew us out last
year. It would be a sweet to get
a win and come out on top
-Steven Rogers, ECUwiderecewer
The Virginia game shows
we're on the rise and that we
can prove that we're capable
of that and so much more. We
have so much potential and
we're starting to put it together
now. We expect big things.
This is the start, hopefully, of
what's to come
-Jay Soimhaltrr. ECU tight end
"They have what we want.
They've got the bowl trophies,
the rings and the watches. We
let our kids know that. They
saw last yearj why they have
them. They whacked us pretty
good. It is a statement game.
It's a barometer for where we
really are as a program. We've
shown some improvement,
we've played well at times, but
we've played bad at times it
will be a challenge. We'll have
to have our head in the game
-Greg Hudson, ECU
defensive coordinator
FOOTBALL PREVIEW
TULSA VS. ECU
TULSA SCHEDULE
AUG. 31VS. STEPHEN F. AUSTINW, 45-7
SEPT. 9VS.MMUHHHHPe-24
SEPT. 16VS. NORTH TEXASW, 28-3
SEPT. 23ATNAMHHBW, 24-23
0CT.2VS. SOUTHERN MISS.W, 20-6
OCT. 14AT. EfllPPHi3:00 PM
OCT. 21VS. MEMPHIS8:00 PM
OCT. 27VS. UTEP8:00 PM
NOV. 4 NOV. 11AT. HOUSTON RICE flHi3:30 PM 3:00 PM
NOV. 18VS. SMU V 3:00 PM
NOV. 25VS.TULANE 3.00 PM
7 Pirates looking to make a
statement against Tulsa
ECU SCHEDULE
TULSA
1. Steal Momentum:
The Pirates have fed off the momentum of their home
crowd in their first three home games, going 2-1 in
those contests. If Tulsa wants to diminish the home-
field advantage for the Pirates, the Golden Hurricane
need to make game-changing plays.
2. If it ain't broke, don't fix it:
Tulsa is in the top three of nearly every statistical
ECU returns to
conference play by
hosting defending
champs
RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
When Steve Kragthorpe was
named the head football coach at
Tulsa in December, 2008, he inher-
ited a football program that had just
two wins in the previous two years
combined. Three years later, Krag-
thorpe led the Golden Hurricane to a
Conference USA championship and
a victory in the Liberty Bowl.
Saturday, Kragthorpe will bring
his 4-1 Tulsa team to Greenville
to take on an improving ECU
team bent on turning its program
around.
"They are where we aspire to
be said ECU head coach Skip
Holtz. "They're 4-1, they're leading
the conference. They've got a great
offense, they've got a great defense,
they've got a great kicking game.
That's where we want to be
Tulsa, which beat Southern
Miss, 20-6, on Oct. 3, brings an
explosive veteran offense led by
senior quarterback Paul Smith. The
Golden Hurricane have four seniors
on their offensive line, which the
category in Conference USA, offensively and defen- third most experienced line in the
sively. What Tulsa has been doing has built
a 4-1 record and Skip Holtz said he is not
expecting the Golden Hurricane to alter
their game plan.
3. Attack the offense:
With a veteran defense that starts five
seniors and three juniors, Tulsa should take
advantage of a young, reshuffled ECU offensive
line with two freshmen starting at left guard and
right tackle, and just one senior.
nation.
Smith has been sacked just
three times this season, which
has allowed the senior
from Owasso, Okla to
complete 66 percent
of his passes for 1,163
yards and nine touch-
downs to only three interceptions.
"I think lack of sacks from an
offensive standpoint are indicative
of what you're doing offensively with
running the ball said Kragthorpe
at his weekly press conference, "stay-
ing out of long down and distance
situations, first down production,
quarterback getting the ball out of
his hands, running backs protecting
well, wide receivers getting open
and obviously the offensive line
protecting. I think it's a function
of everybody, not just the offensive
line
The Pirates (2-3, 1-1 C-USA)
aren't a sack-happy defense, but are
getting better. ECU got to Virginia
quarterback Jameel Sewell three
times and has recorded at least one
sack in its last three games.
"East Carolina I think is a front
that can rush the passer Krag-
thorpe said. "They're not a big pres-
sure team as far as bringing six or
seven guys. They are more of a four
man rush, pop a backer here or there,
but they've shown the ability to pres-
sure the passer against a team like
Virginia who again I think is pretty
good without having to do that
Protecting James Pinkney is
something the reshuffled ECU
offensive line must do against a
senior-laden Tulsa defense that is
ranked 25th nationally. The Golden
Hurricane (4-1, 1-0 C-USA) lead
C-USA in total defense and pass
defense, allowing a meager 268
total yards and 115 through
the air.
SEPT. 2AT NAVYL, 28-23
SEPT. 9ATUABL, 17-12
SEPT. 16VS. MEMPHISW, 35-20
SfPT.23VS. WEST VIRGINIAL, 27-10
OCT. 7 OCT. 14 OCT. 21VS. VIRGINIA VS. TULSA VS. SMUW, 30-21 3:00 PM 3:00 PM
OCT. 28AT SOUTHERN MISS8:00 PM
NOV. 4ATUCF4:00 PM
NOV. 11VS. MARSHALL1:00 PM
NOV. 18AT RICE3:00 PM
NOV. 25AT NX. STATE1:00 PM
KEYS TO
see TULSA page
A8
ECU
1. Run the ball:
The Pirates need to build on what they did last week
with the ground attack. Tulsa's defense is good, but
its secondary is excellent. Establishing the run could
soften up that defensive backfield for some big plays
down the field.
2. Score early:
ECU jumped on Virginia early, getting the crowd into the
game, and never looking back as the Pirates kept the
momentum nearly the entire game. To beat the Golden
Hurricane, the Pirates will have to jump on them early
and not let up.
3. No Turnovers:
For the first time this season, ECU did not turn the ball
over and had its most dominant showing. Turnovers at
the most inopportune times have prevented ECU from
possibly being unbeaten at this point. Going against
the top defense in the conference, the Pirates cannot
squander their opportunities.
"I have never bean to Dowdy-Flcklen
Stadium, but talking to people they say
H's an extremely difficult place to play, it's
loud, it looks like they're drawing well, and
looked like they were into the game from
what I could tall, just watching the TV.
Obviously, you don't get that feel when you
watch the exchange tape copies, but having
watched the game on TV last Saturday
night it looked like the crowd was really into
it. rve heard it's a difficult place to play
KRAGTHORPE
HOLTZ
"That student section is the pulse, it's the
lifeline, it's the heartbeat of any stadium.
Any atmosphere to create that wild energetic
enthusiastic feeling in the stadium and I
think the student body is a huge part of
what we're trying to do right now I want to
encourage all of the students that are here
in town or even if they're leaving to come
to the game and leave town after the game
because they do make a difference We're
going to need the crowd in ft this weekend





THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE A 7
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Open 7 Days for Lunch, Dinner, & Fiestas!
Intramural flag football holds championships
Da Squad wins Men's
Gold title
JARED JACKSON
STAFF WRITER
The ECU intramural depart-
ment held their annual (lag foot-
hall championships Wednesday at
the Hlount Complex. The season
started with 10.5 teams, and
through a four game regular season
and post-season playoffs, was nar-
rowed down to six champions.
Paill and Torture kept it close
in the Co-Rec championship. A
hail mary with no time remaining
before halftinie proved to be the
difference as Ftidonkulous won
42-7.
After the game, captain of
Kidonkulous, Susan Doggett
admitted to being nervous.
"It was a good game said
Doggett. "We were a little worried
at first but our offense stepped up
in the second half. It was fun to
win
In the Sorority championship,
Megan Brown led Alpha Delta Pi.
She intercepted two passes and ran
back a touchdown, in Alpha Delta
Pi's beat Alpha Phi 12-0.
Sports Medicine dominated
Grandma's boys 20-o in the Men's
Purple league championship game
using a passing attack and great
defense.
Chi Phi's Mike Bergman dives for
Sports Medicine captain, Bruce
Henry stressed defense after the
game.
"We played pretty good said
Henry. "Our defense has been
pretty good the whole season.
They were a good team but I felt
our defense came through in the
end. Defense wins games
Chi Phi won the Fraternity
Purple championship beating
Kappa Sigma 12-7. Down 7-0,
Chi Phi failed on the extra point
attempt, but closed the gap to 7-
(. Robert Allen provided the go
ahead score middle way through
the second half for Chi Phi, by
taking an interception back for a
touchdown. The final score was
12-7.
Kappa Sigma drove down to
the 1-yard line with six seconds
remaining. A roughing the passer
a touchdown against Sig Ep.
was called and an un-timed down
was awarded to Kappa Sigma.
Da Squad downed I larry Caray
.S3-6 in the Men's Gold league. Chi
Phi took the Fraternity Gold title
beating Sigma Phi Kpsilon 14-12.
To be eligible for the play-
offs, teams had to win one regu-
lar season game. They were six
leagues for teams to compete in.
"We had a great season said
Intramural staffer Joanna Kzzell.
"We had fewer ejections and good
weather. The games were real
competitive. We had a new playoff
system that split the teams up
in the playoffs according to how
they did in the regular season.
This made the games more com-
petitive
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Brittany
Major at ECU:
Business
Hobbies:
Surfing the web
Why I donate:
To buy clothes
to go clubbing in
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Last month, we paid out $33,035 to 734
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LIVE MUSIC FRIDAY
Beer & Wine Garden Free Samples from Uptown Restaurants
Kids Activities Free Admission Great Fun & Much More
SHAKE YOUR BOOTY UPTOWN
Wachovia j) This Friday:
Presented by Uptown Greenville
From 5 until 8 pm
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Oct. 13
Parrotbeach
Jimmy Buffett cover band
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Next Friday:
Oct. 20
Zydefunk
A gumbo of Louisiana Groom
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For more information or to find out how to volunteer, call 329-4200.
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Onm i rue canoimm
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Come early. Stay late. Search our shops for hidden treasure.
Have some grub in one of our fine UPTOWN restaurants.
Jam gives you great stuff just for eating on campus.
Join Jam by October 25, 2006, to enter for a
chance to win a flat screen TV. If you're already a
Jam member, you're already entered in the drawing.
If you're not a Jam member, join now. It's free. And
there could be a flat screen TV in it for you.






f
PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2006
TULSA
continued from A6
The Pirates moved left giurd
inside to center and started true
freshman Cory Dowless at left
guard against a Cavalier defense
that was ranked '20th in the coun-
try. The Pirates ran roughshod
through the I'V'a front for KM
rushing yards and .) yards of
total offense.
"We got guvs atliew positions,
guys that never played, and we
figure that once we get used to
different things, we can really get
it rolling said redshirt freshman
right tackle Terence Campbell.
"I don't think nobody can really
stop us once we get that running
game going
Junior Chris Johnson did not
play against Virginia due to a
turf toe injury, paving the way
for senior Brandon Fractious to
run for 102 yards, but is expected
to play against Tulsa Johnson,
fractious and sophomore Bran-
don Simmons are all expected to
see significant playing time, with
I loltz yet to decide on a starter.
Establishing the run like they
did against Virginia should free
up some passing lanes for Pinkney,
who could be without top wide-
out Aundrae Allison for a second
straight week.
Stepping up against the Cavs for
ECU was senior Bobby Good. Good
caught five balls for 102 yards,
including a 4-yarder to set up a
Pinkney touchdown run.
"I couldn't be more pleased
with the way Bobby Good has been
playing Holtz said. "He's really
elevated his game from a year ago
when lie was constantly hampered
with thai hamstring injury
Holtz. said Good petitioned
the coach to let him do more
things for the team, so Holtz put
him on special teams to return
punts against Virginia. His return
yardage was nearly non-existent,
hut Holtz said the fact that he
caught the ball instead of letting
it roll, which the Pirates had been
doing, has been invaluable.
"He did really well Holtz said.
"That was a big difference in the
game was the way he caught punts
from a field position standpoint
Pinkney has seen his numbers
and his completion percentage
decline over the last tew weeks, but
"managed the game well" against
Virginia as the Pirates did not
commit any turnovers for the first
time this season.
"James Pinkney played excep-
tionally well Holtz said of his
senior quarterback, who has com-
pleted passes to 14 different receiv-
ers this year. "It was probably a
breath of fresh air for James to be
able to take a little bit of pressure of
the quarterback position and let him
just manage the game I thought he
played very well in those circum-
stances of just managing the game,
running the ball, and using the play
action pass
Tulsa's strength is its second-
ary. TU boasts two defensive
backs, seniors Bobby Blackshire
and Nick Graham, on the Thorpe
Award watch list. The Golden
Hurricane have picked off five
passes while allowing a 49-per-
cent completion rate.
The heart of the Tulsa defense
is linebacker Nick Bunting. The
6-1, ISO-pound senior is ninth in
school history with 285 tackles
and leads the team this year in
sacks and tackles for a loss. He
is a top candidate for the Butkus
Award, Bronco Nagurski Trophy
and the Chuck Bednarik Award.
While the Tulsa defense is
very good, so is its offense. TU
is averaging 28 points per game
and has turned the ball over just
five times. Like ECU, Tulsa has
an experienced senior quarterback
and a talented trio of running
backs, led by Oklahoma transfer
Courtney Tennial.
The fl-foot-g, 214-pound Ten-
nial is averaging six yards per
carry with senior Brandon Diles
carrying the ball at a five-yard-
per-carry clip. Senior Tarrion
Adams has missed Tulsa's last two
games - both wins over Navy and
Southern Miss - but could play
against the Pirates.
"They are very physical run-
ning backs Holtz said. "They run
extremely hard. FTennialj has
really impressed me with averag-
ing six yards a carry. He is a heck
of a player They are playing three
right now that are very similar.
They all have anywhere from six to
ten catches "
Getting back into confer-
ence action at home adds an
extra incentive for the Pirates,
especially considering that Tulsa
hammered ECU 45-13 a year ago
in its way to winning C-USA.
Holtz said he has mentioned last
year's game to remind the players
what happened, but not really as a
motivational tool.
"We've talked about it, but just
as a reminder so they understand
what we're going up against
Holtz said. "It was a great win for
us last week, but that one's over.
I haven't used it as, 'Oh they beat
you because I'm not trying to
get our team down with it, but we
have talked about it because I want
them to relive the way Tulsa lined
up and hit us in the mouth
With the student body going
on fall break, the athletic depart-
ment has added promotional
events and ticket giveaways for
Saturday's game, which will begin
at 3 p.m. Saying that the last three
home games had an "electric
atmosphere Holtz realizes the
magnitude of a packed Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium.
"The atmosphere at home
games have been unbelievable
Holtz said. "I think you could do
a story itself on just the atmo-
sphere. The student section has
been awesome. It is the pulse,
the lifeline and the heartbeat of
any stadium. It creates that wild
energetic, enthusiastic feeling in
the stadium that our football team
feeds off of. The whole advantage
f playing at home is having those
awesome crowds
This writer can be contacted at
sportstheeastcarolinian.com.
Mark A. Ward
Attorney at Law
Board Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
TVaffic Offenses
Drug Offenses
DWI
State & Federal Courts
w VISA
252.752.7529 Visit our website at www.mark-ward.com
Report news students need to know. teC
Accepting applications tor STAFF WRITERS
Learn investigative reporting skills
Must have at least a 2.25GPA
Come Uptown and apply at our office located In the Self Help Building Suite 100F - E. 3rd St
Connect with
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252.744.6238
www.ecu.edupt
October is National Physical Therapy Month
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The ECU Media Board
welcomes applications
DAY STUDENT
REPRESENTATIVE
(A student living off campus and not a member of a fraternity or sorority.)
The board is seeking full-time students interested in serving as the
day student representative on the Media Board, the 11-person board
which governs the media at ECU, WZMB. The Rebel, The East
Carolinian, and Expressions, Web Media and The Buccaneer.
The day representative is one of nine students on the board and is
expected to attend a late afternoon meeting monthly.
For information, contact:
ECU Media Board Office
205A Self Help Building
301 S.Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27858
328-9200
Deadline for Applications due Friday, October 20 at 5p.m.
University
Haircutters
Man's Cut and Style Shop
752-0559
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If you have a genuine desire to help other people and to work as a
frontline primary care provider, then you should explore ECU'S
master's program in Physician Assistant Studies.
m
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School of Allied Health Sciences
Dept. of Physician Assistant Studies
Health Sciences Building
252.744.1100
www.ecu.edupa
Celebrating National Physician Assistant Week
October 6-12, 2006
You drank.
You danced.
You had
Free Pregnancy Tests
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Greenville (252) 757-0003
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Washington location: (252) 946-8040
24 Hour Hotline: 1-800-395-HELP
Community Amenities
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Classifieds
THURSDAY OCTOBER 12,2006 PAGE A9
FOR RENT
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WALK TO campus! 1 block from
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Call Mike 439-0285.
ROOMMATE
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Roommate wanted to share a
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amenities. Call 752-9995.
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Kitchen tables $25 Kitchen
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Perfect Quarters table $50
Ground I
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Being homeless is
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Remember the Rule of Three:
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For more info contact Student
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Want it, get it! Only in our Classifieds.
Microwave $20 Kitchen stools
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Call 347-3281 with inquiries
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Seeking a tutor for college statistics
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Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting 14-
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Applicants must possess a good
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Place: Williams Arena in Minges Coliseum
Registration will begin at 6:00 pm in Minges.
Participants must be full-time ECU students.
si






PAGE A10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 12, 2006
films
m
Wed 1018
Thurs 1019
Fri 1020
Sat 1021
Sun 1022
Wed 1018
Thurs 1019
Fri 1020
9:30PM
7:00PM
9:30 PM
7:0Q PM &
12 AM
9:30PM
Sat 1021
Sun 102
7:00 PM
9:30PM
7:00 PM &
12AM
.9:30 PM
7:00PM
Fri 1020 12AM
wwm m&m u msm
Sat 1021 12AM
enieclainftehj
Swash Improv
Pirate Underground 9PM
0
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 12, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 12, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1930
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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